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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 220)

Rock Climbers To Test Trump’s Boast That His Border Barrier Can’t Be Scaled

Westlake Legal Group 5d984af52100003100311257 Rock Climbers To Test Trump’s Boast That His Border Barrier Can’t Be Scaled

Rock climbers plan to test President Donald Trump’s boast that his new stretch of border barrier cannot be scaled by anyone.

“Many in the climbing community were amused a couple of weeks ago when our POTUS held a press conference at a section of his latest border wall design — a series of parallel square steel posts with a 5-foot-high plate at the top,” climber and engineer Rick Weber wrote Friday in “Rock and Ice” magazine, noting that Trump described it as “impossible to climb.”

The president “boasted that ‘the federal government tested the structure by having 20 skilled mountain climbers attempt to climb it, and no one could,’” Weber wrote. But he added, “No one in our climbing community knows any of these 20 mountaineers. I doubt if they exist.”

Maya Madere, a sophomore at Stanford University who is the nation’s fifth-ranked woman boulderer (that’s someone who climbs smaller rock formations without ropes), called Trump’s claim that the barrier was tested by top climbers “preposterous.” Trump is “full of shit as usual,” she told The Daily Beast last month.

“Definitely no well-recognized U.S. climbers have taken part in something like that,” climber Ross Fulkerson, a seven-time member of the U.S. national team, told The Daily Beast. 

But now Weber is arranging for climbers to test a replica of the barrier in a climbing competition on Oct. 11 and 12 in the Red River Gorge area of Kentucky. Entry is free and there will be prizes, he wrote. The dates overlap with an annual climbing event in the area known as Rocktoberfest.

“To declare something to be impossible to climb to a bonafide rock climber is to issue a challenge,” Weber wrote.

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My Dog Gracie’s Death Absolutely Devastated Me. Please Don’t Say She Was ‘Just A Pet.’

In November 2018, I heard her nails catch the carpet. The noise was a gentle, scratchy zip, and I think even then I knew she was dying. Well, at the very least, the pessimist in me knew something was very wrong. I began Googling, and the worst hit was degenerative myelopathy (DM). That’s what eventually killed my dog, Gracie, on Sept. 7, 2019.

DM is a degenerative disease that affects the spinal cord. It is analogous to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in humans. Initial symptoms include wobbling of the back end and knuckling of the back paws. Then the legs become weak, then paralyzed. Then the bladder goes. Then the front legs. Then the respiratory system. The disease is generally known to be painless and terminal.

My husband, Troy, and I took Gracie to the vet immediately after the first episode of “knuckling” and received an optimistic prognosis — DM was “way down” on the differential. The knuckling only affected the one back paw intermittently. A conservative approach with a focus on strengthening and exercise was a reasonable first step.  

By December 2018, her back legs slipped just a little on my parents’ shiny wood floor as she ambled near the Christmas tree. In February, she ran drills for treats in our living room to strengthen her legs. By March, she wobbled more when she walked and had trouble placing her right back paw firmly on the ground, so we tried therapy and took her for X-rays. Nothing was wrong with her skeleton, not even the arthritis expected of a dog her age.

Westlake Legal Group 5d960fec2100001403f9f26f My Dog Gracie’s Death Absolutely Devastated Me. Please Don’t Say She Was ‘Just A Pet.’

Courtesy of Lauren Twigg Krupica Gracie still standing strong in February 2019.

In April, we traveled to a dog neurologist. He said we could do an MRI. He was pretty sure it was DM without the MRI. He advised we send away a DNA sample for genetic testing. In the meantime, her right back leg became completely paralyzed. The results of the DNA test returned in mid-May: “A/A Homozygous at risk, 2 copies of the DM Mutation.” 

Dejected but defiant, we committed ourselves to Gracie’s wellness. We tried every leg brace and paw-traction aid we could find. We bought a rear harness to operate her right leg for her. Then we bought a wheelchair. We researched the most nutritious foods and supplements and purchased them. When her incontinence started in May, we bought reusable diapers and piddle pads.

In July, the crippling urinary tract infections began. Vet appointments occurred multiple times a week by August. But she rallied! She played with her ball, barked and sniped at her much bigger and younger dog-sister, gave us her paw to shake, and soaked up the attention and treats at a Labor Day cookout. She continued to affirm our game plan: As long as she remained “Gracie,” happy and engaged in life, we would continue to fight with her. When she couldn’t go on, we would know, and we would make a compassionate decision.

Gracie took the decision out of our hands. Two days after the last time she handed Troy her paw in exchange for a treat, her diaphragm apparently stopped working. He picked her up to put her in the car for a planned vet appointment. She looked him in the eyes and died.

