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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 212)

Hurricane Dorian’s Reach Sprawls From Bahamas to Florida

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

Westlake Legal Group 03bahamas-5-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Hurricane Dorian’s Reach Sprawls From Bahamas to Florida Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Hurricane Dorian (2019) Florida Bahama Islands

Hurricane Dorian is now a Category 2 storm and is slowly moving northwest after leaving behind major damage in the Bahamas.CreditCreditRamon Espinosa/Associated Press

The National Hurricane Center warned in its 8 p.m. update on Tuesday that within the next 36 hours, most of the Southeast coast, from Jupiter in central Florida all the way to Surf City, N.C., faced “a danger of life-threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline.” Storm surge warnings were posted for that whole region, with watches for areas on either side.

“Water levels could begin to rise well in advance of the arrival of strong winds,” the center warned, adding that the surge would be accompanied by large and destructive waves. In some places on the coast, seawater could rise to seven feet above normal tidal levels.

Dorian was moving a bit faster, at 6 miles an hour, toward the northwest, and it was expected to keep up that speed or gain a little more overnight, the center said. Its maximum sustained winds remained steady at 110 miles an hour. By Wednesday evening, the storm was expected to turn to a more northerly track.

With the center of the storm about 100 miles east of Melbourne, Fla., Hurricane Dorian was whipping Florida on Tuesday evening with tropical-storm-force winds, which extended out about 175 miles from the center. A tornado or two near the coast of Florida was possible, the center said. The storm’s stronger hurricane-force winds, which extended about 60 miles from the center, remained some hours away from reaching the mainland but were likely to do so overnight.

As he described Hurricane Dorian as one of the greatest crises the Bahamas has ever faced, Prime Minister Hubert Minnis announced on Tuesday night that the official death count increased to seven on Great Abaco.

Mr. Minnis refused to confirm any deaths on Grand Bahama, but he noted that the government is expecting more casualties.

The prime minister said that in Marsh Harbour, Abaco’s capital, roughly 60 percent of homes were badly damaged.

[Read more about what the prime minister of the Bahamas called a “historic tragedy.”]

He said Marsh Harbour’s area was underwater and “looks like a lake.” He noted that Treasure Cay’s airport is O.K., but that the roads are flooded. He also said the Haitian shantytown known as the Mudd was “completely destroyed or decimated.”

Mr. Minnis said the government is sending police and defense force officers to the island to address safety and security concerns. He said the government hopes to prevent the security issues, such as violence and looting, often seen in other countries following disasters.

The United States Coast Guard has sent seven helicopters to the Bahamas to help with rescue efforts, but the continued severe weather was making it difficult for them to reach the hardest-hit islands, Rear Adm. Todd Sokalzuk said on Tuesday.

Admiral Sokalzuk, the deputy commander of the Coast Guard’s Atlantic Area, said that about 35 people had been evacuated by helicopter from Marsh Harbour, the main town in the Abaco Islands. Some had been injured by the storm; others were patients hospitalized at a local clinic that was damaged.

Low visibility and high turbulence have thwarted helicopters from getting to Grand Bahama Island despite two days of trying, the admiral said. “At this point we have only been getting somewhat west of the Abacos,” the admiral said. “We are very anxious for the weather to clear to get into Grand Bahama Island.”

The admiral said airports on both Grand Bahama and Great Abaco were still awash with seawater, and roads had been washed out. “Based on the devastation we have seen in the Abacos, we think it will probably be worse in Grand Bahama,” he added. “Because the storm sat there for so long, there is probably increased damage. There are potentially more people that need assistance.”

The United States Customs and Border Protection also sent a helicopter and, at the request of the Bahamian government, is helping to ferry Royal Bahamian Police Force officers to the affected islands and then evacuate injured people on the return trip, the admiral said.

Hurricane Dorian, now a Category 2 storm, is finally inching away from the Bahamas, where rescue missions were hampered on Tuesday because so many police and government vehicles were submerged in seawater that was only just beginning to recede.

The storm, which hit the northern Bahamas as one of the strongest Atlantic hurricanes on record, has pummeled the islands for more than two days with unrelenting rain and wind, and has killed at least seven people there. It is highly unusual for a storm of Hurricane Dorian’s magnitude to halt and hover over land, as it did in the Bahamas.

By Tuesday evening its center had moved nearly 100 miles north of Grand Bahama Island and was creeping northwest. But tropical storm conditions were not expected to end in the Grand Bahama area for several more hours, said Kevin D. Harris, director general of the Bahamas Information Center.

Emergency offices received at least 200 frantic calls from people stranded on their rooftops or attics. Responders were trying to help after the eye passed over the island, but “some of the bigger vehicles, dump trucks and fire engines are trying to get through the water,” Mr. Harris said.

There was so much water that government offices, including the government radio station, had to move out of the lower floors of buildings. A government minister who was stuck in his flooded home was rescued, Mr. Harris said.

“Some folks were in more of a desperate situation than others,” he said. “We are seeing unprecedented levels of water. ”

He said there was deep concern for the Abaco Islands, which took the full brunt of the hurricane, because many Haitian migrants live there in two shantytowns, known as the Mud and Pigeon Peas. Videos showed stunned residents of the island looking at crumpled cars, smashed homes, piles of debris and contorted trees.

[Read more here about the destruction on the Abaco Islands.]

“We are already hearing from residents that whole towns have been wiped out and devastated,” Mr. Harris said. “This is going to be a big search-and-rescue and rebuilding effort. I don’t think we have seen anything as bad as this. This one is for the history books.”

Westlake Legal Group hurricane-dorian-map-promo-1566933204147-articleLarge-v307 Hurricane Dorian’s Reach Sprawls From Bahamas to Florida Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Hurricane Dorian (2019) Florida Bahama Islands

Maps: Track Hurricane Dorian’s Path

Maps tracking the hurricane’s path as it makes its way toward Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas.

Forecasters said the hurricane would move “dangerously close” to the Florida coast, beginning late Tuesday night and continuing through Wednesday evening. Then it is expected to move northward to affect the Georgia and South Carolina coasts beginning late on Wednesday. By the end of the week it is expected to be shadowing the coasts of North Carolina and Virginia.

