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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 215)

Massive search for missing West Point cadet includes 130 additional military police

Westlake Legal Group iStock-west-point Massive search for missing West Point cadet includes 130 additional military police Melissa Leon fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/missing-persons fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e1865d1-394e-5f3e-a818-09b205c313cc

The widespread search for a missing cadet at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point continued Tuesday as 130 soldiers from the 23rd Military Police Company at Fort Drum, N.Y., arrived to help with the ground search, officials said.

The Class of 2021 cadet, whose name has not been released, and an M4 rifle have been unaccounted for since Friday at 5:30 p.m. after the cadet failed to report for a scheduled military skills competition, the academy said.

“There is no indication the cadet poses a threat to the public, but he may be a danger to himself,” West Point officials said. They don’t believe the cadet has any magazines or ammunition.

FORT STEWART TRAINING ACCIDENT LEAVES 3 SOLDIERS DEAD, 3 INJURED, OFFICIALS SAY

More than 2,000 acres of the West Point garrison have been searched by soldiers and other agencies, including New York State Police and the Coast Guard.

Military and police helicopters are conducting aerial sweeps using “Forward-Looking Infrared Radar” and drones. State police dive teams are searching the Hudson River, as well as lakes and ponds on the West Point campus, according to officials. Railroad police have also provided three working dogs to search along the tracks adjacent to the academy, which is located about 50 miles north of New York City.

When the cadet failed to show up for the military skills competition, fellow cadets “immediately started to search for their missing teammate” before military police were notified, triggering a massive probe of the base at 1 a.m. Saturday that has continued since.

“I want to thank the local and state law enforcement agencies and emergency services for their tireless support,” Academy Superintendent Lt. Gen. Darryl Williams said. “We will continue to search with all means possible, on and off West Point. Safely locating the cadet remains our focus and number one priority.”

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The academy said it’s operating under normal conditions with an “increased force protection status.”

Anyone with information is asked to contact West Point Military Police at 845-938-3333.

Fox News’ Lucas Tomlinson and Travis Fedschun contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group iStock-west-point Massive search for missing West Point cadet includes 130 additional military police Melissa Leon fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/missing-persons fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e1865d1-394e-5f3e-a818-09b205c313cc   Westlake Legal Group iStock-west-point Massive search for missing West Point cadet includes 130 additional military police Melissa Leon fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox-news/topic/missing-persons fox news fnc/us fnc article 7e1865d1-394e-5f3e-a818-09b205c313cc

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Oklahoma county agrees to $12.5 million settlement over death of inmate left in restraint chair for 2 days

Westlake Legal Group Anthony-Huff Oklahoma county agrees to $12.5 million settlement over death of inmate left in restraint chair for 2 days Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/us fnc article 7d45eef0-d011-5e45-a567-7cb4a39d50b5

Officials in Garfield County in Oklahoma announced a $12.5 million settlement over the death of an inmate left in a restraint chair for two days at the county jail, according to published reports.

Anthony Huff was arrested for public intoxication on June 4, 2016. He was held at the Garfield County Jail, where investigators said he was placed in a restraint chair on June 6 and found unresponsive on June 8. He was declared dead later that day.

The Garfield County Board of Commissioners filed suit on behalf of Huff’s family over the death of the 58-year-old. During his time in the chair, Huff was not given “proper amounts of food, water or medical treatment for illnesses he was suffering from,” said a release obtained by KFOR from Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter. The lawsuit alleged negligence and violation of Huff’s constitutional rights.

NEW YORK MAN ROBBED AT GUNPOINT DURING HAIRCUT, VIDEO SHOWS 

An autopsy performed days after Huff died said the cause of death had been natural, most likely related to his chronic alcoholism.

In the 2017 federal lawsuit, lawyers alleged jail employees should have been aware of Huff’s medical conditions from his past incarcerations and known that he took medications for heart disease, hypertension, depression and other conditions.

FLORIDA HUNTER DISCOVERS HUMAN REMAINS AT OCALA NATIONAL FOREST: SMELLED LIKE ‘DEATH’ 

The lawsuit said Huff started experiencing hallucinations and was placed in the restraint chair. A jail administrator testified that Huff was restrained after he began kicking doors and hitting his head on a wall, according to the Enid News & Eagle.

Jail staff didn’t receive a medical recommendation to use the chair, according to the lawsuit. Jail employees did not check Huff’s blood pressure regularly, didn’t give him his blood pressure medication and did not provide him hydration every two hours.

The board said in a statement Monday it “deeply regrets” Huff’s death and the settlement is “reasonable under the circumstances.”

