web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 216)

Along Hurricane Dorian’s Tortured Path, Millions Are United in Fear

ATLANTA — Norma Lemon, the owner of a Caribbean-themed restaurant on the South Carolina coast, knows well the power of a hurricane to shatter both property and lives. She can recall the distinctive sound of roofs being ripped away by the winds of Hurricane Hugo as it tore though Charleston in 1989. She spent nearly three months restoring her Island Breeze restaurant after it was flooded by Hurricane Irma in 2017.

On Sunday, she was also aware of the strange way that a brutal threat like Hurricane Dorian, a Category 5 storm churning on an indeterminate path in the Atlantic some 500 miles southeast of her, can bind a disparate community across states and nations. She knew that all of them — the millions of people living in Dorian’s direct path, or within its vast cone of probable movement — were inhabiting a distinct universe of worry.

“We are in the same boat, pretty much,” said Ms. Lemon, 57. “They’re saying 175 mile-per-hour winds. You’re thinking about people in the Bahamas and other places that’s really getting it. And then you think that it’s coming to you.”

The National Hurricane Center said on Sunday that Dorian was still growing and moving west toward the Florida coast, with hurricane-force winds extending 45 miles from the center and tropical storm-force winds another 95 miles beyond that. The storm tore into the Bahamas Sunday, with wind gusts over 220 m.p.h — the strongest storm on record to hit the archipelago.

If it maintains those wind speeds and makes landfall in Florida, it would be the most powerful to strike the state since the devastating Labor Day hurricane of 1935.

But it was still unclear whether the eye of the storm would reach land in Florida, or anywhere else. Dorian’s possible paths forward were as expansive as they were unsettled. After approaching the Florida coast on Monday, the storm is expected to turn north, but questions about when it would make the turn, and whether it would hug the Atlantic coast or spin farther out to sea, were still unanswerable.

Officials issued formal hurricane warning Sunday afternoon for the Florida coast from near Titusville south to Jupiter, and a storm surge warning south to Lantana, with watches posted for areas to either side. But those were just the places expected to feel the storm’s impact in the next 36 to 48 hours. Longer-term cautions were sounded much farther north along the coast as well, with officials in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia urging residents to prepare for potential catastrophe in the coming days.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160057689_7faa6429-c6fb-4f6a-b7ac-4a259039e08d-articleLarge Along Hurricane Dorian’s Tortured Path, Millions Are United in Fear Weather National Hurricane Center Hurricanes and Tropical Storms Hurricane Dorian (2019)

Inmates from the Clay County Jail filled sandbags on Sunday in Orange Park, Fla., in preparation for Hurricane Dorian.CreditEric Thayer for The New York Times

It was a familiar feeling of dread for a region where residents mark their lives by the hurricanes they have survived. Their relationships with storms, with their power to kill and destroy, are primarily built on fear.

Those who live with storm threats, whether on small islands in the Caribbean or along the American coast, share the rituals of boarding up, of packing up, of moving out when they can.

The repetition, season after season, can be exhausting. “The hurricane seasons are what age you around here,” said Eric Blake, a hurricane specialist at the National Hurricane Center, west of Miami, who has tracked storms for 20 years. “This kind of stuff gets old.”

But it does not necessarily get easier.

“I’m close to tears,” said Ms. Lemon, who has evacuated three times in the last few years. “It just feels like here we go again with this one, like it’s not going to be good, you know?”

Ms. Lemon’s restaurant, a laid-back place where reggae pumps constantly, overlooks a densely forested marsh island at Mosquito Beach, set between Charleston and Folly Beach. The menu emphasizes the easy cultural harmony between the Caribbean and this stretch of Carolina coast, where Gullah accents lend what to an untrained ear might feel like an island flavor. Ms. Lemon’s menu, prepared with input from her fiancé, Norman Khouri, who hails from Ocho Rios, Jamaica, offers oxtail and jerk pork, as well as country fried chicken.

Ms. Lemon said she did not want to leave her restaurant again. But she knew she might have no choice but to evacuate soon. “I don’t even think we care where we’re going to go, because we’re leaving this precious place that we love so much behind,” she said.

Those in the hurricane zone are bound by the grim reality that a near miss for them could still mean ruin for their neighbors.

Puerto Ricans felt collective relief when Dorian, then barely a hurricane, skidded to the east of the island last week and made its first landfall in the Virgin Islands instead of the predicted direct hit on Puerto Rico. But by Sunday, some expressed dread that the people of the Bahamas would experience deadly destruction similar to how Hurricane Maria wrecked Puerto Rico two years ago.