[President Trump’s hurricane-related tweets were delivered with the speed of a hailstorm over the weekend.]

Even if the hurricane’s center does not cross the coastline, powerful winds and rain are all but certain to disrupt life in the region. The storm has grown in size as it has weakened in strength, and its hurricane-force winds were extending outward as far as 60 miles from its center on Tuesday, up from 45 miles on Sunday. Winds of tropical-storm force extended as far as 175 miles from the center.

Much of Florida’s eastern coast is also likely to be hit with dangerous storm surges.

[Here’s what our photographers are seeing as Florida braces for a major hurricane.]

Rain bands and tropical storm-strength winds pelted Palm Beach County on Tuesday morning. The authorities cautioned that residents should remain indoors throughout the day, and people appeared to be heeding the advice. But some people ventured outside, including a few wading in ankle-deep storm surge during high tide at a waterfront park in Lantana.

A spokesman for Florida Power & Light, the state’s giant utility, said it had restored electricity for some 70,000 customers through 4 p.m. on Tuesday. Most of the disruptions had been caused by windblown trees and vegetation falling on lines and equipment, the utility said.

In Jacksonville, Mayor Lenny Curry warned that the window to prepare for the hurricane was quickly closing. The city was deploying teams to rescue residents and clear roads as needed.

“Today is your last day to get prepared,” Mr. Curry said. “This is no time to rest and think that everything’s going to be O.K.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 03dorian-updates02-articleLarge Hurricane Dorian’s Reach Sprawls From Bahamas to Florida Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Hurricane Dorian (2019) Florida Bahama Islands

Winds whipped Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Tuesday as Hurricane Dorian approached the Florida coast.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

Gov. Henry McMaster of South Carolina told reporters on Tuesday that 244,000 people had already left the coastal regions of the state, where a mandatory evacuation had been ordered. State officials issued the order for all or part of eight coastal counties, an area whose population is roughly 830,000.

Mr. McMaster said that residents should take Hurricane Dorian seriously, saying that up to 10 inches of rain was expected and that flooding was all but inevitable.

“There’s plenty of gas and plenty of room to leave,” Mr. McMaster said, adding, “You can always come back.”

In the low-lying and flood-prone city of Charleston, S.C., city officials began distributing sandbags at 8 a.m. Tuesday, and opened parking garages to give residents a safer place to store their cars. The city is within the mandatory evacuation area.

As residents of Florida’s Atlantic coast stirred from days of storm anxiety and being stuck indoors, Gov. Ron DeSantis reminded them that Hurricane Dorian’s threat was not over. Many counties will only now start feeling the hurricane’s effects as it crawls north.

“I appreciate a lot of Floridians hanging in there,” Mr. DeSantis said. “We’re here until the duration, monitoring this thing.”

[Read more here about Florida’s hurricane lessons here.]

George Recktenwald, the administrator of Volusia County, said he knew residents were getting “antsy.” But he noted that the hurricane’s 110 m.p.h. winds were just 1 m.p.h. below Category 3, and that the storm would swipe the coast for the next 24 hours, even though it did not seem likely that it would make landfall there.

Farther south, in Indian River County, officials lifted a mandatory coastal evacuation order, but they asked residents to avoid storm “sightseeing.”

“Stay close to home,” Jason Brown, the county administrator, said.

Residents began evacuating on Tuesday from the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas, as meteorologists warned that Hurricane Dorian would probably bring tornadoes, life-threatening storm surges and dangerous winds along the coasts of the three states into Thursday.

A mandatory evacuation order took effect for Georgia’s coastal counties at noon on Tuesday. In Savannah, restaurants like Clary’s Café and the Two Cracked Eggs Café were open for breakfast in the morning, but downtown was beginning to empty out, as residents and tourists apparently heeded the passionate plea of Mayor Eddie DeLoach.

“I can’t decide for you, but I’m asking you, as the mayor of Savannah: Please attempt to get out of town as best you can, and come back in a few days and begin your life over and move forward,” Mr. DeLoach said in a public appearance Monday night, according to The Savannah Morning News.

In North Carolina, Gov. Roy Cooper said he would issue an evacuation order for all of the state’s barrier islands, noting that some people had already begun to leave.

“We’re still hoping this thing will move off to the east, and won’t hit us too bad,” Mr. Cooper said. “We know the forecast does bring it very close, if not onto the North Carolina coast. And so we’re going to be ready for it.”

A steady flow of traffic headed away from Hilton Head Island, S.C., after mandatory evacuations were ordered ahead of Hurricane Dorian’s anticipated arrival.CreditAudra Melton for The New York Times
Residents were evacuated at an assisted living center in Kissimmee, Fla., on Sunday.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez of Miami-Dade County said the government would begin accepting donations of supplies for the ravaged islands at four sites.

“We’ll match our thoughts and prayers with action by offering as much assistance as we can in the aftermath of this unprecedented event,” he said, accompanied by local and Bahamian officials at a Tuesday morning news conference.

Bahamians were among the first settlers of Miami, and many families can trace their lineage to the archipelago. Some still have relatives there, including Chairwoman Audrey M. Edmonson of the Miami-Dade County Commission.

“They are battered, but they are not broken,” she said.

Linda Treco-Mackey, the consul general of the Bahamas in Miami, said she hoped Hurricane Dorian would quickly peel north and out to sea.

“We are, as a people, just hoping that we get past these next few days,” she said.

Volunteers in Miami gathered cases of water on Tuesday that were being donated to the relief effort in the Bahamas.CreditScott McIntyre for The New York Times

Richard Fausset, Elisabeth Malkin and Daniel Victor contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tennessee ex-college student pleads guilty to putting toilet water in roommate’s drinks, report says

A former Tennessee State University student reportedly pleaded guilty on Tuesday on a charge related to contaminating her roommate’s drink with toilet water.

Tierni Williams, 21, who was reportedly captured on video pouring water from the toilet into her roommate’s water bottles using a Styrofoam cup, was arrested and charged two years ago after her roommate became sick.

The victim reportedly began experiencing weight loss and stomach issues after Williams had tampered with her water.