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Former jail administrator Jennifer Niles pleaded guilty to second-degree manslaughter in Huff’s death and received a 55-hour jail sentence. The board said they hoped the hiring of a new jail administrator, along with policy changes, would “serve to promote the well-being of detainees.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group Anthony-Huff Oklahoma county agrees to $12.5 million settlement over death of inmate left in restraint chair for 2 days Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/us fnc article 7d45eef0-d011-5e45-a567-7cb4a39d50b5   Westlake Legal Group Anthony-Huff Oklahoma county agrees to $12.5 million settlement over death of inmate left in restraint chair for 2 days Morgan Phillips fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/us fnc article 7d45eef0-d011-5e45-a567-7cb4a39d50b5

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Dem congressman says president is ‘no better than’ KKK in wake of ‘lynching’ tweet

Westlake Legal Group green-Trump_Getty-AP Dem congressman says president is 'no better than' KKK in wake of 'lynching' tweet Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/media fnc article 95864ba5-cb5b-5ae5-8d60-c653b62b64f1

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, ripped into President Trump on Tuesday, accusing him of weaponizing bigotry and making the explosive claim that he is “no better than” the Ku Klux Klan.

“If you continue to weaponize racism and bigotry, this makes you no better than those who are screaming ‘blood and soil,’ ‘Jews will not replace us,'” he said on the House floor Tuesday.

“It makes you no better than them. It makes you no better than those who burn crosses. It makes you no better than those who wear hoods and white robes. Do you not understand what you are doing to this country?”

His comments came after Trump tweeted that Democrats were “lynching” him with their impeachment inquiry. “So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights. All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here – a lynching. But we will WIN!” Trump tweeted.

HOGAN GIDLEY RESPONDS TO BACKLASH OVER TRUMP COMPARING IMPEACHMENT TO ‘LYNCHING’

Green was one of the first House Democrats to call for Trump’s impeachment and pushed a failed resolution on the issue in July.

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Green stood next to a prop that tallied the “number of days the Trump administration has been above the law.” It included counts for the number of days since former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report was released, as well as since he testified during the summer.

“How dare the president compare lynching to impeachment,” Green said. “How dare he do this. Does he not know the history of lynching in this country? Does he not know that thousands of African Americans were lynched… does he not know that this is the equivalent of murder?”

DEMOCRATS PILE ON TRUMP TWEET CALLING IMPEACHMENT PROBE A ‘LYNCHING’

Green wasn’t the only one to call out the president, with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., calling the comments “atrocious” on Twitter.

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“It is atrocious that the President would refer to one of the most horrifying, violent practices of white supremacists to pretend he is a victim of anything but his own actions,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group green-Trump_Getty-AP Dem congressman says president is 'no better than' KKK in wake of 'lynching' tweet Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/media fnc article 95864ba5-cb5b-5ae5-8d60-c653b62b64f1   Westlake Legal Group green-Trump_Getty-AP Dem congressman says president is 'no better than' KKK in wake of 'lynching' tweet Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/media fnc article 95864ba5-cb5b-5ae5-8d60-c653b62b64f1

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Boris Johnson Loses a Critical Brexit Vote, Throwing the Process Into Disarray

Westlake Legal Group 22brexit-hfo-loose-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Boris Johnson Loses a Critical Brexit Vote, Throwing the Process Into Disarray Politics and Government May, Theresa M Legislatures and Parliaments Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) Great Britain European Union Europe Corbyn, Jeremy (1949- )

LONDON — Prime Minister Boris Johnson suffered a damaging setback Tuesday in his quest to take Britain out of the European Union, losing a critical vote in Parliament and putting his plans for Brexit on hold, as Britain’s three-year struggle to resolve the issue continued to defy any solution.

Mr. Johnson’s latest defeat came only 15 minutes after his first victory in Parliament. Lawmakers granted preliminary approval to the withdrawal deal he struck with the European Union last week, a major step toward achieving the prime minister’s goal of Brexit and one that broke a string of defeats for him.

But the lawmakers refused in a crucial follow-up vote to put legislation enacting Britain’s departure on a fast track to passage, which could have enabled Mr. Johnson to meet his deadline of leaving the European Union by Oct. 31.

Now, however, Parliament has thrown the whole process into a legislative netherworld that could mean months of further delays to a process that the nation has long since wearied of and just wants to see end.

It is entirely conceivable that Mr. Johnson’s deal will kick around Parliament for weeks, potentially becoming encumbered with amendments that either Mr. Johnson or the European Union would reject as unacceptable. The best option then, analysts said, would be to give the voters a chance to make themselves heard in a general election.

The back-to-back votes captured the one-step-forward, one-step-back nature of the Brexit saga. While lawmakers endorsed the contours of Mr. Johnson’s plan — something they had never done for his predecessor, Theresa May — they balked at being stampeded into passing the necessary legislation in three days.

