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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 214)

Bernie Sanders Leads New Iowa Poll

Westlake Legal Group cjpYsk0-56h6QcIgI14PB09cWAFDwpNF-Rgm-Jz7Yfs Bernie Sanders Leads New Iowa Poll r/politics

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Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over ‘disgraceful race-baiting’ coverage of Meghan Markle

Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-morgan-cnn Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over 'disgraceful race-baiting' coverage of Meghan Markle Joseph Wulfsohn fox news fnc/media fnc article 97dee53c-d050-5f20-b2f4-5afef2d45f3d

“Good Morning Britain” co-host Piers Morgan blasted CNN on Friday over a report that claimed “race” was involved in the highly-publicized fallout between Meghan Markle and the royal family.

In a piece called “Coming or going, Meghan gets the blame — and it’s because of her race,” CNN senior entertainment writer Lisa Respers France insisted that Markle’s mixed background had a role in the hostility she faces since becoming the Duchess of Sussex.

“From the moment Prince Harry and Meghan Markle made their relationship known to the public in 2016, the message many Britons sent to her was clear: You aren’t one of us, and you aren’t welcome,” France began her analysis report. “Meghan, a biracial, divorced American actress, was far from what many envisioned as a fairy-tale match for a beloved member of the British royal family. While many in the UK welcomed her, the British tabloid media and a large swath of the Twitterverse were not kind.”

The report cites multiple professors and experts who all agree that race had a role in the animosity Markle received from the some in the public, including the British press.

CNN SETTLES NICK SANDMANN DEFAMATION LAWSUIT IN COVINGTON CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL CONTROVERSY

“While Meghan identifies as biracial, she is being treated as a black woman. Every black woman, including myself, knows what that means. As far as the world is concerned, your entire being is filtered through the color of your skin,” France continued.

Morgan, who hosted “Piers Morgan Live” on CNN following the 2010 departure of veteran newsman Larry King, ripped his former network for its report.

“Disgraceful race-baiting by ⁦@CNN – this is such a lie,” Morgan reacted.

The British media personality doubled down as he responded to critics.

“Meghan’s had a LOT of very good press & some bad press when she has (mostly) deserved it. But I haven’t seen anything racist published or broadcast about her in the British media. It’s a lie,” Morgan tweeted.

CNN ANALYST BLAMES ‘CROSSFIRE’ ON IRAN SHOOTING DOWN AIRPLANE, GETS PUMMELED ON TWITTER

He followed by sharing images of various British tabloids with covers offering positive headlines for Markle and Prince Harry.

“‘Nasty racist British press had it in for Meghan from the start,'” Morgan sarcastically quipped.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Morgan, a longtime critic of Markle, took a victory lap on Wednesday after the royal couple announced they will take “a step back” as senior members of the royal family.

“People say I’m too critical of Meghan Markle – but she ditched her family, ditched her Dad, ditched most of her old friends, split Harry from William & has now split him from the Royal Family,” Morgan tweeted. “I rest my case.”

Morgan went on to send other tweets, including the snarky, “What Meghan wants.. Meghan gets.”

Fox News’ Brian Flood contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-morgan-cnn Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over 'disgraceful race-baiting' coverage of Meghan Markle Joseph Wulfsohn fox news fnc/media fnc article 97dee53c-d050-5f20-b2f4-5afef2d45f3d   Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-morgan-cnn Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over 'disgraceful race-baiting' coverage of Meghan Markle Joseph Wulfsohn fox news fnc/media fnc article 97dee53c-d050-5f20-b2f4-5afef2d45f3d

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Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over ‘disgraceful race-baiting’ coverage of Meghan Markle

Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-morgan-cnn Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over 'disgraceful race-baiting' coverage of Meghan Markle Joseph Wulfsohn fox news fnc/media fnc article 97dee53c-d050-5f20-b2f4-5afef2d45f3d

“Good Morning Britain” co-host Piers Morgan blasted CNN on Friday over a report that claimed “race” was involved in the highly-publicized fallout between Meghan Markle and the royal family.

In a piece called “Coming or going, Meghan gets the blame — and it’s because of her race,” CNN senior entertainment writer Lisa Respers France insisted that Markle’s mixed background had a role in the hostility she faces since becoming the Duchess of Sussex.