Westlake Legal Group Tierni-Williams-NPD Tennessee ex-college student pleads guilty to putting toilet water in roommate's drinks, report says Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 62708bc2-bb5b-5de0-b51c-060d8210c5e5

Tierni Williams, a former Tennessee State University student, reportedly pleaded guilty on Tuesday for a charge related to contaminating her roommate’s drink with toilet water. (Metropolitan Nashville Police Department)

COLLEGE STUDENT CHARGED WITH ‘CAUSING BODILY HARM’ AFTER GIVING TOILET WATER TO ROOMMATE

The victim learned through Snapchat that her drinking water had been compromised, WKRN-TV reported.

The district attorney’s office handed down an indictment after presenting the case to a grand jury, the station reported.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

On Tuesday, Williams pleaded guilty to adulteration of food, a Class-C felony, the station reported.

She could face three to six years behind bars, according to the news outlet, which added that a sentencing hearing has been scheduled for next month.

Westlake Legal Group Tierni-Williams-NPD Tennessee ex-college student pleads guilty to putting toilet water in roommate's drinks, report says Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 62708bc2-bb5b-5de0-b51c-060d8210c5e5   Westlake Legal Group Tierni-Williams-NPD Tennessee ex-college student pleads guilty to putting toilet water in roommate's drinks, report says Talia Kaplan fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/tennessee fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 62708bc2-bb5b-5de0-b51c-060d8210c5e5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

First female US Airman earns Ranger tab

An Air Force officer on Friday became the first woman of her branch to earn a Ranger tab, joining nearly 300 other Ranger-qualified Airmen.

First Lt. Chelsey Hibsch graduated from the Army Ranger Course at Fort Benning, Ga. Graduates’ families and friends were there to watch the ceremony.

Westlake Legal Group Chelsey-Hibsch-1 First female US Airman earns Ranger tab Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/honors fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox news fnc/us fnc article 974feb83-41aa-527f-bee1-9af829f8f3cf

Maneuver Center of Excellence leaders, family and friends of Ranger Class 18-19 graduates watched them get pinned on Aug. 30. (U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright, Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning Public Affairs)

Ranger School is one of the Army’s most difficult leadership courses – only about half the candidates end up graduating the grueling 61-day course.

“Ranger School is truly not for the weak or faint of heart,” Air Force Security Forces Center Chief of Training Lt. Col. Walter Sorensen said in an Air Force news release.

Westlake Legal Group Chelsey-Hibsch-2 First female US Airman earns Ranger tab Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/honors fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox news fnc/us fnc article 974feb83-41aa-527f-bee1-9af829f8f3cf

Maneuver Center of Excellence leaders, family and friends of Ranger Class 18-19 attended graduation on Aug. 30. (U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright, Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning Public Affairs)

“It speaks well of all those who persevere to find that inner grit and motivation to push through all that Ranger School throws at them. The perspective tabbed Airmen earn serves them well when the mission gets challenging and others look to them to find a way,” said Sorensen, who is also Ranger-qualified.

2 SETS OF TWINS SEPARATE TO GO TO DIFFERENT MILITARY ACADEMIES

The Army began accepting Airmen at Ranger School in 1955. Sixty years later, in 2015, the military said women could attend Ranger School.

Westlake Legal Group Chelsey-Hibsch-3 First female US Airman earns Ranger tab Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/honors fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox news fnc/us fnc article 974feb83-41aa-527f-bee1-9af829f8f3cf

The Ranger Class of 2018-19 graduated on Aug. 30. (U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright, Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning Public Affairs)

Hibsch is now expected to serve as a flight commander in the 821st Contingency Response Support Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, Calif. She previously was assigned to the 374th Security Forces Squadron at Yokota Air Base in Japan.

TRUMP ESTABLISHES SPACE COMMAND, DEFENDS US INTEREST IN SPACE

She attended the Air Force’s Ranger Assessment Course (RAC) and the Tropic Lightning Academy in Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, in order to qualify for a spot at Ranger School.

Hibsch said RAC was “an unmatched learning experience on leadership and followership.”

Westlake Legal Group 2c0f004c-Chelsey-Hibsch-5 First female US Airman earns Ranger tab Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/honors fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox news fnc/us fnc article 974feb83-41aa-527f-bee1-9af829f8f3cf

Airmen from different career fields challenging themselves in the Ranger Assessment course, a combat leadership course that could lead to attending Army Ranger School. (U.S. Air Force)

RAC is intended to be stressful so Airmen will learn how to lead under pressure and in various circumstances.

Hibsch said lessons from RAC could be applied to Ranger School; she had gained an “understanding of how you function when you’re hungry, tired, wet, cold and worse, then you have to lead a team of individuals feeling the exact same way.”

She added, “You really find out a lot about your teammates and yourself in these stressful situations.”

Westlake Legal Group Chelsey-Hibsch-4 First female US Airman earns Ranger tab Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/honors fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox news fnc/us fnc article 974feb83-41aa-527f-bee1-9af829f8f3cf

Then-2nd Lt. Chelsey Hibsch speaks during a Women’s History Month luncheon at Yokota Air Base in March 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Machiko Arita)

The Airborne Ranger and Training Brigade public affairs officer, Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Billings, explained the three phases of Ranger School.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“In the Ft. Benning phase, the students become trained on squad operations and focus on ambush and recon missions, patrol base operations, and planning before moving on to platoon operations. In the Mountain phase, students develop their skills at the platoon level in order to refine and complete their training in Swamp phase. After these three phases, Ranger Students are proficient in leading squad and platoon dismounted operations around the clock in all climates and terrain.”

Air Force Materiel Command said Hibsch was the first female Airman to earn a Ranger tab, “but she won’t be the last!”

Westlake Legal Group Chelsey-Hibsch-1 First female US Airman earns Ranger tab Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/honors fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox news fnc/us fnc article 974feb83-41aa-527f-bee1-9af829f8f3cf   Westlake Legal Group Chelsey-Hibsch-1 First female US Airman earns Ranger tab Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/georgia fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/honors fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military/air-force fox news fnc/us fnc article 974feb83-41aa-527f-bee1-9af829f8f3cf

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hurricane Dorian Tests Florida’s Ability to Move Older Adults Out of Harm’s Way

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — As the outer bands of Hurricane Dorian began brushing the Florida coast on Tuesday, a woman raced to pick up her mother-in-law at a retirement community, where the elevator was about to be shut down. The staff of a nursing home packed up more than 200 residents as well as the supplies they might need: cases of water, air mattresses and board games. At another center, residents were evacuated in specialty ambulances, rented motor coaches and private vehicles.