Steve Neville, a foreman with Florida Power and Light, prepared equipment for potential repair work in Miami in case Hurricane Dorian knocks out power.CreditScott McIntyre for The New York Times

“We had neighborhoods here without power for eight or nine months,” said Luis Raúl Sánchez, the vice mayor of Humacao, P.R., near where Maria came ashore in 2017. “We had no fresh food. No communications. We know that the Bahamas are about to experience something that could be very difficult.”

Residents of the Abaco Islands felt the storm’s wrath on Sunday morning, as residents scrambled for shelters or took refuge in churches. Storm surge of up to 23 feet was possible, along with 25 inches of rain, threatening to swamp many low-lying areas of the Bahamas. Parts of Marsh Harbour, the principal town in the Abaco Islands, were flooded.

Prime Minister Hubert Minnis urged residents of Grand Bahama Island, the next in the storm’s way, to move to safer ground in Freeport, the main city. “As a physician, I have been trained to withstand many things — but never anything like this,” Dr. Minnis told reporters.

The day before the storm struck, the Nassau Guardian newspaper had posted an article on its website detailing evacuation options with the bluntest of headlines: “Get out.”

The hurricane zone is connected by networks of charity. In Miami on Sunday, Valencia Gunder, the unpaid executive director of Smile Trust, a nonprofit group, said she had spent $15,000 buying 11 pallets of water, a half-dozen generators, grills, rice, chicken and hot dogs in case she needed to launch a Miami feeding operation.

If Miami is spared, Ms. Gunder said she would do what she did last year, when she got eighteen-wheelers and shifted her operation to the Florida Panhandle, where Hurricane Michael hit. She has already decided to kick off a response for the Bahamas. After all, she said, much of Miami was built by Bahamian labor.

And the region is kept up and running after storms by people like Stephen Neville, a power lineman full of purpose and swagger.

“When we hear there is a storm, we are walking around the yard, high-fiving each other saying, ‘Bring it on!’” said Mr. Neville, who works for Florida’s largest utility, Florida Power and Light. “Everybody is pumped up. We are like dogs in a cage, ready to attack.”

Valencia Gunder, executive director of the Smile Trust, at the Community Emergency Operations Center in Miami. Ms. Gunder’s group helps supply people in need with hurricane supplies throughout Miami-Dade County.CreditScott McIntyre for The New York Times

The hurricane zone is connected by the mix of people taking flight, and by people who never went back to battered hometowns. There are Puerto Ricans in Florida. There are New Orleanians in Georgia. It is full of people who want to leave when a storm like Dorian approaches, and people who cannot — or will not.

In Cocoa, Fla., on Sunday, Renora Johnson, 69, chatted with friends and family outside her home at the Regina Myra apartments as clouds rolled by overhead and wind whistled through the palm trees in her shady yard. Brevard County has ordered a mandatory evacuation by 8 a.m. Monday for beachside residents in Cocoa, but not for most inland residents like her.

Almost exactly two years ago, she considered evacuating to her family in Georgia for Hurricane Irma. But that seemed like too much of a hassle. She made it through that storm, with water leaking into the bedrooms, but she was anxious about losing power again. One of Ms. Johnson’s daughters is partially paralyzed and uses an electric bed.

Ms. Johnson has gathered bottled water, canned goods and flashlights. And she’s filled several bags of sand from a pile the city dumped a few blocks away. Both of her neighbors helped her board up the windows.

“I pretty much got help from this side and that side,” she said, motioning to the brick, one-story homes bordering her own. “I thank God for good neighbors.”

There are others whose family stories are told in hurricane chapters. Nancy Sikes-Kline, 62, is a native Floridian and city commissioner in St. Augustine, Fla. Her father was born in West Palm Beach, Fla., a year after the ferocious hurricane of 1928 that killed some 2,500 people, and he had memories of the infamous Labor Day Hurricane of 1935. Ms. Sikes-Kline remembers being a little girl sick with scarlet fever when the eye of Hurricane Donna went over her family’s boarded-up house in Lakeland, Fla., in 1960.

In 2016, Hurricane Matthew sent four feet of water into her one-story house. The next year, Hurricane Irma took out all that was left on her lot, a small shed.

