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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 206)

Leonard leads Clippers over LeBron and Lakers 112-102

Kawhi Leonard hit seven straight shots in one stretch, creating a run for the Clippers that his new teammates quickly joined.

“It’s a great sign of leadership,” coach Doc Rivers said. “He talks with his game.”

Leonard began a new career chapter Tuesday night, scoring 30 points to go with a strong bench effort in a 112-102 victory over LeBron James and the Lakers in the teams’ season opener.

Leonard chose the Clippers because he wanted to come home and his family was on hand.

“All those emotions went through me again,” he said.

Lou Williams added 21 points and Montrezl Harrell had 17 off the bench when the Clippers began their 50th season overall and 36th in Los Angeles as the once unlikely but now favorites to win the franchise’s first NBA championship.

“It’s one of 82 (games),” Rivers said. “Next question.”

Leonard won his second NBA title last season in Toronto.

The Lakers showed off their new 1-2 punch of James and Anthony Davis. Davis scored 25 points, making 9 of 14 free throws, and James had 18.

“For us, we’re both aggressive,” Davis said. “Sometimes we kind of miss each other. I missed him a couple times and he missed me, so just trying to figure it out.”

Danny Green outscored them both with 28 points, including seven 3-pointers, in the highest-scoring debut by a Laker in franchise history.

Leonard got it done without his personal recruit Paul George, sidelined indefinitely while rehabbing from a pair of offseason shoulder surgeries.

“It’s just the first game of the season, so it’s going to take the season and mistakes and success to get us on the same page,” Leonard said.

Wearing a black tuxedo jacket and bow tie, George received a mixed reaction when introduced in the playoff-like atmosphere at Staples Center, where the Clippers were the home team for the first of four meetings in the arena the teams share.

“Their fans were very loud early and I thought our fans took over from that point on,” Rivers said. “It’s great for the city.”

The Clippers’ reserves outscored the Lakers’ bench, 60-19. Last season, Williams and Harrell were the NBA’s highest-scoring reserve duo, and they picked up where they left off.

“This bench is going to be better this year than even last year,” Rivers said.

It came down to the fourth quarter, and the Clippers dominated.

Tied 85-all, they opened with a 19-7 run to go up 104-92. Five different players scored and Leonard assisted on Maurice Harkless’ 3-pointer.

James had three of the Lakers’ six turnovers in the fourth, when Harkless and Leonard each blocked shots by Dwight Howard.

“That was just very careless and they capitalized off of it,” James said.

With 4 ½ minutes left, Lakers fans chanted “Let’s go, Lakers! Let’s go, Lakers!” while others hit the exits.

“The NBA’s back and everyone’s trying to have the narrative of it’s a rivalry game and it’s a huge test,” James said, “but I think both teams are not where they want to be. We have a lot of room to improve.”

The Lakers erased a 14-point deficit in the third, led by Danny Green’s 18 points. He capped a 15-0 run with his fifth 3-pointer before JaMychal Green’s 3-pointer pulled the Clippers into an 85-all tie heading into the fourth.

The Clippers outscored the Lakers 40-29 in the second quarter, buoyed by 16 points from Leonard. He made seven straight shots on a variety of moves — pullups, fadeaways, a cutting dunk.

The Lakers raced to a 13-2 lead, their largest of the game. James scored over Leonard and he later heard “MVP! MVP!” chants while sinking his first free throws of the season.

The Lakers shot 53% from the floor in the first quarter, while the Clippers missed shots and had a basket by Williams taken away when the Lakers challenged a foul call on Howard.

The rivalry was on early with a male fan shouting “Go Lakers!” during the national anthem, drawing big cheers while Clipper fans booed.

“It was everything I expected,” Davis said. “Very anticipated game and it was fun.”

TIP-INS

Lakers: They fell to 43-29 all-time in season openers. … G Rajon Rondo (sore right calf) sat out.

Clippers: They improved to 25-25 in openers all-time, but still trail the Lakers 3-2 when the teams meet in a season opener. … G Rodney McGruder (right ankle sprain) missed the game.