The European Union will now have to decide how long an extension to grant Britain. Mr. Johnson said after the votes that he would “pause” the legislation and call European leaders to deliver the message that Britain was not interested in another extension.

Earlier on Tuesday, he said that if the deadlock slipped into next year, he would rather pull the bill altogether and face the voters, calculating that he could still win a popular mandate for a swift Brexit.

But if the European Union offers only a short-term extension of a few weeks, Mr. Johnson might well continue battling for passage of his Brexit blueprint, betting that the pressure would increase on Parliament to pass a deal that its members had already shown support for in principle.

Some critics noted that the legislation — which runs to 435 pages including annexes, and would have profound consequences for the future of the country — was going to have less time for scrutiny in the House of Commons than a recent bill prohibiting the use of wild animals in traveling circuses.

On a day that encapsulated both the high drama and recurring gridlock of the Brexit debate, Mr. Johnson tried to put a good face on the split decision, noting it was the first time a Brexit agreement won a Parliamentary vote.

“How welcome it is, even joyful, that for the first time in this long saga, this House has actually accepted its responsibilities together, come together, and embraced a deal,” Mr. Johnson said.

But he expressed dismay that lawmakers “voted for delay” and said the government would accelerate its preparations to leave the European Union without any deal. “One way or the other,” Mr. Johnson insisted, Britain will leave Europe with “this deal, to which this House has given its assent.”

Earlier in the day, Mr. Johnson said that if his government was thwarted by Parliament, he would pull the legislation and demand an election. “I will argue at that election, ‘Let’s get Brexit done,’” he said.

Whether Mr. Johnson is serious about shelving his own deal — or was simply using it as a threat to pressure wavering lawmakers — was open to interpretation. On Tuesday evening, officials suggested he was keeping his options open.

But it made for another day of political theater in the House of Commons, where lawmakers rose one after another to condemn the government’s strong-arm tactics or to plead for an end to the endless frustration of Brexit.

“The devil is in the detail,” said the leader of the Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, “and having seen the detail it confirms everything we thought about this rotten deal: a charter for deregulation across the board, paving the way for a Trump-style trade deal that will attack jobs, rights and protections.”

Labour lawmakers promised to push for a series of amendments to the deal that could act as a kind of poison pill — demanding that there be a second referendum on whether to leave the European Union or putting all of the United Kingdom into the European Union’s customs union. A provision like that helped torpedo Mrs. May’s withdrawal agreement with Brussels earlier this year.

“We will seek a very clear commitment to a customs union, a strong single market relationship, hard-wired commitments on workers’ rights, non-regression of environmental standards and loopholes closed to avoid the threat of a no-deal Brexit once and for all,” Mr. Corbyn said after the votes.

Former allies of Mr. Johnson complained about the government’s pressure tactics. Waving a doorstop-size bound copy of the bill, Rory Stewart, a member of the Conservative Party who was purged by Mr. Johnson after breaking with him on a no-deal Brexit, said, “This is a hell of a big document.”

“We cannot pretend” that this is enough time to scrutinize the bill, Mr. Stewart said. “This is our Parliament. We cannot do down our Parliament.”

The negative vote on the legislation leaves the European Union with a difficult decision because it is almost impossible for Mr. Johnson’s Brexit deal to be ratified by Oct. 31, the next deadline.

On Saturday, Mr. Johnson was forced to request a new delay to Brexit, until Jan. 31, but it is up to the leaders of the bloc to decide unanimously on whether — and for how long — to delay Brexit again.

European leaders share Britain’s fatigue with the process and want Mr. Johnson’s deal to go through. On Tuesday in Brussels, the outgoing president of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, declared that Brexit had been a “waste of time and energy.”

But they also want to avert any risk of Britain leaving without any agreement, because that would hurt some fragile economies in mainland Europe, albeit not as hard as Britain’s.

Giving Britain a deadline of a few weeks, until mid-November, would put pressure on Parliament to ratify the Brexit deal, but it would be high risk. If lawmakers were unable to agree on the plan, Mr. Johnson would be under no obligation to request a further delay, and a “no deal” Brexit could result.

So European leaders might recycle a tactic they have used before and make Mr. Johnson a conditional offer: Allow Parliament a little more time if the deal can be ratified — potentially getting Britain out of the bloc quickly — but keep open the possibility of a longer delay if that proves impossible.

When Parliament rejected Mrs. May’s deal for a third time, Mrs. May requested an extension until June 30. But European leaders offered something different — a delay until June 1 if the British did not take part in elections for the European Parliament, or until Oct. 31 if they did.

Mrs. May took the second option.