Today, she and her family have a new, raised house, and a plan to evacuate Tuesday, if necessary. Still, she was all nerves on Sunday, like so many others near and far. She would have turned to the succor of church, but services were canceled. “So we didn’t go to church,” she said. “We went to Target to get flashlights instead.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

AFL-CIO Chief Lashes Trump Administration For Hurting American Workers

Westlake Legal Group 5d6c854e2400004f0071c40d AFL-CIO Chief Lashes Trump Administration For Hurting American Workers

The president of the AFL-CIO union federation told Fox News’ Chris Wallace on Sunday that the Trump administration has “done more things to hurt workers” than to help them — comments that elicited angry tweets from President Donald Trump

Richard Trumka, head of the group that includes 55 different unions, said wages are being swamped by rising health care and housing costs, and that Trump is botching his trade war with China.

Trump has also opposed every effort to increase the minimum wage and has stripped safety standards that used to protect workers, Trumka said.

“I’ve tried to call balls and strikes with him,” he said, referring to Trump. “When he does something that’s good for workers, I say so. When he does something that’s bad for workers, I say so. And I have to say, unfortunately, while he may not even know what his administration is doing, they’ve done more things to hurt workers than they have to help them.”

Trump on Monday morning tweeted his displeasure with Trumka, saying union members should stop paying dues and vote for him in 2020. 

In the interview Sunday, Trumka said union voters helped put Trump in the White House.

“He came to our members and said, ‘I’m going to change the rules of the economy,’ and they believed him. And, quite frankly, I wish he would have changed the rules of the economy,” Trumka told Wallace.

“Unfortunately, the rules he’s changing has hurt them. He’s opposed every increase in the minimum wage. He’s changed the regulation to take overtime away from a couple of million people. … He’s rolled back health and safety standards [for] workers.”

Trumka said “real wages are down” because they’re increasingly being gobbled up by “housing costs and health care.” 

“Look, our members are still waiting for the supposed greatness of this economy to reach their kitchen tables,” he said. “When they do, I’ll cheer, they’ll cheer and they’ll all support the person who helped get it there.”

Trumka also said the AFL-CIO will not support the current U.S. Mexico Canada Agreement, the president’s version of NAFTA that hasn’t yet been approved by Congress.

Trumka said the trade regulations are “unenforceable” and that Mexican wages “will suck jobs and capital out of the United States.” 

As for China, Trumka said it was good the president had taken on the country, but that he has “done it the wrong way.” 

“If you’re going to take on China, it has to be multilateral, it has to address human rights and labor rights violations,” Trumka said. “It has to address currency rebalancing, and it has to have a long-term slant towards good jobs in this country. That’s not been the approach, unfortunately.” 

Trumka made many of the same points that farm association leaders have expressed in recent weeks. Roger Johnson, the head of the National Farmers Union, also said last week that Trump should have taken on China as part of a team of allies. Farmers have complained that the China stalemate and other administration policies are hurting their livelihoods

Check out Trumka’s full interview in the video above.

This story has been updated with Trump’s response.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pope Struggles With Higher Power As He Gets Trapped In Elevator For 25 Minutes

Westlake Legal Group 5d6ca11d2400004f0071c41a Pope Struggles With Higher Power As He Gets Trapped In Elevator For 25 Minutes

Kissing Prisoners’ Feet

A mere two weeks after he was announced as pontiff, Francis washed and kissed the feet of 12 prisoners incarcerated in Rome as part of the traditional Holy Thursday rite. The unorthodox component of the ceremony was the <a href=”http://blogs.reuters.com/faithworld/2013/03/29/pope-francis-includes-women-muslims-for-first-time-in-holy-thursday-rite/” target=”_hplink”>inclusion of two women,</a> one of whom was a Muslim. This show of acceptance and compassion was just a hint at what was to come, as the pope has continued to make statements about the importance of interfaith understanding as well as the importance of a greater role for women in the church. Francis sent personal <a href=”https://www.huffpost.com/entry/pope-francis-id-ramadan-greetings_n_3695752″ target=”_hplink”>Eid al-Fitr holiday greetings</a> to Muslims around the world, rather than relying on his office to do so in a show of care and good will that hasn’t happened since Pope John Paul II sent a similar personal message in 1991.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082349433001_6082345397001-vs Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c5fc19b6-617a-5adb-8a77-03219d57bcac article

A 40-year-old former teacher died Saturday during a shooting spree in West Texas after he was shot while sitting in traffic in front of his wife and two children, a report said.