The shock of her imminent death created mental dissonance that is physically painful. We knew this was going to happen. We watched it happen. It happened. So, by definition, it can’t be shocking. Yet, here we are, weeks after she passed, still in shock. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d960efe2200008c01dcc770 My Dog Gracie’s Death Absolutely Devastated Me. Please Don’t Say She Was ‘Just A Pet.’

Courtesy of Lauren Twigg Krupica Lauren Twigg Krupica with her beloved Gracie.

Gracie was sick. In hindsight, she was really sick for much of July and August. The house smelled of urine. “Gracie laundry” added 30 minutes to my prework routine in the morning. I was late to work a lot. Our counters were lined with syringes of steroids and pill bottles for various symptoms. Our refrigerator housed a bag of sodium chloride for emergency hydration; our pantry, needles for subcutaneous injections. Troy learned how to express her bladder and left work midday to keep her on a 4- to 5-hour expression schedule. 

We woke up at least three times each night to reposition her and change the first layer of absorbent padding. For approximately her last 65 days, conversations were exclusively Gracie-focused: “Did you get her to eat? Was her diaper wet when you got home? Do you think she feels warm? Can you grab more wipes on the way home? Why do you think she’s not eating today? Should we go to the emergency vet or wait until the morning? Today is a great day, right?” 

Despite the constant fear and worry, there was no other path. Her “bad” days only punctuated great days. How could we choose to end her life when she appeared happy and dignified, but for some mechanical failings? We became her legs and her bladder. We maintained impeccable hygiene for her. We were practically permanent fixtures at her vet’s office.

Our nervous systems now operate in overdrive. Our shoulders have been crunched under our ears for 10 months. Repeated, alternating sensations of deep relief and overwhelming panic, within the course of a couple of hours, multiple days a week, rewired our brains. I feel a sense of dread when the phone rings. Then I realize the “bad call” already happened and a macabre sense of relief floods me for a second. I start to gear up for postwork caretaking duties as I drive down our hilly driveway, only to realize by the time I pull in the garage, there are none. 

Her absence feels like homesickness: I want to go home, except I can’t because that home disappeared, and there is no way to find it.

I held her for five hours after she died. She became cold and hard and heavy, like a big piggy bank wrapped in fur. I struggled with her weight and shape as I walked around the yard, tracing the route where she used to run after her ball. I watched my bereft husband dig a grave in the impossibly rocky, clay soil of our backyard in nearly 90 degree heat. He placed her in the ground and covered her up, and my previous 12 years hit a hard stop. 

Her absence feels like homesickness: I want to go home, except I can’t because that home disappeared, and there is no way to find it. The three of us were an ecosystem for 12 years, 10 months and 13 days. She watched sports with Troy and “yelled” at the TV when he yelled. She laid her head on my keyboard when I worked too long. She begged for bites of every dinner. She ripped open packages every Christmas. (They weren’t even hers. She just really liked ripping things apart.) She herded nieces and nephews and nestled closely to them at sleepovers. She ate a small piece of birthday pumpkin pie every Oct. 25. She was co-captain of boat rides on the lake. She snuck nibbles of Pop-Tarts from her “Pap” when she visited her “grandparents.” She slept next to us every night. Now what?

In the immediate days after she died, Troy and I stopped eating. I would wake up with a racing heart shortly after falling asleep. I still don’t want to come home from work because the house feels haunted by tragedy. The specter of death had lingered for months, but in the form of a familiar foe. We had a daily strategy and executed it. We were winning. Then death entered the house by sneak attack, establishing itself the victor.

In movies, people fall to the ground and cry when someone has died. Previous to Sept. 7, 2019, I, blessedly, never totally understood why. Now I do. It’s because people actually do fall to the ground and cry when someone has died. Never in my adult life have I spent so much time on the ground. On the deck. On the little bed where she took her last breath. On the patio by her grave. In the living room. In my bedroom. I now see that grief physically forces you down. If there were a place lower than the ground, the grieving would find it. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d9610ee210000f703f9f2e1 My Dog Gracie’s Death Absolutely Devastated Me. Please Don’t Say She Was ‘Just A Pet.’

Courtesy of Lauren Twigg Krupica Gracie on the boat, one of her favorite places, on July 29, 2019.

Looking at the fresh grave in the yard was untenable, so we planted a rose garden around it. We put up a little white picket fence, added some stepping stones, and put a bench next to the two miniature rose bushes we planted on top of her. The physical work, the sweating in the heat and the straining to see our work area as the sun set, helped us sleep at night. Creating something nice allowed us to channel our grief into productivity.