Across the state, a scramble was underway to move older Floridians to safer ground as a weakened but still dangerous Hurricane Dorian, once a Category 5 storm but now a vast Category 2, threatened the state’s Atlantic coast.

The last major storm to hit the state was foremost in officials’ minds. When Hurricane Irma came ashore two years ago, a dozen patients died after a nursing home in Hollywood, Fla., lost its air-conditioning. The tragedy prompted new regulations and an acknowledgment that evacuation orders were not enough to protect the state’s large older population. When it comes to older people, no state has more retirees than Florida, where they make up one-fifth of the population, according to the AARP.

A new state law requires backup generators and enough fuel to maintain comfortable temperatures at nursing homes and assisted living centers, a mandate first tested last year when Hurricane Michael struck the Florida Panhandle. Last week, four nursing home workers were charged in the Hurricane Irma deaths, which were ruled homicides.

At the Towers of Jacksonville, a retirement community in Jacksonville, Fla., officials advised residents with just a few hours’ notice that it would disable its elevator on Monday afternoon. That would have left Lois Evelin, 72, unable to get downstairs unless someone carried her, said her daughter-in-law, Ester Evelin, who rushed to pick her up earlier than she had planned.

“It was a little frustrating, because we were still trying to get our place hurricane-ready,” said Ms. Evelin, 45, whose mother-in-law is now safely at home with her, her husband and their son in Neptune Beach. “But there are a few people that had to stay because they didn’t have any family near that could get to them in time.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160073292_7055dd20-1f00-4c68-aac0-2a94a90240ae-articleLarge Hurricane Dorian Tests Florida’s Ability to Move Older Adults Out of Harm’s Way Retirement Communities and Assisted Living Nursing Homes Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Hurricane Irma (2017) Hurricane Dorian (2019) Evacuations and Evacuees Elder Care

Residents were evacuated after a mandatory evacuation order was issued.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

North of Florida, the worry, preparations and evacuations for Hurricane Dorian’s next possible targets could be found for hundreds of miles up the coast. Meteorologists warned that the storm could bring tornadoes, life-threatening storm surges and dangerous winds along the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas into Thursday.

In Georgia, a mandatory evacuation order was in effect for coastal counties.

In South Carolina, an evacuation order was issued for all or part of eight coastal counties, an area whose population is roughly 830,000. Gov. Henry McMaster told reporters on Tuesday afternoon that 244,000 people had already left the region.

In North Carolina, Gov. Roy Cooper said he would issue an evacuation order for all of the state’s barrier islands.

Some 190,000 people live in Florida nursing homes and assisted living centers, most of them in the state’s southeastern tip. Patrick Manderfield, a spokesman for the state’s Agency for Health Care Administration, said on Monday that all but 42 of the state’s 3,062 licensed assisted living centers had an on-site generator. Five centers had emergency plans to evacuate “if needed,” he said in an email.

Nursing homes, which tend to be larger and have more beds than assisted living centers, are a different story. Reuters reported on Friday that some nursing homes were still waiting for temporary generators, though a state website suggested that they might have all been supplied by Monday afternoon. The Miami Herald reported last week that nearly 60 percent of the state’s 687 nursing homes did not yet have enough power backup.

Large centers for elderly residents who require constant care have put complex emergency plans into action. Among them was the Samantha Wilson Care Center in St. Augustine, Fla., which is near the Intracoastal Waterway. Fearing a dangerously high storm surge, the center evacuated its 126 residents to three separate facilities in Orlando and DeLand, said Shellye Nutter, vice president for clinical and residential services in the center’s skilled nursing unit.

The residents in more delicate health traveled in specialty ambulances. Other traveled in rented motor coaches, sometimes with caregivers and relatives in tow. Clearing out the entire center took all of Monday, Ms. Nutter said.

Buses and ambulances were used to evacuate patients.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

“They’re the most vulnerable population — they’re totally dependent on us for care,” she said.

About four dozen residents temporarily settled into the Orlando Lutheran Towers, a community with skilled nursing and assisted living centers. Amy Dickens, the director of nursing, said it was the first time that the center was taking in evacuees, so it stocked up on extra food, mattresses and clinical staff to support the caregivers coming in from St. Augustine.

“If you’re taking an elderly patient from their normal room to transport them to another facility where they’re maybe on a bed or a mattress, you just try to make it the best atmosphere,” she said.

At the Good Samaritan Society’s retirement home in DeLand, nearly 400 residents milled about in a building that until Sunday had housed about 150. They bit their nails, worked on crossword puzzles or dozed as a television showed a local newscast featuring footage of waves crashing on Cocoa Beach. Water and stacks of fans sat nearby, and in another room a group of women were filling in outlines of hummingbirds with paintbrushes.

Administrators said they had moved 237 residents to the home in buses and ambulances because of mandatory evacuation orders that included Good Samaritan’s homes in Daytona Beach and Kissimmee.

It was a far cry from two summers ago, when a last-minute evacuation stretched past nightfall before flooding from Hurricane Irma submerged golf carts, soaked rooms and caused $500 million in damage at the nursing home. During that storm, many residents were moved to local shelters.

“Here we have sunshine and nice sky,” said Mark Barglof, the executive director of the group’s three Florida locations. “Before, we had floodwater and were working into the night.”

Nate Schema, vice president for operations of the Good Samaritan Society, flew from the organization’s headquarters in South Dakota to keep an eye on the storm. He said the nursing home was lucky to have just completed a new, 80-unit wing, most of which was sitting vacant before the evacuations

At the Good Samaritan Society’s retirement home in DeLand, Fla., nearly 400 people were staying in a building that until Sunday had housed about 150.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

“The good Lord had a little hand in pulling that together,” he said.

Most residents on Tuesday said they felt safe and were thankful for the care they were getting, even if the move to DeLand was a hassle and they had to sleep on air mattresses.

