web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 222)

Mnuchin seeks to delay proposed Secret Service report on Trump family travel costs until after the 2020 election

Westlake Legal Group A-8I_Jki-fdIjohIr_rUSaUwCMQk_GF6EqbYN3ZsEss Mnuchin seeks to delay proposed Secret Service report on Trump family travel costs until after the 2020 election r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.

For those who have questions regarding any media outlets being posted on this subreddit, please click here to review our details as to whitelist and outlet criteria.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Inequality in a nutshell’ — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says the Dow’s record high is meaningless for many Americans

Westlake Legal Group PxRemjCF_mJ_Nqg6w20iVagTGw_HZFCYZPemhP0fXFU 'Inequality in a nutshell' — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says the Dow's record high is meaningless for many Americans r/politics

I think you can make it more poignant, albeit less direct by framing it in terms of retirement savings.

For all of that bottom 80% and even most of that 10%, the only stocks they own are in tax-advantaged retirement accounts. A 401k or an IRA. Most of them get no choice over who invests those stocks or what fees they have to pay.

Most of that bottom 80% has between $0 and $50,000 in those retirement accounts. The majority of them have zero. They either have no retirement plan or will rely solely on Social Security when they stop working.

Most of that 10% represent various professional class people that actually attempt (and are able) to save for retirement and accumulate six or low seven figures by the time they are retirement age.

It’s only approaching the Apex of that top 10% and the 1% where having “investments” that rival their working income is a thing.

Tell when someone wants to pump up the stock market, ask them how much they have saved for retirement.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tiger Woods’ Son Swings Golf Club Like A Chip Off The Old Block

Westlake Legal Group 5e1c51212100005400af8b50 Tiger Woods’ Son Swings Golf Club Like A Chip Off The Old Block

Tiger Woods’ 10-year-old son Charlie is already showing signs that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree on the golf course.

Video of the young Woods hitting the ball on the range at a junior tournament in Jupiter, Florida, went viral.

Charlie is literally almost in the shadow of his GOAT father, who caddied for the lad.

Charlie shot a 5-over-par 41 in the nine-hole event and did not win, Golf Channel reported. But that swing may foreshadow victories to come.

The elder Woods returns to the PGA Tour at the Farmers Insurance Open on Jan. 23, ESPN reported, so perhaps he’ll have time for another caddy gig for Charlie in the bag before that.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Michael Goodwin: Trump’s ‘peace through strength’ philosophy on Iran is what America needs

For a few days, the band was back together. Following President Trump’s decision to target Qassem Soleimani, the media’s favorite go-to critics featured members of President Obama’s administration who crafted and sold the failed nuclear deal with Iran.

John Kerry, Susan Rice, Ben Rhodes, Wendy Sherman and Leon Panetta gave interviews or popped up on social media to defend their tenure and declare that Trump was a reckless fool for poking the mullahs’ nest.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

Naturally, the Obama alums were in perfect sync with the dominant media narrative in the four days between the Soleimani strike and Iran’s feeble retaliation. They helped feed the breathless headlines and feverish speculation that the coming conflagration would rattle the world.

REBECCA GRANT: IRANIAN SHOOT-DOWN OF UKRAINIAN PLANE – HERE IS WHAT WENT WRONG

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The coverage was peppered with a “we told you so” tone about Trump. The Washington press corps and the Obamaites echoed each other in warning that the president was a dangerous commander in chief, and finally they had the facts to prove it.

Except they didn’t. Instead, they all had egg on their faces for getting the big story wrong. Again.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING MICHAEL GOODWIN’S COLUMN IN THE NEW YORK POST

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM MICHAEL GOODWIN

Westlake Legal Group 2trump-soleimani-split-216am Michael Goodwin: Trump's 'peace through strength' philosophy on Iran is what America needs New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 244058b5-3295-5fd7-8eff-3c7f43c88913   Westlake Legal Group 2trump-soleimani-split-216am Michael Goodwin: Trump's 'peace through strength' philosophy on Iran is what America needs New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/politics/executive/national-security fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 244058b5-3295-5fd7-8eff-3c7f43c88913

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

As New CEO Takes Charge, Boeing’s Challenges Remain

Westlake Legal Group southwest-planes-8d2c12307fdbb500c790fae3c21e317b01c9d090-s1100-c15 As New CEO Takes Charge, Boeing's Challenges Remain

Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max aircraft are parked on the tarmac after being grounded, at the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, Calif., in March. Mark Ralston /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Mark Ralston /AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  As New CEO Takes Charge, Boeing's Challenges Remain

Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max aircraft are parked on the tarmac after being grounded, at the Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, Calif., in March.