“From the moment Prince Harry and Meghan Markle made their relationship known to the public in 2016, the message many Britons sent to her was clear: You aren’t one of us, and you aren’t welcome,” France began her analysis report. “Meghan, a biracial, divorced American actress, was far from what many envisioned as a fairy-tale match for a beloved member of the British royal family. While many in the UK welcomed her, the British tabloid media and a large swath of the Twitterverse were not kind.”

The report cites multiple professors and experts who all agree that race had a role in the animosity Markle received from the some in the public, including the British press.

CNN SETTLES NICK SANDMANN DEFAMATION LAWSUIT IN COVINGTON CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL CONTROVERSY

“While Meghan identifies as biracial, she is being treated as a black woman. Every black woman, including myself, knows what that means. As far as the world is concerned, your entire being is filtered through the color of your skin,” France continued.

Morgan, who hosted “Piers Morgan Live” on CNN following the 2010 departure of veteran newsman Larry King, ripped his former network for its report.

“Disgraceful race-baiting by ⁦@CNN – this is such a lie,” Morgan reacted.

The British media personality doubled down as he responded to critics.

“Meghan’s had a LOT of very good press & some bad press when she has (mostly) deserved it. But I haven’t seen anything racist published or broadcast about her in the British media. It’s a lie,” Morgan tweeted.

CNN ANALYST BLAMES ‘CROSSFIRE’ ON IRAN SHOOTING DOWN AIRPLANE, GETS PUMMELED ON TWITTER

He followed by sharing images of various British tabloids with covers offering positive headlines for Markle and Prince Harry.

“‘Nasty racist British press had it in for Meghan from the start,'” Morgan sarcastically quipped.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Morgan, a longtime critic of Markle, took a victory lap on Wednesday after the royal couple announced they will take “a step back” as senior members of the royal family.

“People say I’m too critical of Meghan Markle – but she ditched her family, ditched her Dad, ditched most of her old friends, split Harry from William & has now split him from the Royal Family,” Morgan tweeted. “I rest my case.”

Morgan went on to send other tweets, including the snarky, “What Meghan wants.. Meghan gets.”

Fox News’ Brian Flood contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-morgan-cnn Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over 'disgraceful race-baiting' coverage of Meghan Markle Joseph Wulfsohn fox news fnc/media fnc article 97dee53c-d050-5f20-b2f4-5afef2d45f3d   Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-morgan-cnn Piers Morgan rips former employer CNN over 'disgraceful race-baiting' coverage of Meghan Markle Joseph Wulfsohn fox news fnc/media fnc article 97dee53c-d050-5f20-b2f4-5afef2d45f3d

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As U.S.-Iran Tensions Flare, Iraq Is Caught in the Middle

Westlake Legal Group 10iraq-middle2-facebookJumbo As U.S.-Iran Tensions Flare, Iraq Is Caught in the Middle United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Pompeo, Mike Politics and Government Middle East Mahdi, Adel Abdul Legislatures and Parliaments Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) Iraq Iran international crisis group Great Britain France Federal Reserve System Europe Embargoes and Sanctions Defense and Military Forces Baghdad (Iraq)

BAGHDAD — The walls of the American Embassy in Baghdad were still on fire and members of pro-Iranian armed groups were chanting threats outside, when Iraq’s prime minister tried to explain the situation to President Trump.

“Iraq is between friends who are 5,000 miles away from us and a neighbor we’ve had for 5,000 years,” Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi said in a New Year’s Day telephone call with Mr. Trump, according to a close adviser, Abdul Hussain al-Hunain. “We cannot change geography and we cannot change history, and this is the reality in Iraq. ”

Iraq is caught in a vise.

Many Iraqis were furious that the United States violated their country’s sovereignty by carrying out airstrikes on Iraqi soil. A spate of strikes in December killed at least two dozen members of a pro-Iranian Iraqi military unit, provoking the assault on the American Embassy.

But acceding to the political pressure to rid the country of American troops would be a “disaster” for Iraq, militarily and economically, a senior Iraqi official said.