In the current circumstances, a delay until Jan. 31 could allow time for a general election, though Britain would almost certainly need a longer extension to hold a second referendum on Brexit. The difficulty for the European Union is that Parliament has so far agreed to neither of those options.

The fierce maneuvering in the hours leading up to the votes attested to the complex political crosscurrents of the Brexit debate, more than three years after Britons voted to leave the European Union.

Mr. Johnson lined up support for the first vote on the deal from a handful of members of the Labour Party, which, along with a solid showing by his fellow Conservatives, gave him an unexpectedly healthy margin of 329 to 299.

Yet he lost support from Mr. Stewart and other exiled members of the Conservative Party on the timing of the legislation. That, along with a rejection by Labour members and the Democratic Unionist Party, left him with a losing margin of 308 to 322 for securing final approval of the bill by Thursday.

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Erdogan And Putin Strike A Syria Deal, Taking The Gift Trump Offered Them

Westlake Legal Group 5daf4fbf2100008821ad397b Erdogan And Putin Strike A Syria Deal, Taking The Gift Trump Offered Them

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Russian President Vladimir Putin have reached an agreement on Turkey’s controversial military operation against the Kurds in Syria, Russia’s foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov, announced on Tuesday.

The deal helps Turkey to solidify its presence in a large region of Syria and commits the two countries to removing and disarming fighters there who are loyal to the dominant Kurdish military force, known as the YPG, according to a memorandum shared with reporters. By the middle of next week, Russia and Turkey are planning to run joint patrols in a large portion of the Turkey-Syria border region that was previously dominated by the YPG.

The agreement is the latest consequence of President Donald Trump’s decision earlier this month to effectively greenlight a Turkish offensive against the YPG ― and it’s the latest evidence his approach will lead to big losses for the Kurds and their local Syrian partners, who for years worked with the U.S. against the Islamic State group, and to significantly less U.S. influence in the Middle East. The idea of joint Turkish-Russian patrols is especially striking as prior to Trump’s reshaping of U.S. policy, American officials had suggested joint U.S.-Turkish patrols to both manage Ankara’s concerns about the YPG and protect America’s relationship with Turkey, a NATO ally.

While the Kurds are not a party to the deal, Moscow has maintained communication channels with their leadership for years. It’s likely that Putin will now pressure them to comply with the bargain as the best they can hope for, given that they no longer have American backing, and point to the agreement’s promised protection for the Kurds’ largest city, Qamishli.

That suggests a bleak future for Syria’s Kurds. Tens of thousands have already fled their homes out of fear of the Turkish military and the Syrian Arab forces working with the Turks. Tuesday’s deal says that many of the areas the Kurds have left will be resettled by Syrian refugees whom Erdogan wants to remove from Turkey.

Key decisions about Syria and the future of the more than 2 million people living in the once-Kurdish-administered region are now being made by Putin and Erdogan as well as Syrian dictator Bashar Assad. None has much incentive to preserve the level of autonomy that the Kurds and the Arabs, Assyrians and others living alongside them have had for years. In that time, the Kurds developed a form of democratic governance emphasizing gender equality and environmentalism that’s a far cry from the autocratic societies administered by Moscow, Ankara and Damascus.

Two of Trump’s own top officials ― Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Syria envoy James Jeffrey ― have acknowledged that Turkish-backed forces have likely already committed war crimes against the Kurds.

Trump has repeatedly said the U.S. has no responsibility to protect the Kurds, calling them “no angels” last week. He has echoed Erdogan’s claims about the YPG being dangerous because of its ties to the PKK, a transnational Kurdish militant group that fights the Turkish state. Trump also said his move to withdraw U.S. soldiers from the region and allow the Turks to move in was appropriate because he wanted American soldiers to come home. (Those troops have actually been redeployed to Iraq.)

Congressional lawmakers, including Republicans, have repeatedly condemned Trump’s approach to the situation, last week passing a bipartisan rebuke in the House of Representatives and unveiling proposals for new sanctions on Turkey in both chambers of Congress. Tuesday’s news sparked fresh outrage.

“This agreement locks in Erdogan’s land grab in Syria and opens the door for further violence against the Syrian people,” said Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.). Trump’s choices, Murphy said, “have made Putin the kingmaker in determining the future of Syria. Trump’s decision to sell out the Kurds has handed a gift to Russia, Assad, ISIS, and Turkey all at once, and this agreement is proof.”

The president has responded to the public outrage over his abandonment of the Kurds by touting his own dealmaking abilities, imposing limited penalties on Turkey over its invasion and urging Erdogan to negotiate with the U.S. A trip to Turkey by Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo last week produced a limited promise from Ankara to halt its advance into Syria. But Erdogan secured big concessions, including American pledges to respect his claims to a safe zone inside Syria and to disarm the YPG. Meanwhile, some fighting, including reported Turkish use of chemical weapons, has continued.

