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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 224)

Halloween Comes Early For Mom Who Sees ‘Ghost Baby’ Sleeping Beside Son

Maritza Cibuls experienced a real taste of the spooky season Friday night.

The Illinois mom had just put her 18-month-old son to sleep when she spotted something terrifying on the baby monitor. Nestled beside her sleeping child was what looked like the ghost of a baby:

Westlake Legal Group 5dae961f210000e81e34aa26 Halloween Comes Early For Mom Who Sees ‘Ghost Baby’ Sleeping Beside Son

Maritza Cibuls Maritza Cibuls was terrified when she saw what looked like a ghost baby lying beside her sleeping son.

“So last night I was positive there was a ghost baby in the bed with my son,” she wrote on Facebook. “I was so freaked out, I barely slept. I even tried creeping in there with a flashlight while my son was sleeping.”

Cibuls repeatedly checked on her son and sent the above picture to her mom, husband and friends to seek an explanation. She even tried feeling around in the crib ― to no avail. 

When morning came, Cibuls finally got her answer:

Westlake Legal Group 5dae99f8200000881c5065ea Halloween Comes Early For Mom Who Sees ‘Ghost Baby’ Sleeping Beside Son

Maritza Cibuls Maritza Cibuls was in a panic when she thought she could see a “ghost baby” beside her son in his cot all night. She couldn’t help but laugh when she uncovered the explanation the next morning.

“Well, this morning I go to investigate a bit further. It turns out my husband just forgot to put the mattress protector on when he changed the sheets,” Maritza wrote, alongside laughing emojis. “I could kill him.”

On Monday, with her viral post clocking in at 500,000 likes and almost 300,000 shares, Cibuls told HuffPost she never imagined “our silly little ghost story would spread so far and fast.”

“We’re so glad we were able to spread some laughter!” she said.

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China Sharpens Hacking to Hound Its Minorities, Far and Wide

Westlake Legal Group 19chinahack1-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 China Sharpens Hacking to Hound Its Minorities, Far and Wide Xinjiang (China) Xi Jinping Uighurs (Chinese Ethnic Group) Tibet Surveillance of Citizens by Government Smartphones People's Liberation Army (China) Mobile Applications Ministry of State Security of the People's Republic of China Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Google Inc FireEye Inc facial recognition software Cyberwarfare and Defense Computers and the Internet Computer Security Citizen Lab China Apple Inc Android (Operating System)

SAN FRANCISCO — China’s state-sponsored hackers have drastically changed how they operate over the last three years, substituting selectivity for what had been a scattershot approach to their targets and showing a new determination by Beijing to push its surveillance state beyond its borders.

The government has poured considerable resources into the change, which is part of a reorganization of the national People’s Liberation Army that President Xi Jinping initiated in 2016, security researchers and intelligence officials said.

China’s hackers have since built up a new arsenal of techniques, such as elaborate hacks of iPhone and Android software, pushing them beyond email attacks and the other, more basic tactics that they had previously employed.

The primary targets for these more sophisticated attacks: China’s ethnic minorities and their diaspora in other countries, the researchers said. In several instances, hackers targeted the cellphones of a minority known as Uighurs, whose home region, Xinjiang, has been the site of a vast build-out of surveillance tech in recent years.

“The Chinese use their best tools against their own people first because that is who they’re most afraid of,” said James A. Lewis, a former United States government official who writes on cybersecurity and espionage for the Center for Strategic Studies in Washington. “Then they turn those tools on foreign targets.”

China’s willingness to extend the reach of its surveillance and censorship was on display after an executive for the National Basketball Association’s Houston Rockets tweeted support for protesters in Hong Kong this month. The response from China was swift, threatening a range of business relationships the N.B.A. had forged in the country.

In August, Facebook and Twitter said they had taken down a large network of Chinese bots that was spreading disinformation around the protests. And in recent weeks, a security firm traced a monthslong attack on Hong Kong media companies to Chinese hackers. Security experts say Chinese hackers are very likely targeting protesters’ phones, but they have yet to publish any evidence.