The main mission of the roughly 5,200 American troops stationed at a handful of bases around Iraq is to help the country fight the Islamic State. If they leave, the official said, it would not only hamper that battle, but it would have a host of knock-on effects, from the departure of troops from other coalition countries to dire financial hardship if, as President Trump has threatened, the United States were to impose economic sanctions.

“Yes, there is big pressure from our people to have the troops leave,” the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to reporters. “But we can bear this big pressure much better than we can bear the departure of the Americans.”

For now, however, Mr. Abdul Mahdi seems to be moving ahead with plans to implement Parliament’s will. On Friday, he said that he had asked Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to send a delegation from the United States to discuss steps for withdrawal.

Mr. Pompeo fired back that the United States would do no such thing, despite the military’s frequent refrain that it is a guest of the Iraqi government and will comply with its host’s demands.

“We are happy to continue the conversation with the Iraqis about what the right structure is,” he said at a news conference on Friday. But the American mission in Iraq is to train Iraqi forces to fight the Islamic State, he said, and “we’re going to continue that mission.”

After the Iraqi Parliament vote on Sunday, President Trump threatened to impose “very big sanctions” on Iraq if it ousted American forces — “sanctions like they’ve never seen before.” He also said that Iraq would have to reimburse the United States for billions of dollars it had invested in a major air base there.

But for many Iraqis, booting out the Americans was long overdue. Although many remain grateful that the United States ousted the longtime dictator Saddam Hussein, and fought alongside Iraqi forces to drive out the Islamic State, they are still pained by American military mistakes and decisions, including massive civilian casualties during the war that followed the American invasion and the humiliating abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib.

The recent American airstrikes killed Iranian proxy fighters who were also members of the Iraqi security forces — and considered heroes by many Iraqis for their role in helping fight the Islamic State. The final straw appears to have been the American drone strike last week that killed the Iranian military leader Maj. Gen. Qassem Suleimani and the deputy chief of Iraq’s Popular Mobilization Forces, the armed groups that have fought against the Islamic State.

“We are in a state of enthusiasm in Iraq,” Mr. al-Hunain said. “The process of the U.S. withdrawal reclaims a part of Iraq’s dignity after the airstrikes and violations of Iraqi sovereignty.”

The feeling is especially strong among Shiite Muslims, who make up a majority in Iraq; many have ties to Iran’s Shiite theocracy. Iran has long sought the ouster of American troops, which it views as a threat on its border.

But the unanimous vote in Parliament — taken in the heat of the moment, with no consideration of the potential consequences and costs to the country — suggests more unity than may be the case. Only 170 out of 328 members voted, with most Sunni Muslim and Kurdish members refusing to attend.

One of the few Sunni members who did attend the session, Ahmed al-Jarba, raised a red flag, saying that the departure of American troops might benefit Iran.

After the Americans leave, he asked, “Are our neighbors our friends or our masters?” referring to Iran. “Are we going to hand the country’s wealth and decisions into the hands of neighboring countries?”

Mr. al-Hunain, the senior adviser to the prime minister, said that Mr. Abdul Mahdi’s hope was that if the American forces left, Iran would no longer have security concerns about them and would leave Iraq alone.

Senior Iraqi government officials, diplomats and scholars laid out the opposite scenario: Iraq, they said, could be forced into the arms of Iran, deprived of American dollars, and isolated from the West.

As worrying — even for Iran — is the risk that the Islamic State might return if there are no Americans to help fight it. The Sunni extremist group no longer controls territory in Iraq and is much diminished, but it still launches near-daily attacks.

A second senior Iraqi official and a senior Western diplomat said that if the Americans left, so would European and other coalition forces because they depend on American logistical and technical support. The American hospital at the Baghdad International Airport, for instance, treats the personnel of all 30 countries in the international coalition.

The economic sanctions that Mr. Trump threatened would be intended not only to punish Iraq, but also to effectively extend the administration’s pressure campaign against Iran. The two countries’ economies are closely entwined.

Iraq would risk being cut off from its main source of dollars because its account at the Federal Reserve Bank in New York could be frozen. Iraq deposits the proceeds of its oil sales there, withdrawing them to pay government salaries and contracts.

