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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 215)

Google parent company’s legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations

David Drummond, the legal chief officer of Google’s parent company Alphabet and one of its highest-paid executives, has stepped down following allegations about his conduct at the company.

The 56-year-old executive will leave the tech giant on Jan. 31, the company confirmed to Fox News. “I believe that it’s also the right time for me to make way for the next generation of leaders,” the executive wrote in a note that was sent to colleagues, according to Bloomberg News.

Drummond, who received $47 million in salary and equity last year according to Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings, is the latest American executive to be called out in the #MeToo era. A blog post in August of 2019 described an alleged extramarital affair with a former lover. An independent subcommittee was investigating how executives handled claims of sexual harassment and misconduct, including Drummond’s actions, CNBC reported in November.

AUSTRALIA’S FIRES HAVE KILLED OR IMPERILED 1 BILLION ANIMALS

Westlake Legal Group getty-images-david-drummond-google Google parent company's legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f415758-bb5d-5b35-85f3-1053d1204626

David Drummond, senior vice president for corporate development and chief legal officer at Google Inc., at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, California on March 11, 2011. (Ryan Anson/AFP/Getty Images)

NASA CAPTURES BREATHTAKING IMAGE OF NACREOUS CLOUDS OVER SWEDEN

For his part, Drummond labeled himself at the time as “far from perfect,” although he denied starting a relationship with anyone at Alphabet other than Jennifer Blakely, the former Google manager who wrote the scathing blog post.

“With Larry and Sergey now leaving their executive roles at Alphabet, the company is entering an exciting new phase, and I believe that it’s also the right time for me to make way for the next generation of leaders. As a result, after careful consideration, I have decided to retire at the end of this month,” Drummond, who was Google’s first lawyer, wrote in his note to employees.

The issue of sexual misconduct allegations and how they have been handled has roiled many industries, including Big Tech.

Twenty thousand Google employees worldwide walked out in protest in November after an explosive New York Times story detailed how the company protected top executives who were accused of sexual harassment — including paying $90 million to one who allegedly coerced a subordinate into performing sexual acts.

When reached by Fox News, the tech giant declined to comment further on the matter.

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Westlake Legal Group getty-images-david-drummond-google Google parent company's legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f415758-bb5d-5b35-85f3-1053d1204626   Westlake Legal Group getty-images-david-drummond-google Google parent company's legal chief is leaving following misconduct allegations fox-news/tech/topics/big-tech-backlash fox-news/tech/companies/google fox-news/tech fox news fnc/tech fnc Christopher Carbone article 0f415758-bb5d-5b35-85f3-1053d1204626

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Live Updates: Ukraine Blames Missile Strike or Terrorist Attack for Crash

Here are the latest developments:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166870002_2ec482fd-66ed-43c5-91f2-6a2e8f021912-articleLarge Live Updates: Ukraine Blames Missile Strike or Terrorist Attack for Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States Ukraine International Airlines Tehran (Iran) Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Boeing Company Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine placing flowers at a memorial for the victims of the plane crash at the Boryspil airport on Thursday.Credit…Ukrainian Presidential Press Service

Ukraine’s main intelligence agency, the S.B.U., or Security Service of Ukraine, said on Friday that it had narrowed down the possible causes of the airplane crash in Iran to either a missile strike or a terrorist act.

The S.B.U said in a statement that it’s unclear whether the SA-15 missile system that Western officials say likely brought down the plane shortly after takeoff from Tehran was actually responsible.

The agency’s statement came shortly after Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko, said at a news conference in Kyiv that Ukrainian officials “will come to our conclusions,” but “we don’t want to come to them right now.”

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine spoke with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday morning Washington time after he requested that the United States and other Western countries release the evidence that a Ukrainian passenger jet that crashed shortly after takeoff in Iran had been shot down.

The jet crashed hours after Iran fired ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of a powerful branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, and was bracing for a possible American response.

Mr. Zelensky has pledged to get to the bottom of what happened, cutting short a trip to Oman immediately after the crash and dispatching a team of 45 Ukrainian experts to Tehran.

On Friday, Mr. Zelensky made it clear that Western governments, allies in his country’s conflict with Russia, had not initially shared the evidence that led them to believe that the Ukrainian jet had been shot down by Iran.

Mr. Prystaiko said the extent of Iran’s cooperation with Ukrainian officials on the ground was “adequate.”

Ukrainian officials analyzed the plane’s flight pattern on Friday and determined it had stayed completely within the normal corridor for flights out of the airport, he said.

“The plane was within the corridor departing from within the international airport, so there was nothing to indicate the flight was in danger,” he said.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada and Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain both said Iran had probably shot down the plane by accident. President Trump said he suspected that the downing of the plane had been the result of “a mistake on the other side.”

An American official told The New York Times that the United States had a high level of confidence that a Russian-made Iranian air defense system had fired two surface-to-air missiles at the plane.

The crash of the Ukrainian jet has presented Mr. Zelensky, a 41-year-old comedian who swept to a stunning victory in the presidential election last spring, with the most urgent crisis of his short tenure.

“Our goal is to ascertain the undeniable truth,” Mr. Zelensky said in his statement on Friday. “We believe this is the responsibility of the whole international community before the families of the dead and the memory of the victims of the catastrophe.”

The Ukrainian prosecutor general’s office issued a public request for help from Canada, seeking information from intelligence agencies about a possible missile strike.

Secretary Pompeo confirmed on Friday that the United States and its allies have intelligence that the Ukrainian passenger jet that crashed in Iran had been shot down.

“We do believe that it’s likely that the plane was shot down by an Iranian missile,” Mr. Pompeo said at a briefing at the White House announcing new sanctions against Iran. “We’re going to let the investigation play out before we make a final determination. It’s important that we get to the bottom of it.”

Mr. Pompeo was the first American official to publicly confirm the intelligence assessments. American and allied officials said on Thursday that they had intelligence that surface-to-air missiles fired by Iranian military forces shot down the Boeing 737 minutes after it took off from Tehran, headed for Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital.

Mr. Pompeo said that he had spoken with his Canadian counterpart and with Ukrainian President Zelensky by phone on Friday, but noted that an investigation was ongoing.

“When we get the results of that investigation, I am confident we and the rest of the world will take appropriate action,” he said.

The Trump administration also plans to issue sanctions waivers to American companies or others who can help the investigation, Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin said at the briefing.

Iran’s Fars News Agency, which is affiliated with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, said on Friday that Iran would issue a statement on Saturday announcing the cause of the crash of the Ukrainian jetliner. The report offered no hint of what that cause might be.

“There will be a meeting with domestic and international representatives related to the crash tomorrow and after studying preliminarily, the cause of the crash will be announced,” Fars News said in a news alert citing what it described as a source from the Joint Armed Forces.

Iran has maintained that there was no evidence that the plane was struck by a missile and doubled down on that assertion on Friday, despite western officials pointing to intelligence suggesting the passenger jet was accidentally hit by a missile.

Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization chief, Ali Abedzadeh, speaking during a Friday news conference, urged caution and said that nothing could be determined until the data from the black boxes was analyzed and said statements made by other nations were politically motivated.

But, he added, what could be said was that the plane had not been hit by a missile and was likely on fire before it crashed. He also urged nations with intelligence on the crash, namely the United States and Canada, to share that information with Iran.

“We cannot just give you speculation,” Mr. Abedzadeh said in footage televised and translated on Iranian state television. “So far what I can tell you is that the plane has not been hit by a missile, and we have to look for the cause of the fire.”

Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said during the same news conference that it could take more than a month to process the data recovered from the flight recorders and that the investigation could take up to two years. He also noted that Ukraine, France, Canada, and Russia have all said they are willing to assist Iran with the data extraction, and Tehran will send the black box to one of these countries if it fails to retrieve the data.

Normally, Iran has the capacity to download black box data, but Mr. Rezaeifar said that since the devices had been damaged, it would be difficult to extract information.

“We need special software and hardware which are available in our country, but if we fail to extract the data due to the damages of the black box, we will get help from other countries,” he said.

The black box will begin to be evaluated on Friday, Iran’s state-run IRNA news agency reported, “to assess and check whether it is possible to reconstruct and analyze the information inside the country.” State television aired footage that it said showed the two black boxes that were recovered from the crash site.

Video

Westlake Legal Group xxivid-iran-plane-2-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Live Updates: Ukraine Blames Missile Strike or Terrorist Attack for Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States Ukraine International Airlines Tehran (Iran) Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Boeing Company Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

The New York Times has obtained and verified video showing the moment a Ukrainian airliner was hit in Iran.CreditCredit…Screenshot from video

Footage verified by The New York Times appears to show a missile fired from Iranian territory hitting a plane near Tehran’s airport, the area where a Ukrainian jet crashed on Wednesday.

As investigators work to determine an official cause of the accident, the video offered new clues about the crash, which came hours after a violent confrontation between Iran and the United States.

A small explosion occurred when what appears to be a missile hit the plane above Parand, a city near the airport, but the plane did not explode, the video showed. The jet continued flying for several minutes and turned back toward the airport, The Times has determined.

The plane, which by then had stopped transmitting its signal, flew toward the airport ablaze before it exploded and crashed quickly, other videos verified by The Times showed.

Visual and audio clues in the footage also matched flight path information and satellite imagery of the area near where the plane crashed.

The Trump administration slapped another round of sanctions on Iran on Friday, seeking to further deter what it called Tehran’s support for terrorist activities. Given that Iran is already under heavy sanctions from the United States, the newest round is unlikely to have any major economic effect but could help deter investment from countries including China and Russia, analysts said.

Secretaries Mnuchin and Pompeo announced the new sanctions in a briefing at the White House. The sanctions apply to industries including steel, construction, mining and textiles, as well as to eight senior officials said by the United States to have had a role in the missile strikes by Iran this week.

“The president has been very clear we will continue to apply economic sanctions until Iran stops its terrorist activities and commit that it will never have nuclear weapons,” Mr. Mnuchin said.

The move was the first substantive response by the United States following the missile strikes on bases housing American forces in Iraq, and was seen by analysts as an additional signal of de-escalation by the administration.

Peter Harrell, a sanctions expert at the Center for New American Security, a research organization, said the sanctions would do negligible additional damage to Iran’s economy because the bulk of its revenue streams have been cut off already. The new sanctions, he said, largely, tighten enforcement of existing sanctions by targeting companies that are engaging in prohibited trade with Iran.

“When it comes to putting materially more economic pressure on Iran, the Trump administration is something of a victim of its own success — and I think we are reaching the end of the road for what ‘maximum pressure’ can achieve when it comes to Iran’s economy,” Mr. Harrell said. “Trump has already succeeded in cutting off the vast majority of Iran’s cash-earning exports, particularly oil, and has caused a sharp drop in Iranian GDP.”

The aftermath of the plane crash in Iran has the potential to open a fresh rift between Ukraine and its most important Western allies.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine has already turned into an unwilling player in United States domestic politics as a result of the Trump administration’s pressure campaign seeking assistance in the 2020 presidential race. Now, he is stuck in the middle of an even more volatile American crisis: the conflict with Iran.

On the one hand, Mr. Zelensky needs Iranian cooperation to deliver the full-fledged investigation of the disaster that he has pledged to his public. On the other, Mr. Zelensky needs the data collected by Western intelligence — not to mention his continued reliance on Western support in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia.

“He could end up in a situation of being caught between two fires,” said Oleksandr Danylyuk, Mr. Zelensky’s former national security adviser, who resigned in September. “It’s a very complicated situation.”

Mr. Zelensky was caught flat-footed on Thursday when American officials went public with intelligence findings about the crash, and it was clear that the United States and its Western allies had not briefed Kyiv.

In an interview with The New York Times, Pavlo Klimkin, a former foreign minister of Ukraine, described the failure by Western officials to share their intelligence earlier as a moral setback in Kyiv’s relationship with its partners.

“We lost our plane, we lost our citizens,” Mr. Klimkin said. “Of course we want to expect of our friends to be with us in this important moment in the sense of sharing information, in the sense of solidarity, in the sense of simply working together.”

On Friday, American and Ukrainian officials raced to dispel any appearance of a rift. But Anatoliy Hrytsenko, a former Ukrainian defense minister, said that any recalcitrance from Western countries would create suspicions in Ukraine that they were using the tragedy as a cudgel in their conflict with Iran.

“Western leaders must give us these intelligence findings,” Mr. Hrytsenko said. “If we assume the worst and they don’t do this, then a big question mark arises: Is this really about determining the cause of a plane crash or is this now geopolitics?”

France’s aviation investigation authority said on Friday that it had been invited by Iran to take part in the investigation into the crash of an Ukrainian plane near Tehran this week.

A spokesman for the authority, known by its French acronym B.E.A., or Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses, said France was getting involved because the jetliner’s engine had been designed by CFM, a joint venture between GE Aviation, an American company, and Safran Aircraft Engines, a French one.

“No further assistance has been requested at this point in time,” the spokesman said, adding that Iranian aviation authorities were the lead investigator in the case.

Jean-Yves Le Drian, France’s foreign minister, did not say on Friday whether the country had proof that the jetliner had been shot down by Iranian missiles, but said that France was “available” to help with the investigation.

“Before the speculation, we must establish the truth in conditions of utmost transparency,” Mr. Le Drian told RTL, a French radio station. France, one of the signatories of the Iranian nuclear deal, is now trying to salvage it by acting as a go-between for Iran and the United States.

While many of the passengers onboard the Ukrainian plane that crashed near Tehran on Wednesday were Iranians, there were citizens of at least seven other nations on the flight when it plunged to the ground killing everyone.

Among the dead were at least 63 Canadians, many of them university students. Dozens are believed to be from the city of Edmonton, members of the Iranian community told local news outlets. At least 10 were students or staff at the University of Alberta, according to a statement from David H. Turpin, the president of the university.