WARNING FANS

As part of the NBA’s crackdown on fan behavior this season, cards carrying a message from league security were on seats located courtside and the first couple rows back. They reminded that every fan is required to comply with the league’s fan code of conduct and anyone who acts inappropriately may be subject to ejection and-or revocation of their tickets. The public address announcer reminded fans before both halves about minding their manners.

LEONARD’S GREETING

Leonard took to the mic to welcome Clippers fans to the game. He had to raise his usually low voice to be heard over the din, a mix of cheers from Clippers fans and boos from Lakers fans. “It’s going to be a great season,” Leonard said. “We’re going to play hard every night. Let’s get it going.”

STARRY NIGHT

Famous faces came out, including Kate Hudson, Angela Bassett, Jeff Garlin, and athletes Lisa Leslie and Diana Taurasi of the WNBA, Joc Pederson of the Dodgers and soccer player Alex Morgan. Halsey performed outdoors at LA Live before the game and Ty Dolla $ign rapped at halftime.

UP NEXT

Lakers: Return to Staples Center as the home team Friday against Utah. The Lakers are 25-12 all-time against the Jazz at home.

Clippers: Travel to Golden State on Thursday to open the Chase Center in San Francisco in another blockbuster matchup.

Westlake Legal Group NBA-Kawhi-LeBron Leonard leads Clippers over LeBron and Lakers 112-102 fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-clippers fox-news/sports/nba fnc/sports fnc c15f4ba9-054c-522a-9111-9f674af9ae64 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group NBA-Kawhi-LeBron Leonard leads Clippers over LeBron and Lakers 112-102 fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-clippers fox-news/sports/nba fnc/sports fnc c15f4ba9-054c-522a-9111-9f674af9ae64 Associated Press article

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Always to stop using Venus symbol on menstruation products to be more inclusive

Proctor & Gamble brand Always will remove the feminine Venus symbol from its menstruation products in an effort to be more “inclusive” to transgender customers, according to reports.

The move came after LGBTQ activists reminded the company on social media that not all of their customers are women, The Independent reported.

In response, the company said it would remove the symbol from its packaging by December.

FEDERAL COURT STRIKES DOWN OBAMA ADMINISTRATION ‘TRANSGENDER MANDATE’ FOR DOCTORS

Westlake Legal Group always Always to stop using Venus symbol on menstruation products to be more inclusive fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc c53c67ca-f268-5d49-8359-8ae0f5cf7ac8 Brie Stimson article

(Always.com)

“For over 35 years Always has championed girls and women, and we will continue to do so,” the company said in a statement Tuesday, according to The Independent. “We’re also committed to diversity & inclusion and are on a continual journey to understand the needs of all of our consumers.”

Company officials added that they realize not everyone who needs feminine hygiene products “identif[ies] as female.” Proctor & Gamble did not immediately respond to an after-hours email from Fox News.

The decision was lauded by trans activists but faced criticism online.

“Women are quite literally being erased from sanitary products now. Is there anywhere we are allowed to be visible!?” one woman wrote on Twitter, according to The Independent.

Advocacy group Trans Actual praised the decision.

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“We’re quite frankly worried for the women whose sense of self is so fragile that the removal of a symbol from a packet of sanitary towels makes them feel ‘erased,'” the group wrote on Twitter.

Westlake Legal Group always Always to stop using Venus symbol on menstruation products to be more inclusive fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc c53c67ca-f268-5d49-8359-8ae0f5cf7ac8 Brie Stimson article   Westlake Legal Group always Always to stop using Venus symbol on menstruation products to be more inclusive fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc c53c67ca-f268-5d49-8359-8ae0f5cf7ac8 Brie Stimson article

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Itty-Bitty Satellites Take On Big-Time Science Missions

Westlake Legal Group pia22317_wide-bf1c688093a0a3eb7f65de987084d39e97b8f9b1-s1100-c15 Itty-Bitty Satellites Take On Big-Time Science Missions

Engineer Joel Steinkraus tests solar panels on one of two CubeSats that made up NASA’s Mars Cube One mission. The MarCO CubeSats — the first to be sent into deep space — flew to Mars and relayed telemetry from NASA’s InSight lander. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Westlake Legal Group  Itty-Bitty Satellites Take On Big-Time Science Missions

Engineer Joel Steinkraus tests solar panels on one of two CubeSats that made up NASA’s Mars Cube One mission. The MarCO CubeSats — the first to be sent into deep space — flew to Mars and relayed telemetry from NASA’s InSight lander.