The United States could also end the waivers that allow Iraq to buy Iranian gas to fuel its electricity generators in the south, which supply at least 35 percent of the country’s power. Iraq could seek another source, but it could be difficult to find one on short notice. The other option — making do with less electricity — could spawn unrest in the south as soon as the weather heats up, as electrical shortages did in 2018.

American and other foreign companies might reduce or suspend operations if they become concerned about safety. A number of American contractors left in the days after General Suleimani’s death because they wanted to stay out of the line of fire.

So far, Mr. Abdul Mahdi appears willing to face those potential consequences. If he harbors any thoughts of compromise, he has kept them to himself, perhaps wary of the anti-American political climate.

“It looks like the decision making and opinion in the prime minister’s office is turning eastward,” a senior Iraqi official said. “They are almost in denial about what a drastic path they are going down.”

The problem, said Joost Hiltermann, the Middle East and North Africa program director for the International Crisis Group, is that no one in the government is seriously considering possible compromises.

“The Iraqis don’t want either the United States or Iran, but if they have to have one, they would rather have both because they balance each other out,” he said. “The U.S. is a counterweight to Iran.”

There are a few glimmers of potential ways out.

Mr. Abdul Mahdi’s adviser, Mr. al-Hunain, said that while the American forces are not welcome now, the government does want other international forces to stay. Talks with other coalition countries could open the door to keeping at least some Americans, those arguably needed to sustain the coalition and help fight the Islamic State.

The Europeans, for their part, would like to preserve the ability to fight the Islamic State in Iraq, fearing that any relaxing of pressure would allow the group to reconstitute.

A senior Western diplomat said the British and French were working to outline an alternative mission for the international forces relying on a smaller number of troops focused on ensuring that “the gains made against ISIS are not lost.”

Perhaps the most promising sign that Mr. Abdul Mahdi might be open to compromise was his request for a briefing paper from Iraq’s National Security Council on the options for proceeding with the parliamentary mandate. Mr. Abdul Mahdi is an economist and has served as finance minister, a background that gives him an understanding of the price of economic isolation even if he now seems more swayed by political concerns.

The council provided three options, according to a senior official who works closely with the council: The first was to require American troops to leave as quickly as possible, an approach that could at least deter Iranian-backed armed groups from attacking them.

The second option was a negotiated withdrawal, which would slow the drawdown and potentially allow the fight against the Islamic State to go on in some places even as troops were withdrawing from others.

The third was a renegotiation of the agreement with the American-led coalition that might allow for some troops to stay, which would open the door to having other international forces stay as well.

The National Security Council recommended option three.

Falih Hassan contributed reporting.

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Muilenburg, Fired Boeing C.E.O., Will Receive More Than $60 Million

Westlake Legal Group 10muilenburg-facebookJumbo Muilenburg, Fired Boeing C.E.O., Will Receive More Than $60 Million Muilenburg, Dennis A Executive Compensation Boeing Company Airlines and Airplanes

Dennis A. Muilenburg, who was ousted as Boeing’s chief executive last month as the company contended with the biggest crisis in its history, will leave the company with more than $60 million, the company said Friday.

Mr. Muilenburg will not receive any additional severance or separation payments in connection with his departure, and Boeing said he had forfeited stock units worth some $14.6 million.

But the value of the other stock and pension awards he is contractually entitled to receive is worth $62.2 million, the company said.

“We thank Dennis for his nearly 35 years of service to the Boeing Company,” the company said in a statement. “Upon his departure, Dennis received the benefits to which he was contractually entitled and he did not receive any severance pay or a 2019 annual bonus.”

Boeing’s new chief executive, David Calhoun, will receive a $7 million bonus if he is able to get the 737 Max, which has been grounded since March, safely flying again. The jet was grounded in the wake of two deadly crashes that left 346 people dead.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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Muilenburg, Fired Boeing C.E.O., Will Receive More Than $60 Million

Westlake Legal Group 10muilenburg-facebookJumbo Muilenburg, Fired Boeing C.E.O., Will Receive More Than $60 Million Muilenburg, Dennis A Executive Compensation Boeing Company Airlines and Airplanes

Dennis A. Muilenburg, who was ousted as Boeing’s chief executive last month as the company contended with the biggest crisis in its history, will leave the company with more than $60 million, the company said Friday.