Mark Ralston /AFP via Getty Images

As he moves into the chief executive’s suite in Boeing’s 36-story world headquarters building in downtown Chicago today, David Calhoun will find he has monumental tasks ahead of him.

The aerospace giant is still reeling from the fallout of two 737 Max jetliner crashes — in Indonesia in October 2018 and in Ethiopia last March — that killed a total of 346 people.

Documents released by Boeing late last week reveal that during the years the 737 Max was under development, key company employees appear to have hidden safety problems and deceived regulators and customers, while also sometimes mocking them, along with some of Boeing’s suppliers and even fellow employees.

“I’m just shaking my head and rolling my eyes,” says Scott Hamilton, an aviation industry consultant for the Leeham Company, who has been closely watching Boeing for decades. He says he can understand expressing frustrations in the workplace, “but in this case, this goes beyond frustrations. This is disdain, this is contempt for the regulators, for some of their customers and even for some of their co-workers.”

“This is another black eye for Boeing,” Hamilton adds. Even though it may not hurt the company’s efforts to get the troubled 737 Max re-certified by regulators around the world, he says, “It’s going to affect the ability to restore confidence in the traveling public.”

The more than 100 pages of emails and internal instant messages show a pattern of deceit as Boeing employees downplay safety problems with the 737 Max. In one of the most shocking messages, one worker tells another, “This plane was designed by clowns who are in turn supervised by monkeys.”

Another unnamed employee, while complaining about safety flaws, mentions that the company once admired for high safety standards has changed, and “created a culture of ‘good enough’ and that is an incredibly low bar.”

In another exchange, one employee asks a colleague, “Would you put your family on a Max simulator trained aircraft? I wouldn’t.” The colleague responds, “No.”

The documents also detail schemes to hide information about a new automated flight control system on the Max that has been pinpointed as a primary cause of the two deadly crashes; as well as efforts to mislead regulators so they don’t require costly pilot training in a simulator, something that some experts say might have been able to prevent the plane crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

“It’s horrifying,” says Nadia Milleron, the mother of Samya Stumo, who was 24 when she was killed in the crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 310 on March 10, 2019. “I feel like I’m living a nightmare; I keep wanting to wake up.”

“These revelations sicken me,” adds Michael Stumo, Samya’s father.

“The culture of Boeing has eroded horribly,” he added. “My daughter is dead as a result.”

The documents released by Boeing dropped late Thursday on the FAA and congressional committees investigating the 737 Max crisis. They paint a picture of a corporate culture fixated on cutting costs, and boosting profits and shareholder value, at the expense of engineering excellence and safety.

“It’s terrible. The company has to change completely in order to actually produce safe aircraft,” says Milleron.

Milleron and some others say they don’t have much faith in new CEO Calhoun, a private equity executive and one-time head of GE’s aircraft engine unit, who has served on Boeing’s board of directors for more than a decade.

“I would point out that David Calhoun has been on the board since 2009 and has set and endorsed the policies of shareholder value and cost,” says industry consultant Hamilton, who has closely watched Boeing since the 1970s. “And so I would say he’s actually part of the problem.”

Milleron puts it more bluntly to those expecting Calhoun to bring an outsider’s perspective and shake things up: “He’s not new to the company. He is partially responsible for my daughter’s death.”

Boeing has made one significant change, reversing its long-held position that pilots don’t need training on a simulator to fly a 737 Max even after its flaws are fixed. The company is now recommending simulator training for all 737 Max pilots before the plane is certified to return to passenger service.

