web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 211)

Man intentionally hit veteran with car because he was ‘looking for someone to kill,’ authorities say

Westlake Legal Group 5cf7bd94-Capture Man intentionally hit veteran with car because he was 'looking for someone to kill,' authorities say Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 4743ccfe-fe2e-528b-8044-a44fc540c54c

A Florida man intentionally ran over a 75-year-old Vietnam veteran because he was wanted to “see what it’s like to kill,” authorities said Friday.

Justyn Pennell, 21, of the Tampa suburb of Hudson, called 911 Thursday afternoon to say he just hit a man with his PT Cruiser. He told Pasco County Sheriff’s investigators he intentionally hit the man and didn’t stop until his vehicle stopped working less than a mile away, WTVT-TV reported.

Pennell said he saw the unnamed victim, a grandfather and veteran of the Vietnam War, walking along a roadway with a walking stick and made a U-turn before accelerating and running into him. He confessed to deputies at the scene, authorities said.

UK ISSUES EXTRADITION REQUEST FOR AMERICAN WOMAN CHARGED IN DEATH OF BRITISH TEEN

“While he’s driving at his victim, he could see the look of fright on the victim’s face,” Pasco County Sheriff Chris Nocco said during a Friday news conference. “This man is absolutely evil.”

“There are some cases … that make us realize there are pure evil in this world,” Nocco added. “Because of the pure evil that happened yesterday, there’s a 75-year-old man, who’s a father, a grandfather, a Vietnam War veteran, who was killed.”

He said the act wasn’t random but the victim was. Pennell faces a first-degree murder charge.

He admitted to having thoughts of killing someone for several months and left home with the intention of looking for someone walking or biking on the road to kill, according to the news outlet.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Investigators don’t believe Pennell was under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of the incident. He has no prior arrests, authorities said.

He is being held without bond in the Pasco County jail.

Westlake Legal Group 5cf7bd94-Capture Man intentionally hit veteran with car because he was 'looking for someone to kill,' authorities say Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 4743ccfe-fe2e-528b-8044-a44fc540c54c   Westlake Legal Group 5cf7bd94-Capture Man intentionally hit veteran with car because he was 'looking for someone to kill,' authorities say Louis Casiano fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 4743ccfe-fe2e-528b-8044-a44fc540c54c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Sean Hannity tells Senate Republicans to ‘do your job’ in impeachment trial

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity tells Senate Republicans to 'do your job' in impeachment trial Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 590e0e5d-5241-5c63-8c15-b4afd22b577b

Sean Hannity criticized House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Friday and implored Senate Republicans to “do your job” next week, when the impeachment trial of President Trump is likely to take place.

“Before this current month-long pause of urgency, the very dazed and confused Nancy Pelosi, speaker-in-name-only, argued that impeachment was urgent,” Hannity said on his television program. “But now, after weeks and weeks of stalling over some fantasy that she’s going to actually dictate the Constitution to the U.S. Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell … Pelosi has given in.”

PRESSURE MOUNTS ON PELOSI TO TRANSMIT ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT, AS DEMOCRATS LOSE PATIENCE

“What have [Democrats] done for three years?” Hannity added. “Nothing.”

Pelosi announced Friday that she will take steps next week to send impeachment articles to the Senate after delaying the process in a bid to extract favorable terms for a trial.

Hannity advised Republicans to stay on track.

“Do your job. Your job is not to undo the mess that they’re handing you. Your job is to dismiss it because there’s nothing there,” Hannity said.  “Do not carry out Nancy Pelosi’s bidding, ‘the squad’s’ bidding. That is not your constitutional role, to hold little Adam Schiff’s hand and correct all his lies.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The host asked the Senate Republicans to get the procedure over with and focus on issues that affect the American people.

“End the B.S. once and for all,” he said. “Get back to working on issues that will impact the lives, the safety, the security, the prosperity, the American people.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity tells Senate Republicans to 'do your job' in impeachment trial Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 590e0e5d-5241-5c63-8c15-b4afd22b577b   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096898958001_6096890350001-vs Sean Hannity tells Senate Republicans to 'do your job' in impeachment trial Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 590e0e5d-5241-5c63-8c15-b4afd22b577b

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Defense attorney: ‘I absolutely believe that Harvey Weinstein is not a rapist’

Westlake Legal Group harverywein Defense attorney: 'I absolutely believe that Harvey Weinstein is not a rapist' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/person/harvey-weinstein fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc ce0faaba-ebc2-523b-a30a-a952735e9dce article

Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein‘s attorney Donna Rotunno told “The Story with Martha MacCallum” Friday that she does not believe the mogul committed rape and defended her choice to take on Weinstein as a client.

“When you do the work that I do, you stand up and you defend people that are charged with crimes, regardless of race, gender, any bias, race, religion,” Rotunno said. “And so it doesn’t make a difference to me whether I’m a woman and he’s a man or vice versa.”

HARVEY WEINSTEIN INDICTED ON NEW SEX CRIMES IN LOS ANGELES

The attorney told MacCallum everyone deserves a defense but in the case of Weinstein, the evidence has led her to determine his innocence.