The timeline that Erdogan, Pence and Pompeo agreed to expired on Tuesday afternoon, but just hours before Russia announced its deal, U.S. officials indicated they expected the terms of the U.S.-Turkey agreement to continue and Washington to give Turkey some sanctions relief.

The U.S. now appears to be in the bizarre position of working with Putin and Erdogan to weaken a former partner without any guarantee of what America gets in return. Trump has spoken vaguely of defending Syrian oil, but the 200 or so U.S. soldiers left in Syria have almost no partners with whom to do that, while Russia, Assad’s regime and their ally Iran hold strong positions.

Disputes over Syria are likely to become even a bigger headache for Trump. There’s “still a strong appetite for sanctions” on Capitol Hill, a Democratic congressional aide told HuffPost. And one of the Trump administration’s favorite arguments against punishment for Turkey ― that moves like passing sanctions would drive it into Russia’s arms ― took a major blow Tuesday with Ankara showing it’s already willing to treat Putin as a key partner on matters like Syria.

Officials at the White House, the State Department and the Defense Department did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

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A Tenn. county official called Pete Buttigieg a slur. It sparked calls to boycott Dollywood

KNOXVILLE, Tenn – County officials in Tennessee moved swiftly Tuesday to distance themselves from a county commissioner who used a homophobic slur to describe presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg during a public meeting.

In a video of Monday’s Sevier County commission meeting recorded by Knoxville TV station WVLT-TV, Commissioner Warren Hurst went on to say, “I’m not prejudice, but by golly, a white male in this country has very few rights, and they’re getting took more every day.”

The county has since received a flood of criticism, including some calls for a tourism boycott of one of the nation’s most popular travel destinations.

Sevier County’s official Twitter account on Tuesday morning disavowed Hurst’s comments, saying, “The statements made by Commissioner Hurst at the Sevier County Commission meeting of October 21, 2019, do not reflect the opinion or position of Sevier County administration. Sevier County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or status in any other group protected by law. “

At the meeting, one woman challenged Hurst’s comments, saying, “Excuse me, this is not professional. This is (expletive),” as she walked out. But many in the crowd, which was there to hear about a pending vote on a gun issue, applauded Hurst, and some added, “Amen.”

No one answered the door at Hurst’s home on Tuesday. He did not return phone and text messages.

Westlake Legal Group  A Tenn. county official called Pete Buttigieg a slur. It sparked calls to boycott Dollywood

A growing number of social media users are calling on Hurst to resign and are asking for tourists to think twice before spending money in Sevier County. The community is the gateway to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the country’s most visited national park.

Sevier County also includes Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge, which host dozens of tourist attractions, including Dollywood and restaurants owned by Paula Deen and Blake Shelton. Many social media posts criticizing Hurst’s statements have tagged the tourist attractions and organizations.

Rep. Gloria Johnson, D-Knoxville, said the comments made by Hurst in Sevierville, which is about 30 miles southeast of her district, were “embarrassing.”

“It was just horrific, and the way people just laughed and mocked was really embarrassing,” she said. “I’m embarrassed by that behavior. We would hope that Tennesseans would be better than that. And folks in Sevier County who rely on tourist dollars – it’s that sort of thing that’s going to chase people away from their county.”

Dollywood, Johnson said, is “the most open and welcoming place.”

“And then to hear something like that, I could see it just killing anybody’s desire to try to come up there,” she said. “You’ve got a fabulous place that’s opening and welcoming and friendly, and then you’ve got officials like that. It just sends a terrible message.”

Pete Owens, vice president of marketing and public relations for Dollywood, said the park has no comment at this time.

The flashpoint in Monday’s meeting came as commissioners discussed a resolution declaring the county’s commitment to the Second Amendment.

Commissioner Mike Chambers said the resolution supporting the so-called Second Amendment sanctuary status was something constituents had been asking for.

“We just had a lot of people that contacted us in the county and all my constituents that talk to me – I talk to several – they all wanted to be supportive of it,” he told Knox News.

“We stand by our gun owners, and we do support that. The other things that went on,” he said, referring to Hurst’s comments, “I had nothing to do with.”

Follow Tyler Whetstone and Travis Dorman on Twitter: @tyler_whetstone and @travdorman

Westlake Legal Group  A Tenn. county official called Pete Buttigieg a slur. It sparked calls to boycott Dollywood

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McConnell chides Trump for calling impeachment inquiry a ‘lynching’

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday called President Trump’s use of the word “lynching” to describe the House impeachment investigation “unfortunate,” even as some Republicans have accused their Democratic colleagues of flagrant hypocrisy on the issue.