Pilots and travelers’ advocates applaud the reversal in Boeing’s position but some say they are disturbed to discover in the emails and other messages released last week the great lengths Boeing went to in order to fight against such recommendations.

One of the airlines that the documents show had been pushing for Boeing to provide their pilots with more costly and time-consuming simulator training was Indonesia’s Lion Air. On October 29, 2018, Lion Air flight 610 was the first Boeing 737 Max to crash, killing all 189 people on board.

“Boeing worked very hard to dissuade them, pressure them, some might say, bully them by using examples of other airlines around the world and regulators around the world that said the simulator time wasn’t necessary,” says Sean Broderick, senior air transport and safety editor at Aviation Week, adding that “Boeing, in that case, didn’t take its customers’ best interest into consideration. It took its own best interests into consideration.

Rebuilding relationships with airlines, with pilots and with aviation regulators is among the top challenges facing Calhoun, as is restoring the trust of airline passengers, many of whom say they won’t fly on a Max even if regulators clear the troubled plane to fly again.

“He’s got his work cut out for him,” says Hamilton.

For doing that job, Calhoun will earn a salary of $1.4 million, plus a $7 million bonus if and when the Max is re-certified and other benchmarks are met. In all, he could earn nearly $30 million with all the stock options, incentives and bonuses Boeing is offering.

Meanwhile, the company has announced his predecessor, Dennis Muilenburg, is walking out with more than $62 million in compensation. In a statement, Boeing says that is what Muilenburg is contractually entitled to receive. Boeing said he is not receiving severance pay or a bonus, and he has returned nearly $15 million worth of stock options.

Still, that’s a hefty payout for someone who one of the families of those killed in the plane crash says failed to do his job, which is to keep airline passengers safe.

“He shouldn’t get any reward for killing people,” Nadia Milleron says. “He should actually go to jail rather that get a reward.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

15 Thoughtful Quotes About Motherhood From Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Julia Louis-Dreyfus knows the hilarious highs and somber lows of parenthood.

The “Veep” star and her husband, Brad Hall, have two adult sons, Henry and Charlie. Since becoming a mother in 1992, Louis-Dreyfus has opened up about work-life balance, mom guilt and more.

Westlake Legal Group 5e18dd402500006d299906a1 15 Thoughtful Quotes About Motherhood From Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Randy Shropshire via Getty Images

Brad Hall, Charlie Hall, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and Henry Hall attend the Fifth Annual InStyle Awards at The Getty Center on Oct. 21, 2019, in Los Angeles.

In honor of her birthday, here are 15 of her quotes about motherhood.

On Being A Working Mom

“I’d had a lot of anxiety about being a mother working outside the home ― that I was missing things, that I needed to be with them and I wasn’t. I’d had a nursery on the set at ‘Seinfeld,’ and I would take both boys with me ― which in some ways was worse because then you’re so split! I was racing between the stage and the nursery, I was breastfeeding and all that shit.”

On Watching Her Kids Grow Up

“When you have children, which is in so many ways a glorious endeavor, part of it is about constantly separating. Even when they’re born ― I remember thinking, oh, God, I miss that movement in my body. And from there on that story continues: They crawl away from you. They go to school. It’s a constant. Separation has been a theme in my life, something that I’ve really struggled with.”

On The Secret To Her Long Marriage

“You’ve got to find the right fellow. It is kind of basic, but very crucial. Brad and I certainly have similar goals and sensibilities; we’re on the same page in terms of how we want to raise our children and what we like to do. We’re always trying new things together ― having adventures is a great way to be with your partner.”

On Pregnancy

“I’m not one of those happy pregnant women. I’m delighted to be having a child, but I don’t relish the idea of pregnancy.”

On Being A Mom To Boys

“Well, I have four sisters. I went to an all-girls school. So I just assumed I’d have girls. It didn’t even occur to me that I might have a boy, let alone two.”

On Pressure From Other Parents

“Many years ago, I went to [my child’s] school and ran into a mom who said, ‘Oh, Julia, I can’t believe I’m seeing you. We never see you anymore!’ I was already consumed with guilt because I’d been working a lot. But I just put a huge smile on my face and said, ‘Oh, really? I guess you haven’t been here when I have.’”