“It really isn’t about what Harvey has to convince me of. It’s about what the evidence has convinced me of,”Rotunno said. “But in this circumstance, I absolutely believe that Harvey Weinstein is not a rapist. And I do not believe that he raped the women [he is accused of raping]

On Thursday, the trial judge declined a request by Weinstein’s defense to remove himself from the case. The attorneys objected to comments Burke made when he threatened to jail Weinstein for ignoring a court order barring texting in the courtroom.

Weinstein’s lawyers blasted the judge’s comments as “prejudicial and inflammatory,” and raised questions about his impartiality.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Rotunno told MacCallum there was more to the story.

“In these cases, these women had relationships with Harvey that did not start the night that they walked into a hotel room,” Rotunno said. “So there’s a lot more in this in this story than that I think meets the eye.”

Westlake Legal Group harverywein Defense attorney: 'I absolutely believe that Harvey Weinstein is not a rapist' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/person/harvey-weinstein fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc ce0faaba-ebc2-523b-a30a-a952735e9dce article   Westlake Legal Group harverywein Defense attorney: 'I absolutely believe that Harvey Weinstein is not a rapist' Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/fox-news-flash fox-news/shows/the-story fox-news/person/harvey-weinstein fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc ce0faaba-ebc2-523b-a30a-a952735e9dce article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Obituary goes viral after journalist pens his own funny, touching tribute

The Des Moines Register published an obituary this week of one of its former journalists, who actually wrote his own tribute before his passing. The missive quickly went viral.

“Ken Fuson, born June 23, 1956, died Jan. 3, 2020 in at Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, of liver cirrhosis, and is stunned to learn that the world is somehow able to go on without him,” writer Ken Fuson began his obituary.

Fuson noted that he landed his “dream job” as a reporter at the Register in 1981 and how in 1996, “Ken took the principled stand of leaving the Register because The Sun in Baltimore offered him more money.” Three years later, though, “having blown most of that money at Pimlico Race Track, he returned to the Register, where he remained until 2008.”

He listed several awards he had received throughout his career, including the Ernie Pyle Award, the ASNE Distinguished Writing Award, and the National Headliner Award.

“No, he didn’t win a Pulitzer Prize, but he’s dead now, so get off his back,” Fuson quipped.

ROLLING STONE HITS POMPEO FOR ‘MILITARY STRIKE THAT LEFT 2 CHILDREN DEAD’ WHEN REFERRING  TO ISIS LEADER’S KILLING

The former Register journalist went on to work at the Simpson College marketing department from 2011 to 2018, but he warned readers of an “important lesson: Always have a Plan B.”

“He was diagnosed with liver disease at the beginning of 2019, which is pretty ironic given how little he drank. Eat your fruits and vegetables, kids,” Fuson advised young readers.

Fuson is survived by his two sons, Jesse and Max, as well as his stepson Jared Reese, and he said the trio brought him “unsurpassed joy” and “was (and is) extraordinarily proud to be their father.”

But the scribe didn’t gloss over the more troubling parts of his life. He went into detail about his long struggle with gambling addiction.

“For most of his life, Ken suffered from a compulsive gambling addiction that nearly destroyed him. But his church friends, and the loving people at Gamblers Anonymous, never gave up on him. Ken last placed a bet on Sept. 5, 2009. He died clean,” Fuson wrote. “He hopes that anyone who needs help will seek it, which is hard, and accept it, which is even harder. Miracles abound. Ken’s pastor says God can work miracles for you and through you.”

THE ATLANTIC’S DAVID FRUM BLAMES TRUMP FOR DOWNING OF PLANE IN IRAN, DEATHS OF 176

Westlake Legal Group The-Des-Moines-Register-Logo Obituary goes viral after journalist pens his own funny, touching tribute Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/events/obituary fox news fnc/media fnc article 7f71feed-e0bc-5261-9cd6-eaf998f280fa

The reporter also shared the religious journey he had taken as an adult.

“Skepticism may be cool, and for too many years Ken embraced it, but it was faith in Jesus Christ that transformed his life. That was the one thing he never regretted. It changed everything,” Fuson continued. “For many years Ken was a member of the First United Methodist Church in Indianola and sang in the choir, which was a neat trick considering he couldn’t read a note of music. The choir members will never know how much they helped him. He then joined Lutheran Church of Hope. If you want to know what God’s love feels like, just walk in those doors.”

Fuson offered a sincere apology to those he “owes money” to and acknowledged his “many character flaws” but that he “liked to think that he had a good sense of humor and a deep compassion for others.”

He added, “He prided himself on letting other drivers cut in line. He would give you the shirt off his back, even with the ever-present food stain. Thank goodness nobody asked. It wouldn’t have been pretty. He also was a master Jumbles solver.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fuson wrapped up his obituary by urging mourners to “wear black armbands and wail in public during a one-year grieving period” and that “if that doesn’t work, how about donating a book to the public libraries in Granger or Indianola?”