Melanie Gentry, a retired member of the Air Force, was at the nursing home on Tuesday with her mother and father. She said that while her family had been prepared to leave for Hurricane Irma, she was grateful there was more notice this time.

During past storms, they grabbed only important documents and an heirloom or two and put everything else on high shelves, Ms. Gentry said.

“Now, you have so much time you have to stop yourself because you can’t take everything,” she said with a laugh.

For older people who live alone, storms also present a challenge. Sometimes, they also need a nudge from a friend or relative to get out of harm’s way.

PeggyAnn Cromartie, 72, left her home in the inland Palm Beach County town of Pahokee, Fla., after a friend in South Carolina encouraged her to make a plan to avoid getting stuck in case of an emergency.

“I wanted to be safe, because you never know what may happen,” said Ms. Cromartie, who evacuated to the West Boynton Park and Recreation Center in Lake Worth, Fla., on Sunday. “It’s not really scary, but I thought about the flooding or the lights going out.”

Randye Carol Pollack, 68, of Boynton Beach, Fla., said she feared her 30-year-old apartment building might not fare well in a strong storm but planned to stay if she could not find accommodation with her parakeet, Sweet Pea. That did not prove to be a problem: The pet shelter had an area set aside for birds.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Distress calls, mourning and search for answers: How the California boat fire unfolded

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Distress calls, mourning and search for answers: How the California boat fire unfolded

A makeshift memorial grows dockside in Santa Barbara, California after a boating fire claimed the lives of 34 people, as local clergy members seek to provide aid to those affected by the tragedy. (Sept. 3) AP, AP

A Labor Day weekend scuba excursion in open water near Santa Cruz Island, about 90 miles northwest of Los Angeles, ended in tragedy after a boat carrying more than three dozen people caught fire overnight.

All 33 passengers and one crew member are assumed dead, officials said. 

Authorities reported in a press conference Tuesday that the remains of 20 victims had been recovered, including 11 females and 9 males. Fourteen victims remain missing. 

Investigators have yet to determine the cause of the fire. Authorities said Tuesday that there was no indication that an explosion had occurred. Passengers were unable to get out because both the main stairwell and escape hatch were likely blocked by fire. It is unclear whether passengers were actually asleep when they died, U.S. Coast Guard Captain Monica Rochester said.

Here’s what we know about how the tragedy unfolded:

Saturday, August 31 — Conception leaves Santa Barbara Harbor

4 a.m. The boat “Conception” leaves Santa Barbara Harbor for a recreational scuba diving trip, going on to tour Santa Cruz Island’s south side that afternoon. On board the vessel charted by Truth Aquatics are six crew members and 33 passengers. 

11 p.m. Conception stops for the night on the island’s east side.

Sunday, September 1 — Conception continues island tour

Conception tours Santa Cruz Island’s northwest side before looking for a place to dock for the night near the island.

Monday, September 2 — A fire sinks Conception 

12:05 a.m. According to MarineTraffic.com, Conception’s last recorded location was near Platts Harbor. Law enforcement later confirmed the boat docked 20 yards from the shore of Santa Cruz Island.

Around 3 a.m. Asleep on another boat, the Grape Escape, Bob Hansen and his wife awoke to knocking on the side of their vessel. Five crew members had escaped in a dingy. In the distance, Hansen could see Conception fully ablaze.

“They were not just in shock but several were crying,’’ said Bob Hansen, 70. “One guy was in a tremendous amount of pain (with a broken leg). The captain was all shook up. Nothing can prepare you for that. For myself, it was like, ‘I can’t do anything here. I’m freaking helpless.’ It’s like an airplane (crash). What are you going to do after it’s already hit the ground?’’

Instead of heading back toward the Conception, Hansen said the boat’s captain suggested he contact the Coast Guard instead.

3:15 a.m. A distress call is made to the Coast Guard. Authorities later said a call was made from the Conception and others from the Great Escape. In audio of a call on Broadcastify that authorities suggested may have been edited to combine multiple calls, only the Coast Guard dispatcher can be heard, not the responses.

The dispatcher asks if passengers are trapped and if there’s an escape hatch.

3:30 a.m. The Coast Guard arrives on scene and begins to fight the fire.

7:20 a.m. Conception sinks in 64 feet of water off the coast of Santa Cruz Island.

8:40 a.m.James Kohls arrives at the U.S. Coast Guard Station Channel Island, waiting to hear from his brother Mike, who he says is a cook and a deckhand on the Conception.

“I haven’t heard from anybody,” Kohls said.

9 a.m. At a press conference, the Coast Guard says that 34 people are unaccounted for and that shoreline searches on the island are underway. The department also says that the five crew members were asleep on the top deck while passengers were asleep below deck.

11:15 a.m. The Coast Guard announces that four bodies have been found near the Conception.

4 p.m. At an afternoon press conference, Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown says four more bodies have been found, increasing the death toll to eight victims.

9:44 p.m. The Coast Guard says that 25 bodies have been found, but 9 remain still missing.

Tuesday, September 3 — Mourning and search for answers

7:15 a.m. A memorial on the Santa Barbara dock entrance, which began the night before, continues to grow.

9:40 a.m. The Coast Guard suspends search effort after search via air, water and ground was conducted over a 160-mile area, according to Capt. Monica Rochester.

10:00 a.m. At a press conference, Sheriff Brown says no additional survivors have been found, adding that the victims ranged from age 17 to 60, with the majority being from the Bay Area. 

Brown indicated that one crew member had been asleep in the passenger’s quarters and that the five surviving crew members would be formally interviewed by the Sheriff’s Office on Tuesday. He said there was no indication passengers got onto the deck and that it “appeared” the victims had most likely been trapped by fire.

Capt. Rochester added that the ship would not have had locked doors and also had firefighting equipment aboard when it was last inspected by the Coast Guard. 

3:20 p.m. At a press conference by the National Transportation Safety Board, board member Jennifer Homendy said the organization’s investigation would include collecting perishable evidence, talking to parties involved and asking for the public’s help in providing them with any other details, such as photos or videos of the vessel.

Homendy said such investigations can take anywhere from one to two years, but that she was “100 percent confident” her organization would determine how and why the fire began and what would be needed to prevent such an event from happening again.