“Guilt is a bitch. It’s so useless as an emotion, for me anyway.”

– Julia Louis-Dreyfus

On The Biggest Challenge She’s Faced As A Mom

“Staying calm in the face of anything you perceive as a crisis … I don’t know [how to do that]. I’m still trying to do it. Let me get back to you in 10 years. Well, I don’t even know if I’ll be able to then.”

On Raising Balanced Sons

“I mean, I love men. And I like the directness of the male sensibility. And I like the sensitivity of women. So, you know, it’s a good mix. I’m hoping that’s something I’ve been able to impart to our children. I’m not the sole imparter of that, of course. My husband is a sensitive guy, too. But there is a softness and a sensitivity to other people that I hope my boys are learning. And I think they are.”

On How Motherhood Inspired Her Activism

“As soon as I gave birth, I suddenly noticed issues in my own backyard. Motherhood changed everything for me.”

On Being Pregnant On TV

“I went through two pregnancies over a nine-year period on ‘Seinfeld,’ and I gained 45 pounds both times. Maybe it was 40 pounds, but not less than that, and I’m 5-foot-3. I really tried not to put those 40 pounds on, but I was hungry, man. I craved red meat and lemonade, and I cannot believe the amount of food I could take in. And it’s really documented on TV. I was trying to hide the weight.”

On Guilt

“Yeah, the working mom thing is definitely tricky. Guilt is a bitch. It’s so useless as an emotion, for me anyway. It clouds things. I’m not saying people shouldn’t feel guilty, but for me, it makes certain decision-making more difficult. And I have felt guilty. It’s one of the reasons I haven’t made a lot of movies. Network television is a full-time job, but it’s manageable. I also think it’s good for my kids to see me have artistic desires, work hard, and have success.”

On Compartmentalizing

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

These Were The Most Popular Baby Names 100 Years Ago

Westlake Legal Group 5e18b1d72400005c00527aaa These Were The Most Popular Baby Names 100 Years Ago

Baby names don’t typically experience dramatic dips and surges in popularity from one year to the next. But over time, there are interesting trends.

Some fall off the map for good, while others decline only to make a comeback. And of course, there are the classics that remain popular to this day. HuffPost took a look at the Social Security Administration’s baby name database to see which names have tanked over time and which ones have staying power … like 100 years of staying power.

Below, find the 25 most popular baby names for boys and girls in 1920. While James, William, Elizabeth and Evelyn remain popular today, others like Gladys, Mildred and Howard aren’t seen on many new birth certificates a century later.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Diego the tortoise retires, high sex drive credited with helping to save his species in the Galapagos, conservancy says

The famed Galapagos giant tortoise named Diego — estimated at over 100 years old — fathered 40 percent of all tortoises on Espanola Island in the Galapagos and is officially retiring.

He is credited with saving his species from extinction thanks to his high sex drive, according to a release by the Giant Tortoise Restoration Initiative and translated by the Galapagos Conservancy.

Ecuador’s Environmental Ministry made the decision on Friday to end the 40-year captive breeding program for Espanola tortoises, which has helped the population rise from 15 to 2,000, the conservancy said.

The release added that the evaluation conducted by the Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD) and Galapagos Conservancy as part of the Giant Tortoise Restoration Initiative (GTRI) concluded that the breeding program demonstrated “the recovery of habitat conditions” and the “populations that it hosts.”

SOLAR STORMS MIGHT BE CAUSING GRAY WHALES TO GET LOST

<img src="https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2020/01/640/320/diego1.jpg?ve=1&tl=1" alt="The famed Galapagos giant tortoise named Diego — estimated at over 100 years old and credited with saving his species from extinction after he fathered 40 percent of all tortoises on Espanola Island in the Galapagos — thanks to his high sex drive — is officially retiring”>

The famed Galapagos <a data-cke-saved-href=”https://www.foxnews.com/category/science/wild-nature/reptiles” href=”https://www.foxnews.com/category/science/wild-nature/reptiles”>giant tortoise</a> named Diego — estimated at over 100 years old and credited with saving his species from <a data-cke-saved-href=”https://www.foxnews.com/category/us/environment/endangered-species” href=”https://www.foxnews.com/category/us/environment/endangered-species”>extinction</a> after he fathered 40 percent of all tortoises on Espanola Island in the Galapagos — thanks to his high sex drive — is officially retiring (San Diego Zoo)

The 175 pound Diego is a Chelonoidis hoodensis, a species only found in the wild on the island of Espanola, according to AFP. He reportedly fathered an estimated 800 offspring as of 2016.