Grieving for a dog feels bad. On top of the devastation of losing the being that got me through the entirety of young adulthood, I feel guilt and shame. There are people who have lost children to illness, violence and accidents; people who don’t have money for necessities, let alone veterinary care; 12-year-old children who haven’t lived a life as good as this dog had; ailing elderly people who are not provided the attention and quality of care that we gave Gracie; and a litany of other terrible things affecting people and this planet at any given time. That is a problem. I know it. I am sorry for it, and I wish my sorrow for those things would change how bone-achingly sad I am about my dead dog. While wrestling with the uncomfortable privilege of mourning this dog, I need to mourn this dog. 

Admitting to the grief is embarrassing. Despite the fact that Americans spend billions of dollars a year on pets, and occasionally give them seats at dinner tables and create social media accounts for them, their deaths have an unspoken qualification: “just.” Just a pet. Just a dog.

Their deaths are presumed to be a source of sadness, but not high enough in the Hierarchy of Sad Things to qualify you for bereavement leave. Perhaps there are practical reasons for that. My father, at age 13, lost his father. The emotional devastation was compounded by a new economic landscape and a new reality as the “man of the house.” 

When a pet dies, there are no ancillary impacts. I have suffered no loss of income as a result of my dog’s death. I didn’t depend on her to make dinner or cut the grass. There is no estate that I must now administer. No showing or funeral to publicly pay respects. There is only loss. A dogless collar, a negative space at the head of my bed, a confounding detachment between my present self and the person I was when she was mine. 

Despite the fact that Americans spend billions of dollars a year on pets, and occasionally give them seats at dinner tables and create social media accounts for them, their deaths have an unspoken qualification: “just.” Just a pet. Just a dog.

Gracie was more than her illness. Failing to recognize that would be a scandalously reductive view of a rich and impactful 12 years. She was a force, and the fact that she thrived with her condition as long as she did is a testament to her mental and physical grit. Weighing in around 30 pounds for most of her life and standing at approximately a foot tall, she was a hardy little beast, but petite and beautiful. Bright orange and white with an eardrum-shattering bark, Gracie made herself known.

She was parent and child to us. Protector and protected. She was my favorite childhood stuffed animal come to life: pure, tactile comfort and warmth with the added bonus of a real, unique personality incapable of malice. Food, water, and general care and keeping in exchange for unconditional love, acceptance, kinship and limitless joy seems too good to be true. In the fog of grief, sometimes I think it was. 

I named Gracie within moments of locking eyes with her in December 2006. She looks graceful, I thought. I never actually looked up the word “grace” in all those years. The first definition from Merriam-Webster.com is “unmerited divine assistance given to humans for their regeneration or sanctification.” Boy, was she ever. It was pure bad luck that my Corgi was afflicted with DM, but resentment is an affront to her spirit. How fortunate any of us may be to share a fraction of our lives with such precious creatures. How fortunate I was to have so many years full of grace.

Lauren Twigg Krupica is an attorney in West Virginia.

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Dolly Parton shares moving memories of Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, more favorite moments

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Dolly Parton shares moving memories of Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, more favorite moments

Dolly Parton speaks about her upcoming lifestyle brand Brianna Paciorka, USA TODAY NETWORK – Tennessee

Dolly Parton will make new memories Oct. 12 at the Grand Ole Opry as she celebrates 50 years as a member with two sentimental (sold-out) shows.

Parton made her Grand Ole Opry debut when she was 13 years old alongside her uncle Billy Owens. Jimmy C. Newman gave up one of his weekly Saturday night spots so Parton could sing. Johnny Cash introduced her, and the teenager received three encores.

Six decades later, Parton shared her Top 5 favorite Opry memories with The Tennessean, which is part of the USA TODAY Network. 

‘Spiritual moment for me’: Dolly Parton retraces steps from East Tennessee home to Opry circle

1. Dolly inducted    

“Becoming a memory of the Grand Ole Opry would be the highlight of everything.”

2. Dressing room sorority     

“I have memories of being back there as a young girl and those dressing rooms were too small for three women, much less 10 or 12. The Jan Howards, the Jeannie Seelys, the Kitty Wells, all those women, all the different ones through the years, Dottie West. Everyone was crammed in there, and you’d hear some of them gossiping in the corner, and everybody would be fighting over their one little spot to get their lipstick on. I just remember feeling like I was part of the girl club, being in there with them. I was thinking, ‘This is history.’ And I felt like I was part of something big and special and important.” 