Follow Nate Chute on Twitter: @nchute

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Distress calls, mourning and search for answers: How the California boat fire unfolded

Aerial U.S. Coast Guard footage shows smoke pouring from a dive boat that caught fire off the Southern California coast early Monday, killing 34 people who were below deck. (Sept. 3) AP, AP

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Hurricane Dorian Tests Florida’s Ability to Move Older Adults Out of Harm’s Way

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — As the outer bands of Hurricane Dorian began brushing the Florida coast on Tuesday, a woman raced to pick up her mother-in-law at a retirement community, where the elevator was about to be shut down. The staff of a nursing home packed up more than 200 residents as well as the supplies they might need: cases of water, air mattresses and board games. At another center, residents were evacuated in specialty ambulances, rented motor coaches and private vehicles.

Across the state, a scramble was underway to move older Floridians to safer ground as a weakened but still dangerous Hurricane Dorian, once a Category 5 storm but now a vast Category 2, threatened the state’s Atlantic coast.

The last major storm to hit the state was foremost in officials’ minds. When Hurricane Irma came ashore two years ago, a dozen patients died after a nursing home in Hollywood, Fla., lost its air-conditioning. The tragedy prompted new regulations and an acknowledgment that evacuation orders were not enough to protect the state’s large older population. When it comes to older people, no state has more retirees than Florida, where they make up one-fifth of the population, according to the AARP.

A new state law requires backup generators and enough fuel to maintain comfortable temperatures at nursing homes and assisted living centers, a mandate first tested last year when Hurricane Michael struck the Florida Panhandle. Last week, four nursing home workers were charged in the Hurricane Irma deaths, which were ruled homicides.

At the Towers of Jacksonville, a retirement community in Jacksonville, Fla., officials advised residents with just a few hours’ notice that it would disable its elevator on Monday afternoon. That would have left Lois Evelin, 72, unable to get downstairs unless someone carried her, said her daughter-in-law, Ester Evelin, who rushed to pick her up earlier than she had planned.

“It was a little frustrating, because we were still trying to get our place hurricane-ready,” said Ms. Evelin, 45, whose mother-in-law is now safely at home with her, her husband and their son in Neptune Beach. “But there are a few people that had to stay because they didn’t have any family near that could get to them in time.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160073292_7055dd20-1f00-4c68-aac0-2a94a90240ae-articleLarge Hurricane Dorian Tests Florida’s Ability to Move Older Adults Out of Harm’s Way Retirement Communities and Assisted Living Nursing Homes Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Hurricane Irma (2017) Hurricane Dorian (2019) Evacuations and Evacuees Elder Care

Residents were evacuated after a mandatory evacuation order was issued.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

North of Florida, the worry, preparations and evacuations for Hurricane Dorian’s next possible targets could be found for hundreds of miles up the coast. Meteorologists warned that the storm could bring tornadoes, life-threatening storm surges and dangerous winds along the coasts of Georgia and the Carolinas into Thursday.

In Georgia, a mandatory evacuation order was in effect for coastal counties.

In South Carolina, an evacuation order was issued for all or part of eight coastal counties, an area whose population is roughly 830,000. Gov. Henry McMaster told reporters on Tuesday afternoon that 244,000 people had already left the region.

In North Carolina, Gov. Roy Cooper said he would issue an evacuation order for all of the state’s barrier islands.

Some 190,000 people live in Florida nursing homes and assisted living centers, most of them in the state’s southeastern tip. Patrick Manderfield, a spokesman for the state’s Agency for Health Care Administration, said on Monday that all but 42 of the state’s 3,062 licensed assisted living centers had an on-site generator. Five centers had emergency plans to evacuate “if needed,” he said in an email.

Nursing homes, which tend to be larger and have more beds than assisted living centers, are a different story. Reuters reported on Friday that some nursing homes were still waiting for temporary generators, though a state website suggested that they might have all been supplied by Monday afternoon. The Miami Herald reported last week that nearly 60 percent of the state’s 687 nursing homes did not yet have enough power backup.

Large centers for elderly residents who require constant care have put complex emergency plans into action. Among them was the Samantha Wilson Care Center in St. Augustine, Fla., which is near the Intracoastal Waterway. Fearing a dangerously high storm surge, the center evacuated its 126 residents to three separate facilities in Orlando and DeLand, said Shellye Nutter, vice president for clinical and residential services in the center’s skilled nursing unit.

The residents in more delicate health traveled in specialty ambulances. Other traveled in rented motor coaches, sometimes with caregivers and relatives in tow. Clearing out the entire center took all of Monday, Ms. Nutter said.

Buses and ambulances were used to evacuate patients.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

“They’re the most vulnerable population — they’re totally dependent on us for care,” she said.

About four dozen residents temporarily settled into the Orlando Lutheran Towers, a community with skilled nursing and assisted living centers. Amy Dickens, the director of nursing, said it was the first time that the center was taking in evacuees, so it stocked up on extra food, mattresses and clinical staff to support the caregivers coming in from St. Augustine.

“If you’re taking an elderly patient from their normal room to transport them to another facility where they’re maybe on a bed or a mattress, you just try to make it the best atmosphere,” she said.

At the Good Samaritan Society’s retirement home in DeLand, nearly 400 residents milled about in a building that until Sunday had housed about 150. They bit their nails, worked on crossword puzzles or dozed as a television showed a local newscast featuring footage of waves crashing on Cocoa Beach. Water and stacks of fans sat nearby, and in another room a group of women were filling in outlines of hummingbirds with paintbrushes.

Administrators said they had moved 237 residents to the home in buses and ambulances because of mandatory evacuation orders that included Good Samaritan’s homes in Daytona Beach and Kissimmee.

It was a far cry from two summers ago, when a last-minute evacuation stretched past nightfall before flooding from Hurricane Irma submerged golf carts, soaked rooms and caused $500 million in damage at the nursing home. During that storm, many residents were moved to local shelters.

“Here we have sunshine and nice sky,” said Mark Barglof, the executive director of the group’s three Florida locations. “Before, we had floodwater and were working into the night.”