He was brought to the U.S. between 1928 and 1933 and placed in a breeding center on the Galapagos island of Santa Cruz, after his species was determined to be critically endangered in the 1960s, according to the San Diego Zoo.

“Based on the results of the last census conducted at the end of 2019 and all the data available since 1960 — both of the island and its tortoise population … the conclusion was that the island has sufficient conditions to maintain the tortoise population, which will continue to grow normally — even without any new repatriation of juveniles,” said Washington Tapia, the director of the GTRI.

AUSTRALIA’S FIRES HAVE KILLED OR IMPERILED 1 BILLION ANIMALS, EXPERT WARNS

Tapia had told AFP back in 2016 that Diego was “a very sexually active male,” who contributed “enormously to repopulating the island.”

The closure of the program means 15 of the breeding adult tortoises — 12 females and 3 males — will be allowed to return to their natural habitat, the first time that’s happened since the mid-1960s, the release said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Diego will return to his home island of Espanola in the Galapagos nearly eight decades after being extracted from it. The plan is to release all 15 tortoises back to Espanola, their island of origin in March 2020.

Fox News’ James Rogers contributed to the report

Westlake Legal Group diego1 Diego the tortoise retires, high sex drive credited with helping to save his species in the Galapagos, conservancy says fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox-news/science/wild-nature/endangered fox-news/science fox news fnc/science fnc David Aaro article 555caae9-c85d-555a-b464-29492d935982   Westlake Legal Group diego1 Diego the tortoise retires, high sex drive credited with helping to save his species in the Galapagos, conservancy says fox-news/science/wild-nature/reptiles fox-news/science/wild-nature/endangered fox-news/science fox news fnc/science fnc David Aaro article 555caae9-c85d-555a-b464-29492d935982

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Newt Gingrich: House Republicans in 2020 can have a great year – here’s how

Westlake Legal Group Elise-Stefanik-REUTERS Newt Gingrich: House Republicans in 2020 can have a great year – here's how Newt Gingrich fox-news/politics/2020-house-races fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1b35321-9e6f-5d5b-9b98-75d920b9349c article

The liberal media likes to focus on how many House Republicans are retiring. Somehow this is supposed to make Republicans feel defeated and hopeless.

In this context, I was startled recently to hear Congresswoman Elise Stefanik say 2020 was going to be the year of the House Republican woman. She went on to assert that there was a historic record being set for Republican women filing to run for the House.

I checked in with Chairman Tom Emmer at the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) and found that, if anything, Stefanik had understated the momentum of new recruits.

NEWT GINGRICH: TENS OF THOUSANDS OF AMERICANS ARE DYING EACH YEAR FROM THIS HORRIFIC EPIDEMIC

With House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy and the leadership team going all out, the House Republicans are setting a remarkably encouraging series of records.

Consider these numbers: The total number of Republicans filed for House seats so far is 928, according to Federal Elections Commission (FEC) figures – or 188 more than the total at the same time in 2010 (740). The year 2010 matters because it was the last time Nancy Pelosi was kicked out of the majority and Speaker John Boehner led the House GOP to its biggest gain in modern times – with his “where are the jobs” slogan. In fact, in 2010 the House GOP gained 63 seats for a majority of 242 Republicans.

More from Opinion

The House Republican recruiting surge is also tremendously widespread. So far, I am told that Republican candidates are running in 380 congressional districts (compared with 341 districts at this point in 2010).