NASA/JPL-Caltech

Tiny satellites are taking on a big-time role in space exploration.

CubeSats are small, only about twice the size of a Rubik’s Cube. As the name suggests, they’re cube-shaped, 4 inches on each side, and weigh in at about 3 pounds. But with the miniaturization of electronics, it’s become possible to pack a sophisticated mission into a tiny package.

CubeSats have been around since 1999. Two professors, Jordi Puig-Suari from California Polytechnic State University and Bob Twiggs from Stanford University, wanted to standardize the design specifications of what they termed “picosatellites.” That would make it easier for teams of college students anywhere in the world to collaborate. What’s more, they were cheap enough that even students could make one.

“I saw a flyer on a bus stop that said, ‘Want to build a satellite?’ ” says Hannah Goldberg. At the time, in 1999, she was an undergraduate engineering major at the University of Michigan. The flyer caught her attention, and she decided that building satellites was exactly what she wanted to do.

Today, Goldberg works at GomSpace, a Danish satellite company making CubeSats for the European Space Agency.

“In the beginning, in the early days of CubeSats, they kind of had a bad reputation,” Goldberg says. “People didn’t think you could do much science or much engineering benefit with them.”

And in the beginning, that was probably true. After all, they were initially intended as tools for students learning the principles of aerospace engineering. If they broke after a few months in space, no big deal.

But with the advent of smartphones, Goldberg says, engineers started getting really good at packing a bunch of electronics into a small space. CubeSats started getting more sophisticated, and the cost of electronics that could be used in space came down. Scientists started to take notice.

Still, they were cautious about signing onto a mission that relied on a CubeSat, says Barbara Cohen, a planetary scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

“We want to get science out of it,” Cohen says. “We don’t want it to be throwing something into space for the sake of in three months becoming space debris.”

Now, however, she thinks CubeSats are ready for prime time.

“It’s a miniature spacecraft,” she says. “That’s actually the way we think about it.”

Cohen is principal investigator for a mission called Lunar Flashlight. It’s actually what’s known as a 6-U CubeSat, essentially six CubeSats stuck together. The final product is about as big as a family-sized cereal box.

“Lunar Flashlight is designed to look for exposed water frost in the permanently shadowed regions of the moon,” she says.

The deep craters at the moon’s south pole never see the sunlight, and the temperatures drop to about 35 degrees above absolute zero. The spacecraft will shine a laser into those craters and measure what kind of light is reflected back. That will help scientists decide whether there’s an icy frost at the bottom of the crater.

Finding water would be a boon for future attempts to sustain human habitats on the moon. “It would be a resource for living off the land if we could find enough of it there,” Cohen says.

One of the reasons CubeSats can be so small and light is they don’t have to have a rocket engine to propel them into space. They can hitch a ride on other missions’ rockets. But Cohen even if you get a lift from someone else, if you’re going to the moon or some other spot outside Earth’s orbit, you still need to have some kind of propulsion system to be able to change course.

“About one-third of our satellite is dedicated to our propulsion system,” she says.

Lunar Flashlight uses a fairly standard thruster system for its propulsion, but there are a lot of ways to propel through space.

“We are using a solar sail as our primary propulsion system,” says Tiffany Russell Lockett, an engineer NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. She’s working on a CubeSat mission called NEA Scout that’s heading for an asteroid.

“A solar sail is large, thin-film reflective surface,” Lockett says. “Think of like a sailboat or a large kite. But instead of using wind to propel itself, it uses sunlight.”

The sail is folded up for launch, a process done by hand that takes weeks. Unfurled, the sail is bigger than a highway billboard, completely dwarfing the tiny box it emerged from.

[embedded content]

YouTube

One of the reasons scientists like CubeSat missions is they’re cheap compared with major science satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope, so you can have them all to yourself.