“These individuals were integral to the intellectual and social fabric of our university and the broader community,” Mr. Turpin said. “We are grieving for lost colleagues, classmates, teachers, and mentors, as well as loved ones, family, friends, and roommates.”

“We will feel their loss — and the aftermath of this tragedy — for many years to come,” he added.

Sweden’s prime minister said he spoke with the leaders of Canada and Britain following reports that the plane may have accidentally been shot down by an Iranian missile, and said that the country would do all it could to aid in the investigation after the “serious information” emerged.

A number of Swedish nationals were also onboard the Ukraine International Airlines flight when it crashed.

“We will do everything we can to find out what happened,” Prime Minister Stefan Lofven of Sweden said in a statement. “My thoughts go to the victims, their families and close relatives at this difficult time. You are not alone. We share your sorrow.”

Although no German citizens were among the victims, the mayor of Werl, a town in western Germany, told the German news agency DPA on Friday that a 30-year-old Afghan woman who had been granted asylum in the country and had been living in the town since 2017 was killed. Her 8-year-old daughter and 5-year-old son had also died in the crash. The mayor, Michael Grossmann, said the woman’s brother, who also lives in the town, had confirmed the deaths, but gave no further details.

The Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany posted an online tribute to a Paniz Soltani, a young Iranian woman who had been completing her doctoral studies at the institute. Described as “a sparkling and gifted PhD student, a valued colleague and dear friend.”

Anton Troianovski, Megan Specia, Aurelien Breeden, Melissa Eddy, Christiaan Triebert, Malachy Browne, Sarah Kerr and Ainara Tiefenthäler contributed reporting.

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Meghan Markle, Prince Harry miles apart as they start independent life

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are starting their new independent life thousands of miles apart, as Markle flew back to Canada and Harry stayed in England.

Buckingham Palace confirmed Friday that Markle, 38, had returned to Canada, where the Sussexes and 8-month-old son Archie spent a six-week holiday out of the public eye at a secluded luxury home on Vancouver Island.

Meanwhile, Harry, 35, is in England, where the royal family is seeking to contain the crisis sparked by the couple’s decision to effectively quit as senior royals.

WHAT HAPPENS TO MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY’S FROGMORE COTTAGE AFTER THEY STEP BACK AS SENIOR ROYALS

On Thursday, Neil Sean, a royal author and broadcaster, told Fox News that palace aides may not have been prepared for the unexpected announcement. “The palace aides are working in conjunction with the queen,” he explained. “It’s not lost on anyone that they decided to launch this without the permission of the queen.”

The announcement came in the evening, U.K. time. A source close to the palace told Fox News at the time that palace aides held an emergency meeting before Buckingham Palace officially responded to the couple’s announcement on social media.

“Discussions with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are at an early stage,” one palace spokesman told Fox News late Wednesday. “We understand their desire to take a different approach, but these are complicated issues that will take time to work through.”

HOW MEGHAN MARKLE AND PRINCE HARRY’S FINANCES WILL BE IMPACTED BY ABRUPT ROYAL EXIT

Westlake Legal Group megharry Meghan Markle, Prince Harry miles apart as they start independent life Mariah Haas fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/princess-diana fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/person/prince-andrew fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc ca18aa09-2b7e-57fa-a6ed-d007daac39f6 article

Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex gesture during their visit to Canada House in thanks for the warm Canadian hospitality and support they received during their recent stay in Canada, in London, Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020. (Photo by Daniel Leal-Olivas/Pool Photo via AP)

The spokesman added that “nothing is being ruled or ruled out.”

A source close to the palace also told Fox News: “Some members of the royal family were not consulted before the Duke and Duchess’ statement was issued.”

According to Sean, the work being conducted by palace aides is far from over and there was a “big meeting planned” Thursday with Prince Charles and the queen “to discuss the next steps,” he claimed.

“Charles’ private equerry (the royal private secretary) has delivered a note to the duke to demand a meeting … oddly though alone,” Sean said, also alleging that a source close to the palace informed him that Queen Elizabeth “is not best pleased with this news” and “the planning and progression of this will and could take considerably longer than first planned.”

CELEBRITIES REACT TO MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY ‘STEPPING BACK’ FROM ROYAL DUTIES

The crisis talks were triggered by Harry and Markle’s “personal message” Wednesday evening saying they were stepping back from being senior members of Britain’s royal family, would work to become financially independent and would “balance” their time between the U.K. and North America.

Westlake Legal Group meghan-markle-AP Meghan Markle, Prince Harry miles apart as they start independent life Mariah Haas fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/princess-diana fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/person/prince-andrew fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc ca18aa09-2b7e-57fa-a6ed-d007daac39f6 article

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are stepping back from royal duties. (AP)

Harry is sixth in line to the British throne, behind his father, older brother Prince William and his brother’s three children. The former British army officer is one of the royal family’s most popular members and has spent his entire life in the public eye.

Before marrying the prince in a wedding watched around the world in 2018, Markle had carved out a successful career as an actress and lifestyle “influencer” with a popular blog, the now-defunct The Tig.

A friend of the couple, broadcaster Tom Bradby, said Harry and Markle were made aware while in Canada over the holidays that the monarchy’s future focus would be on those at the top of the line of succession. An image of the queen and the three next in line to the throne — Charles, William and his son George — underscored the message of who the Windsors see as their core members.

KATE MIDDLETON ‘IS THE QUEEN’S NUMBER ONE PRIORITY’ WHEN IT COMES TO THE MONARCHY’S FUTURE, ROYAL EXPERT SAYS

“It had been made clear to them in their absence there was going to be a slimmed-down monarchy and they weren’t really a part of it,” said Bradby, an ITV television anchor who filmed revealing interviews with Harry and Markle while they were in Africa last year.

Bradby described the royal split as inevitable. He said the couple’s wish to leave the grind of front-line royal duty had been known, though the timing of their announcement was not.

Westlake Legal Group QueenElizabethGettyImagesSamir-HusseinWireImage Meghan Markle, Prince Harry miles apart as they start independent life Mariah Haas fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/princess-diana fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/person/prince-andrew fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc ca18aa09-2b7e-57fa-a6ed-d007daac39f6 article

Queen Elizabeth II tours Queen Mother Square on October 27, 2016 in Poundbury, Dorset. (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage/Getty)

“It’s certainly not true to say the palace were blindsided by this,” Bradby told ITV.

The royal rift has exposed more divisions within the British monarchy, which was rocked in November by Prince Andrew’s disastrous television interview about his relationship with the late convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. Andrew, the queen’s second son, has relinquished royal duties and patronages after being accused by a woman who says she was an Epstein trafficking victim who slept with the prince.

Harry and Markle have faced a barrage of criticism from the British press over their decision. They have long complained of intrusive media coverage and accused some British media commentators of racism toward the biracial duchess. This week they slammed the country’s long-standing arrangements for royal media coverage and insisted that from now on they prefer to communicate directly with the public through social media.

MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY DIDN’T CONSULT SOME MEMBERS OF ROYAL FAMILY BEFORE ANNOUNCEMENT: SOURCE

Many in Britain, though, expressed sympathy for the royal couple. Labour Party lawmaker Clive Lewis told backers Friday at his campaign launch that he understood their decision.

“It is extremely unfortunate and a sign of the media we have that they feel they have to do this,” he said. “I know it is not the only reason. But if you look at the intrusion on their lives, if you look at the racism that Meghan Markle has experienced in the British media, then I can understand why.”

The couple’s statement on Wednesday left many questions unanswered — such as what they plan to do and how they will earn private income without tarnishing the royal image. At the moment, they are largely funded by Harry’s father, Prince Charles, through income from his vast Duchy of Cornwall estate.

BUCKINGHAM PALACE RESPONDS TO MEGHAN MARKLE, PRINCE HARRY’S EXIT: ‘THESE ARE COMPLICATED ISSUES’

The couple said they plan to cut ties to the British taxpayer support given each year to the queen for official use, which currently covers 5 percent of the costs of running their office. But commentators have questioned whether the royal couple have misunderstood their true cost to the country, arguing their statement doesn’t appear to cover some of the expenditures embedded in royal life, such as security.

Harry and Markle have considerable assets of their own. Harry inherited an estimated 7 million pounds ($9.1 million) from his late mother, Princess Diana, as well as money from his great-grandmother. Markle has money from a successful acting career.

The Associated Press and Fox News’ Stephanie Nolasco contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121080682001_6121068538001-vs Meghan Markle, Prince Harry miles apart as they start independent life Mariah Haas fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/princess-diana fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/person/prince-andrew fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc ca18aa09-2b7e-57fa-a6ed-d007daac39f6 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6121080682001_6121068538001-vs Meghan Markle, Prince Harry miles apart as they start independent life Mariah Haas fox-news/world/personalities/will fox-news/world/personalities/queen fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox-news/person/princess-diana fox-news/person/prince-harry fox-news/person/prince-andrew fox-news/person/jeffrey-epstein fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc ca18aa09-2b7e-57fa-a6ed-d007daac39f6 article

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Buckle Up for Another Facebook Election

Westlake Legal Group 10Roose-01-facebookJumbo Buckle Up for Another Facebook Election Zuckerberg, Mark E United States Politics and Government Social Media Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Rumors and Misinformation Presidential Election of 2020 Presidential Election of 2016 Political Advertising Online Advertising Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet

SAN FRANCISCO — If you were hoping to hear less about Facebook this year, you’re out of luck.

The social platform announced on Thursday — after months of hemming and hawing — that it would not change its basic rules for political advertising ahead of the 2020 election. Unlike Google, which restricted the targeting of political ads last year, or Twitter, which barred political ads entirely, Facebook and its chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, decided to preserve the status quo.

Politicians will still be exempt from Facebook’s fact-checking program, and will still be allowed to break many of the rules that apply to other users. Campaigns will still be allowed to spend millions of dollars on ads targeted to narrow slices of the electorate, upload their voter files to build custom audiences and use all the other tools of Facebook tradecraft.

The social network has spent much of the past three years apologizing for its inaction during the 2016 election, when its platform was overrun with hyperpartisan misinformation, some of it Russian, that was amplified by its own algorithms. And ahead of 2020, some people wondered if Mr. Zuckerberg — who is, by his own admission, uncomfortable with Facebook’s power — would do everything he could to step out of the political crossfire.

Instead, Mr. Zuckerberg has embraced Facebook’s central role in elections — not only by giving politicians a pass on truth, but by preserving the elements of its advertising platforms that proved to be a decisive force in 2016.

“It was a mistake,” Alex Stamos, Facebook’s former chief security officer, said about Facebook’s decision. Mr. Stamos, who left the company after the 2016 election, said political considerations had most likely factored into the decision to leave its existing ad targeting options in place.

“They’re clearly afraid of political pushback,” he said.

Mr. Stamos, like some Facebook employees and outside agitators, had advocated for small but meaningful changes to Facebook’s policies, such as raising the minimum size of an audience that a political advertiser is allowed to target and disallowing easily disprovable claims made about a political candidate by his or her rivals. These proposed changes were intended to discourage bad behavior by campaigns, while still letting them use Facebook’s powerful ad tools to raise money and turn out supporters.

But in the end, those arguments lost out to the case — made by Andrew Bosworth, a Facebook executive, in an internal memo, as well as President Trump’s campaign and several Democratic groups — that changing the platform’s rules, even in an ostensibly neutral way, would amount to tipping the scales. Mr. Bosworth, who oversaw Facebook’s ad platform in 2016, argued that the reason Mr. Trump was elected was simply that “he ran the single best digital ad campaign I’ve ever seen from any advertiser.”

In other words, the system worked as designed.

Don’t get me wrong: Facebook has made strides since 2016 to deter certain kinds of election interference. It has spent billions of dollars beefing up its security teams to prevent another Russian troll debacle, and it has added more transparent tools to shine more light on the dark arts of digital campaigning, such as a political ad library and a verification process that requires political advertisers to register with an American address. These moves have forced would-be election meddlers to be stealthier in their tactics, and have made a 2016-style foreign influence operation much less likely this time around.

But despite these changes, the basic architecture of Facebook is largely the same as it was in 2016, and vulnerable in many of the same ways. The platform still operates on the principle that what is popular is good. It still takes a truth-agnostic view of political speech — telling politicians that, as long as their posts don’t contain certain types of misinformation (like telling voters the wrong voting day, or misleading them about the census), they can say whatever they want. And it is still reluctant to take any actions that could be construed as partisan — even if those actions would lead to a healthier political debate or a fairer election.

Facebook has argued that it shouldn’t be an arbiter of truth, and that it has a responsibility to remain politically neutral. But the company’s existing policies are anything but neutral. They give an advantage to candidates whose campaigns are good at cranking out emotionally charged, hyperpartisan content, regardless of its factual accuracy. Today, that describes Mr. Trump’s strategy, as well as those used successfully by other conservative populists, including President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil and Prime Minister Viktor Orban of Hungary. But it could just as well describe the strategy of a successful Democratic challenger to Mr. Trump. Facebook’s most glaring bias is not a partisan one — it is a bias toward candidates whose strategies most closely resemble that of a meme page.

On one level, Mr. Zuckerberg’s decision on ads, which came after months of passionate lobbying by both Republican and Democratic campaigns, as well as civil rights groups and an angry cohort of Facebook employees, is a bipartisan compromise. Both sides, after all, rely on these tools, and there is an argument to be made that Democrats need them in order to close the gap with Mr. Trump’s sophisticated digital operation.

Ultimately, though, Mr. Zuckerberg’s decision to leave Facebook’s platform architecture intact amounts to a powerful endorsement — not of any 2020 candidate, but of Facebook’s role in global democracy. It’s a vote for the idea that Facebook is a fairly designed playing field that is conducive to healthy political debate, and that whatever problems it has simply reflect the problems that exist in society as a whole.

Ellen L. Weintraub, a commissioner on the Federal Election Commission who has been an outspoken opponent of Facebook’s existing policies, told me on Thursday that she, too, was disappointed in the company’s choice.