3. Standing in the wings with Patsy Cline

“I remember standing in the wings watching all these incredible artists, people with big names, the biggest people. You know, from Hank Snow, Webb Pierce, you see I go back. All the way back. I remember seeing Patsy Cline. I was young, and it was after she had had a car wreck and she’d gotten scarred up. And I remember as a child thinking there was this really big deep scar between her eyebrows. I remember seeing her before she had that, and I remember thinking about how awful that was that she got her pretty face scarred up like that. It didn’t hurt her singing any. But I just felt sorry and sad just thinking about her nearly getting killed in a wreck and how she wound up dying anyway. I just remember looking at her and seeing that and then her walking to the microphone and her starting to sing and then nothing else registered besides her God-given voice.” 

4. Shaken and stirred by Johnny Cash

“One of my favorite memories is when I was in the audience and I saw Johnny Cash on stage. He was young and on drugs, but he had this great charisma and sex appeal, and that was the first time I ever got stirred by a grown person … in a way that I didn’t understand. I was just a young girl. It affected me and the way he moved and all that.

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“Years later, I laughed about that because he was just doped up the way he was moving, all that charisma and stuff, moving his shoulders and wiggling around. It was sexy to me. I guess it could have been withdrawals. He was my first grown crush, on a grown man, that I understood what sex appeal was and getting stirred and all those feelings as a young girl. I’d kissed and had little sweethearts, but I had never been moved like that.

“I told him that. I told June, too. We always laughed about it. Seeing him on that stage that night, it paralyzed me. I still see that to this day, just us talking about it. I see that as plain as I was sitting there looking at him. That’s how big an impression it made on me.”

5. Special times with Porter Wagoner

I have fond memories of working with Porter and the Wagonmasters. That was very, very special, too. I wouldn’t have been a member of the Opry that early if it hadn’t been for Porter and being part of the show and him pulling strings. It was special times.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/music/2019/10/05/dolly-parton-grand-ole-opry-talks-johnny-cash-patsy-cline/3867024002/

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Brandon Judd: DNA collection from illegal immigrants will help solve unsolved crimes

Westlake Legal Group Judd-Cropped Brandon Judd: DNA collection from illegal immigrants will help solve unsolved crimes Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc ffbc5fba-f1a3-529c-86aa-00265761b5f8 article

The Department of Homeland Security’s plan for border agents to collect DNA samples from illegal immigrants in detention centers could help to solve unsolved crimes, Border Patrol Union President Brandon Judd claimed Saturday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” with anchor Griff Jenkins, Judd explained: “When we collect the DNA, we know that there’s a lot of people that come and go into the United States. And, there are thousands of crimes that are committed that are unsolved on a yearly basis.”

“DNA will help us solve those crimes because there’s always residue from DNA that [is] left at every single crime scene,” Judd said.

The DHS’s program proposal is not new. The “Finger Print Act” originated as a response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks to help better identify potential terrorists and criminals. The Obama administration then issued a waiver that halted the program.

There is no timeline for when the new testing will be rolled out. The regulation that calls for DNA collection will be issued by the Justice Department, said the official, who noted that the DOJ rule will provide the framework and that DHS will phase in implementation.

DNA samples can be collected from individuals in custody, including non-Americans, per the DNA Fingerprint Act of 2005. However, it’s not mandatory to collect someone’s DNA.

“The laws are supposed to benefit the United States and those people who are within the borders,” Judd told Jenkins. “Trump is all about the rule of law; he stood for the rule of law, and he continues to stand for the rule of law in support of the American citizens.”

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has already denounced the reinstatement of the Bush-era act. Staff Attorney Vera Eidelman wrote that “forced DNA collection raises serious privacy and civil liberties concerns and lacks justification, especially when DHS is already using less intrusive identification methods like fingerprinting.”

“This kind of mass collection alters the purpose of DNA collection from one of criminal investigation to population surveillance, which is contrary to our basic notions of freedom and autonomy,” Eidelman stated.

Judd said that in his more than two decades in law enforcement, he has “never seen a situation in which DNA has caused unwarranted profiling.”

“In fact, that’s where the ACLU is going to fail in this court challenge,” he exclaimed. “But, where they’re going to fail is they’re not going to be able to show a judge cause or reasonable likelihood that DNA will be…used to profile persons. It’s not reality.”

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He concluded: “When we’ve got people that are talking about getting rid of the MPP, when we’ve got people that are talking about getting rid of the rule of law, we’re going to go down as a country. We just will not have those protections, and illegal immigration will spike.”

As of August, the FBI’s national DNA index contained more than 17 million profiles of offenders and arrestees. Law enforcement agencies can submit samples from non-citizens who are detained, as well as suspects arrested or convicted of crimes.

Fox News’ Catherine Herridge and Cyd Upson contributed to this report, as well as The Associated Press.