Joseph Griffith was remembered by his family for his sense of humor and his dedication to his family, The Odessa American newspaper reported. He worked six days a week to support his family and was killed while on his way with his family to have their portraits taken, according to the paper.

GUNMAN LOST JOB HOURS BEFORE :  REPORT

“This maniac pulled up next to him and shot him, took his life, murdered my baby brother,” Carla Byrne, his sister, told The Washington Post.

Authorities in Texas are working to determine what led to the shooting rampage that started with a traffic stop on Saturday and ended when the gunman—who was identified  in a press release—was gunned down in a movie theater parking lot in Odessa. He killed seven and injured 22.

Among the victims included a 29-year-old mail carrier who was “carjacked and murdered” while on the job. Authorities said there were about 15 crime scenes.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The 22 injured included three law enforcement officers and a 17-month-old who will undergo an operation on Monday to remove shrapnel from her chest.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082349433001_6082345397001-vs Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c5fc19b6-617a-5adb-8a77-03219d57bcac article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082349433001_6082345397001-vs Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c5fc19b6-617a-5adb-8a77-03219d57bcac article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082349433001_6082345397001-vs Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c5fc19b6-617a-5adb-8a77-03219d57bcac article

A 40-year-old former teacher died Saturday during a shooting spree in West Texas after he was shot while sitting in traffic in front of his wife and two children, a report said.

Joseph Griffith was remembered by his family for his sense of humor and his dedication to his family, The Odessa American newspaper reported. He worked six days a week to support his family and was killed while on his way with his family to have their portraits taken, according to the paper.

GUNMAN LOST JOB HOURS BEFORE :  REPORT

“This maniac pulled up next to him and shot him, took his life, murdered my baby brother,” Carla Byrne, his sister, told The Washington Post.

Authorities in Texas are working to determine what led to the shooting rampage that started with a traffic stop on Saturday and ended when the gunman—who was identified  in a press release—was gunned down in a movie theater parking lot in Odessa. He killed seven and injured 22.

Among the victims included a 29-year-old mail carrier who was “carjacked and murdered” while on the job. Authorities said there were about 15 crime scenes.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The 22 injured included three law enforcement officers and a 17-month-old who will undergo an operation on Monday to remove shrapnel from her chest.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082349433001_6082345397001-vs Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c5fc19b6-617a-5adb-8a77-03219d57bcac article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082349433001_6082345397001-vs Texas shooting victims include dad gunned down in front of wife, kids fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche c5fc19b6-617a-5adb-8a77-03219d57bcac article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hurricane Dorian is the strongest storm to ever threaten Florida’s East Coast, batters Bahamas

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082388062001_6082391842001-vs Hurricane Dorian is the strongest storm to ever threaten Florida's East Coast, batters Bahamas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 31b21669-30e6-5b4b-b7e3-0acd58edc83f

Florida weather officials warned late Sunday that Hurricane Dorian—the Category 5 monster that continues to batter parts of the Bahamas with 185 mph winds— is the strongest storm to ever threaten the state’s East Coast.

The storm—which was about 135 miles east of West Palm Beach as of 11:35 p.m. ET Sunday—is still considered unpredictable. Millions of residents on the East Coast are watching to see if the storm will turn north in the next two days and spare the state with a direct hit.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT DORIAN’S PATH

“No matter what path this storm takes, our state will be impacted,” Jared Moskowitz, the director of the state’s Department of Emergency Management, said. “We will continue to work around the clock to prepare.”

The National Hurricane Center on Sunday issued its first hurricane warning for parts of Florida related to Dorian. The storm has slowed early Monday and is moving west at 5 mph.

IF YOU’RE IN STORM’S PATH, YOU SHOULD KNOW THESE CRITICAL THINGS 

The warning affected areas from Juniper Inlet, in Palm Beach County — stretching from the state’s Atlantic coast into its rural center — to the Volusia-Brevard County line. A hurricane watch also was issued from the Volusia-Brevard County line to the Flagler-Volusia County line.  

CONTINUING COVERAGE ON FOX NEWS CHANNEL 

Glenn Richards, the chief meteorologist on Fox 35, said late Sunday that the forecast “turns Dorian northwest Monday afternoon/eve” and should keep the storm about 50-70 miles off the coast of Central Florida.