In a tweet Tuesday, Trump compared the House impeachment inquiry into his dealings with Ukraine to “a lynching,” essentially likening the horrors of a deadly and racist chapter in U.S. history to a process laid out in the Constitution.

The president added: “All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here – a lynching.”

His words have brought bipartisan condemnation. McConnell, speaking to reporters, said “that was an unfortunate choice of words.”

McConnell added: “Given the history in our country, I would not compare this to a lynching.”

But, some Republicans pointed to video showing prominent Democrats, including Reps. Gregory Meeks and Danny Davis, calling Bill Clinton’s impeachment proceedings a de facto “lynching” in 1998.

GOP Rapid Response Director Steve Guest also pointed to an October 2008 comment from now-Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y, that was published in an Associated Press article.

The quote from Nadler read: “I am the president’s defender in the sense that I haven’t seen anything yet that would rise, in my opinion, to the level of impeachable offense. … I wish we could get this over with quickly. … In pushing the process, in pushing the arguments of fairness and due process the Republicans so far have been running a lynch mob.”

This time around, however, Democrats have sounded a sterner tone.

Westlake Legal Group 9ffe2e5c-Congress090919 McConnell chides Trump for calling impeachment inquiry a 'lynching' Gregg Re fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc article 52858763-7959-51c2-a89c-6d837072e57e

Lawmakers have criticized the president for comparing Democrats’ impeachment push to a “lynching.” (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

“That is one word no president ought to apply to himself,” said South Carolina Democratic Rep. James Clyburn, the highest-ranking African American in Congress. “That is a word that we ought to be very, very careful about using.”

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., who is also black, called on Trump to delete his tweet.

“Do you know how many people who look like me have been lynched, since the inception of this country, by people who look like you. Delete this tweet,” Rush wrote.

“This is a lynching in every sense.”

— South Carolina GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham

Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., tweeted to Trump: “No sir! No, @realDonaldTrump: this is NOT a lynching, and shame on you for invoking such a horrific act that was used as a weapon to terrorize and murder African Americans.”

The New York Times, in a tweet, condemned Trump for “using a term that invokes the decades-long racist history of white mob murders of black people to describe a legal process laid out in the Constitution.”

Meanwhile, Republican legislators largely tried to put the focus on what they said was the unfair way in which Democrats are conducting the inquiry.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said Trump’s description was “pretty well accurate.” He called the impeachment effort a “sham” and a “joke” because the president does not know the identity of his accuser, and the process is playing out in private.

“This is a lynching in every sense,” said Graham, who is close to Trump.

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South Carolina GOP Sen. Tim Scott, the Senate’s only black Republican, agreed with Trump’s sentiment but not his word choice.

“There’s no question that the impeachment process is the closest thing (to) a political death row trial, so I get his absolute rejection of the process,” Scott said. He added, “I wouldn’t use the word lynching.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6071503536001_6071501835001-vs McConnell chides Trump for calling impeachment inquiry a 'lynching' Gregg Re fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc article 52858763-7959-51c2-a89c-6d837072e57e   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6071503536001_6071501835001-vs McConnell chides Trump for calling impeachment inquiry a 'lynching' Gregg Re fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc article 52858763-7959-51c2-a89c-6d837072e57e

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Katie Hill, Rising Democratic Star in House, Denies Relationship With Aide

Westlake Legal Group 22dc-hill-facebookJumbo Katie Hill, Rising Democratic Star in House, Denies Relationship With Aide House of Representatives Hill, Katie (1987- ) Democratic Party California

WASHINGTON — Representative Katie Hill, a first-term Democrat widely considered a rising star in her party, on Tuesday denied reports that she had a sexual relationship with a member of her staff, but refused to comment on an allegation that she was intimately involved with a campaign aide, saying that a nude photograph of her and another woman was published on the internet without her consent.

Ms. Hill, 32, of California, made her comments in a brief interview and a statement in response to a report on the conservative news site RedState alleging that she had been intimately involved with her legislative director and a young campaign aide while married to her husband, whom she is divorcing.

Members of Congress are barred by House rules from engaging in sexual relationships with their aides, but the rules do not cover campaign staff. Ms. Hill said the photograph, which appears to show the congresswoman seated and brushing the hair of another woman, was the subject of a police investigation.

“Intimate photos of me and another individual were published by Republican operatives on the internet without my consent,” Ms. Hill said in the statement.

“I have notified Capitol Hill police, who are investigating the situation and potential legal violations of those who posted and distributed the photos, and therefore will have no further comment on the digital materials,” she said.

Ms. Hill said that the stories, which she called “a smear campaign,” were being driven by Republican operatives and a “husband who seems determined to try to humiliate me,” and that she had spoken to Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her top lieutenant, Representative Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland, about the matter. Mr. Hoyer declined to comment, and a spokesman for Ms. Pelosi said the speaker was on her way to Baltimore on Tuesday for the funeral of her brother.