“They have a real responsibility here, and they’re just shirking it,” Ms. Weintraub said. “They don’t want to acknowledge that something they’ve created is contributing to the decline of our democracy, but it is.”

In Facebook’s partial defense, safeguarding elections is not a single company’s responsibility, nor are tech companies the sole determinants of who is elected. Income inequality, economic populism, immigration policy — these issues still matter, as do the media organizations that shape perception of them.

I also don’t believe, as some Facebook critics do, that Mr. Zuckerberg is doing this for the money. Facebook’s political advertising revenue is a tiny portion of its overall revenue, and even a decision to bar political ads entirely wouldn’t materially change the company’s financial health.

Instead, I take Mr. Zuckerberg at his word that he genuinely believes that an election with Facebook at its core is better than one without it — that, as he said last year, “political ads are an important part of voice.”

There are reasons to quibble with Mr. Zuckerberg’s definition of “voice,” and to ask why a platform that fact-checked politicians’ ads or limited their ability to microtarget voters would have less of it. But it barely matters, because the terms for the 2020 election are now set. This election, like the 2016 election, will be determined in large part by who can best exploit Facebook’s reluctance to appear to be refereeing our politics, even while holding the whistle.

“They’ve laid out what the rules are going to be — and now everyone has to line up behind these rules,” said Mr. Stamos, the former Facebook security chief. “Which are effectively no rules.”

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Live Updates: Ukraine Blames Missile Strike or Terrorist Attack for Crash

Here are the latest developments:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166870002_2ec482fd-66ed-43c5-91f2-6a2e8f021912-articleLarge Live Updates: Ukraine Blames Missile Strike or Terrorist Attack for Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States Ukraine International Airlines Tehran (Iran) Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Boeing Company Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine placing flowers at a memorial for the victims of the plane crash at the Boryspil airport on Thursday.Credit…Ukrainian Presidential Press Service

Ukraine’s main intelligence agency, the S.B.U., or Security Service of Ukraine, said on Friday that it had narrowed down the possible causes of the airplane crash in Iran to either a missile strike or a terrorist act.

The S.B.U said in a statement that it’s unclear whether the SA-15 missile system that Western officials say likely brought down the plane shortly after takeoff from Tehran was actually responsible.

The agency’s statement came shortly after Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko, said at a news conference in Kyiv that Ukrainian officials “will come to our conclusions,” but “we don’t want to come to them right now.”

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine spoke with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday morning Washington time after he requested that the United States and other Western countries release the evidence that a Ukrainian passenger jet that crashed shortly after takeoff in Iran had been shot down.

The jet crashed hours after Iran fired ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of a powerful branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, and was bracing for a possible American response.

Mr. Zelensky has pledged to get to the bottom of what happened, cutting short a trip to Oman immediately after the crash and dispatching a team of 45 Ukrainian experts to Tehran.

On Friday, Mr. Zelensky made it clear that Western governments, allies in his country’s conflict with Russia, had not initially shared the evidence that led them to believe that the Ukrainian jet had been shot down by Iran.

Mr. Prystaiko said the extent of Iran’s cooperation with Ukrainian officials on the ground was “adequate.”

Ukrainian officials analyzed the plane’s flight pattern on Friday and determined it had stayed completely within the normal corridor for flights out of the airport, he said.

“The plane was within the corridor departing from within the international airport, so there was nothing to indicate the flight was in danger,” he said.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada and Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain both said Iran had probably shot down the plane by accident. President Trump said he suspected that the downing of the plane had been the result of “a mistake on the other side.”

An American official told The New York Times that the United States had a high level of confidence that a Russian-made Iranian air defense system had fired two surface-to-air missiles at the plane.

The crash of the Ukrainian jet has presented Mr. Zelensky, a 41-year-old comedian who swept to a stunning victory in the presidential election last spring, with the most urgent crisis of his short tenure.

“Our goal is to ascertain the undeniable truth,” Mr. Zelensky said in his statement on Friday. “We believe this is the responsibility of the whole international community before the families of the dead and the memory of the victims of the catastrophe.”

The Ukrainian prosecutor general’s office issued a public request for help from Canada, seeking information from intelligence agencies about a possible missile strike.

Secretary Pompeo confirmed on Friday that the United States and its allies have intelligence that the Ukrainian passenger jet that crashed in Iran had been shot down.

“We do believe that it’s likely that the plane was shot down by an Iranian missile,” Mr. Pompeo said at a briefing at the White House announcing new sanctions against Iran. “We’re going to let the investigation play out before we make a final determination. It’s important that we get to the bottom of it.”

Mr. Pompeo was the first American official to publicly confirm the intelligence assessments. American and allied officials said on Thursday that they had intelligence that surface-to-air missiles fired by Iranian military forces shot down the Boeing 737 minutes after it took off from Tehran, headed for Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital.

Mr. Pompeo said that he had spoken with his Canadian counterpart and with Ukrainian President Zelensky by phone on Friday, but noted that an investigation was ongoing.

“When we get the results of that investigation, I am confident we and the rest of the world will take appropriate action,” he said.

The Trump administration also plans to issue sanctions waivers to American companies or others who can help the investigation, Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin said at the briefing.

Iran’s Fars News Agency, which is affiliated with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, said on Friday that Iran would issue a statement on Saturday announcing the cause of the crash of the Ukrainian jetliner. The report offered no hint of what that cause might be.

“There will be a meeting with domestic and international representatives related to the crash tomorrow and after studying preliminarily, the cause of the crash will be announced,” Fars News said in a news alert citing what it described as a source from the Joint Armed Forces.

Iran has maintained that there was no evidence that the plane was struck by a missile and doubled down on that assertion on Friday, despite western officials pointing to intelligence suggesting the passenger jet was accidentally hit by a missile.

Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization chief, Ali Abedzadeh, speaking during a Friday news conference, urged caution and said that nothing could be determined until the data from the black boxes was analyzed and said statements made by other nations were politically motivated.

But, he added, what could be said was that the plane had not been hit by a missile and was likely on fire before it crashed. He also urged nations with intelligence on the crash, namely the United States and Canada, to share that information with Iran.

“We cannot just give you speculation,” Mr. Abedzadeh said in footage televised and translated on Iranian state television. “So far what I can tell you is that the plane has not been hit by a missile, and we have to look for the cause of the fire.”

Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said during the same news conference that it could take more than a month to process the data recovered from the flight recorders and that the investigation could take up to two years. He also noted that Ukraine, France, Canada, and Russia have all said they are willing to assist Iran with the data extraction, and Tehran will send the black box to one of these countries if it fails to retrieve the data.

Normally, Iran has the capacity to download black box data, but Mr. Rezaeifar said that since the devices had been damaged, it would be difficult to extract information.

“We need special software and hardware which are available in our country, but if we fail to extract the data due to the damages of the black box, we will get help from other countries,” he said.