“Hubble is shared by hundreds of people every year,” says astronomer Evgenya Shkolnik of Arizona State University, who has been using the telescope to study stars. “And even though our team has a large program, what’s considered a large program on Hubble, it’s still only a week of time.”

Shkolnik studies the radiation environment around stars that have planets orbiting them. Understanding that environment will be crucial in determining whether exoplanets have atmospheres. To do that work, she needs to point a telescope at the stars for as long as possible. That’s why she’s working on a CubeSat called SPARCS, the Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat.

“This way if you build what you need for one very clear experiment, then you can have the full year to do one experiment really well,” Shkolnik says.

She thinks more scientists will be turning to miniature satellites in the future.

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Google Claims a Quantum Breakthrough That Could Change Computing

Westlake Legal Group 23quantum-promo-facebookJumbo Google Claims a Quantum Breakthrough That Could Change Computing Supercomputers Quantum Computing Nature (Journal) Laboratories and Scientific Equipment International Business Machines Corporation Google Inc

SAN FRANCISCO — Google said on Wednesday that it had achieved a long-sought breakthrough called “quantum supremacy,” which could allow new kinds of computers to do calculations at speeds that are inconceivable with today’s technology.

In a paper published in the science journal Nature, Google said its research lab in Santa Barbara, Calif., had reached a milestone that scientists had been working toward since the 1980s: Its quantum computer performed a task that isn’t possible with current technology.

In this case, a mathematical calculation that the largest supercomputers could not complete in under 10,000 years was done in 3 minutes 20 seconds, Google said in its paper.

Scientists likened Google’s announcement to the Wright brothers’ first plane flight in 1903 — proof that something is really possible even though it may be years before it can fulfill its potential.

“The original Wright flyer was not a useful airplane,” said Scott Aaronson, a computer scientist at the University of Texas at Austin who reviewed Google’s paper before publication. “But it was designed to prove a point. And it proved the point.”

A quantum machine, the result of more than a century’s worth of research into a type of physics called quantum mechanics, operates in a completely different manner from regular computers. It relies on the mind-bending ways some objects act at the subatomic level or when exposed to extreme cold, like the metal chilled to nearly 460 degrees below zero inside Google’s machine.

One day, researchers believe, these devices could power advances in artificial intelligence or easily overwhelm the encryption that protects computers vital to national security. Because of that, the governments of the United States and China consider quantum computing a national security priority.

[Quantum computing, one of the “jazziest and most mysterious concepts” in science, has struggled to come of age.]

But first, scientists must prove such a machine can be built, and some researchers cautioned against getting too excited about Google’s milestone since so much more work needs to be done before quantum computers can migrate out of the research lab. Right now, a single quantum machine costs millions of dollars to build.

Many of the tech industry’s biggest names, including Microsoft, Intel and IBM as well as Google, are jockeying for a position in quantum computing. And venture capitalists have invested more than $450 million into start-ups exploring the technology, according to a recent study.

China is spending $400 million on a national quantum lab and has filled almost twice as many quantum patents as the United States in recent years. The Trump administration followed suit this year with its own National Quantum Initiative, promising to spend $1.2 billion on quantum research, including computers.

Traditional computers perform calculations by processing “bits” of information, with each bit holding either a 1 or a 0. That has been the case for decades.

Understanding how a quantum computer is different requires a philosophical leap: accepting the notion that a single object can behave like two separate objects at the same time when it is either extremely small or extremely cold.

By harnessing that odd behavior, scientists can instead build a quantum bit, or qubit, which stores a combination of 1 and 0. Two qubits can hold four values at once. And as the number of qubits grows, a quantum computer becomes exponentially more powerful, making today’s supercomputers look like toys.

Scientists first described the idea in the 1980s, but qubits are fragile. Stringing even a few together can involve years of work. For the past several decades, labs in academia, industry and government have worked on quantum computing through a wide variety of techniques, including systems built around particles of light or electromagnetic fields that trap tiny charged particles.

About 20 years ago, researchers in Japan pioneered “superconducting qubits,” for which certain metals are chilled to extremely low temperatures.