Westlake Legal Group Judd-Cropped Brandon Judd: DNA collection from illegal immigrants will help solve unsolved crimes Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc ffbc5fba-f1a3-529c-86aa-00265761b5f8 article   Westlake Legal Group Judd-Cropped Brandon Judd: DNA collection from illegal immigrants will help solve unsolved crimes Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration/border-security fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc ffbc5fba-f1a3-529c-86aa-00265761b5f8 article

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Escalating Impeachment Inquiry Rattles State Department

Westlake Legal Group 5d988aa3200000f2004cf8c3 Escalating Impeachment Inquiry Rattles State Department

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department has been deeply shaken by the rapidly escalating impeachment inquiry, as revelations that President Donald Trump enlisted diplomats to dig up dirt on a political rival threaten to tarnish its reputation as a nonpartisan arm of U.S. foreign policy, former senior officials said Friday.

A department where morale was already low under a president who, at times, has seemed hostile to its mission is now reeling from days of disclosures that place it at the center of an escalating political scandal, say former diplomats who fear that the turmoil will damage American foreign policy objectives around the world.

“This has just been a devastating three years for the Department of State,” said Heather Conley, a senior policy adviser at State under President George W. Bush. “You can just feel there is a sense of disbelief. They don’t know who will be subpoenaed next.”

The first blow was the release of a rough transcript of the July 25 call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in which the American president pressed for an investigation of the son of former Vice President Joe Biden.

In the call, the president also disparaged the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, who was removed from her post in May amid a campaign coordinated by Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Thursday saw the release of text messages between Ukraine special envoy Kurt Volker and two senior diplomats as they scrambled to accommodate Giuliani’s campaign to leverage American support for Ukraine in a search for potential political dirt.

“This is only the latest in a large number of very damaging things that have been done to the State Department,” said Thomas Pickering, a former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and Russia under President George H.W. Bush. “It represents a new low in basically ignoring and indeed punishing the people who have made a professional commitment to the country and Constitution.”

With Washington in tumult over the escalating impeachment inquiry, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo toured southeast Europe on Friday, trying to ignore the furor back home.

He did not respond to shouted questions on the topic from journalists at photo opportunities in Podgorica, Montenegro, and Ohrid, North Macedonia, and no questions were allowed at his scheduled press events in the two cities. His staff steadfastly refused to comment on the latest developments in the rapidly unfolding drama, including at a briefing for reporters at his last stop of the day in Athens.

Earlier this week in Rome, Pompeo acknowledged for the first time that he had been on the July 25 phone call between Trump and Zelenskiy.

House Democrats launched the impeachment probe over the Ukraine matter after a government whistleblower disclosed Trump’s call with Zelenskiy and the push to have a foreign government interfere in U.S. elections by digging up dirt on Biden.

Trump has sought, without evidence, to implicate Biden and his son Hunter in the kind of corruption that has long plagued Ukraine. Hunter Biden served on the board of a Ukrainian gas company at the same time his father was leading the Obama administration’s diplomatic dealings with Kyiv. Though the timing raised concerns among anti-corruption advocates, there has been no evidence of wrongdoing by either the former vice president or his son.

Trump has had a tense relationship with the State Department since he took office, repeatedly proposing to slash its budget, leaving key posts unfulfilled and choosing political appointees over career foreign service officers for ambassadorships to a greater degree than other recent presidents have.

His ouster of U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, a respected career officer, and his dismissal of her as “bad news” in the call left many diplomats dismayed.

“This is a workforce that already feels besieged and undercut and in a perpetual defensive crouch,” said Derek Chollet, a former senior policy adviser in the Defense Department and State Department. “The lack of a vigorous defense of her is a signal that they are very vulnerable here. It just confirms their worst fears.”

Conley, now a program director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said the State Department had settled down a bit under Pompeo following the chaotic early part of the administration under former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

But now, she said, diplomats are conflicted and confused because everything has happened outside normal channels, with no regard for long-held processes.

Conley said that during her tenure at the department, even when there were disagreements between senior leaders, “there was a respect for hierarchy and the process.” And when something went wrong, there was a chain of command and a process that protected people.

But that has changed. “No one knows what’s going to happen next,” Conley said. “They’re all trying their best, but no one is untouched, no one is unharmed.”

She said foreign leaders who come to Washington can’t make progress on important issues because the Ukraine furor overwhelms the conversation, as it did during a visit by the president of Finland earlier this week.

Other former officials and diplomats say U.S. standing around the world has been weakened.

“Even a hint of the President using the power of his office to advance his personal interests in an upcoming domestic election will undermine the U.S. in diplomacy and military affairs significantly — especially with our NATO allies, who are following all of this closely with real concern,” said James Stavridis, a retired Navy admiral who was the top NATO commander in Europe from 2009 to 2013.

“We have come into a situation where not only unpredictability is the hallmark of the United States, but unreliability as well,” Pickering said. “The wisdom and judgment that the United States was known for has been diminished.”