“Yes, this obituary is probably too long. Ken always wrote too long. God is good. Embrace every moment, even the bad ones. See you in heaven. Ken promises to let you cut in line,” Fuson concluded.

Westlake Legal Group The-Des-Moines-Register-Logo Obituary goes viral after journalist pens his own funny, touching tribute Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/events/obituary fox news fnc/media fnc article 7f71feed-e0bc-5261-9cd6-eaf998f280fa   Westlake Legal Group The-Des-Moines-Register-Logo Obituary goes viral after journalist pens his own funny, touching tribute Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/events/obituary fox news fnc/media fnc article 7f71feed-e0bc-5261-9cd6-eaf998f280fa

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former ‘lean’ bod in before-and-after photos

Westlake Legal Group Plus-Size-Bikini-iStock Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former 'lean' bod in before-and-after photos Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/health/healthy-living/mind-and-body fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 3156b6d9-5327-503f-8c01-3024df334b04

Most before-and-after photos typically highlight body milestones like weight loss or body-building transformations.

An Australian influencer, however, took a different approach with a post celebrating how she went from fit and trim to thick and curvy.

“I find it so hard to look at old photos and remember being that girl,” wrote Instagram blogger Kate of @dedikated_lifestyle, referring to the “before” photo of her toned body in 2014.

BODY-POSITIVITY BLOGGER EXPOSES THE REALITY BEHIND THE ‘PERFECT’ INSTAGRAM PHOTO

The right photo, taken in 2020, shows Kate embracing her natural, full figure in a bikini.

”Not because I wish I still looked like that or because I compare my body. But because it reminds me of how obsessed I was,” she continued. “It reminds me of sadness, being self conscious and never feeling like I was good enough.”

Kate said that during her years of maintaining what society considers to be the perfect bod, she skipped social events to avoid eating out and lost time with loved ones because she spent all her time at the gym. She became so obsessed, she said, with losing more weight that she weighed herself daily.

“I can tell you that weighing less does not mean your life will suddenly be better,” she wrote. “Long term happiness, fulfillment and purpose doesn’t come from short term weight loss.”

Since letting go of her fixation on being lean, Kate said she’s learned to love every inch of her “curvier” body.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“I know that I would much rather be curvier/bigger/thicker, be free from diet culture and have freedom around food, than be ‘lean’ and consumed by weighing less, seeing those numbers go down every day and counting the calories in my lettuce leaves,” she said.

She added: “Remember that sometimes gaining weight is simply a side effect of living your best life, and that ‘healthy’ looks different on every body. Maybe it’s time to trust yours and let it do it’s [sic] thing.”

Many of Kate’s more than 140,000 Instagram followers praised her for the radical acceptance of her body and spreading a message of self-love.

“You are beyond amazing,” one follower commented. “Thank you for being so raw and sharing. You are such an inspiring woman.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Love this. You are so inspiring, it takes a lot to create this mindset,” wrote another, who said she unfollowed a lot of “unrealistic” Instagram influencer pages that made her “unhappy and negative against myself.”

“You remind me to be happy with who I am, I love your page and your posts,” she added. “Keep doing what you are doing!”

Westlake Legal Group Plus-Size-Bikini-iStock Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former 'lean' bod in before-and-after photos Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/health/healthy-living/mind-and-body fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 3156b6d9-5327-503f-8c01-3024df334b04   Westlake Legal Group Plus-Size-Bikini-iStock Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former 'lean' bod in before-and-after photos Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/health/healthy-living/mind-and-body fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 3156b6d9-5327-503f-8c01-3024df334b04

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former ‘lean’ bod in before-and-after photos

Westlake Legal Group Plus-Size-Bikini-iStock Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former 'lean' bod in before-and-after photos Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/health/healthy-living/mind-and-body fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 3156b6d9-5327-503f-8c01-3024df334b04

Most before-and-after photos typically highlight body milestones like weight loss or body-building transformations.

An Australian influencer, however, took a different approach with a post celebrating how she went from fit and trim to thick and curvy.

“I find it so hard to look at old photos and remember being that girl,” wrote Instagram blogger Kate of @dedikated_lifestyle, referring to the “before” photo of her toned body in 2014.

BODY-POSITIVITY BLOGGER EXPOSES THE REALITY BEHIND THE ‘PERFECT’ INSTAGRAM PHOTO

The right photo, taken in 2020, shows Kate embracing her natural, full figure in a bikini.

”Not because I wish I still looked like that or because I compare my body. But because it reminds me of how obsessed I was,” she continued. “It reminds me of sadness, being self conscious and never feeling like I was good enough.”

Kate said that during her years of maintaining what society considers to be the perfect bod, she skipped social events to avoid eating out and lost time with loved ones because she spent all her time at the gym. She became so obsessed, she said, with losing more weight that she weighed herself daily.

“I can tell you that weighing less does not mean your life will suddenly be better,” she wrote. “Long term happiness, fulfillment and purpose doesn’t come from short term weight loss.”