This method has shown particular promise, sparking projects at IBM, Google and Intel. Their machines look nothing like a regular computer. They are large cylinders of metal and twisted wires that are dropped into stainless steel refrigerators. You send information to the machine, as you would to a traditional computer chip, and receive calculations in return.

Google’s paper became a bit of an internet mystery after it was published and then quickly unpublished online in late September. That brief appearance was enough to raise the hackles of researchers at competing companies who believe the Silicon Valley giant is inflating its accomplishment.

On Monday, IBM fired a pre-emptive shot with a blog post disputing Google’s claim that its quantum calculation could not be performed by a traditional computer. The calculation, IBM argued, could theoretically be run on a current computer in less than two and a half days — not 10,000 years.

“This is not about final and absolute dominance over classical computers,” said Dario Gil, who heads the IBM research lab in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., where the company is building its own quantum computers.

Other researchers dismissed the milestone because the calculation was notably esoteric. It generated random numbers using a quantum experiment that can’t necessarily be applied to other things.

Though IBM disputed that Google had really accomplished all that much, Dr. Gil argued that quantum computers were indeed getting closer to reality. “By 2020, we will be able to use them for commercial and scientific advantage,” he said.

Like much of the cutting-edge work being done in corporate research labs, Google’s quantum effort has its roots in academia. In 2014, Google hired a team of physicists who had spent the previous several years working on quantum computing at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

The researchers were expected to discuss their work with reporters later on Wednesday.

As its paper was published, Google responded to IBM’s claims that its quantum calculation could be performed on a classical computer. “We’ve already peeled away from classical computers, onto a totally different trajectory,” a Google spokesman said in a statement. “We welcome proposals to advance simulation techniques, though it’s crucial to test them on an actual supercomputer, as we have.”

The calculation performed by Google’s machine is a way of showing that a complex quantum system can be reliable. The company also believes the random numbers it generates could have practical uses.

As the machines get better over time, they could help improve cryptography, or even aid in the creation of new medicines or materials, said Daniel Lidar, a professor at the University of Southern California who specializes in quantum computing.

“This would be a big deal,” he said. “It has applications in many different places.”

Dr. Lidar said he expected that other scientists would try to disprove Google’s claims. But some see a broader benefit to all researchers working on this near-mythical device.

“Google’s result is a major achievement not just for Google but also for the broader scientific community,” said Chad Rigetti, who worked on IBM’s quantum computing project and now runs his own start-up. (Mr. Rigetti’s wife is an editor for the Opinion section of The New York Times.)

“It is just a short amount of time now before we have commercially relevant problems that quantum machines can solve,” he said.

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39 Bodies Found Inside Truck Container In Southeast England

Westlake Legal Group 5db011662100008821ad3a48 39 Bodies Found Inside Truck Container In Southeast England

A murder investigation has been launched after the discovery of 39 dead bodies in a truck container in Essex, southeast England, early Wednesday morning. 

Early indications suggest 38 of the dead are adults and one is a teenager. 

A 25-year-old man from Northern Ireland has been arrested on suspicion of murder. 

A cordon has been put in place and access to and from the Waterglade Industrial Park, where the truck container was found, remains closed.

Police Chief Superintendent Andrew Mariner said: “This is a tragic incident where a large number of people have lost their lives. Our enquiries are ongoing to establish what has happened.

“We are in the process of identifying the victims, however I anticipate that this could be a lengthy process.

“We believe the lorry is from Bulgaria and entered the country at Holyhead on Saturday, 19 October, and we are working closely with our partners to investigate.  

“We have arrested the lorry driver in connection with the incident who remains in police custody as our enquiries continue.”

This is a breaking news story and will be updated. Follow HuffPost UK on Twitter here, and on Facebook here.

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39 bodies found in back of truck in southeastern England, suspect arrested

Police in the United Kingdom on Wednesday arrested a 25-year-old Northern Ireland man on suspicion of murder after 39 bodies were found in the back of a semi-truck in Essex, which is east of London.

Essex police said that 38 of the bodies were adults and one was a teenager.

Chief Superintendent Andrew Mariner said investigators are working to identify the bodies, which is expected to be a “lengthy” process.