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Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds welcome third child: reports

Westlake Legal Group blake-lively-ryan-reynolds-getty Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds welcome third child: reports The Sun fnc/entertainment fnc article 61321081-b4eb-5317-90ae-a6e4659ededf

Blake Lively has given birth to her third baby with Ryan Reynolds.

The pair, who married in 2012, has “secretly welcomed” their child two months ago, according to US reports.

A source told US Weekly the baby is now “two months old” but no other details have been revealed.

RYAN REYNOLDS TROLLS BLAKE LIVELY OVER RISQUÉ INSTAGRAM PIC

The Sun Online has contacted Blake’s reps for comment.

Meanwhile, Ryan, 42, has been active on Instagram, and shared videos about his next movie Free Guy which also stars Brit sensation Jodie Comer.

His last interaction with wife Blake, 31, online was when he trolled her and shared unflattering pics on her 32nd birthday – but she still looked stunning.

Ryan and Blake, who already have kids James and Inez, don’t take themselves too seriously and never miss an opportunity to troll each other.

RYAN REYNOLDS ‘EXCITED’ ABOUT THIRD BABY, TALKS NEW ‘DETECTIVE PIKACHU’ MOVIE

Ryan used the special occasion to share some less than flattering pictures of his glamorous wife, who is pregnant with their third child.

But former Gossip Girl actress Blake still looked incredible – even when caught off guard – thanks to her supermodel-esque looks.

Ryan had fans in hysterics with the never-before-seen candid photos of his wife as they celebrated her 32nd birthday.

RYAN REYNOLDS TROLLS WIFE, BLAKE LIVELY, ON BIRTHDAY WITH CANDID INSTAGRAM PHOTOS

In nearly all of the photos, her eyes are closed while she smiles at the camera.

Deadpool actor Ryan also appeared in most of the intimate snaps and captioned them: “Happy Birthday, @blakelively” Whilst Deadpool creator Rob Liefeld said in the comments: “There are no bad pictures of @blakelively”.

“Haha! Happy birthday shes still always so beautiful,” commented Stranger Things actress Millie Bobby Brown.

It is not the first time Ryan has shared unflattering snaps of Blake on social media.

After photos emerged of Blake looking far from her glamorous self while shooting a film in Dublin, her husband took to Instagram to post a cheeky snap.

BLAKE LIVELY AND RYAN REYNOLDS DONATE $2M TO HELP MIGRANT CHILDREN AT BORDER

Ryan shared one of the unrecognisable photos of his wife, captioning it: “#nofilter”.

The normally glamorous star was snapped while filming scenes for spy thriller The Rhythm Section.

She revealed in May that she is pregnant with her third child.

Blake and Ryan are parents to two daughters, James and Inez.

The couple tied the knot at Boone Hall Plantation in Mount Pleasant – where The Notebook was filmed – in front of friends and family.

Ryan was previously married to Scarlett Johansson for two years, but he filed for divorce in December 2010.

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When he was 17, he had a brief romance with Sabrina the Teenage Witch co-star Melissa Joan Hart.

The star also got engaged to Alanis Morissette in 2004.

After his marriage to Johansson fell apart, he briefly dated Charlize Theron in 2011.

Blake had a fling with Leonardo DiCaprio in 2011.

This story originally appeared in The Sun. 

Westlake Legal Group blake-lively-ryan-reynolds-getty Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds welcome third child: reports The Sun fnc/entertainment fnc article 61321081-b4eb-5317-90ae-a6e4659ededf   Westlake Legal Group blake-lively-ryan-reynolds-getty Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds welcome third child: reports The Sun fnc/entertainment fnc article 61321081-b4eb-5317-90ae-a6e4659ededf

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Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1173728992_wide-6537bbe4a7a63b7d59d0b5438b64031d6078e27e-s1100-c15 Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

People wear masks and chant slogans outside a shopping mall as they take part in a rally in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on Saturday. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

People wear masks and chant slogans outside a shopping mall as they take part in a rally in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on Saturday.

Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Hundreds of masked protesters peacefully marched through Hong Kong’s central business district Saturday afternoon, some linking arms to form human chains, in defiance of a decision to ban face masks at public gatherings only the day before.

They chanted a new demand, adding to a list of five demands reiterated over more than four months of protest: “We have the right to wear face masks.”

The protesters have been demanding democratic reforms, an independent police inquiry into policy violence against protesters and for a complete suspension of an extradition bill with China. Only the last demand has been granted.

Saturday’s march comes after Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s embattled chief executive, announced Friday that she would invoke colonial-era emergency powers to enforce the ban, the first time such powers have been used in more than half a century.