Since letting go of her fixation on being lean, Kate said she’s learned to love every inch of her “curvier” body.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“I know that I would much rather be curvier/bigger/thicker, be free from diet culture and have freedom around food, than be ‘lean’ and consumed by weighing less, seeing those numbers go down every day and counting the calories in my lettuce leaves,” she said.

She added: “Remember that sometimes gaining weight is simply a side effect of living your best life, and that ‘healthy’ looks different on every body. Maybe it’s time to trust yours and let it do it’s [sic] thing.”

Many of Kate’s more than 140,000 Instagram followers praised her for the radical acceptance of her body and spreading a message of self-love.

“You are beyond amazing,” one follower commented. “Thank you for being so raw and sharing. You are such an inspiring woman.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Love this. You are so inspiring, it takes a lot to create this mindset,” wrote another, who said she unfollowed a lot of “unrealistic” Instagram influencer pages that made her “unhappy and negative against myself.”

“You remind me to be happy with who I am, I love your page and your posts,” she added. “Keep doing what you are doing!”

Westlake Legal Group Plus-Size-Bikini-iStock Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former 'lean' bod in before-and-after photos Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/health/healthy-living/mind-and-body fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 3156b6d9-5327-503f-8c01-3024df334b04   Westlake Legal Group Plus-Size-Bikini-iStock Instagram blogger embraces curves, slams former 'lean' bod in before-and-after photos Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/health/healthy-living/mind-and-body fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox-news/entertainment/genres/diet-fitness fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 3156b6d9-5327-503f-8c01-3024df334b04

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-crash1-facebookJumbo Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States International Relations Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 Ukraine Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike Missiles and Missile Defense Systems Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iranian officials plan to meet with international investigators on Saturday and announce the cause of the Ukrainian jetliner crash near Tehran this week that killed all 176 aboard, Iran’s semiofficial Fars News Agency reported on Friday, capping a day of international recriminations.

The announcement comes amid a global race to answer the many questions surrounding the Wednesday crash. American and allied intelligence assessments have suggested that Iranian missiles brought down the plane, most likely by accident, amid the heightened tensions between the United States and Iran. On Friday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo became the first American official to publicly confirm the disclosures.

“We do believe that it’s likely that the plane was shot down by an Iranian missile,” he said at a briefing at the White House to announce new sanctions against Iran in response to its firing of ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq this week. “We’re going to let the investigation play out before we make a final determination,” he added.

Iranian officials have denied that its missiles brought down the plane. A top aviation official doubled down on Friday, saying that statements from other nations were politically motivated.

But by late Friday, officials were considering acknowledging that Iranian missiles brought down the jet, according to four Iranians familiar with the deliberations. But the government may instead try to blame faulty jet equipment.

Ukraine’s main intelligence agency, known as the S.B.U., said only that it had narrowed the cause of the crash to a missile strike or a terrorist act and that it could not confirm Western intelligence that an Iranian missile system was likely to blame.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine made clear on Friday that Western governments, allies in his country’s conflict with Russia, had not initially shared the evidence underpinning their assessments that Iran had brought down the Ukrainian jet, though later a spokeswoman said that American officials had handed over more information.

The crash has presented Mr. Zelensky, a 41-year-old comedian who swept into office with a surprising election victory last spring, with the most urgent crisis of his short tenure. And its aftermath has the potential to open a fresh rift between Ukraine and its most important Western allies.

Mr. Zelensky has already turned into an unwilling player in United States domestic politics as a result of President Trump’s pressure campaign seeking announcements of investigations by Ukraine that could benefit him politically. Now, Mr. Zelensky is stuck in the middle of an even more volatile American crisis: the conflict with Iran.

Mr. Zelensky needs Iranian cooperation to deliver the full-fledged investigation of the disaster that he has pledged to Ukrainians. But he also needs the data collected by Western intelligence — as well as continued Western support in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia.

“Our goal is to ascertain the undeniable truth,” Mr. Zelensky said in a statement on Friday. “We believe this is the responsibility of the whole international community before the families of the dead and the memory of the victims of the catastrophe.”

American and Ukrainian officials scrambled on Friday to dispel any appearance of a rift. After speaking to Mr. Zelensky, Mr. Pompeo said he was ready to offer help in the crash inquiry.

Any reluctance from Western countries to help would create suspicions in Ukraine that those countries were using the tragedy as a cudgel in their conflict with Iran, said Anatoliy Hrytsenko, a former Ukrainian defense minister.

“Western leaders must give us these intelligence findings,” Mr. Hrytsenko said. “If we assume the worst and they don’t do this, then a big question mark arises: Is this really about determining the cause of a plane crash or is this now geopolitics?”

Ukrainian officials also analyzed the plane’s flight pattern on Friday and determined it had stayed within the normal corridor for flights out of Tehran’s Imam Khomeini International Airport, Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko, said at a news conference.

“There was nothing to indicate the flight was in danger,” he said.