Mr. Muilenburg will not receive any additional severance or separation payments in connection with his departure, and Boeing said he had forfeited stock units worth some $14.6 million.

But the value of the other stock and pension awards he is contractually entitled to receive is worth $62.2 million, the company said.

“We thank Dennis for his nearly 35 years of service to the Boeing Company,” the company said in a statement. “Upon his departure, Dennis received the benefits to which he was contractually entitled and he did not receive any severance pay or a 2019 annual bonus.”

Boeing’s new chief executive, David Calhoun, will receive a $7 million bonus if he is able to get the 737 Max, which has been grounded since March, safely flying again. The jet was grounded in the wake of two deadly crashes that left 346 people dead.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Fired Boeing C.E.O. Will Receive More Than $60 Million

Westlake Legal Group 10muilenburg-facebookJumbo Fired Boeing C.E.O. Will Receive More Than $60 Million Muilenburg, Dennis A Executive Compensation Boeing Company Airlines and Airplanes

Dennis A. Muilenburg, who was ousted as Boeing’s chief executive last month as the company contended with the biggest crisis in its history, will leave the company with more than $60 million, the company said Friday.

Mr. Muilenburg will not receive any additional severance or separation payments in connection with his departure, and Boeing said he had forfeited stock units worth some $14.6 million.

But the value of the other stock and pension awards he is contractually entitled to receive is worth $62.2 million, the company said.

“We thank Dennis for his nearly 35 years of service to the Boeing Company,” the company said in a statement. “Upon his departure, Dennis received the benefits to which he was contractually entitled and he did not receive any severance pay or a 2019 annual bonus.”

Boeing’s new chief executive, David Calhoun, will receive a $7 million bonus if he is able to get the 737 Max, which has been grounded since March, safely flying again. The jet was grounded in the wake of two deadly crashes that left 346 people dead.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Women Now Outnumber Men On U.S. Payrolls

Westlake Legal Group ap_17349470110458-bcb4689f810681fdb19ac0c36526cfbd7eabd11a-s1100-c15 Women Now Outnumber Men On U.S. Payrolls

Women got the lion’s share of new jobs in December and now outnumber men on U.S. payrolls. This unusual situation reflects the growth of industries like health care where women dominate. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption

John Minchillo/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Women Now Outnumber Men On U.S. Payrolls

Women got the lion’s share of new jobs in December and now outnumber men on U.S. payrolls. This unusual situation reflects the growth of industries like health care where women dominate.

John Minchillo/AP

Job growth slowed last month as U.S. employers added just 145,000 jobs. But there was an interesting milestone in Friday’s report from the Labor Department. Ninety-five percent of the net jobs added in December went to women.

Women now hold just over half of all payroll jobs in America, for only the second time in history. The first was during the Great Recession, when a wave of layoffs hit male workers first, temporarily giving women an edge in the workplace. The period was even dubbed the Mancession.

Before long, though, women were hit with their own layoffs. And their numerical advantage didn’t last.

This time could be different, because women’s gains come from being hired at a faster pace than men.

“I feel very strongly that a year from now, their share will continue to be over 50%,” says Betsey Stevenson, a University of Michigan economist who served in the Obama administration.

Loading…

Don’t see the graphic above? Click here.

(Importantly, the Labor Department’s count of payroll workers excludes both farmers and the self-employed. Men still dominate both of those categories.)

The growing number of women on company payrolls reflects a long-running evolution away from male-dominated industries like manufacturing toward the service side of the economy, where women have an edge.

“That’s what the U.S. does. We’re a service-sector economy,” Stevenson says. “The service sector is really broad. It’s not just about serving coffee or taking care of children.”

Serving coffee and taking care of children are big businesses, though. The hospitality industry alone added 40,000 jobs in December. Women hold 77% of the jobs in health care and education — fast-growing fields that eclipse the entire goods-producing sector of the economy.

“The sectors that typically tend to employ men, like mining, manufacturing — those have all been in decline,” says Megan Greene, a senior fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. Factories shed 12,000 jobs in December while mining and logging lost 9,000.

Construction is one male-dominated field that showed growth last month, adding 20,000 jobs.