“This will produce tropical storm sustained winds and hurricane gusts along the coast with tropical-storm-force gusts inland. Still expecting 1-3 inches of rain inland with 3-6 inches near the coast,” he said. “Worst weather arrives early Tuesday and departs early Wednesday.”

The U.S. National Hurricane Center issued a hurricane watch for Florida’s East Coast from Deerfield Beach north to the Georgia state line. The same area was put under a storm surge watch. Lake Okeechobee was under a tropical storm watch.

Ken Graham, director of the hurricane center, urged people not to bet on safety just because the forecast track had the storm a bit offshore. With every new forecast, “we keep nudging (Dorian’s track) a little bit to the left” — that is, is closer to the Florida coast, Graham said.

The storm slammed into the Bahamas on Sunday as the strongest hurricane in modern records for the northwestern part of the islands.

FLIGHT CANCELLATIONS

Dr. Hubert Minnis, the prime minister of the Bahamas, cried on Sunday as he described the devastation left behind. Forecasters said Dorian was most likely to begin pulling away from the Bahamas early Tuesday.

“This is a deadly storm and a monster storm. I can only say to them, that I hope this is not the last time they will hear my voice and may God be with them,” he said.

There was little information from the affected islands, though officials expected many residents to be left homeless. Most people went to shelters as the storm approached, with tourist hotels shutting down and residents boarded up their homes.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Dorian’s maximum sustained winds reached 185 mph, with gusts up to 220 mph, tying the record for the most powerful Atlantic hurricane to ever make landfall.

That equaled the Labor Day hurricane of 1935, before storms were named. The only recorded storm that was more powerful was Hurricane Allen in 1980, with 190 mph winds, though it did not make landfall at that strength.

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster issued an order Sunday for the mandatory evacuation of his state’s entire coast. The order, which covers about 830,000 people, was to take effect at noon Monday, at which point state troopers were to make all lanes on major coastal highways one-way heading inland.

A few hours later, Georgia’s governor, Brian Kemp, ordered mandatory evacuations for that state’s Atlantic coast, also starting at midday Monday. North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper warned his state that it could see heavy rain, winds and floods later in the week.

“As we continue to monitor this storm, all Floridians should follow local reports and heed the call for evacuations,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said. “We are ready to deploy assets as needed and will continue to monitor traffic and fuel levels as more counties come under hurricane watches and warnings.”

Fox News’ Frank Miles and the Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082388062001_6082391842001-vs Hurricane Dorian is the strongest storm to ever threaten Florida's East Coast, batters Bahamas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 31b21669-30e6-5b4b-b7e3-0acd58edc83f   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082388062001_6082391842001-vs Hurricane Dorian is the strongest storm to ever threaten Florida's East Coast, batters Bahamas fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 31b21669-30e6-5b4b-b7e3-0acd58edc83f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Postal worker, 15-year-old student are among the victims killed in Texas shooting

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Postal worker, 15-year-old student are among the victims killed in Texas shooting

A traffic stop triggered a deadly shooting rampage. Warning: Some viewers may find this video disturbing. Wochit, Wochit

PHOENIX – A teenager who had just celebrated her quinceañera, a postal worker and a former math teacher were among the seven people killed on the streets around Odessa, Texas, when a mass shooter shattered an otherwise quiet Saturday afternoon.

An additional 22 people were injured. 

The shooting began after state troopers pulled over a man for failing to use a turn signal on Interstate 20, said Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke.

The driver grabbed a rifle and shot multiple times at the troopers through the rear window, wounding one of them, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

The man then sped off, firing at motorists and passers-by, and eventually hijacking a U.S. Postal Service vehicle. The 36-year-old shooter was killed after being chased by officers from neighboring cities Midland and Odessa.

Officials said the ages of the deceased ranged from 15 to 57 years old. Police haven’t identified those killed during Sunday afternoon’s massacre, but details surrounding the lives that were cut short have begun to emerge.

These are their stories.

Mary Granados

The U.S. Postal Service confirmed to the USA TODAY Network that one of its employees – 29-year-old Mary Granados – was among those killed. 

“The Postal Service is shocked and saddened by the events that occurred yesterday in the Midland-Odessa area,” a USPS statement said. “We are especially grieving the loss of our postal family member, letter carrier Mary Granados, age 29, and we continue to keep her family in our thoughts.”

7 killed: ‘We are heartbroken’: Death toll rises to seven in Texas shooting; gunman identified

USPS said its law enforcement arm, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, is working with law enforcement to assist in the investigation. 