American officials have a high level of confidence that a Russian-made Iranian air defense system had fired two surface-to-air missiles at the plane minutes after it took off for Kyiv, one United States official has said. The jet had crashed hours after Iran fired ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of a powerful branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, and was bracing for a possible American response.

But Iran’s failure to close its airspace and ground commercial planes was a key error, according to an American official. Some officials believe Iran may have left its airspace open to avoid telegraphing the precise timing of the airstrike, the official said.

Ali Abedzadeh, the chief of Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization, urged caution at a Friday news conference, saying that investigators could not determine anything about the cause of the crash until they analyzed data from the so-called black-box flight recorders. No missile hit the plane, he said, and it was likely on fire before it crashed.

But the Iranian air defense system used Wednesday is designed to explode near aircraft, creating shrapnel that takes a plane out of the sky, rather than directly hitting it. And footage verified by The New York Times appears to show a missile fired from Iranian territory exploding near where the jet crashed.

State television in Iran aired footage that it said showed two black boxes recovered from the crash site. Processing their data could take more than a month, and the investigation could take up to two years, Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said during the news conference.

Normally, Iran has the capacity to download black-box data, but Mr. Rezaeifar said that the devices were damaged, making it difficult to extract information.

“We need special software and hardware which are available in our country, but if we fail to extract the data due to the damages of the black box, we will get help from other countries,” he said, noting that Ukraine, France, Canada and Russia have all expressed willingness to help.

France’s aviation investigation authority, known by its French acronym B.E.A., said Iran had invited it to take part in the investigation because the jetliner’s engine was designed by CFM International, a joint venture between GE Aviation, an American company, and Safran Aircraft Engines, a French one.

While many of the passengers on board were Iranians, citizens of at least seven other nations were on board, prompting expressions of sympathies from around the world that continued on Friday.

Among the dead were at least 63 Canadians, many of them university students. Dozens were believed to be from Edmonton, members of the Iranian community there told local news outlets. At least 10 were students or staff at the University of Alberta, according to a statement from David H. Turpin, the school’s president.

“We are grieving for lost colleagues, classmates, teachers, and mentors, as well as loved ones, family, friends and roommates,” he said.

A number of Swedish nationals were also on board. “We will do everything we can to find out what happened,” Stefan Lofven, the Swedish prime minister, said in a statement. “My thoughts go to the victims, their families and close relatives at this difficult time. You are not alone. We share your sorrow.”

Farnaz Fassihi and Julian E. Barnes contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-crash1-facebookJumbo Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States International Relations Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 Ukraine Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike Missiles and Missile Defense Systems Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iranian officials plan to meet with international investigators on Saturday and announce the cause of the Ukrainian jetliner crash near Tehran this week that killed all 176 aboard, Iran’s semiofficial Fars News Agency reported on Friday, capping a day of international recriminations.

The announcement comes amid a global race to answer the many questions surrounding the Wednesday crash. American and allied intelligence assessments have suggested that Iranian missiles brought down the plane, most likely by accident, amid the heightened tensions between the United States and Iran. On Friday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo became the first American official to publicly confirm the disclosures.

“We do believe that it’s likely that the plane was shot down by an Iranian missile,” he said at a briefing at the White House to announce new sanctions against Iran in response to its firing of ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq this week. “We’re going to let the investigation play out before we make a final determination,” he added.

Iranian officials have denied that its missiles brought down the plane. A top aviation official doubled down on Friday, saying that statements from other nations were politically motivated.

But by late Friday, officials were considering acknowledging that Iranian missiles brought down the jet, according to four Iranians familiar with the deliberations. But the government may instead try to blame faulty jet equipment.

Ukraine’s main intelligence agency, known as the S.B.U., said only that it had narrowed the cause of the crash to a missile strike or a terrorist act and that it could not confirm Western intelligence that an Iranian missile system was likely to blame.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine made clear on Friday that Western governments, allies in his country’s conflict with Russia, had not initially shared the evidence underpinning their assessments that Iran had brought down the Ukrainian jet, though later a spokeswoman said that American officials had handed over more information.

The crash has presented Mr. Zelensky, a 41-year-old comedian who swept into office with a surprising election victory last spring, with the most urgent crisis of his short tenure. And its aftermath has the potential to open a fresh rift between Ukraine and its most important Western allies.

Mr. Zelensky has already turned into an unwilling player in United States domestic politics as a result of President Trump’s pressure campaign seeking announcements of investigations by Ukraine that could benefit him politically. Now, Mr. Zelensky is stuck in the middle of an even more volatile American crisis: the conflict with Iran.

Mr. Zelensky needs Iranian cooperation to deliver the full-fledged investigation of the disaster that he has pledged to Ukrainians. But he also needs the data collected by Western intelligence — as well as continued Western support in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia.

“Our goal is to ascertain the undeniable truth,” Mr. Zelensky said in a statement on Friday. “We believe this is the responsibility of the whole international community before the families of the dead and the memory of the victims of the catastrophe.”

American and Ukrainian officials scrambled on Friday to dispel any appearance of a rift. After speaking to Mr. Zelensky, Mr. Pompeo said he was ready to offer help in the crash inquiry.