Some security researchers said the improved abilities of the Chinese hackers had put them on a par with elite Russian cyberunits. And the attacks on cellphones of Uighurs offered a rare glimpse of how some of China’s most advanced hacking tools are now being used to silence or punish critics.

Google researchers who tracked the attacks against iPhones said details about the software flaws that the hackers had preyed on would have been worth tens of millions of dollars on black market sites where information about software vulnerabilities is sold.

On the streets in Xinjiang, huge numbers of high-end surveillance cameras run facial recognition software to identify and track people. Specially designed apps have been used to screen Uighurs’ phones, monitor their communications and register their whereabouts.

Gaining access to the phones of Uighurs who have fled China — a diaspora that has grown as many have been locked away at home — would be a logical extension of those total surveillance efforts. Such communities in other countries have long been a concern to Beijing, and many in Xinjiang have been sent to camps because relatives traveled or live abroad.

The Chinese police have also made less sophisticated efforts to control Uighurs who have fled, using the chat app WeChat to entice them to return home or to threaten their families.

China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs did not respond to a request for comment. China has denied past claims that it conducts cyberespionage, adding that it, too, is often a target.

Security researchers recently discovered that the Chinese used National Security Agency hacking tools after apparently discovering an N.S.A. cyberattack on their own systems. And several weeks ago, a Chinese security firm, Qianxin, published an analysis tying the Central Intelligence Agency to a hack of China’s aviation industry.

Breaking into iPhones has long been considered the Holy Grail of cyberespionage. “If you can get inside an iPhone, you have yourself a spy phone,” said John Hultquist, director of intelligence analysis at FireEye, a cybersecurity firm.

The F.B.I. couldn’t do it without help during a showdown with Apple in 2016. The bureau paid more than $1 million to an anonymous third party to hack an iPhone used by a gunman involved in the killing of 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif.

Google researchers said they had discovered that iPhone vulnerabilities were being exploited to infect visitors to a set of websites. Although Google did not release the names of the targets, Apple said they had been found on about a dozen websites focused on Uighurs.

“You can hit a high school student from Japan who is visiting the site to write a research report, but you are also going to hit Uighurs who have family members back in China and are supporting the cause,” said Steven Adair, the president and founder of the security firm Volexity in Virginia.

The technology news site TechCrunch first reported the Uighur connection. A software update from Apple fixed the flaw.

In recent weeks, security researchers at Volexity uncovered Chinese hacking campaigns that exploited vulnerabilities in Google’s Android software as well. Volexity found that several websites that focused on Uighur issues had been infected with Android malware. It traced the attacks to two Chinese hacking groups.

Because the hacks targeted Android and iPhone users — even though Uighurs in Xinjiang don’t commonly use iPhones — Mr. Adair said he believed that they had been aimed in part at Uighurs living abroad.

“China is expanding their digital surveillance outside their borders,” he said. “It seems like it really is going after the diaspora.”

Another group of researchers, at the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, recently uncovered an overlapping effort, using some of the same code discovered by Google and Volexity. It attacked the iPhones and Android phones of Tibetans until as recently as May.

Using WhatsApp messages, Chinese hackers posing as New York Times reporters and representatives of Amnesty International and other organizations targeted the private office of the Dalai Lama, members of the Tibetan Parliament and Tibetan nongovernmental organizations, among others.

Lobsang Gyatso, the secretary of TibCERT, an organization that works with Tibetan organizations on cybersecurity threats, said in an interview that the recent attacks were a notable escalation from previous Chinese surveillance attempts.

For a decade, Chinese hackers blasted Tibetans with emails containing malicious attachments, Mr. Lobsang said. If they hacked one person’s computer, they hit everyone in the victim’s address books, casting as wide a net as possible. But in the last three years, Mr. Lobsang said, there has been a big shift.

“The recent targeting was something we haven’t seen in the community before,” he said. “It was a huge shift in resources. They were targeting mobile phones, and there was a lot more reconnaissance involved. They had private phone numbers of individuals, even those that were not online. They knew who they were, where their offices were located, what they did.”

Adam Meyers, the vice president of intelligence at CrowdStrike, said these operations were notably more sophisticated than five years ago, when security firms discovered that Chinese hackers were targeting the phones of Hong Kong protesters in the so-called Umbrella Revolution.