Rosie Granados, Mary’s sister, told CNN that she heard Mary scream as she was shot while talking on the phone. 

“It was very painful,” Granados told news outlet. “I just wanted to help her and I couldn’t. I thought she had got bit by a dog or something. I tried calling her name and she wouldn’t answer.”

Rosie and a former co-worker named Leslie Aide set up a GoFundMe page to offset funeral expenses.

Joseph Griffith

Joseph Griffith, 40, was waiting at a traffic light with his wife and two children when he was fatally shot, Carla Byrne – Griffith’s oldest sister – told The Washington Post.

“This maniac pulled up next to him and shot him, took away his life, murdered my baby brother,” Griffith told The Post. “Like nothing. We are so broken.”

Byrne told the news outlet that Griffith had been a math teacher who cared deeply for his students.

Becky Griffith, Joseph’s wife, urged people to attend church in a Facebook post Sunday morning.

“I’ve been up most of the night and I’d like to ask you all to get up and go to church,” Griffith wrote. “Pray for those still fighting for their lives, pray for those devastated by what they witnessed yesterday and pray for those dealing losses (sic). Get the word of God in your heart and love each other.”

Rodolfo ‘Rudy’ Arco

Rodolfo “Rudy” Arco, 57, had left his home in Las Vegas after the anniversary of a mass shooting that took place at a music festival there in 2017, said his sister Maria Arco. 

“He felt that Odessa was the place to go,” she said. “He sold everything in Vegas and moved there, in the hopes that things would be safer for him and the family.”

Rudy, who owned a trucking company in Odessa, was driving Saturday when three bullets were fired at his truck. Two went through the cab and one came right through the window and killed him instantly, Maria Arco said. 

Rudy’s daughter, Julieanna, works at Music City Mall in Odessa. After being released from lockdown there Saturday, she headed home and saw her father’s truck on the side of the road, Maria Arco said. Julieanna was directed to the hospital, her aunt said. 

Vigil: Odessa and neighboring Midland vow to heal in face of a day filled with ‘the best and worst of humanity’

Maria said that she, Rudy and their youngest brother, Emilio, moved with their family to the U.S. as Cuban refugees in 1969. 

She described her brother as loving and joyous – the kind of person who’d always try to help other people at a party to have fun.

“He enjoyed life,” she said.

He was an entrepreneur who started the trucking business in Odessa and previously owned several taquerias in Las Vegas.

Maria Arco described the violence in this country as a “societal ill.” 

“It’s not a geographical ill that is in this country,” she said. “We need to take care of whatever is ailing our families in our society. I don’t think it’s guns, I think it goes deeper than that. It’s not about one physical thing – I think it goes to the emotional.”

Above all, she said society must take a collective stand against violence.

“I just think it’s too many,” she said. “Our legislators can only do so much, but I think society is the one that needs to say, ‘OK, we’re done here.’ ”

A GoFundMe has been started for Rudy’s family.

Leilah Hernandez

Leilah Herandez is the youngest among the dead.

Hernandez’s grandmother, Nora Leyva, told The Post that she spent two years helping the family plan Hernandez’s quinceañera, which they celebrated in May. 

Leyva described to The Post how Leilah’s mother was stunned as she mourned the loss of her daughter. The family remains gathered at the Odessa hospital where they await updates on the condition of Leilah’s 18-year-old brother, Nathan, who was shot in the arm while his arms were around her.

The Ector County Independent School District tweeted that it was mourning the loss of one of its students but didn’t name Hernandez. 

“We are heartbroken and outraged by the violence that struck our community and our school district today,” the school district tweeted. “We are learning that we have lost friends, family members, as well as one of our students.”

The district added that it will provide additional councilors to help staff, students and families process the tragedy.

Kameron Brown

Kameron Brown survived the deserts of Afghanistan as a U.S. Army soldier before he was gunned down in the country he called home.

Standard Safety & Supply, a first-aid and fire protection service based Odessa where Brown was employed, mourned the loss of its former employee on the company Facebook page.

The latest: 7 dead, 22 injured in Odessa, Midland, Texas shooting: Here’s what we know now

“We are deeply saddened to confirm that a member of our team died tragically as a victim of the senseless and horrifying shootings that occurred in and around Odessa on Saturday,” the company wrote. “We ask that the privacy of our team member and his family be respected during this most difficult time.”