Any reluctance from Western countries to help would create suspicions in Ukraine that those countries were using the tragedy as a cudgel in their conflict with Iran, said Anatoliy Hrytsenko, a former Ukrainian defense minister.

“Western leaders must give us these intelligence findings,” Mr. Hrytsenko said. “If we assume the worst and they don’t do this, then a big question mark arises: Is this really about determining the cause of a plane crash or is this now geopolitics?”

Ukrainian officials also analyzed the plane’s flight pattern on Friday and determined it had stayed within the normal corridor for flights out of Tehran’s Imam Khomeini International Airport, Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko, said at a news conference.

“There was nothing to indicate the flight was in danger,” he said.

American officials have a high level of confidence that a Russian-made Iranian air defense system had fired two surface-to-air missiles at the plane minutes after it took off for Kyiv, one United States official has said. The jet had crashed hours after Iran fired ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of a powerful branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, and was bracing for a possible American response.

But Iran’s failure to close its airspace and ground commercial planes was a key error, according to an American official. Some officials believe Iran may have left its airspace open to avoid telegraphing the precise timing of the airstrike, the official said.

Ali Abedzadeh, the chief of Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization, urged caution at a Friday news conference, saying that investigators could not determine anything about the cause of the crash until they analyzed data from the so-called black-box flight recorders. No missile hit the plane, he said, and it was likely on fire before it crashed.

But the Iranian air defense system used Wednesday is designed to explode near aircraft, creating shrapnel that takes a plane out of the sky, rather than directly hitting it. And footage verified by The New York Times appears to show a missile fired from Iranian territory exploding near where the jet crashed.

State television in Iran aired footage that it said showed two black boxes recovered from the crash site. Processing their data could take more than a month, and the investigation could take up to two years, Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said during the news conference.

Normally, Iran has the capacity to download black-box data, but Mr. Rezaeifar said that the devices were damaged, making it difficult to extract information.

“We need special software and hardware which are available in our country, but if we fail to extract the data due to the damages of the black box, we will get help from other countries,” he said, noting that Ukraine, France, Canada and Russia have all expressed willingness to help.

France’s aviation investigation authority, known by its French acronym B.E.A., said Iran had invited it to take part in the investigation because the jetliner’s engine was designed by CFM International, a joint venture between GE Aviation, an American company, and Safran Aircraft Engines, a French one.

While many of the passengers on board were Iranians, citizens of at least seven other nations were on board, prompting expressions of sympathies from around the world that continued on Friday.

Among the dead were at least 63 Canadians, many of them university students. Dozens were believed to be from Edmonton, members of the Iranian community there told local news outlets. At least 10 were students or staff at the University of Alberta, according to a statement from David H. Turpin, the school’s president.

“We are grieving for lost colleagues, classmates, teachers, and mentors, as well as loved ones, family, friends and roommates,” he said.

A number of Swedish nationals were also on board. “We will do everything we can to find out what happened,” Stefan Lofven, the Swedish prime minister, said in a statement. “My thoughts go to the victims, their families and close relatives at this difficult time. You are not alone. We share your sorrow.”

Farnaz Fassihi and Julian E. Barnes contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-crash1-facebookJumbo Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States International Relations Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 Ukraine Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike Missiles and Missile Defense Systems Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iranian officials plan to meet with international investigators on Saturday and announce the cause of the Ukrainian jetliner crash near Tehran this week that killed all 176 aboard, Iran’s semiofficial Fars News Agency reported on Friday, capping a day of international recriminations.

The announcement comes amid a global race to answer the many questions surrounding the Wednesday crash. American and allied intelligence assessments have suggested that Iranian missiles brought down the plane, most likely by accident, amid the heightened tensions between the United States and Iran. On Friday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo became the first American official to publicly confirm the disclosures.

“We do believe that it’s likely that the plane was shot down by an Iranian missile,” he said at a briefing at the White House to announce new sanctions against Iran in response to its firing of ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq this week. “We’re going to let the investigation play out before we make a final determination,” he added.

Iranian officials have denied that its missiles brought down the plane. A top aviation official doubled down on Friday, saying that statements from other nations were politically motivated.

But by late Friday, officials were considering acknowledging that Iranian missiles brought down the jet, according to four Iranians familiar with the deliberations. But the government may instead try to blame faulty jet equipment.

Ukraine’s main intelligence agency, known as the S.B.U., said only that it had narrowed the cause of the crash to a missile strike or a terrorist act and that it could not confirm Western intelligence that an Iranian missile system was likely to blame.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine made clear on Friday that Western governments, allies in his country’s conflict with Russia, had not initially shared the evidence underpinning their assessments that Iran had brought down the Ukrainian jet, though later a spokeswoman said that American officials had handed over more information.

The crash has presented Mr. Zelensky, a 41-year-old comedian who swept into office with a surprising election victory last spring, with the most urgent crisis of his short tenure. And its aftermath has the potential to open a fresh rift between Ukraine and its most important Western allies.