Her announcement set off a night of violent protests and pitched street battles among hardcore demonstrators and the city’s police on Friday.

A 14-year-old protester was shot by a police officer during the night’s melee, according to local Hong Kong media reports. The protester is the second to be shot with a live round this week; on Tuesday, a police officer critically wounded an 18-year-old protester after he and others attacked two officers.

Protesters also began vandalizing metro stations and setting fires outside metro entrances Friday night, causing the city’s metro operator to completely shut down the metro system soon after. The entire metro system — normally known for its efficiency and speed — remained shuttered Saturday morning.

“The extreme acts of the rioters brought dark hours to Hong Kong last night and half-paralyzed society today,” Lam said in videotaped remarks sent to press Saturday.

Saturday, normally one of the city’s busiest shopping days, was unusually quiet as shopping malls, supermarkets and restaurants were closed following Friday night’s violence. 7/11, the convenience store open 24 hours a day, even through Hong Kong’s tumultuous typhoon season, also closed its locations Saturday.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1173714400-1--824e81ae07b4d204f7351340d44da958e2888de2-s800-c15 Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

A last customer leaves as an employee pulls down the shutters at 5 p.m. at a convenience store normally open 24 hours a day in Hong Kong on Saturday. Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

A last customer leaves as an employee pulls down the shutters at 5 p.m. at a convenience store normally open 24 hours a day in Hong Kong on Saturday.

Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images

Many of the city’s major banks stopped service at their branches across Hong Kong, citing safety concerns for their customers and employees. Protesters have targeted mainland Chinese bank branches in Hong Kong by graffitiing their facades. Bank branches have begun saran-wrapping their exteriors up to eye-level to prevent further damage.

Some protesters in Telegram chat groups used to coordinate marches called for a “day of rest” on Saturday in preparation for the much bigger rally planned on Sunday, while others pressed ahead for Saturday’s march.

“Fear has become the ultimate tool of this government,” read one of the many protest posters sent out across Telegram groups in preparation for Saturday’s march.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Opinion: Did Secretary Pompeo Forget His West Point Pledge?

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-631548816_wide-a0b74f06429f4146d36d8248a6d412c42d0a94bf-s1100-c15 Opinion: Did Secretary Pompeo Forget His West Point Pledge?

For several days this week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo dodged questions about the whistleblower’s complaint before finally admitting he had actually been on the call at the center of the complaint. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Opinion: Did Secretary Pompeo Forget His West Point Pledge?

For several days this week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo dodged questions about the whistleblower’s complaint before finally admitting he had actually been on the call at the center of the complaint.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Mike Pompeo graduated first in his class at West Point in 1986, became a tank commander, went to Harvard Law, became a Beltway lawyer, Kansas businessman, congressman, CIA director and, now, secretary of state.

“There’s no doubt West Point impacted who I am,” Mr. Pompeo has said. “It has an enormous emphasis, not only on military aspects, but character development. Whether it’s the honor code, or the interactions you have … every place you are is a character test.

In these days of qualifiers and codicils, the West Point honor code is concise and plain: “A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.”

U.S. Army officers I’ve met in wars have told me they carry that code through life.

They’ve explained that “will not lie” includes what Gen. Maxwell Taylor, who was superintendent of West Point, called “quibbling, evasive statements, or the use of technicalities…”

An officer doesn’t find clever ways to avoid telling the truth.

If a soldier asks, “Is the enemy behind that hill?” and an officer knows they’ve actually dug in on top of that hill, the officer shouldn’t say, “Oh, not really.” A West Point grad is supposed to answer with the truth they know is crucial — not, “quibbling, evasive statements.”

Last Sunday, when Secretary Pompeo was asked by ABC’s Martha Raddatz about the conversation between President Trump and President Volodymyr Zelenskiy of Ukraine, and the report of a whistleblower about that conversation, the secretary said, “So you just gave me a report about a I.C. whistleblower complaint, none of which I’ve seen…”

And the secretary told a State Department briefing, “I haven’t had a chance to actually read the whistleblower complaint yet. I read the first couple of paragraphs, and then got busy today …”

It wasn’t until Wednesday — after a report in The Wall Street Journal that he had been in on that phone call — when Secretary Pompeo finally said at a press conference in Italy the entire truth about that conversation. He said, “I was on the phone call.”

Most politicians can be evasive; it’s part of the parlance of politics. But Mike Pompeo is a trained soldier who conducts the foreign policy of the United States.