At the time, Chinese hackers could break only into phones that had been “jailbroken,” or altered in some way to allow the installation of apps not vetted by Apple’s official store. The recent attacks against the Uighurs broke into up-to-date iPhones without tipping off the owner.

“In terms of how the Chinese rank threats, the highest threats are domestic,” Mr. Lewis said. “The No. 1 threat, as the Chinese see it, is the loss of information control on their own population. But the United States is firmly No. 2.”

Chinese hackers have also used their improved skills to attack the computer networks of foreign governments and companies. They have targeted internet and telecommunications companies and have broken into the computer networks of foreign tech, chemical, manufacturing and mining companies. Airbus recently said China had hacked it through a supplier.

In 2016, Mr. Xi consolidated several army hacking divisions under a new Strategic Support Force, similar to the United States’ Cyber Command, and moved much of the country’s foreign hacking operation from the army to the more advanced Ministry of State Security, China’s main spy agency.

The restructuring coincided with a lull in Chinese cyberattacks after a 2015 agreement between Mr. Xi and President Barack Obama to cease cyberespionage operations for commercial gain.

“The deal gave the Chinese the time and space to focus on professionalizing their cyberespionage capabilities,” Mr. Lewis said. “We didn’t expect that.”

Chinese officials also cracked down on moonlighting in moneymaking schemes by its state-sponsored hackers — a “corruption” issue that Mr. Xi concluded had sometimes compromised the hackers’ identities and tools, according to security researchers.

While China was revamping its operations, security experts said, it was also clamping down on security research in order to keep advanced hacking methods in house. The Chinese police recently said they planned to enforce national laws against unauthorized vulnerability disclosure, and Chinese researchers were recently banned from competing in Western hacking conferences.

“They are circling the wagons,” Mr. Hultquist of FireEye said. “They’ve recognized that they could use these resources to aid their offensive and defensive cyberoperations.”

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Today on Fox News, Oct. 22, 2019

STAY TUNED:

On Fox News:

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Daniel Krauthammer, son of the late Charles Krauthammer; U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo.; Kevin Sorbo on his new film, “The Reliant.” Plus, the Republican National Committee reveals the “victims of socialism.”
 
On Fox Business:
 
Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET:
Former U.S. Senator Al D’Amato, R-N.Y.

Varney & Co., 9 a.m. ET: Linda McMahon, former administrator of the Small Business Administration under President Trump.
 
On Fox News Radio:
 
The Fox News Rundown podcast:
“2016 Rematch? Clinton’s Gabbard Swipe Fueling 2020 Speculation” – Hillary Clinton has inserted herself into the 2020 presidential campaign. Without mentioning Rep. Tulsi Gabbard by name, the 2016 Democrat nominee accused the Hawaii congresswoman of being a “Russian asset” out to sabotage the party.

Besides creating a split among Democrats, Clinton’s comments are also fueling speculation she may be considering yet another presidential run. Mark Penn, chief strategist on Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign, joins the Rundown to give his reaction to the Clinton/Gabbard feud and speculation the former First Lady may want to run again.

Also on the Rundown: Presidential candidate, billionaire and political outsider Tom Steyer thinks he has what it takes to take on President Trump in the 2020 election. Steyer discusses why he’s been pushing for President Trump’s impeachment and talks about his campaign and his recent debut on the debate stage in Ohio. Plus, commentary by Jason Chaffetz, Fox News contributor and former Utah congressman.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.
 
The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include – Neil Cavuto, host of “Your World with Neil Cavuto”; Bret Baier, host of “Special Report”; Daniel Krauthammer. Allen West, former Florida congressman; Chris Stirewalt, Fox News political editor; Michael Goodwin, New York Post columnist.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Oct. 22, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 2fe27f8c-f369-5f06-8cfc-f89b06594477   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News, Oct. 22, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 2fe27f8c-f369-5f06-8cfc-f89b06594477

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‘I Am Back’: How Bernie Sanders’ Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176888003-1-_wide-93066b988bc2ada995baf43d3a369d04b0af362f-s1100-c15 'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in Queensbridge Park in New York on Saturday. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in Queensbridge Park in New York on Saturday.