Westlake Legal Group 109338301_bcdd3a0e-64ee-49fe-bdd2-3dc3eea709fd 39 bodies found in back of truck in southeastern England, suspect arrested fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc Brie Stimson article a39d383b-fa90-5d53-aca9-b54b997781e8

Waterglade Industrial Park (Google Maps)

The truck traveled from Bulgaria through the Welsh town of Holyhead, police said according to the BBC.

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Police have cordoned off the Waterglade Industrial Park where the bodies were found.

Westlake Legal Group 109338301_bcdd3a0e-64ee-49fe-bdd2-3dc3eea709fd 39 bodies found in back of truck in southeastern England, suspect arrested fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc Brie Stimson article a39d383b-fa90-5d53-aca9-b54b997781e8   Westlake Legal Group 109338301_bcdd3a0e-64ee-49fe-bdd2-3dc3eea709fd 39 bodies found in back of truck in southeastern England, suspect arrested fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc Brie Stimson article a39d383b-fa90-5d53-aca9-b54b997781e8

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

39 Bodies Found Inside Truck Container In Southeast England

Westlake Legal Group 5db011662100008821ad3a48 39 Bodies Found Inside Truck Container In Southeast England

A murder investigation has been launched after the discovery of 39 dead bodies in a truck container in Essex, southeast England, early Wednesday morning. 

Early indications suggest 38 of the dead are adults and one is a teenager. 

A 25-year-old man from Northern Ireland has been arrested on suspicion of murder. 

A cordon has been put in place and access to and from the Waterglade Industrial Park, where the truck container was found, remains closed.

Police Chief Superintendent Andrew Mariner said: “This is a tragic incident where a large number of people have lost their lives. Our enquiries are ongoing to establish what has happened.

“We are in the process of identifying the victims, however I anticipate that this could be a lengthy process.

“We believe the lorry is from Bulgaria and entered the country at Holyhead on Saturday, 19 October, and we are working closely with our partners to investigate.  

“We have arrested the lorry driver in connection with the incident who remains in police custody as our enquiries continue.”

This is a breaking news story and will be updated. Follow HuffPost UK on Twitter here, and on Facebook here.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Want a Big Theatrical Release, Mr. Scorsese? How About Broadway?

Westlake Legal Group 22NETFLIXTHEATER-01-facebookJumbo Want a Big Theatrical Release, Mr. Scorsese? How About Broadway? Theaters (Buildings) The Irishman (Movie) Scorsese, Martin Paris Theater (Manhattan, NY) Netflix Inc Movies Marriage Story (Movie) Belasco Theater Baumbach, Noah Academy Awards (Oscars)

LOS ANGELES — When Netflix went into the business of making movies with big stars and A-list directors, it found itself faced with a new challenge: the handling of the Hollywood ego.

For a company with roots in Silicon Valley, it has not always been easy to accommodate the rules and customs of the entertainment capital, where the red carpet is more important than any algorithm.

For one thing, the streaming giant has not gone along with the old way of releasing movies. Most of its films make their debuts on the streaming service itself, rather than in movie theaters. Even its Oscar contenders have limited theatrical runs, because Netflix has not been willing to book them in theaters run by the major chains, which insist on lengthy periods of exclusivity, sometimes as long as 90 days.

That strategy is nice for Netflix’s 158 million subscribers, but it has led to some grumbling among cinephiles and some filmmakers.

Now, with the 2020 Academy Awards campaign underway, Netflix has gone to unusual lengths to please the auteurs and their fans, engineering splashy theatrical plans for a pair of Oscar contenders, Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman” and Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story.” At the same time, the company is trying to acquire a historic repertory theater in Los Angeles.

Starting Nov. 1, Mr. Scorsese’s $159 million crime epic, which received strong reviews after its premiere at the New York Film Festival last month, will be shown at the Belasco Theater, a 1,015-seat Broadway theater on West 44th Street. The release will have the trappings of a bona fide Broadway production: eight shows a week, dark on Mondays — and the film’s title in lights outside the theater. The ticket price is an un-Broadway-like $15.