The black box will begin to be evaluated on Friday, Iran’s state-run IRNA news agency reported, “to assess and check whether it is possible to reconstruct and analyze the information inside the country.” State television aired footage that it said showed the two black boxes that were recovered from the crash site.

Video

Westlake Legal Group xxivid-iran-plane-2-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Live Updates: Ukraine Blames Missile Strike or Terrorist Attack for Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States Ukraine International Airlines Tehran (Iran) Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Boeing Company Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

The New York Times has obtained and verified video showing the moment a Ukrainian airliner was hit in Iran.CreditCredit…Screenshot from video

Footage verified by The New York Times appears to show a missile fired from Iranian territory hitting a plane near Tehran’s airport, the area where a Ukrainian jet crashed on Wednesday.

As investigators work to determine an official cause of the accident, the video offered new clues about the crash, which came hours after a violent confrontation between Iran and the United States.

A small explosion occurred when what appears to be a missile hit the plane above Parand, a city near the airport, but the plane did not explode, the video showed. The jet continued flying for several minutes and turned back toward the airport, The Times has determined.

The plane, which by then had stopped transmitting its signal, flew toward the airport ablaze before it exploded and crashed quickly, other videos verified by The Times showed.

Visual and audio clues in the footage also matched flight path information and satellite imagery of the area near where the plane crashed.

The Trump administration slapped another round of sanctions on Iran on Friday, seeking to further deter what it called Tehran’s support for terrorist activities. Given that Iran is already under heavy sanctions from the United States, the newest round is unlikely to have any major economic effect but could help deter investment from countries including China and Russia, analysts said.

Secretaries Mnuchin and Pompeo announced the new sanctions in a briefing at the White House. The sanctions apply to industries including steel, construction, mining and textiles, as well as to eight senior officials said by the United States to have had a role in the missile strikes by Iran this week.

“The president has been very clear we will continue to apply economic sanctions until Iran stops its terrorist activities and commit that it will never have nuclear weapons,” Mr. Mnuchin said.

The move was the first substantive response by the United States following the missile strikes on bases housing American forces in Iraq, and was seen by analysts as an additional signal of de-escalation by the administration.

Peter Harrell, a sanctions expert at the Center for New American Security, a research organization, said the sanctions would do negligible additional damage to Iran’s economy because the bulk of its revenue streams have been cut off already. The new sanctions, he said, largely, tighten enforcement of existing sanctions by targeting companies that are engaging in prohibited trade with Iran.

“When it comes to putting materially more economic pressure on Iran, the Trump administration is something of a victim of its own success — and I think we are reaching the end of the road for what ‘maximum pressure’ can achieve when it comes to Iran’s economy,” Mr. Harrell said. “Trump has already succeeded in cutting off the vast majority of Iran’s cash-earning exports, particularly oil, and has caused a sharp drop in Iranian GDP.”

The aftermath of the plane crash in Iran has the potential to open a fresh rift between Ukraine and its most important Western allies.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine has already turned into an unwilling player in United States domestic politics as a result of the Trump administration’s pressure campaign seeking assistance in the 2020 presidential race. Now, he is stuck in the middle of an even more volatile American crisis: the conflict with Iran.

On the one hand, Mr. Zelensky needs Iranian cooperation to deliver the full-fledged investigation of the disaster that he has pledged to his public. On the other, Mr. Zelensky needs the data collected by Western intelligence — not to mention his continued reliance on Western support in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia.

“He could end up in a situation of being caught between two fires,” said Oleksandr Danylyuk, Mr. Zelensky’s former national security adviser, who resigned in September. “It’s a very complicated situation.”

Mr. Zelensky was caught flat-footed on Thursday when American officials went public with intelligence findings about the crash, and it was clear that the United States and its Western allies had not briefed Kyiv.

In an interview with The New York Times, Pavlo Klimkin, a former foreign minister of Ukraine, described the failure by Western officials to share their intelligence earlier as a moral setback in Kyiv’s relationship with its partners.

“We lost our plane, we lost our citizens,” Mr. Klimkin said. “Of course we want to expect of our friends to be with us in this important moment in the sense of sharing information, in the sense of solidarity, in the sense of simply working together.”

On Friday, American and Ukrainian officials raced to dispel any appearance of a rift. But Anatoliy Hrytsenko, a former Ukrainian defense minister, said that any recalcitrance from Western countries would create suspicions in Ukraine that they were using the tragedy as a cudgel in their conflict with Iran.

“Western leaders must give us these intelligence findings,” Mr. Hrytsenko said. “If we assume the worst and they don’t do this, then a big question mark arises: Is this really about determining the cause of a plane crash or is this now geopolitics?”

France’s aviation investigation authority said on Friday that it had been invited by Iran to take part in the investigation into the crash of an Ukrainian plane near Tehran this week.

A spokesman for the authority, known by its French acronym B.E.A., or Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses, said France was getting involved because the jetliner’s engine had been designed by CFM, a joint venture between GE Aviation, an American company, and Safran Aircraft Engines, a French one.

“No further assistance has been requested at this point in time,” the spokesman said, adding that Iranian aviation authorities were the lead investigator in the case.

Jean-Yves Le Drian, France’s foreign minister, did not say on Friday whether the country had proof that the jetliner had been shot down by Iranian missiles, but said that France was “available” to help with the investigation.

“Before the speculation, we must establish the truth in conditions of utmost transparency,” Mr. Le Drian told RTL, a French radio station. France, one of the signatories of the Iranian nuclear deal, is now trying to salvage it by acting as a go-between for Iran and the United States.

While many of the passengers onboard the Ukrainian plane that crashed near Tehran on Wednesday were Iranians, there were citizens of at least seven other nations on the flight when it plunged to the ground killing everyone.

Among the dead were at least 63 Canadians, many of them university students. Dozens are believed to be from the city of Edmonton, members of the Iranian community told local news outlets. At least 10 were students or staff at the University of Alberta, according to a statement from David H. Turpin, the president of the university.

“These individuals were integral to the intellectual and social fabric of our university and the broader community,” Mr. Turpin said. “We are grieving for lost colleagues, classmates, teachers, and mentors, as well as loved ones, family, friends, and roommates.”

“We will feel their loss — and the aftermath of this tragedy — for many years to come,” he added.

Sweden’s prime minister said he spoke with the leaders of Canada and Britain following reports that the plane may have accidentally been shot down by an Iranian missile, and said that the country would do all it could to aid in the investigation after the “serious information” emerged.

A number of Swedish nationals were also onboard the Ukraine International Airlines flight when it crashed.

“We will do everything we can to find out what happened,” Prime Minister Stefan Lofven of Sweden said in a statement. “My thoughts go to the victims, their families and close relatives at this difficult time. You are not alone. We share your sorrow.”

Although no German citizens were among the victims, the mayor of Werl, a town in western Germany, told the German news agency DPA on Friday that a 30-year-old Afghan woman who had been granted asylum in the country and had been living in the town since 2017 was killed. Her 8-year-old daughter and 5-year-old son had also died in the crash. The mayor, Michael Grossmann, said the woman’s brother, who also lives in the town, had confirmed the deaths, but gave no further details.

The Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany posted an online tribute to a Paniz Soltani, a young Iranian woman who had been completing her doctoral studies at the institute. Described as “a sparkling and gifted PhD student, a valued colleague and dear friend.”

Anton Troianovski, Megan Specia, Aurelien Breeden, Melissa Eddy, Christiaan Triebert, Malachy Browne, Sarah Kerr and Ainara Tiefenthäler contributed reporting.

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One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds

A new study finds one in three Hong Kong adults are suffering from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of violent protests that began there in June.

The University of Hong Kong (HKU) study found the number was six times higher than four years ago, the BBC reported, adding that the increase in PTSD symptoms corresponds with around 2 million adults in the semi-autonomous territory.

Hong Kong has an adult population of about 6.3 million.

HONG KONG WELCOMES 2020 WITH FRESH PRO-DEMOCRACY PROTESTS, CLASHES WITH POLICE

Westlake Legal Group Hong-Kong-Protest-AP One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc article 173f9b69-74f0-517b-a789-0c749fdb72df

Protesters march Sunday during a demonstration against “parallel traders” who buy goods in Hong Kong to resell in mainland China. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

According to the study, up to 11 percent of adults reported symptoms of depression, up from two percent before separate protests in 2014 and 6.5 percent in 2017,

“One in five adults now reports probable depression or suspected PTSD, which is comparable to those experiencing armed conflicts, large-scale disasters, or terrorist attacks,” the study said.

HONG KONG ANNOUNCES 336 ARRESTS DURING CHRISTMAS PROTESTS

The clashes between protestors and police have led to nearly 7,000 arrests, 2,500 injuries and several deaths, according to reports.

The researchers also found that heavy use of social media to follow socio-political events appeared to increase the risk of probable depression and suspected PTSD, Agence France-Presse reported.

“Hong Kong is under-resourced to deal with this excess mental health burden,” said research leader Gabriel Leung, HKU’s dean of medicine, according to AFP.

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The researchers, who published their findings Friday in The Lancet medical journal, conducted surveys of more than 18,000 Hong Kong residents between 2009 and 2019, according to the BBC.

Westlake Legal Group Hong-Kong-Protest-AP One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc article 173f9b69-74f0-517b-a789-0c749fdb72df   Westlake Legal Group Hong-Kong-Protest-AP One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc article 173f9b69-74f0-517b-a789-0c749fdb72df

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One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds

A new study finds one in three Hong Kong adults are suffering from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of violent protests that began there in June.

The University of Hong Kong (HKU) study found the number was six times higher than four years ago, the BBC reported, adding that the increase in PTSD symptoms corresponds with around 2 million adults in the semi-autonomous territory.

Hong Kong has an adult population of about 6.3 million.

HONG KONG WELCOMES 2020 WITH FRESH PRO-DEMOCRACY PROTESTS, CLASHES WITH POLICE

Westlake Legal Group Hong-Kong-Protest-AP One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc article 173f9b69-74f0-517b-a789-0c749fdb72df

Protesters march Sunday during a demonstration against “parallel traders” who buy goods in Hong Kong to resell in mainland China. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

According to the study, up to 11 percent of adults reported symptoms of depression, up from two percent before separate protests in 2014 and 6.5 percent in 2017,

“One in five adults now reports probable depression or suspected PTSD, which is comparable to those experiencing armed conflicts, large-scale disasters, or terrorist attacks,” the study said.

HONG KONG ANNOUNCES 336 ARRESTS DURING CHRISTMAS PROTESTS

The clashes between protestors and police have led to nearly 7,000 arrests, 2,500 injuries and several deaths, according to reports.

The researchers also found that heavy use of social media to follow socio-political events appeared to increase the risk of probable depression and suspected PTSD, Agence France-Presse reported.

“Hong Kong is under-resourced to deal with this excess mental health burden,” said research leader Gabriel Leung, HKU’s dean of medicine, according to AFP.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The researchers, who published their findings Friday in The Lancet medical journal, conducted surveys of more than 18,000 Hong Kong residents between 2009 and 2019, according to the BBC.

Westlake Legal Group Hong-Kong-Protest-AP One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc article 173f9b69-74f0-517b-a789-0c749fdb72df   Westlake Legal Group Hong-Kong-Protest-AP One-third of Hong Kong adults suffering from PTSD symptoms due to protests, study finds Robert Gearty fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox news fnc/world fnc article 173f9b69-74f0-517b-a789-0c749fdb72df

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Daniel Radcliffe says he was mistaken for a homeless man: ‘Apparently, I need to shave more often’

Daniel Radcliffe is famous but isn’t too recognizable all of the time.

The 30-year-old star, who garnered mega fame in his time playing the beloved Harry Potter, revealed as much during an appearance on the “Graham Norton Show” on Friday, sharing some interesting moments he’s experienced in public.

“It’s weird and funny, with some very odd moments,” Radcliffe said before launching into a tale about the time he was mistaken for a homeless man.

DANIEL RADCLIFFE SAYS HE FEELS ‘TERRIBLE’ FOR MEGHAN MARKLE

Westlake Legal Group sundance3 Daniel Radcliffe says he was mistaken for a homeless man: ‘Apparently, I need to shave more often’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c9024632-bb96-52b5-bbdd-c97effb323f3 article

Daniel Radcliffe said he was recently mistaken for a homeless man in New York City. (Reuters)

“I was in New York recently with my girlfriend and while she was in a shop, I was outside with our adopted dog. It was very cold, and I had on a hoodie, a fleece and then a big coat over the top,” Radcliffe explained (via Entertainment Tonight).

“Because it was so cold, I knelt down to warm the dog and I saw this guy looking at me and then he walked past me,” the actor continued. “But then he came back and handed me five dollars and said, ‘Get yourself a coffee mate.'”

Added Radcliffe: “Apparently, I need to shave more often!”

DANIEL RADCLIFFE TRANSFORMS INTO TIM JENKIN FOR ‘ESCAPE FROM PRETORIA’ FILM

Westlake Legal Group Daniel20Radcliffe20Harry20Potter Daniel Radcliffe says he was mistaken for a homeless man: ‘Apparently, I need to shave more often’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c9024632-bb96-52b5-bbdd-c97effb323f3 article

Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter in the 2004 film “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.” (Warner Bros.)

Radcliffe obviously hasn’t fallen on hard times financially, however, the “Miracle Workers” star has been deeply open about the demons he personally faced while dealing with immense fame, revealing nearly a year ago that he had turned to alcohol as a teenager to cope.

“There is an awareness that I really struggled with, particularly in my late teens when I was going out to places for the first time where you would feel — again, it could have largely been in my head — where you would feel watched when you went into a bar, when you went into a pub,” the British actor explained during an interview with “Off Camera With Sam Jones.”

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“In my case, the quickest way to forget you were being watched was to get very drunk,” he continued. “Then as you get very drunk, you become aware, ‘Oh, people are watching more now because now I’m getting very drunk, so I should probably drink more to ignore that more.’ It can affect your psyche.”