Kena Betancur/Getty Images

About three weeks ago, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders had a heart attack that threw his campaign into question. But now, it’s more apparent than perhaps at any point in this presidential campaign that the 78-year-old white-haired politician and his revolution will remain a powerful force in the Democratic primary.

Sanders’ campaign has a renewed vitality following a record-setting rally in New York over the weekend, a strong debate performance last week in Ohio, an infusion of campaign cash that translates to having more money on hand than any other Democratic presidential candidate, and endorsements from two of the most progressive women of color in Congress: Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar and New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

His campaign is optimistic and emboldened with a clear mission: prove the senator’s skeptics wrong and quash any lingering questions about his health and ability to serve after his heart attack.

“In the professional pundit class, in the elite media circles, there’s been a strong effort to discount Bernie Sanders: ‘The movement is over, he can’t succeed. He doesn’t have opportunities for him to grow, it’s gonna end for him,'” said Faiz Shakir, Sanders’ campaign manager, paraphrasing what he sees as a problematic narrative.

But Shakir contends that the last week proves the pundits wrong.

“Sanders has shown that he has the support and the stamina to stick around,” he said.

On Saturday, the white septuagenarian was joined by perhaps the most well-known Latina in politics, the 30-year-old Ocasio-Cortez — an alliance that countered the “Bernie bro” caricature of his 2016 campaign. Ocasio-Cortez, a darling of the progressive left, officially offered her stamp of approval to the Vermont senator.

“For me, the mass movement, mobilization and the decades of work that have gone into that was a personal tipping point,” Ocasio-Cortez told NPR’s Michel Martin on Weekend All Things Considered, explaining why she specifically supported Sanders over a progressive woman in the field (such as Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren). “It’s far larger than a presidential campaign, this is about really creating a mass movement … to guarantee health care, housing and education.”

Westlake Legal Group ap_19292707743753-77cf02672c5c39e2e53e067e07f0ce256742505a-s1100-c15 'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders hugs Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez during last Saturday’s campaign rally in Queens. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP

Westlake Legal Group  'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders hugs Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez during last Saturday’s campaign rally in Queens.

Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP

Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez were met in Queens, N.Y., by a crowd that campaign officials estimated exceeded 25,000 people — a rally larger than any other Democratic candidate has seen this campaign.

‘A loyal, strong base’

Sanders is not the first presidential candidate in history to have had a heart attack. In fact, Dwight D. Eisenhower suffered from one in 1955, a year before he was re-elected for a second term.

But Sanders has long been scrutinized for his age, and the moderators on the debate stage in Ohio last week were eager to get a response from him on record.

“I’m healthy, I’m feeling great,” Sanders quipped at one point, “but I would like to respond to that question,” he added, as he jumped into a conversation about the opioid epidemic and drug companies.

Analysts and experts agreed Sanders looked and sounded healthy on stage.

His positive debate reviews came on the heels of new fundraising numbers that showed his campaign had $33.7 million on hand at the end of the third fundraising quarter — more cash than any of his Democratic opponents, and notably more than three times as much money as former Vice President Joe Biden.

“If history is any guide, don’t count Sen. Sanders out, he is someone who I think will be with us in this campaign for quite a while,” said Karen Finney, a Democratic strategist who worked for Hillary Clinton in 2016. “We know that he’s got a loyal, strong base of support.”

Mark Longabaugh, a Democratic consultant who worked on Sanders’ campaign in 2016, pointed out that part of the senator’s fundraising advantage was his 2016 campaign operation.

“Just in a technical sense he came into this race with by far the largest fundraising list of any of the candidates,” said Longabaugh. ” And that was underestimated by a lot of people.”

For Finney and Longabaugh, the main question is how and if Sanders can regain his standing in the polls.

Even before his heart attack, Sanders’ poll numbers had begun dropping. And the conventional wisdom was that the Democratic primary was winnowing down to a two-person contest between Biden and Warren.

Shakir is dismissive of the polls and insists they don’t capture Sanders full support, but he also acknowledges that the senator has a steep path to the nomination.