In the weeks ahead, Secretary Pompeo will be asked to comply with subpoenas and requests for records. You may wonder if he will use his skills to dance, slide and misdirect, or be as honest and direct as the West Point honor code he knows by heart.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

4 homeless men in NYC’s Chinatown fatally beaten in their sleep, suspect in custody: reports

Westlake Legal Group CHINA 4 homeless men in NYC's Chinatown fatally beaten in their sleep, suspect in custody: reports Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 3267ddc0-3e2d-5c51-b93a-c102a9abfe86

Four homeless men are dead, another seriously injured, after police say they were all beaten in their sleep by a man wielding a large metal object in New York City early Saturday morning.

Police received a 911 call at around 1:50 a.m. over reports of a man with “severe trauma to the head” discovered on Bowery Street, The New York Times reported citing an NYPD spokesperson.

FLORIDA WOMAN DRIVES CAR INTO TREE AFTER TELLING FOUR KIDS TO REMOVE SEAT BELTS: ‘THE DEVIL CAN’T HURT YOU’ 

Not long after, a second man was found with similar head injuries. He was immediately transported to the hospital. Three additional men were found dead on Broadway and East Broadway.

A 24-year-old man was taken into custody in connection with the attack, Lt. Thomas Antonetti told the Times. He said police also found a 3-foot-long metal object that resembled a construction stud.

The suspect is also believed to be homeless, the New York Post reported.

Officials have not released the identities of the victims but said they were all believed to be homeless.

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This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group CHINA 4 homeless men in NYC's Chinatown fatally beaten in their sleep, suspect in custody: reports Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 3267ddc0-3e2d-5c51-b93a-c102a9abfe86   Westlake Legal Group CHINA 4 homeless men in NYC's Chinatown fatally beaten in their sleep, suspect in custody: reports Paulina Dedaj fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article 3267ddc0-3e2d-5c51-b93a-c102a9abfe86

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1173728992_wide-6537bbe4a7a63b7d59d0b5438b64031d6078e27e-s1100-c15 Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

People wear masks and chant slogans outside a shopping mall as they take part in a rally in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on Saturday. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

People wear masks and chant slogans outside a shopping mall as they take part in a rally in the Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong on Saturday.

Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Hundreds of masked protesters peacefully marched through Hong Kong’s central business district Saturday afternoon, some linking arms to form human chains, in defiance of a decision to ban face masks at public gatherings only the day before.

They chanted a new demand, adding to a list of five demands reiterated over more than four months of protest: “We have the right to wear face masks.”

The protesters have been demanding democratic reforms, an independent police inquiry into policy violence against protesters and for a complete suspension of an extradition bill with China. Only the last demand has been granted.

Saturday’s march comes after Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s embattled chief executive, announced Friday that she would invoke colonial-era emergency powers to enforce the ban, the first time such powers have been used in more than half a century.

Her announcement set off a night of violent protests and pitched street battles among hardcore demonstrators and the city’s police on Friday.

A 14-year-old protester was shot by a police officer during the night’s melee, according to local Hong Kong media reports. The protester is the second to be shot with a live round this week; on Tuesday, a police officer critically wounded an 18-year-old protester after he and others attacked two officers.

Protesters also began vandalizing metro stations and setting fires outside metro entrances Friday night, causing the city’s metro operator to completely shut down the metro system soon after. The entire metro system — normally known for its efficiency and speed — remained shuttered Saturday morning.

“The extreme acts of the rioters brought dark hours to Hong Kong last night and half-paralyzed society today,” Lam said in videotaped remarks sent to press Saturday.

Saturday, normally one of the city’s busiest shopping days, was unusually quiet as shopping malls, supermarkets and restaurants were closed following Friday night’s violence. 7/11, the convenience store open 24 hours a day, even through Hong Kong’s tumultuous typhoon season, also closed its locations Saturday.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1173714400-1--824e81ae07b4d204f7351340d44da958e2888de2-s800-c15 Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

A last customer leaves as an employee pulls down the shutters at 5 p.m. at a convenience store normally open 24 hours a day in Hong Kong on Saturday. Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Hong Kong Protesters Defy Ban On Face Masks And Adopt A New Slogan

A last customer leaves as an employee pulls down the shutters at 5 p.m. at a convenience store normally open 24 hours a day in Hong Kong on Saturday.

Mohd Rasfan/AFP via Getty Images

Many of the city’s major banks stopped service at their branches across Hong Kong, citing safety concerns for their customers and employees. Protesters have targeted mainland Chinese bank branches in Hong Kong by graffitiing their facades. Bank branches have begun saran-wrapping their exteriors up to eye-level to prevent further damage.

Some protesters in Telegram chat groups used to coordinate marches called for a “day of rest” on Saturday in preparation for the much bigger rally planned on Sunday, while others pressed ahead for Saturday’s march.

“Fear has become the ultimate tool of this government,” read one of the many protest posters sent out across Telegram groups in preparation for Saturday’s march.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com