Unlike some other current Broadway houses, which served as movie theaters many decades ago, the 112-year-old Belasco has never shown films. One of the stars of “The Irishman” is no stranger to the setting, though: Al Pacino won his first Tony Award for “Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?,” a drug-addiction drama that had 48 performances, including previews, at the Belasco in 1969.

Mr. Baumbach’s film, starring Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson, is heading to the Paris Theater, the last single-screen theater in New York. The developer Sheldon Solow closed it in August after 71 years of operation. Netflix will reopen the theater for “Marriage Story” on Nov. 6, and the film will start streaming Dec. 6. The company is trying to work out a long-term lease that would make the Paris a prime New York venue for Netflix films for years to come.

Netflix is also in late-stage negotiations to acquire Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard. Now owned by the nonprofit American Cinematheque, the theater, which opened in 1922, has been deemed a Los Angeles landmark. Netflix has said it would use the Egyptian for premieres and events during the week, leaving the weekends free for the Cinematheque’s programming of historic films and contemporary art-house fare.

Despite Netflix’s pledge to allow the Cinematheque to have a hand in running the Egyptian, film preservationists and community activists have come out against the proposed deal. More than 2,500 people have signed a petition calling for a halt to the possible sale and demanding that the Cinematheque hold a public meeting to describe its plans in detail.

“The future of the American Cinematheque and the Egyptian Theatre should be determined in an open conversation that includes the members and a qualified Executive Director, and not in secret by the board of directors and Netflix,” the petition reads, in part.

Despite the naysayers, the three initiatives provide Netflix with an argument against those who portray it as somehow anti-cinema.

“It all feels very positive,” said Eugene Hernandez, the deputy director of film at Lincoln Center and the co-publisher of Film Comment magazine. “Netflix is putting its money where its mouth is. They are not only financing and supporting these auteur directors, but they are also bringing them to audiences in a theatrical environment.”

Netflix, which declined to comment, made 55 films last year, not counting documentaries and animated movies. It has been criticized by directors and cineastes who say moviegoers should have an easier time finding its films on the big screen. The company’s biggest Oscar-winner, Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma,” had an exclusive three-week run in United States theaters last year before it started streaming. Before that, Netflix’s presence in theaters was minimal.

The company negotiated for months with large cinema chains to work out a plan to blanket the country with “The Irishman,” only to hit an impasse. Major exhibitors like AMC Theatres, Regal Cinemas and Cinemark have not agreed to Netflix’s preference to have its prestige films in theaters for brief engagements before making them available for streaming. Smaller chains and independent movie theaters have been willing to go along with the strategy.

Jeff Blake, the former chairman of worldwide marketing and distribution for Sony Pictures, said Netflix’s attention-grabbing moves into the theater world won’t do much for the company’s bottom line, adding: “But it’s certainly a fun way to qualify for the Academy Awards.”

To be eligible for an Oscar, a film must play for one week at a theater in Los Angeles. In addition to their engagements at the Belasco and the Paris, “The Irishman” and “Marriage Story” will have limited runs at select theaters.

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John Lithgow’s Rudy Giuliani Impression Is Just Wild

Westlake Legal Group 5db0077a210000ad1e34ac82 John Lithgow’s Rudy Giuliani Impression Is Just Wild

Lithgow as the former New York mayor guzzled wine (his “research department”), donned an astronaut’s helmet and spread conspiracy theories about aliens, former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter and Trump’s 2016 Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in the spoof interview with host Stephen Colbert.

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Scorsese Does Broadway, and Other Splashy Netflix Plans

Westlake Legal Group 22NETFLIXTHEATERS-still-facebookJumbo Scorsese Does Broadway, and Other Splashy Netflix Plans Theaters (Buildings) The Irishman (Movie) Scorsese, Martin Paris Theater (Manhattan, NY) Netflix Inc Movies Marriage Story (Movie) Belasco Theater Baumbach, Noah Academy Awards (Oscars)

LOS ANGELES — When Netflix went into the business of making movies with big stars and A-list directors, it found itself faced with a new challenge: the handling of the Hollywood ego.

For a company with roots in Silicon Valley, it has not always been easy to accommodate the rules and customs of the entertainment capital, where the red carpet is more important than any algorithm.