Mr. Zelensky has already turned into an unwilling player in United States domestic politics as a result of President Trump’s pressure campaign seeking announcements of investigations by Ukraine that could benefit him politically. Now, Mr. Zelensky is stuck in the middle of an even more volatile American crisis: the conflict with Iran.

Mr. Zelensky needs Iranian cooperation to deliver the full-fledged investigation of the disaster that he has pledged to Ukrainians. But he also needs the data collected by Western intelligence — as well as continued Western support in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia.

“Our goal is to ascertain the undeniable truth,” Mr. Zelensky said in a statement on Friday. “We believe this is the responsibility of the whole international community before the families of the dead and the memory of the victims of the catastrophe.”

American and Ukrainian officials scrambled on Friday to dispel any appearance of a rift. After speaking to Mr. Zelensky, Mr. Pompeo said he was ready to offer help in the crash inquiry.

Any reluctance from Western countries to help would create suspicions in Ukraine that those countries were using the tragedy as a cudgel in their conflict with Iran, said Anatoliy Hrytsenko, a former Ukrainian defense minister.

“Western leaders must give us these intelligence findings,” Mr. Hrytsenko said. “If we assume the worst and they don’t do this, then a big question mark arises: Is this really about determining the cause of a plane crash or is this now geopolitics?”

Ukrainian officials also analyzed the plane’s flight pattern on Friday and determined it had stayed within the normal corridor for flights out of Tehran’s Imam Khomeini International Airport, Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko, said at a news conference.

“There was nothing to indicate the flight was in danger,” he said.

American officials have a high level of confidence that a Russian-made Iranian air defense system had fired two surface-to-air missiles at the plane minutes after it took off for Kyiv, one United States official has said. The jet had crashed hours after Iran fired ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of a powerful branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, and was bracing for a possible American response.

But Iran’s failure to close its airspace and ground commercial planes was a key error, according to an American official. Some officials believe Iran may have left its airspace open to avoid telegraphing the precise timing of the airstrike, the official said.

Ali Abedzadeh, the chief of Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization, urged caution at a Friday news conference, saying that investigators could not determine anything about the cause of the crash until they analyzed data from the so-called black-box flight recorders. No missile hit the plane, he said, and it was likely on fire before it crashed.

But the Iranian air defense system used Wednesday is designed to explode near aircraft, creating shrapnel that takes a plane out of the sky, rather than directly hitting it. And footage verified by The New York Times appears to show a missile fired from Iranian territory exploding near where the jet crashed.

State television in Iran aired footage that it said showed two black boxes recovered from the crash site. Processing their data could take more than a month, and the investigation could take up to two years, Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said during the news conference.

Normally, Iran has the capacity to download black-box data, but Mr. Rezaeifar said that the devices were damaged, making it difficult to extract information.

“We need special software and hardware which are available in our country, but if we fail to extract the data due to the damages of the black box, we will get help from other countries,” he said, noting that Ukraine, France, Canada and Russia have all expressed willingness to help.

France’s aviation investigation authority, known by its French acronym B.E.A., said Iran had invited it to take part in the investigation because the jetliner’s engine was designed by CFM International, a joint venture between GE Aviation, an American company, and Safran Aircraft Engines, a French one.

While many of the passengers on board were Iranians, citizens of at least seven other nations were on board, prompting expressions of sympathies from around the world that continued on Friday.

Among the dead were at least 63 Canadians, many of them university students. Dozens were believed to be from Edmonton, members of the Iranian community there told local news outlets. At least 10 were students or staff at the University of Alberta, according to a statement from David H. Turpin, the school’s president.

“We are grieving for lost colleagues, classmates, teachers, and mentors, as well as loved ones, family, friends and roommates,” he said.

A number of Swedish nationals were also on board. “We will do everything we can to find out what happened,” Stefan Lofven, the Swedish prime minister, said in a statement. “My thoughts go to the victims, their families and close relatives at this difficult time. You are not alone. We share your sorrow.”

Farnaz Fassihi and Julian E. Barnes contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash

Westlake Legal Group 10dc-crash1-facebookJumbo Iran Is Expected to Announce Cause of Ukrainian Jet Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States International Relations Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 Ukraine Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Pompeo, Mike Missiles and Missile Defense Systems Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iranian officials plan to meet with international investigators on Saturday and announce the cause of the Ukrainian jetliner crash near Tehran this week that killed all 176 aboard, Iran’s semiofficial Fars News Agency reported on Friday, capping a day of international recriminations.

The announcement comes amid a global race to answer the many questions surrounding the Wednesday crash. American and allied intelligence assessments have suggested that Iranian missiles brought down the plane, most likely by accident, amid the heightened tensions between the United States and Iran. On Friday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo became the first American official to publicly confirm the disclosures.

“We do believe that it’s likely that the plane was shot down by an Iranian missile,” he said at a briefing at the White House to announce new sanctions against Iran in response to its firing of ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq this week. “We’re going to let the investigation play out before we make a final determination,” he added.