The company also shared a link to a GoFundMe page, which described Brown as being a resident of Brownwood, Texas, a city nearly 200 miles east of Odessa.

“The funds raised through this campaign will provide financial assistance for Kameron’s family as they make funeral arrangements for their beloved family member,” the GoFundMe page reads.

The page’s organizer, Meghan Farmer, did not specify her relationship with Brown or his family.

The Coleman County Chamber of Commerce, expressed its condolences on Facebook and said Brown had attended school in Coleman, east of Midland. 

Edwin Peregrino

Edwin Peregrino, 25, was visiting his parents in Odessa when he went outside to investigate the sound of gunshots and was hit, The Post reported.

His sister, Eritizi Peregrino, told the news outlet her brother was visiting after recently moving to San Antonio. 

“You’re not even safe at your own house,” Peregrino told The Post.

Peregrino’s husband also was shot, but is recovering.

22 others injured

Nearly two dozen other people were injured in the mass shooting, including a 17-month-old girl and three law enforcement officers.

One of those officers is Zack Owens, 28, with Midland’s police department.

According to a GoFundMe page created for him, Owens was shot multiple times in the arm and hand. His most serious injury was glass shards in his eye.

The page’s creator, Abigail McCollough, is Owens’ cousin by marriage.

“What we really need is a lot of prayer. Not only for Zack, but for everyone impacted by today’s events,” McCollough wrote in a Facebook post.

Owens has been an officer with the department since December 2014, according to a Police Department post on Facebook. On Sunday, the Midland Police Department posted on Facebook a message of thanks to the community, including their “cherished brother” Owens.

A local funeral home, Perches, has offered to provide free funeral services for families impacted by the shooting.

Follow Molly Duerig and Perry Vandell on Twitter: @mollyduerig and @PerryVandell

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/01/texas-shooting-victims-what-we-know/2189455001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A year later and the Trump official who wrote ‘I am the resistance’ remains a secret

Westlake Legal Group GCtUqHGvtsSljbI5UBuktzO-QpLzvI8usyCQV5abpW0 A year later and the Trump official who wrote ‘I am the resistance’ remains a secret r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Attack ideas, not users. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas gunman was fired from job hours before shooting rampage: report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082360396001_6082355743001-vs Texas gunman was fired from job hours before shooting rampage: report fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 570d8311-2137-553e-ba13-c3463d8615cf

Texas authorities on Sunday said the gunman who opened fire the day before—killing seven and injuring at least 22—had been fired from his trucking job just hours before the shooting rampage,  a report said.

The gunman was killed by law enforcement in a movie theater parking lot in the town of Odessa. It is believed he was acting alone and no motive was determined, The New York Times reported.

MAIL CARRIER AMONG THOSE KILLED IN THE SHOOTING SPREE

]The deceased victims ranged from 15 to 57. The gunman—who was identified in a press release Sunday—used an “AR-type weapon” in the rampage that had multiple crime scenes.

Law enforcement mentioned that this was a “different type” of active shooter situation because the gunman was “mobile,” the Times reported. President Trump praised police officers who engaged the gunman.

The shooting began around 3 p.m. Saturday after state troopers pulled over the gunman for making a left-handed turn without signaling.

In the chaos that followed, the suspect hijacked the mail carrier truck, Mary Granados, 29, and fired at random, investigators said.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Authorities said 15 separate locations had been designated crime scenes. The 22 injured included three law enforcement officers and a 17-month-old who will undergo an operation on Monday to remove shrapnel from her chest.

Fox News’ Talia Kaplan and Robert Gearty contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082360396001_6082355743001-vs Texas gunman was fired from job hours before shooting rampage: report fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 570d8311-2137-553e-ba13-c3463d8615cf   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082360396001_6082355743001-vs Texas gunman was fired from job hours before shooting rampage: report fox news fnc/us fnc Edmund DeMarche article 570d8311-2137-553e-ba13-c3463d8615cf

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Reese May: Hurricane Dorian is a monster storm – Three critical things Americans in its path need to know

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082388062001_6082391842001-vs Reese May: Hurricane Dorian is a monster storm – Three critical things Americans in its path need to know Reese May fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 33c189b5-21d2-5862-ab37-bd4de4aab28c

After disasters, we often see the best of America. Neighbors helping neighbors, the bravery of first responders, and an outpouring of support, volunteerism, and goods and services for those affected. As a nation, we are pretty good at “winning the response.” But response and recovery are very different endeavors.
 