“The low interest rates we’ve been seeing recently has generated more of a housing boom than we expected at the beginning of the year,” says White House economist Tom Philipson.

But Greene says the U.S. is likely to keep adding jobs faster in industries where women have traditionally played an outsize role. That could be a factor keeping wage gains in check, since women often work in lower-wage industries, and they tend to earn less than men.

“If we’re adding most of our jobs at the low end of the pay scale, we’re not getting much upward pressure on wages,” Greene says. “And that’s I think why wages have been so frustratingly low in this recovery.”

Over the last year, average wages rose just 2.9%, even though unemployment is at a 50-year low.

On the positive side, the growing number of women in the workplace is likely to reshape demand for things like flexible hours and paid family leave, which working men might appreciate as well.

“The bigger the footprint women have, the harder it is to say this is a fringe group that wants a fringe benefit, and the labor market won’t stand for it,” Stevenson says.

In some ways it’s only a footnote that women’s share of payroll jobs went from just below 50% in November to just above that threshold last month. But in other ways, it’s a watershed.

“It reminds us to take a moment and think about the kind of strides women have made in the labor market,” Stevenson says. “But also, the future of the labor force is going to involve greater women’s equality.”

For years now, Stevenson says, women have been outpacing men in education. That investment should pay more dividends for the economy, as women’s numbers grow in the workplace.

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Why Pete Buttigieg Has Made Religion Central to His Campaign

Westlake Legal Group merlin_166479486_9b64a3f0-4676-4df4-953a-e50359580ef2-facebookJumbo Why Pete Buttigieg Has Made Religion Central to His Campaign Sharpton, Al Race and Ethnicity Primaries and Caucuses Presidential Election of 2020 Evangelical Movement Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Black People

DES MOINES — It was a Sunday, and Pete Buttigieg’s standard riff on the role of faith in politics went on a little longer than usual.

He castigated Republicans for using religion as a wedge to divide Americans. “Look at what they do,” he said at a campaign stop about 45 minutes outside of Des Moines, calling out Republicans for “using faith as a way to tell some people they don’t belong.”

It was “O.K.,” he added, “for us to talk about how each of us are formed, and where our faith takes us,” and he challenged the notion that religious values are the province of the G.O.P. “God does not belong to a political party in the United States of America,” he told his listeners.

More than most of his rivals for the Democratic nomination, Mr. Buttigieg has put religion at the center of his presidential campaign, seeing it as an opportunity to speak to a broad swath of the electorate, both inside and outside the Democratic Party. The themes of political healing and reconciliation that are at the core of his message, he says, are guided by Scripture, which taught him: “How you voted doesn’t make you a good person or a bad person.”

He has suggested that his party could benefit from a “religious left” movement to counter the influence of the religious right, and has criticized Democrats for having “an allergy” to discussing faith.

For a candidate who has struggled at times to bond with voters who see little in his life experience they can relate to, faith is Mr. Buttigieg’s bridge across racial, socioeconomic and cultural divides.

“For all the ways in which faith and religion can divide people, it also has this unifying power,” he said in an interview backstage before a rally in West Des Moines recently. “Because you have a thing you share with somebody whose station in life or generational or racial or professional experience is so different from your own.”

Campaigning, he added, is about finding “some way of connecting at a human level with as many people as you can — especially with people who may not be obviously like you.”

The attributes that Mr. Buttigieg’s supporters say make him so appealing — gay, a Rhodes scholar, military veteran and polyglot who was the youngest person in modern times elected as mayor of South Bend, Ind. — are also what many voters say make them wary. Some see him as a precocious millennial, lacking in empathy or simply too risky a bet in a time when they crave stability.

So there are strategic reasons for Mr. Buttigieg to emphasize faith. African Americans, especially women, are among the most religious voters in the Democratic Party. And there are entire suburbs full of educated, affluent, churchgoing conservatives — the kind Mr. Buttigieg likes to call “future former Republicans” — who say they would find it difficult to vote for President Trump again.

Mr. Trump has clearly noticed Mr. Buttigieg’s overtures to a constituency that is critical to his re-election (eighty-one percent of white evangelicals supported him in 2016). At a rally in a Miami megachurch last week, the president mocked Mr. Buttigieg, claiming he had become religious just “two weeks ago.” (Mr. Buttigieg responded: “I’m pretty sure I’ve been a believer longer than he’s been a Republican.”)