Importantly, women and minority candidates have surged. This is an area which has historically been a Republican weakness. In Texas alone, there are at least 30 Republican women candidates. So far, 186 women are seeking to become House Republicans in total. The previous record was 133 women running for the House as Republicans. And filing is still open in a number of states, so the number will almost certainly increase.

I am told by the NRCC there are also 146 Republican candidates from minority communities. Furthermore, 188 veterans are running for the House as Republicans.

I will write more details about women and minority candidates in future columns. However, I think it is important to note a profound change underway in financing Republican campaigns.

The Democrats had an enormous advantage in the 2018 election because they had built an online donation system called ActBlue. ActBlue had been founded in 2004 to enable small-dollar donors to easily and efficiently help Democratic candidates all over the country.

The combination of great recruiting, the development of WinRed as a system for engaging grassroots Republicans in races across the country, the intensity of Trump’s support, and the self-destruction of the Democrats are combining to create a new, dynamic, aggressive House Republican Party.

When the online system was powered by the intensity of anti-Trump emotions, there was a flood of targetable money for Democratic candidates. Activists from all over the country could conveniently go online, identify the campaigns they wanted to help, and quickly send the money.

In the 2018 cycle, this system raised $1.8 billion over the two-year period. When this scale of small-donor involvement was combined with massive donors like Michael Bloomberg (who spent $5 million on ads in the last two weeks in some elections) the Democrats’ money advantage was enormous. This helps explain the Republican House defeats.

The threat posed by the ActBlue system was reinforced in 2019 when it raised more than $1 billion for the Democrats.

Republican leaders realized they had to match or exceed the small-dollar system the Democrats had invented. They developed a competitive model called WinRed.

The intensity of support for President Trump – combined with growing anger over the Democrats’ investigation and impeachment strategy – has made WinRed a success much faster than anyone expected.

In its first two quarters, WinRed raised $101 million. Its effectiveness is growing rapidly.  It raised $31 million in its first quarter of existence and more than doubled that in the second quarter with $70 million (fourth quarter of 2019). In fact, WinRed raised more in its first 190 days than ActBlue raised in its first five years.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR OPINION NEWSLETTER

The impact of the Democrats’ overreach on impeachment has been amazing. WinRed pages that mentioned “impeach” or “impeachment” raised 300 percent more than any other page.

In fact, the growing impact of WinRed can be seen in Stefanik’s experience. After her remarkable defense of President Trump on the House Intelligence Committee, she mentioned people could donate at WinRed on Fox News. In two hours, $500,000 was donated from across the country.

The combination of great recruiting, the development of WinRed as a system for engaging grassroots Republicans in races across the country, the intensity of Trump’s support, and the self-destruction of the Democrats are combining to create a new, dynamic, aggressive House Republican Party.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

If retirements are the story of the past, then recruitment is the story of the future. This is the story on which Leader McCarthy and his team are focused.

I suspect it’s the story that will make him Speaker McCarthy in January 2021.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY NEWT GINGRICH

Westlake Legal Group Elise-Stefanik-REUTERS Newt Gingrich: House Republicans in 2020 can have a great year – here's how Newt Gingrich fox-news/politics/2020-house-races fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1b35321-9e6f-5d5b-9b98-75d920b9349c article   Westlake Legal Group Elise-Stefanik-REUTERS Newt Gingrich: House Republicans in 2020 can have a great year – here's how Newt Gingrich fox-news/politics/2020-house-races fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/kevin-mccarthy fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c1b35321-9e6f-5d5b-9b98-75d920b9349c article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Sold Voters on Stopping ‘Endless Wars.’ What if a New One Starts?

Westlake Legal Group merlin_166952985_4d21a658-bc09-4128-8e64-f42602e72094-facebookJumbo Trump Sold Voters on Stopping ‘Endless Wars.’ What if a New One Starts? United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Presidential Election of 2020 Presidential Election of 2016 Iraq War (2003-11)

DUBUQUE, Iowa — Almost exactly four years ago, Donald J. Trump touched down at an airport hangar here, delivered a donation to a group that provides service dogs to veterans and, before inviting a few kids to run around on his Boeing 757, criticized the wars in the Middle East that many local families had sent their sons and daughters to fight in.