Nate Schema, vice president for operations of the Good Samaritan Society, flew from the organization’s headquarters in South Dakota to keep an eye on the storm. He said the nursing home was lucky to have just completed a new, 80-unit wing, most of which was sitting vacant before the evacuations

At the Good Samaritan Society’s retirement home in DeLand, Fla., nearly 400 people were staying in a building that until Sunday had housed about 150.CreditEve Edelheit for The New York Times

“The good Lord had a little hand in pulling that together,” he said.

Most residents on Tuesday said they felt safe and were thankful for the care they were getting, even if the move to DeLand was a hassle and they had to sleep on air mattresses.

Melanie Gentry, a retired member of the Air Force, was at the nursing home on Tuesday with her mother and father. She said that while her family had been prepared to leave for Hurricane Irma, she was grateful there was more notice this time.

During past storms, they grabbed only important documents and an heirloom or two and put everything else on high shelves, Ms. Gentry said.

“Now, you have so much time you have to stop yourself because you can’t take everything,” she said with a laugh.

For older people who live alone, storms also present a challenge. Sometimes, they also need a nudge from a friend or relative to get out of harm’s way.

PeggyAnn Cromartie, 72, left her home in the inland Palm Beach County town of Pahokee, Fla., after a friend in South Carolina encouraged her to make a plan to avoid getting stuck in case of an emergency.

“I wanted to be safe, because you never know what may happen,” said Ms. Cromartie, who evacuated to the West Boynton Park and Recreation Center in Lake Worth, Fla., on Sunday. “It’s not really scary, but I thought about the flooding or the lights going out.”

Randye Carol Pollack, 68, of Boynton Beach, Fla., said she feared her 30-year-old apartment building might not fare well in a strong storm but planned to stay if she could not find accommodation with her parakeet, Sweet Pea. That did not prove to be a problem: The pet shelter had an area set aside for birds.

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Distress calls, mourning and search for answers: How the California boat fire unfolded

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Distress calls, mourning and search for answers: How the California boat fire unfolded

A makeshift memorial grows dockside in Santa Barbara, California after a boating fire claimed the lives of 34 people, as local clergy members seek to provide aid to those affected by the tragedy. (Sept. 3) AP, AP

A Labor Day weekend scuba excursion in open water near Santa Cruz Island, about 90 miles northwest of Los Angeles, ended in tragedy after a boat carrying more than three dozen people caught fire overnight.

All 33 passengers and one crew member are assumed dead, officials said. 

Authorities reported in a press conference Tuesday that the remains of 20 victims had been recovered, including 11 females and 9 males. Fourteen victims remain missing. 

Investigators have yet to determine the cause of the fire. Authorities said Tuesday that there was no indication that an explosion had occurred. Passengers were unable to get out because both the main stairwell and escape hatch were likely blocked by fire. It is unclear whether passengers were actually asleep when they died, U.S. Coast Guard Captain Monica Rochester said.

Here’s what we know about how the tragedy unfolded:

Saturday, August 31 — Conception leaves Santa Barbara Harbor

4 a.m. The boat “Conception” leaves Santa Barbara Harbor for a recreational scuba diving trip, going on to tour Santa Cruz Island’s south side that afternoon. On board the vessel charted by Truth Aquatics are six crew members and 33 passengers. 

11 p.m. Conception stops for the night on the island’s east side.

Sunday, September 1 — Conception continues island tour

Conception tours Santa Cruz Island’s northwest side before looking for a place to dock for the night near the island.

Monday, September 2 — A fire sinks Conception 

12:05 a.m. According to MarineTraffic.com, Conception’s last recorded location was near Platts Harbor. Law enforcement later confirmed the boat docked 20 yards from the shore of Santa Cruz Island.

Around 3 a.m. Asleep on another boat, the Grape Escape, Bob Hansen and his wife awoke to knocking on the side of their vessel. Five crew members had escaped in a dingy. In the distance, Hansen could see Conception fully ablaze.

“They were not just in shock but several were crying,’’ said Bob Hansen, 70. “One guy was in a tremendous amount of pain (with a broken leg). The captain was all shook up. Nothing can prepare you for that. For myself, it was like, ‘I can’t do anything here. I’m freaking helpless.’ It’s like an airplane (crash). What are you going to do after it’s already hit the ground?’’

Instead of heading back toward the Conception, Hansen said the boat’s captain suggested he contact the Coast Guard instead.

3:15 a.m. A distress call is made to the Coast Guard. Authorities later said a call was made from the Conception and others from the Great Escape. In audio of a call on Broadcastify that authorities suggested may have been edited to combine multiple calls, only the Coast Guard dispatcher can be heard, not the responses.

The dispatcher asks if passengers are trapped and if there’s an escape hatch.

3:30 a.m. The Coast Guard arrives on scene and begins to fight the fire.

7:20 a.m. Conception sinks in 64 feet of water off the coast of Santa Cruz Island.

8:40 a.m.James Kohls arrives at the U.S. Coast Guard Station Channel Island, waiting to hear from his brother Mike, who he says is a cook and a deckhand on the Conception.

“I haven’t heard from anybody,” Kohls said.

9 a.m. At a press conference, the Coast Guard says that 34 people are unaccounted for and that shoreline searches on the island are underway. The department also says that the five crew members were asleep on the top deck while passengers were asleep below deck.

11:15 a.m. The Coast Guard announces that four bodies have been found near the Conception.

4 p.m. At an afternoon press conference, Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown says four more bodies have been found, increasing the death toll to eight victims.

9:44 p.m. The Coast Guard says that 25 bodies have been found, but 9 remain still missing.

Tuesday, September 3 — Mourning and search for answers

7:15 a.m. A memorial on the Santa Barbara dock entrance, which began the night before, continues to grow.

9:40 a.m. The Coast Guard suspends search effort after search via air, water and ground was conducted over a 160-mile area, according to Capt. Monica Rochester.

10:00 a.m. At a press conference, Sheriff Brown says no additional survivors have been found, adding that the victims ranged from age 17 to 60, with the majority being from the Bay Area. 

Brown indicated that one crew member had been asleep in the passenger’s quarters and that the five surviving crew members would be formally interviewed by the Sheriff’s Office on Tuesday. He said there was no indication passengers got onto the deck and that it “appeared” the victims had most likely been trapped by fire.