Convincing Americans to vote for a 37-year-old who is openly gay is a proposition that no major presidential contender has ever tested. And there are indications some are not convinced. His poll numbers with African Americans, for example, are minuscule, not even registering 1 percent in some surveys, though many say they don’t know enough about him to form an opinion. And his campaign’s focus groups have found his sexual orientation to be a hurdle with some black voters.

Without black support — a pillar of the Democratic Party base — it is virtually inconceivable that he could make it to the general election and get the opportunity to convert those wayward Republicans he talks about in such aspirational terms.

Still, Democrats who have watched their party gradually cede ground to Republicans on cultural issues believe Mr. Buttigieg fills a void on the left that is larger than many of them would like to admit.

“We made a mistake when we gave up the Bible and the flag,” said Rev. Al Sharpton, the civil rights activist, referring to the perception — encouraged by Republicans — that they are the true home for voters motivated by faith and patriotism. As a veteran who went to Afghanistan with the Navy Reserves and an Episcopalian who attends church nearly every Sunday, “Pete has both of those,” Mr. Sharpton said.

The Buttigieg campaign is investing in faith with more than just the candidate’s words. Last month it unveiled a $2 million advertising campaign in South Carolina, which prominently featured him quoting the Gospel of Matthew as an inspiration. “In our White House,” he says, as the camera cuts to a shot of a young black woman filming him with her phone, “you won’t have to shake your head and ask yourself whatever happened to ‘I was hungry and you fed me; I was a stranger and you welcomed me?’”

His campaign has hired a director of faith outreach, and Mr. Buttigieg recently hired a director of African-American outreach, who visits black churches on his behalf.

Mr. Buttigieg was baptized Catholic, though he has said he never strongly identified with the faith. His upbringing was not especially religious, despite attending a Catholic high school and having two parents who taught at the University of Notre Dame.

But when he was in England during his Rhodes scholarship, he began attending Anglican services and grew intrigued. He said in an interview with CNN that this was the period in his life when he first started feeling truly religious because he came to realize “that there were forms of truth that I was not going to be accessing through reason” alone.

Every Sunday when he is not traveling the country campaigning, he attends the Episcopal Cathedral of St. James in South Bend, where he married his husband, Chasten, in 2018.

His discussions of faith can enrage social conservatives, especially when he needles Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. He has called Mr. Pence, an evangelical Christian and opponent of same-sex marriage, “the cheerleader of the porn star presidency” and challenged the vice president’s belief that homosexuality is wrong. “Your quarrel, sir, is with my creator,” he said in a speech in April.

Most recently, he drew conservatives’ ire on Christmas Day when he invoked Jesus in a swipe at the administration’s policies toward immigrants and the poor. “Today I join millions around the world in celebrating the arrival of divinity on earth, who came into this world not in riches but in poverty, not as a citizen but as a refugee,” he wrote on Twitter.

“When did you come up with THAT load of crap?” replied a prominent conservative pastor — a response that was typical of the hostile and dismissive tone of his critics that day, or any other day when he accuses the religious right of hypocrisy for its unbreakable devotion to Mr. Trump.

Conservatives have also challenged him for his unambiguous support for abortion rights, asking how someone who scolds them for supposedly ignoring Jesus’s teachings about caring for the less fortunate can support terminating a pregnancy. Mr. Buttigieg’s response has been to say that the Bible makes a lot of contradictory claims, none of which left him with the clear understanding that abortion is wrong.

In less overtly religious way, Mr. Buttigieg also talks frequently about values on the campaign trail. He asks his supporters to commit themselves on his website by signing a code of 10 “Rules of the Road” — respect, discipline, joy, among others — that he says center his campaign. For $27, the campaign also sells T-shirts listing all 10.

“I don’t think being a person of faith creates, on its own, a distinct advantage,” said Joel Benenson, a top Democratic strategist who worked on the Obama and Hillary Clinton campaigns and whose firm is advising the Buttigieg campaign. “But I think being able to talk about faith helps you with all voters because it shows you’re a person rooted in a set of values that speak to treating people with respect.”