“I’m the guy that didn’t want to go to war,” he told a crowd of several hundred. “It’s just unjust, it’s a mess,” Mr. Trump went on, promising that if he ever did deploy the military anywhere, it would be “so strong, so powerful that nobody is going to mess with us anymore.”

That November, Dubuque County voted Republican in the presidential election for the first time since 1956, when Dwight Eisenhower was on the ballot.

Mr. Trump’s success in places like Dubuque — heavily white, working class, union-friendly and Catholic — remade the Republican electorate. And his path to a second term depends heavily on whether those voters turn their backs on the Democratic Party again.

But the specter of a new conflict in the Middle East — this time with Iran — threatens the political coalition that Mr. Trump built in 2016 by running against a national Republican Party that many voters came to see as indifferent and unresponsive, particularly when it came to the human cost of war.

“All he’s been saying is, ‘We’re getting out of there, we’re getting out of there, we’re getting out of there,’” said Mark Blume, a contractor in Dubuque who stopped into the local American Legion after work one evening last week for a beer.

Mr. Blume, who was raised in a Democratic household in New York and said he voted for Republicans and Democrats in presidential elections but did not vote for either Mr. Trump or Hillary Clinton in 2016, expressed fatigue with the president’s erratic style. If it weren’t for that, he would be less uncertain about voting for Mr. Trump, who he believes has done a better than expected job as president.

“He’s putting those kids in harm’s way,” Mr. Blume added. “What he says and what he does are two different things, and that’s what I don’t like about him.” (In fact, Mr. Trump did not always oppose going to war with Iraq as he has insisted; he initially expressed support for it after the invasion began in 2003.)

As tensions with Iran remain high, Mr. Trump risks becoming the wartime president he claimed he never wanted to be. And he has struggled to reconcile the inconsistencies in his foreign policy, leaving some voters wondering what he really is as a commander in chief: the president who crushed the Islamic State and will stop “endless wars,” as he claims, or a volatile decision maker who in the span of three months orders troops to pull out of Syria and then deploys thousands more to prepare for a possible conflict with Iran after taking out one of its top generals in a drone strike.

His provocations with Iran have further divided a country already exhausted by three years of constant political combat and chaos. “I just get heartsick with all this political tribalism,” said Ray Harrington, an Iowa National Guard veteran and self-described moderate Republican who served in Afghanistan. He is torn about the president’s recent moves, he explained one recent afternoon as he kicked up his feet on a chair in the kitchen of the Veteran’s Freedom Center in Dubuque, which provides resources and assistance to veterans.

Part of him wants to be over there, he said, alongside the troops. “But I get concerned. My son’s 18. He’s draft age,” Mr. Harrington added.

While Mr. Trump’s 2016 victory is often tied to his nationalist rallying cries to curtail immigration, restrict trade and restore America to a bygone “greatness,” one of the more overlooked pieces of the “America First” agenda he promised was his vow to end what he called “reckless, interventionist globalism.”

His contention that the political establishment was careless with American lives — just as he said both parties were indifferent to the suffering of middle-class Americans while pushing policies that helped almost everyone else, from big corporations to undocumented immigrants — was especially powerful.

The resonance was profound in Iowa and elsewhere across the Midwest, according to one study, where he broke through Democrats’ “blue wall” in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania by a minuscule 77,000-vote margin.

One factor that helped put him over the edge in these states was the communities that have paid a steep toll from nearly 20 years of war.

A study of military casualty rates at the state and county level found that Mr. Trump won significantly more votes than the 2012 Republican nominee, Mitt Romney, in places that suffered disproportionately high casualty rates.

The authors, Douglas Kriner of Cornell University and Francis Shen of the University of Minnesota Law School, then factored out demographic characteristics that tend to overlap with Mr. Trump’s base — race, level of education, income and population density. And they determined that even in counties predisposed to support Mr. Trump because they were more white, rural, poor and less educated, he still significantly outperformed Mr. Romney.

This not only helped Mr. Trump win the election, they concluded, but also could have decided the race. If casualty rates were only slightly lower in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin, their model determined that all three states could have voted for Hillary Clinton.