Capt. Rochester added that the ship would not have had locked doors and also had firefighting equipment aboard when it was last inspected by the Coast Guard. 

3:20 p.m. At a press conference by the National Transportation Safety Board, board member Jennifer Homendy said the organization’s investigation would include collecting perishable evidence, talking to parties involved and asking for the public’s help in providing them with any other details, such as photos or videos of the vessel.

Homendy said such investigations can take anywhere from one to two years, but that she was “100 percent confident” her organization would determine how and why the fire began and what would be needed to prevent such an event from happening again.

Follow Nate Chute on Twitter: @nchute

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Distress calls, mourning and search for answers: How the California boat fire unfolded

Aerial U.S. Coast Guard footage shows smoke pouring from a dive boat that caught fire off the Southern California coast early Monday, killing 34 people who were below deck. (Sept. 3) AP, AP

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/03/california-boat-fire-what-happened-after-conception-left-harbor/2204738001/

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White House pushes back after judge orders restoration of Playboy journalist’s credentials

The White House said Tuesday it disagreed with a federal judge in Washington ordered officials to reinstate Playboy journalist Brian Karem’s credentials, which had been revoked following Karem’s altercation with former Trump aide Sebastian Gorka.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Rudolph Contreras, a Barack Obama appointee, marked the second time a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to reinstate a reporter’s pass. The first instance came in November 2018 when a judge ordered CNN reporter Jim Acosta’s credentials restored days after they were revoked. The so-called hard pass allows reporters to easily obtain access to the White House grounds without having to separately apply for a press credential each time they seek entry.

“The First Amendment requires ‘that individual newsmen not be arbitrarily excluded from sources of information,'” Contreras wrote in his opinion, citing federal case law. “His First Amendment interest depends on his ability to freely pursue ‘journalistically productive conversations with White House officials.’ Yet without his hard pass, he lacks access to pursue those conversations — even as an eavesdropper.”

In issuing a temporary restraining order and injunction against the White House, Judge Contreras said that the White House’s guidelines for appropriate behavior were insufficient and vague. Contreras’ decision, although not yet a final ruling on the merits of the case, strongly signaled that he believed Karem ultimately would prevail.

CNN’S ACOSTA WINS BACK PRESS CREDENTIALS AFTER LAWSUIT

“White House events appear to vary greatly in character,” the judge wrote, adding that “without any contextual guideposts, ‘professionalism,’ standing alone, remains too murky to provide fair notice here. … “Karem has provided some evidence that White House press events are often freewheeling and that aggressive conduct has long been tolerated without punishment.”

The judge clarified that “In granting Karem relief, the Court finds only that the White House likely did not provide the requisite guidance in this specific case — nothing more. And, as noted earlier, the Court does not reach Karem’s independent free speech claim.”

Nevertheless, the judge concluded: “Karem has shown that even the temporary suspension of his pass inflicts irreparable harm on his First Amendment rights.”

Gorka and Karem got into a shouting match that was captured on video July 11, after Karem described the participants in a White House meeting of conservative social media personalities as a “group of people that are eager for demonic possession.”

After a back and forth, Gorka shouted at Karem, “You are threatening me now in the White House, in the Rose Garden. You are threatening me in the Rose Garden. You’re a punk, you’re not a journalist, you’re a punk.”

Karem then told Gorka to “get a job.” At one point, Karem suggested they take their conversation “outside.”

The crowd erupted into chants of “Gorka! Gorka!” Karem replied that Gorka should “go home.”

Westlake Legal Group Brian-Karem-Getty White House pushes back after judge orders restoration of Playboy journalist's credentials Gregg Re fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 3a0629c4-703a-50bd-9f64-d708076cca99

Brian Karem of Playboy Magazine arguing with Sebastian Gorka at the White House in July. (Alex Wong/Getty Images, File)

“No doubt, Karem’s remark that he and Gorka could ‘go outside and have a long conversation,’ was an allusion to a physical altercation, but the videos make clear that it was meant as an irreverent, caustic joke and not as a true threat,” the judge wrote on Tuesday.

Following Tuesday’s ruling, White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said the White House to be able to deter unprofessional behavior on the grounds of the Executive Mansion.

“We disagree with the decision of the district court to issue an injunction that essentially gives free rein to members of the press to engage in unprofessional, disruptive conduct at the White House,” Grisham said. “Mr. Karem’s conduct, including threatening to escalate a verbal confrontation into a physical one to the point that a Secret Service agent intervened, clearly breached well-understood norms of professional conduct. The Press Secretary must have the ability to deter such unacceptable conduct.”

Immediately after the episode, Grisham had condemned Karem for “insulting invited guests,” threatening a physical altercation and not leaving when a White House staffer asked him to do so during the event.

But the White House did not suspend Karem’s hard pass until several weeks after the episode, after providing him notice and an opportunity to object. During that period, Karem was allowed onto the White House grounds — providing evidence, the judge said, that the White House could afford to wait to enforce its sanction against Karem until after proceedings in the case were concluded.

Karem, meanwhile, was celebratory, tweeting, “Free Speech and Due process win!”

The White House took away Acosta’s credentials after a contentious exchange with President Trump in which the White House claimed Acosta had placed his hands on a female intern while trying to hold on to his microphone.

CNN sued and nine days later a judge ordered his credentials restored.

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Following that episode, the White House instituted new behavioral guidelines for White House guests requiring “professionalism,” but Judge Contreras ruled that they were unclear.

“Though ‘professionalism’ has a well-known common meaning, it is inherently subjective and context dependent,” the judge wrote.

Fox News’ Brie Stimson and Meghan Welsh contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Brian-Karem-Getty White House pushes back after judge orders restoration of Playboy journalist's credentials Gregg Re fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 3a0629c4-703a-50bd-9f64-d708076cca99   Westlake Legal Group Brian-Karem-Getty White House pushes back after judge orders restoration of Playboy journalist's credentials Gregg Re fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/politics fnc article 3a0629c4-703a-50bd-9f64-d708076cca99

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A very annoyed Mitch McConnell would like everyone to stop calling him ‘Moscow Mitch’

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A very annoyed Mitch McConnell would like everyone to stop calling him ‘Moscow Mitch’

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