Faith, Mr. Benenson added, “can be a potent force for communicating with voters who value that. And I think in some states where Democrats have to work harder to compete and win, it can be particularly valuable.”

Still, evangelicals have long complained that they are mocked by the left based on stereotypes of their faith, and there is a risk, Democrats said, in talking about faith if it comes across as preachy and self-righteous. Ever since the religious right became a foundational element of the Republican Party’s base in the 1970s and ’80s, Democrats have accused Republicans of selling voters on a false choice: that only their party represents Christian values.

Democrats should not then turn around and lecture Republicans about their beliefs and values in the same way they believe Republicans have lectured them, said Michael Wear, who led President Barack Obama’s faith outreach efforts in 2012.

“We don’t want to see a mirror image of the religious right in the sense that you have progressives who are saying that being a progressive is the only way to be a Christian or is the only faithful way to be in politics,” Mr. Wear said. “There’s the line Obama used about the way the religious right would use faith as a weapon to bludgeon people, as opposed to lift them up. And, as people of faith, we need to be careful.”

Mr. Buttigieg’s faith outreach probably won’t do much good with skeptical voters, especially African Americans in the Democratic primary, unless he is able to forge deeper connections. “It gets you a second look,” Mr. Sharpton said of Mr. Buttigieg’s embrace of religion. “But that’s it.”

At a recent event in downtown Des Moines, Meskerem Mamo, 26, wore a red, white and blue button that said “African Americans for Pete” and nodded along as Mr. Buttigieg spoke. Afterward, she said in an interview that his spiritual message was one of the main reasons she would support him in the Iowa caucuses.

“I think it’s really important to talk about,” she said. “My father is Christian, my mother is Muslim. So if you talk about God, I’m listening.”

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Google parent company’s legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations

David Drummond, the legal chief officer of Google’s parent company Alphabet and one of its highest-paid executives, has stepped down following allegations about his conduct at the company.

The 56-year-old executive will leave the tech giant on Jan. 31, the company confirmed to Fox News. “I believe that it’s also the right time for me to make way for the next generation of leaders,” the executive wrote in a note that was sent to colleagues, according to Bloomberg News.

Drummond, who received $47 million in salary and equity last year according to Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings, is the latest American executive to be called out in the #MeToo era. A blog post in August of 2019 described an alleged extramarital affair with a former lover. An independent subcommittee was investigating how executives handled claims of sexual harassment and misconduct, including Drummond’s actions, CNBC reported in November.

AUSTRALIA’S FIRES HAVE KILLED OR IMPERILED 1 BILLION ANIMALS

Westlake Legal Group getty-images-david-drummond-google Google parent company's legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f415758-bb5d-5b35-85f3-1053d1204626

David Drummond, senior vice president for corporate development and chief legal officer at Google Inc., at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, California on March 11, 2011. (Ryan Anson/AFP/Getty Images)

NASA CAPTURES BREATHTAKING IMAGE OF NACREOUS CLOUDS OVER SWEDEN

For his part, Drummond labeled himself at the time as “far from perfect,” although he denied starting a relationship with anyone at Alphabet other than Jennifer Blakely, the former Google manager who wrote the scathing blog post.

“With Larry and Sergey now leaving their executive roles at Alphabet, the company is entering an exciting new phase, and I believe that it’s also the right time for me to make way for the next generation of leaders. As a result, after careful consideration, I have decided to retire at the end of this month,” Drummond, who was Google’s first lawyer, wrote in his note to employees.

The issue of sexual misconduct allegations and how they have been handled has roiled many industries, including Big Tech.

Twenty thousand Google employees worldwide walked out in protest in November after an explosive New York Times story detailed how the company protected top executives who were accused of sexual harassment — including paying $90 million to one who allegedly coerced a subordinate into performing sexual acts.

When reached by Fox News, the tech giant declined to comment further on the matter.

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Westlake Legal Group getty-images-david-drummond-google Google parent company's legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f415758-bb5d-5b35-85f3-1053d1204626   Westlake Legal Group getty-images-david-drummond-google Google parent company's legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f415758-bb5d-5b35-85f3-1053d1204626

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