Westlake Legal Group Grint-Harry-Potter-2001 Daniel Radcliffe says he was mistaken for a homeless man: ‘Apparently, I need to shave more often’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c9024632-bb96-52b5-bbdd-c97effb323f3 article

(From left) Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Daniel Radcliffe in the 2001 film “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” (Warner Bros. Pictures)

‘HARRY POTTER’ STAR EMMA WATSON SAYS SHE ISN’T SINGLE, CALLS IT ‘SELF-PARTNERED’

The star noted that his experience has helped him sympathize with fellow celebrities that got their start at a young age.

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“There is no blueprint for starting young and working stuff out,” he told the interviewer. “That’s why whenever people are having a go at Justin Bieber drag-racing cars or whatever, I’m always like, ‘Yeah, but you never know. Stuff could be super crazy for him right now.’”

Fox News’ Tyler McCarthy contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group sundance3 Daniel Radcliffe says he was mistaken for a homeless man: ‘Apparently, I need to shave more often’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c9024632-bb96-52b5-bbdd-c97effb323f3 article   Westlake Legal Group sundance3 Daniel Radcliffe says he was mistaken for a homeless man: ‘Apparently, I need to shave more often’ Julius Young fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc c9024632-bb96-52b5-bbdd-c97effb323f3 article

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U.S. Military Unsuccessfully Targeted Second Iranian Official

Westlake Legal Group merlin_159559578_bfffc40b-fd76-47a6-9d8d-bd3eb97b649e-facebookJumbo U.S. Military Unsuccessfully Targeted Second Iranian Official Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Quds Force Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Defense Department Defense and Military Forces

WASHINGTON — The American military unsuccessfully tried to kill a senior Iranian in Yemen on the same day a drone strike took out Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, one of Iran’s most important commanders, according to American officials.

The disclosure of a second mission indicated that the Trump administration was attempting to target a larger set of Iranian military and paramilitary leaders than was previously known.

The unsuccessful airstrike in Yemen was aimed at Abdul Reza Shahlai, an official with Iran’s Quds Force, a potent paramilitary organization. He was known as a key financier for Iran’s proxy wars.

President Trump approved the strike against Mr. Shahlai at the same time as he authorized the strike against General Suleimani, although it is unclear if the American attack in Yemen occurred at precisely the same time.

Mr. Shahlai and General Suleimani were two of several officials the Trump administration considered striking in an effort to halt Iranian attacks on American embassies and to deter Iran from ramping up aggression in the region.

The Yemen strike was first reported Friday by the Washington Post.

The mission to kill Mr. Shahlai shows that the Trump administration was seeking to hit multiple officials from Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, which includes the Quds Force. Both organizations direct Iran’s proxy forces in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Yemen.

The successful strike in Iraq and the unsuccessful attack in Yemen were meant to knock the Guards Corps back on its heels, and some senior military and intelligence officials believed a drastic strike against the group would effectively damage Iran’s ability to direct its proxy forces.

But other officials, including intelligence officials, believed strikes against senior commanders were risky, and might have the effect of inciting the broader conflict the Trump administration said it was trying to avoid.

Members of Congress have also raised questions about intelligence the administration has used to justify the strikes on General Suleimani.

The Pentagon declined to confirm the strike. But Cmdr. Rebecca Rebarich, a Pentagon spokeswoman, noted that Yemen “is long understood as a safe space for terrorists and other adversaries to the United States.”

The United States had offered a $15 million reward for information about Mr. Shahlai. The announcement of the reward accused him of having a long history of involvement in attacks on American allies, including a failed 2011 plot to kill the Saudi ambassador to the United States.

Mr. Shahlai was based in Yemen, where Iran is supporting the Houthi rebels, who are fighting forces backed by Saudi Arabia.

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Barstool Sports boss taunts Deadspin owner, offers to buy rival site out of ‘spite’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088872957001_6088876460001-vs Barstool Sports boss taunts Deadspin owner, offers to buy rival site out of ‘spite’ fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 956dffd7-e7b9-5b54-811f-6d8aedd1f755

Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy continued his long-running feud with Deadspin on Friday, offering to buy and save the struggling website out of “spite.”

Portnoy’s taunt was in response to news that Deadspin parent G/O Media would move the website from New York to Chicago and suspended negotiations with unionized employees. G/O Media CEO Jim Spanfeller’s memo about the decision was tweeted by a Wall Street Journal reporter and Portnoy quickly offered an alternative solution.

BARSTOOL SPORTS BOSS DAVE PORTNOY GLOATS AS RIVAL DEADSPIN SUFFERS MASS EXODUS, OFFERS FIRED EDITOR ‘BUTLER’ POSITION

“Hey @JimSpanfeller call me. I will buy, save, and make @deadspin successful. Why? 1 word. Spite,” Portnoy tweeted.

G/O Media did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

MEDIA BAD BOY BARSTOOL SPORTS THRIVING IN POLITICALLY CORRECT CLIMATE: ‘WE’RE PRETTY RARE’

Deadspin was famously a thorn in Barstool’s side, regularly posting critical stories about Portnoy and his company. As a result, Portnoy mocked Deadspin as the site crumbled last year amid a mass exodus of employees after staffers were told by new ownership to focus solely on sports.

“So by now everybody knows that Deadspin has imploded. 90% of the staff has either been fired or quit. It’s over,” Portnoy wrote in a blog post in October. “They are dead. I have destroyed them just like I have destroyed every single enemy who has ever dared cross my path.”

Portnoy even offered the site’s now-former deputy editor Barry Petchesky a $100,000 yearly salary with benefits to be his “butler” when he was fired by Deadspin for refusing to stick to sports.

TOP DEADSPIN EDITOR SAYS HE WAS FIRED AFTER REFUSING TO ‘STICK TO SPORTS’

Deadspin published new content on a regular basis for the last two months as the chaos unfolded. Spanfeller’s memo said he hopes to “restart the Deadspin publication as soon as possible in a manner that provides both the editorial freedom necessary” to thrive and the “business focus to ensure its long-term suitability.”

Spanfeller announced moving the site to Chicago is part of the new plan and scrapped plans to negotiate with unionized employees because of “unreasonable and unprecedented” demands.

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Meanwhile, Barstool’s Chicago-based blogger, “Barstool Carl,” sarcastically welcomed Deadspin to the Windy City.

“We’re the sports guys in town,” he wrote. “You don’t get to put your feet up on our coffee table while we’re out here interviewing Jeff Fisher about how to fly-fish steelhead salmon … but I don’t want to discourage you as that would be very Un-Midwestern. So let me instead just say I’m very excited to see your Chicago Fire and expanded MLS coverage.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088872957001_6088876460001-vs Barstool Sports boss taunts Deadspin owner, offers to buy rival site out of ‘spite’ fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 956dffd7-e7b9-5b54-811f-6d8aedd1f755   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6088872957001_6088876460001-vs Barstool Sports boss taunts Deadspin owner, offers to buy rival site out of ‘spite’ fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 956dffd7-e7b9-5b54-811f-6d8aedd1f755

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