Response is early, visible, urgent and fast. In the weeks and months following the disaster, many families remain displaced with no means to recover and no clear path home. Long-term recovery can be agonizingly slow.
 
We saw that with Katrina, and volunteering in St. Bernard Parish after that storm is what led Zack Rosenburg and Liz McCartney to create the St. Bernard Project, now SBP, a national organization dedicated to preventing people from being pushed beyond their breaking point after a disaster.

HURRICANE DORIAN’S PATH: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
 
Over the past 14 years, we’ve seen too many American citizens suffer because of three main factors: a delay between disaster and recovery, lack of a clear and predictable path forward, and lack of access to resources.  Based on our experience in 12 communities across the country, we offer the following suggestions for those in Dorian’s path:
 
1. Survivors must be prepared to fiercely advocate for themselves.
 
Disaster survivors cannot receive any type of federal assistance without first completing an application. It is the responsibility of survivors to apply for any and all assistance needed, while supplying all the supporting documentation. If applicants disagree with a decision, it is their right and responsibility to appeal that decision. The more accurately damage is reported, the better sense government, philanthropy, and service organizations will have about immediate and long-term recovery needs.

Over the past 14 years, we’ve seen too many American citizens suffer because of three main factors: a delay between disaster and recovery, lack of a clear and predictable path forward and lack of access to resources.

During a recovery training hosted by SBP in Paradise, Calif., in February, one resident shared that she had received six denials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) before finally receiving assistance. She would have given up but her 89-year-old mother intervened and drove her back to apply one last time.
 
2. Government must increase the predictability of recovery resources.
 
We’ve seen much greater flexibility and creativity by FEMA and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). That said, accurate, timely and fair damage inspections are needed, both for individual citizens and to enable federal appropriations and allocation processes to work more efficiently.

FEMA has begun exploring newer technologies, though its current method of damage assessment is susceptible to human error and is extremely time-consuming. Inspectors use pad and pen, or tablet devices, visually inspecting one home at a time and manually inputting information.

State and local government leaders should test the accuracy of the data they receive to ensure it is an accurate representation of damage and of individual and community needs. At the same time, construction and insurance companies are integrating technologies such as satellite imagery and flyover images into their practices. FEMA should continue to investigate and test the benefits of these newer methods of evaluation.
 
3. Americans should rethink charitable giving after a disaster and focus on both response and recovery.
 
After a disaster, 70 to 80 percent of total monetary donations are raised within the first two weeks, with most stakeholders opting to give to disaster relief and response organizations. In the ensuing weeks and months, many families remain displaced.

To address this glaring need, American’s must understand that charitable giving from businesses and corporations, individual donors and major foundations play a critical role in the first two to three years of a community’s recovery.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER
 
These entities provide the raw materials for communities to build a bridge from the day the storm makes landfall to the arrival of federal assistance, some two years later. If corporations, foundations and individuals better understand the need, they can give to support long-term recovery efforts that enable families to return home — minimizing unnecessary suffering caused by a delayed recovery.
 
In Houston, J.J. Watt, the Houston Texans defensive lineman, recognized the value of long-term rebuilding after Hurricane Harvey. Watt’s foundation granted funding to SBP, which enabled us to build 100 homes in the first year. SBP then trained and sub-granted funding and AmeriCorps members to seven other smaller nonprofits, which also began rebuilding for families in need. At the two-year anniversary of Harvey, SBP and its partners have rebuilt 285 homes. Future recoveries will be better resourced if donors remember to support both the response and the recovery when planning charitable giving.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP
 
Wherever Dorian makes landfall, Americans will do their part to help. Some will donate or volunteer—assisting communities and families regain what was lost.

Recent college graduates and civic-oriented individuals will join AmeriCorps and complete a term of service to drive meaningful results for fellow citizens. But despite the best intentions of many, the recovery process will be painfully long and slow. We can do better. Keeping these three issues in mind is a good place to start.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082388062001_6082391842001-vs Reese May: Hurricane Dorian is a monster storm – Three critical things Americans in its path need to know Reese May fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 33c189b5-21d2-5862-ab37-bd4de4aab28c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6082388062001_6082391842001-vs Reese May: Hurricane Dorian is a monster storm – Three critical things Americans in its path need to know Reese May fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters/hurricane-dorian fox-news/science/planet-earth/natural-disasters fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 33c189b5-21d2-5862-ab37-bd4de4aab28c

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com