For one thing, the streaming giant has not gone along with the old way of releasing movies. Most of its films make their debuts on the streaming service itself, rather than in movie theaters. Even its Oscar contenders have limited theatrical runs, because Netflix has not been willing to book them in theaters run by the major chains, which insist on lengthy periods of exclusivity, sometimes as long as 90 days.

That strategy is nice for Netflix’s 158 million subscribers, but it has led to some grumbling among cinephiles and some filmmakers.

Now, with the 2020 Academy Awards campaign underway, Netflix has gone to unusual lengths to please the auteurs and their fans, engineering splashy theatrical plans for a pair of Oscar contenders, Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman” and Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story.” At the same time, the company is trying to acquire a historic repertory theater in Los Angeles.

Starting Nov. 1, Mr. Scorsese’s $159 million crime epic, which received strong reviews after its premiere at the New York Film Festival last month, will be shown at the Belasco Theater, a 1,015-seat Broadway theater on West 44th Street. The release will have the trappings of a bona fide Broadway production: eight shows a week, dark on Mondays — and the film’s title in lights outside the theater. The ticket price is an un-Broadway-like $15.

Unlike some other current Broadway houses, which served as movie theaters many decades ago, the 112-year-old Belasco has never shown films. One of the stars of “The Irishman” is no stranger to the setting, though: Al Pacino won his first Tony Award for “Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?,” a drug-addiction drama that had 48 performances, including previews, at the Belasco in 1969.

Mr. Baumbach’s film, starring Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson, is heading to the Paris Theater, the last single-screen theater in New York. The developer Sheldon Solow closed it in August after 71 years of operation. Netflix will reopen the theater for “Marriage Story” on Nov. 6, and the film will start streaming Dec. 6. The company is trying to work out a long-term lease that would make the Paris a prime New York venue for Netflix films for years to come.

Netflix is also in late-stage negotiations to acquire Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard. Now owned by the nonprofit American Cinematheque, the theater, which opened in 1922, has been deemed a Los Angeles landmark. Netflix has said it would use the Egyptian for premieres and events during the week, leaving the weekends free for the Cinematheque’s programming of historic films and contemporary art-house fare.

Despite Netflix’s pledge to allow the Cinematheque to have a hand in running the Egyptian, film preservationists and community activists have come out against the proposed deal. More than 2,500 people have signed a petition calling for a halt to the possible sale and demanding that the Cinematheque hold a public meeting to describe its plans in detail.

“The future of the American Cinematheque and the Egyptian Theatre should be determined in an open conversation that includes the members and a qualified Executive Director, and not in secret by the board of directors and Netflix,” the petition reads, in part.

Despite the naysayers, the three initiatives provide Netflix with an argument against those who portray it as somehow anti-cinema.

“It all feels very positive,” said Eugene Hernandez, the deputy director of film at Lincoln Center and the co-publisher of Film Comment magazine. “Netflix is putting its money where its mouth is. They are not only financing and supporting these auteur directors, but they are also bringing them to audiences in a theatrical environment.”

Netflix, which declined to comment, made 55 films last year, not counting documentaries and animated movies. It has been criticized by directors and cineastes who say moviegoers should have an easier time finding its films on the big screen. The company’s biggest Oscar-winner, Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma,” had an exclusive three-week run in United States theaters last year before it started streaming. Before that, Netflix’s presence in theaters was minimal.

The company negotiated for months with large cinema chains to work out a plan to blanket the country with “The Irishman,” only to hit an impasse. Major exhibitors like AMC Theatres, Regal Cinemas and Cinemark have not agreed to Netflix’s preference to have its prestige films in theaters for brief engagements before making them available for streaming. Smaller chains and independent movie theaters have been willing to go along with the strategy.

Jeff Blake, the former chairman of worldwide marketing and distribution for Sony Pictures, said Netflix’s attention-grabbing moves into the theater world won’t do much for the company’s bottom line, adding: “But it’s certainly a fun way to qualify for the Academy Awards.”

To be eligible for an Oscar, a film must play for one week at a theater in Los Angeles. In addition to their engagements at the Belasco and the Paris, “The Irishman” and “Marriage Story” will have limited runs at select theaters.

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