Ms. Hill, who campaigned to make history as the first openly bisexual congresswoman from California, unseated a Republican, former Representative Steve Knight, in the so-called blue wave that carried Democrats to power in the House in 2018. She is a favorite of Ms. Pelosi, who named her vice chairwoman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, an unusually high-ranking position for a freshman on a panel that is playing a crucial role in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump.

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Top Boeing Executive to Leave as 737 Max Crisis Swells

Boeing’s executive in charge of commercial airplanes is leaving, the company said on Tuesday. He is the most senior official to depart as the airline maker struggles to contain the crisis following the crashes of two 737 Max jets that killed 346 people.

The executive, Kevin McAllister, had been at the center of the company’s efforts to fix the automated system that contributed to the two crashes and return the plane to service. This month, The New York Times reported that he was under scrutiny inside the company for his poor handling of customer relationships and his management of the commercial division, which is Boeing’s largest business.

Stanley A. Deal, the head of global services for Boeing, will replace Mr. McAllister.

His departure adds a new element of volatility to the biggest crisis in the company’s 103-year-history. The Max jets have been grounded since March, costing Boeing at least $8 billion and disrupting the global aviation industry.

“We’re grateful to Kevin for his dedicated and tireless service to Boeing, its customers and its communities during a challenging time, and for his commitment to support this transition,” the company’s chief executive, Dennis A. Muilenburg, said in a statement.

The news about Mr. McAllister comes days after messages became public that suggested a pilot working on the Max had voiced concerns about the automated system in 2016, months before the Federal Aviation Administration certified the plane. That system, known as MCAS, was found to have played a role in the accidents.

Westlake Legal Group merlin_152397885_5588305c-8e58-47f0-9b4a-3ac83d14e790-articleLarge Top Boeing Executive to Leave as 737 Max Crisis Swells McAllister, Kevin G Lion Air Justice Department Federal Aviation Administration Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters Appointments and Executive Changes Airlines and Airplanes

Boeing 737 Max: What’s Happened After the 2 Deadly Crashes

Boeing remains under intense scrutiny nearly one year after the first Max jet was involved in a fatal accident.

Those messages undermined Boeing’s long-held position that it had no indication that the Max was unsafe until the crashes of Lion Air Flight 610 in Indonesia last October and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 in March.

Since the Max’s grounding shortly after the second crash, airlines have canceled thousands of flights and lost hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue.

The Max’s return to service has been delayed multiple times in recent months as Boeing and global regulators have uncovered new problems with the plane. Airlines do not expect the plane to fly again until next year.

Boeing has said that if the delays persist much longer, it may be forced to halt production of the Max, a drastic step that would disrupt Boeing’s enormous manufacturing work force and its vast network of suppliers.

Boeing is facing multiple investigations and lawsuits related to the crashes, including a criminal investigation being led by the Department of Justice. Boeing is scheduled to report quarterly earnings on Wednesday, and Mr. Muilenburg is preparing to testify before Congress next week.

The commercial division is dealing with problems beyond the Max. They include claims of shoddy production at Boeing’s plant in Charleston, S.C.; cracking on the 737 NG, the Max’s predecessor; and the discovery of foreign objects inside the KC-46 tanker, a military aircraft that the group builds.

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Top Army modernization priorities are ‘on track,’ says Army Vice Chief of Staff

Warrior Maven Interview – Vice Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Joseph Martin

“—-A 1986 graduate of West Point, Martin deployed to Iraq five times including stints as a company commander during Operation Desert Storm, as a battalion and brigade commander during Iraqi Freedom and he commanded the famed 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas. Martin also served as the commander of the Combined Joint Forces Land Component Command during the pivotal Battle of Mosul, a major multi-national offensive that helped the Iraqi government retake control of the Iraqi city from ISIS forces—-” From an Army ReportMARTIN ARMY BIO HERE

Warrior & Martin — Q&A

Warrior: There is a lot of discussion about the Army’s Top 6 Modernization priorities:…Long Range Precision Fires, Next Generation Combat Vehicles, Future Vertical Lift, Network, Air and Missile Defense, and Soldier Lethality…. How are they progressing and what sticks out in your mind?

Martin: All the modernization priorities are doing very well. We’re seeing the progress that we need to right now. We’ve got a lot of work to do. We need to continue to have consistent funding; without consistent funding, requirements can be requirements, but they’ll never turn into material that we develop. So, we’ll continue to work with Congress and everyone who is involved to make sure that we have consistent funding over time.

Warrior: Is there an example of the kind of new technology consistent Congressional funding can provide?