Iranian officials have denied that its missiles brought down the plane. A top aviation official doubled down on Friday, saying that statements from other nations were politically motivated.

But by late Friday, officials were considering acknowledging that Iranian missiles brought down the jet, according to four Iranians familiar with the deliberations. But the government may instead try to blame faulty jet equipment.

Ukraine’s main intelligence agency, known as the S.B.U., said only that it had narrowed the cause of the crash to a missile strike or a terrorist act and that it could not confirm Western intelligence that an Iranian missile system was likely to blame.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine made clear on Friday that Western governments, allies in his country’s conflict with Russia, had not initially shared the evidence underpinning their assessments that Iran had brought down the Ukrainian jet, though later a spokeswoman said that American officials had handed over more information.

The crash has presented Mr. Zelensky, a 41-year-old comedian who swept into office with a surprising election victory last spring, with the most urgent crisis of his short tenure. And its aftermath has the potential to open a fresh rift between Ukraine and its most important Western allies.

Mr. Zelensky has already turned into an unwilling player in United States domestic politics as a result of President Trump’s pressure campaign seeking announcements of investigations by Ukraine that could benefit him politically. Now, Mr. Zelensky is stuck in the middle of an even more volatile American crisis: the conflict with Iran.

Mr. Zelensky needs Iranian cooperation to deliver the full-fledged investigation of the disaster that he has pledged to Ukrainians. But he also needs the data collected by Western intelligence — as well as continued Western support in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia.

“Our goal is to ascertain the undeniable truth,” Mr. Zelensky said in a statement on Friday. “We believe this is the responsibility of the whole international community before the families of the dead and the memory of the victims of the catastrophe.”

American and Ukrainian officials scrambled on Friday to dispel any appearance of a rift. After speaking to Mr. Zelensky, Mr. Pompeo said he was ready to offer help in the crash inquiry.

Any reluctance from Western countries to help would create suspicions in Ukraine that those countries were using the tragedy as a cudgel in their conflict with Iran, said Anatoliy Hrytsenko, a former Ukrainian defense minister.

“Western leaders must give us these intelligence findings,” Mr. Hrytsenko said. “If we assume the worst and they don’t do this, then a big question mark arises: Is this really about determining the cause of a plane crash or is this now geopolitics?”

Ukrainian officials also analyzed the plane’s flight pattern on Friday and determined it had stayed within the normal corridor for flights out of Tehran’s Imam Khomeini International Airport, Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko, said at a news conference.

“There was nothing to indicate the flight was in danger,” he said.

American officials have a high level of confidence that a Russian-made Iranian air defense system had fired two surface-to-air missiles at the plane minutes after it took off for Kyiv, one United States official has said. The jet had crashed hours after Iran fired ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of a powerful branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, and was bracing for a possible American response.

But Iran’s failure to close its airspace and ground commercial planes was a key error, according to an American official. Some officials believe Iran may have left its airspace open to avoid telegraphing the precise timing of the airstrike, the official said.

Ali Abedzadeh, the chief of Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization, urged caution at a Friday news conference, saying that investigators could not determine anything about the cause of the crash until they analyzed data from the so-called black-box flight recorders. No missile hit the plane, he said, and it was likely on fire before it crashed.

But the Iranian air defense system used Wednesday is designed to explode near aircraft, creating shrapnel that takes a plane out of the sky, rather than directly hitting it. And footage verified by The New York Times appears to show a missile fired from Iranian territory exploding near where the jet crashed.

State television in Iran aired footage that it said showed two black boxes recovered from the crash site. Processing their data could take more than a month, and the investigation could take up to two years, Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said during the news conference.

Normally, Iran has the capacity to download black-box data, but Mr. Rezaeifar said that the devices were damaged, making it difficult to extract information.

“We need special software and hardware which are available in our country, but if we fail to extract the data due to the damages of the black box, we will get help from other countries,” he said, noting that Ukraine, France, Canada and Russia have all expressed willingness to help.

France’s aviation investigation authority, known by its French acronym B.E.A., said Iran had invited it to take part in the investigation because the jetliner’s engine was designed by CFM International, a joint venture between GE Aviation, an American company, and Safran Aircraft Engines, a French one.

While many of the passengers on board were Iranians, citizens of at least seven other nations were on board, prompting expressions of sympathies from around the world that continued on Friday.

Among the dead were at least 63 Canadians, many of them university students. Dozens were believed to be from Edmonton, members of the Iranian community there told local news outlets. At least 10 were students or staff at the University of Alberta, according to a statement from David H. Turpin, the school’s president.

“We are grieving for lost colleagues, classmates, teachers, and mentors, as well as loved ones, family, friends and roommates,” he said.

A number of Swedish nationals were also on board. “We will do everything we can to find out what happened,” Stefan Lofven, the Swedish prime minister, said in a statement. “My thoughts go to the victims, their families and close relatives at this difficult time. You are not alone. We share your sorrow.”

Farnaz Fassihi and Julian E. Barnes contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com