“The parts of the country that have seen this war most intensely — they were looking for someone who would end the damn wars,” Mr. Shen said in an interview. “And in Trump they found someone who at least told them that’s what he would do.”

The way Mr. Trump talks about the cost of war and American foreign policy that preceded him echoes the other class-based divisions that have defined his populist political appeal.

In doing so, he expanded his party’s base of support, even as he upended decades of status quo among Republicans favoring a more active and heavy-handed approach to the use of American troops.

But his recent bellicosity toward Iran has unsettled some of his supporters who were drawn to the noninterventionist aspect of his “America First” promises.

“We were going to get out of these wars, focus on America first,” said Allen Chesser of Spring Hope, N.C., about 40 minutes from Raleigh. “That’s what I think everybody thought they were getting.”

Mr. Chesser, who served for 11 months in Iraq in 2005 and 2006 and returned to work in law enforcement before running an unsuccessful campaign for Congress, said he and others who took Mr. Trump at his word on foreign policy had become dismayed as the Republican Party largely fell in line behind him after the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the powerful Iranian commander.

“These are what you would call conservatives, they’re patriots. They’ve fought and paid,” he said. Now, he said, “because I disagree I’m somehow anti-Trump, which somehow makes me anti-Republican and lessens my patriotism? I don’t get it.”

The threat voters like Mr. Chesser pose to Mr. Trump is if they do not vote for a presidential candidate at all, or vote third party.

“These are not left-wing, antiwar people,” Mr. Kriner said. In the study on military casualties and Trump voters, he and Mr. Shen warn, “If Trump wants to win again in 2020, his electoral fate may well rest on the administration’s approach to the human costs of war.”

Some of Mr. Trump’s most prominent allies are warning him of the political risks inherent in escalating the conflict with Iran any further.

“It’s important that the president listens to his judgment here — that he doesn’t listen to the same people who got us sucked into Iraq in the first place,” Laura Ingraham, the Fox News host, said the other night on her program.

Others, like Ms. Ingraham’s Fox colleague Tucker Carlson, have noted with dismay Mr. Trump’s apparent reliance on advice from what they characterize as the same “deep state” intelligence officials he has said need to be purged from the government.

“If you say so, Mr. Unnamed C.I.A. official, I’m happy to send my kid to the Middle East a week after Christmas,” Mr. Carlson fumed on his program recently.

The risk in taking too provocative an approach with Iran is even greater because the political realignment now taking place between the two parties — with Republicans attracting more working class, white voters who once leaned Democratic, and Democrats appealing to higher-income Americans — is still in its early stages.

“They may be learning to be Republicans, much as Reagan Democrats learned to be Republicans, so long as Republicans kept faith with them,” said Henry Olsen, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center and the author of a book on the realignment called “The Working Class Republican.”

“That doesn’t mean,” Mr. Olsen added, “that the process is complete. And one way to stop the process or reverse it is to break faith on a core issue that Trump was an outlier on.”

Still, for those who have watched the political poles reverse in Dubuque over the years, there is a sense that Mr. Trump is retaining his hold on most of his voters.

At the Veteran’s Freedom Center, Jim Wagner, a 71-year-old veteran of the Vietnam War and a lifelong Democrat, said he could not fathom how anyone believed Mr. Trump when he said he would end the wars. “Trump is so way far out there, they think it’s cool,” he said. “They think it’s funny. See, I don’t.”

Democrats like him have made something of a comeback in Dubuque. In the 2018 midterm elections, a local Democrat who emphasized her family’s blue-collar, union roots, Abby Finkenauer, beat the incumbent Republican congressman in Iowa’s First Congressional District.

As Mr. Blume ordered another round at the American Legion, he considered the last three years under Mr. Trump. “He’s made my life better,” he said, citing the steady stream of contracting work he had been getting because of the healthy economy. “I haven’t lacked.”

Mr. Blume contemplated the possibility that Mr. Trump might get re-elected — and that he might even vote for him.

“It’s not going to be the end of the world,” he said, catching himself.

“Well,” he added, with a nervous laugh.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com