Martin: We are very excited about the progress we’ve made on the programs that we have anticipated we would have completed at this time. The Enhanced Night Vision Goggles B (ENVG-B), that was a great idea and… 2 years later, we actually fielded something to a brigade, 2nd Brigade of First Infantry Division. We will have other successes like that if we have consistent funding. We are on the verge of changing the momentum…right now, it’s an uphill fight–building requirements and having dialogues between material developers and requirements developers. We’re pushing the rock uphill. We get that over the top of the hill, these programs are going to take on a life of their own and we’re going to be very very successful.

Warrior: How is the number one priority progressing – Long-Range Precision Fires – as there is a program underway building prototypes and preparing for live fire?

Martin: We have many different experiments that are going on for long-range precision fires, but, in essence, I guess the tagline is this–”we want to make artillery great again.” The way we’re going to do that is we’re going to increase the capability of our cannons, we’re going to increase the capabilities of our rocket forces and we’re going to change the dynamics necessary to compete in the future on the multi-domain battlefield.

Westlake Legal Group army-q-and-a-pic-warrior-maven Top Army modernization priorities are 'on track,' says Army Vice Chief of Staff Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fnc/tech fnc article 1db180f5-3dbf-57dc-9a80-f72d60095889

Image courtesy of US Army (US Army photo)

From the Army Report

“—Martin also served as the commander of the Combined Joint Forces Land Component Command during the pivotal Battle of Mosul, a major multi-national offensive that helped the Iraqi government retake control of the Iraqi city from ISIS forces.–”

************

Warrior: What are your thoughts on the current strategic shift to great power competition and all the discussion about Russian and Chinese threats?

Martin: There are many things that change. I go back, Kris, when you and I were younger, and the Army was coming out of the Vietnam era. And, during that time period, while we were focused on Vietnam, the Soviets were focused on modernizing equipment, changing their doctrine, changing their disposition…and, the next thing you knew, we looked at what we were doing in Europe and understood we had to change some things.

Warrior: How has this strategic perspective informed your current view of Army modernization?

Martin: So, a huge amount of energy went into, changing our doctrine and creating the Big 5 as all of us remember…things like the tank, the Bradley, the Apache, the Blackhawk helicopter…but, we also created the combat training centers, which changed the Army forever. You saw that fully expressed in Desert Storm and beyond that. We’ve got equipment platforms that were born in that era that are over 40-years-old now, and we’ve got to replace them, so while we’ve been busy focusing on the Middle East, our adversaries in China and Russia have been working on capabilities to deny our capabilities. So, what we’re doing is we’re modernizing the Army and changing our doctrine to multi-domain operations, and we’re taking a hard look at how we’re organized across the Army to make sure that we’re appropriately structured for, equipped with and trained to succeed and dominate in that environment.

Warrior: What are your thoughts on the future of heavy armor? When will we truly see a next-generation tank? What will it look like?

Martin: As we look at the future of the mechanized fleet, the armored fleet, what we want to do is we want to take a look at what’s the right platform or platforms to replace our Bradleys and our tanks. So, we’re looking at things like optionally-manned vehicles–think about a vehicle that could be manned or could be robotic and could be controlled from elsewhere, could operate autonomously or not autonomously. We’re looking at new mobile firepower capabilities, we’re looking at leveraging the technology that’s available in the metallurgical development field so that we can have the lightest vehicle possible, but also the most survival vehicle as possible.

Warrior: Will advances in AI, lightweight composites, long-range sensors and unmanned systems remove the need for some armor?

Martin: We’re also taking a hard look at the firepower these vehicles have to determine which is the optimal firepower for us to be able to counter and dominate our adversary’s capabilities. So, there’s going to be a need for a mechanized, or armored, vehicle in the future, it’s just what exactly that looks like. So, the next generation combat vehicle is focused principally on that. We’ve got a great team there. They’re looking at the requirements, they’re starting to work to prototype equipment in the future, and that’s going to allow us to arrive at the appropriate solution, just like we did with the Abrams tank back in the mid 70’s.

— Kris Osborn of WARRIOR MAVEN (CLICK HERE) can be reached at krisosborn.ko@gmail.com

Westlake Legal Group army-q-and-a-pic-warrior-maven Top Army modernization priorities are 'on track,' says Army Vice Chief of Staff Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fnc/tech fnc article 1db180f5-3dbf-57dc-9a80-f72d60095889   Westlake Legal Group army-q-and-a-pic-warrior-maven Top Army modernization priorities are 'on track,' says Army Vice Chief of Staff Warrior Maven Kris Osborn fox-news/tech/topics/us-army fnc/tech fnc article 1db180f5-3dbf-57dc-9a80-f72d60095889

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