“The path for Bernie Sanders to win this nomination is arguably the hardest and most ambitious path of any candidate,” he said.

Why?

Because Sanders base of support comes from young and lower-income Americans – people who usually vote at far lower rates than older and wealthier voters.

“He is trying desperately hard to increase voter participation,” said Shakir.

An urgency to differentiate

Strategists say it’s not enough to have a strong debate performance or bring in lots of money from devoted supporters, Sanders, they say, also has to figure out how to blunt Warren’s momentum.

One possible option is to focus on progressive policy.

Sanders has been trying to prove that he’s the furthest left candidate in the field.

For some of his supporters, that strategy is particularly effective on health care. Sanders, as he likes to point out, wrote the “damn bill” outlining a Medicare for All system. Warren has endorsed his plan, but, thus far, she has not laid out how she would pay for it.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19292841653948_wide-b52a97e2524ebf22480268c791a9b82363597939-s1100-c15 'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders speaks at last Saturday’s “Bernie’s Back Rally” at Queensbridge Park in New York. Greg Allen/Greg Allen/Invision/AP hide caption

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Greg Allen/Greg Allen/Invision/AP

Westlake Legal Group  'I Am Back': How Bernie Sanders' Revolution Is Proving Resilient

Sanders speaks at last Saturday’s “Bernie’s Back Rally” at Queensbridge Park in New York.

Greg Allen/Greg Allen/Invision/AP

“The Medicare for All message has sort of been his bread and butter, and I think that is still a powerful issue at the grassroots,” said Longabuagh.

Longabaugh, who is not working for Sanders this cycle, says part of the Vermont senator’s resiliency goes back to his consistency, particularly on healthcare.

Shakir says his loyal support is also about trust.

“You just trust that this is somebody who has a lifetime of consistency and that when he gets into the oval office, and he says he’s gonna fight for Medicare for All, he’s gonna fight for Medicare for All,” Shakir said. The indirect assumption from Shakir’s statement is that Warren, the other leading progressive candidate in the field supporting Medicare for All, cannot be trusted as much as Sanders to keep their word on the issue.

Sanders has also attempted to outflank Warren on one of her signature campaign issues: a wealth tax.

He recently proposed a plan that goes even further than Warren’s and, as our colleagues at Planet Money pointed out, it “could have one large unintended consequence: It makes Warren’s wealth tax look moderate.”

Sanders has been hesitant to go after Warren directly. The two senators are friends and allies in the Senate, but strategists say there is an urgency for Sanders to differentiate himself soon. Time is running out before the all-important early states start voting.

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This Day in History: Oct. 22

On this day, Oct. 22 …

1979: The U.S. government allows the deposed Shah of Iran to travel to New York for medical treatment — a decision that precipitates the Iran hostage crisis.
 
Also on this day:

  • 1797: French balloonist Andre-Jacques Garnerin makes the first parachute descent, landing safely from a height of about 3,000 feet over Paris.
  • 1934: Bank robber Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd is shot to death by federal agents and local police at a farm near East Liverpool, Ohio.
Westlake Legal Group JFKCuba102219 This Day in History: Oct. 22 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 57900844-c6e4-5409-845b-67df6e26c778
  • 1962: In a nationally broadcast address, President John F. Kennedy reveals the presence of Soviet-built missile bases under construction in Cuba and announces a quarantine of all offensive military equipment being shipped to the Communist island nation.
  • 1981: The Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization is decertified by the federal government for its strike the previous August.
  • 1986: President Reagan signs into law sweeping tax-overhaul legislation.
  • 1991: The European Community and the European Free Trade Association concludes a landmark accord to create a free trade zone of 19 nations by 1993.
  • 1995: The largest gathering of world leaders in history marks the 50th anniversary of the United Nations.
  • 1998: The government advises parents to remove the batteries from their kids’ “Power Wheels” cars and trucks, made by Fisher-Price, because of faulty wiring that could cause them to erupt into flame.
  • 2001: A second Washington, D.C., postal worker, Joseph P. Curseen, dies of inhalation anthrax.
  • 2002: A bus driver, Conrad Johnson, is shot to death in Aspen Hill, Md., in the final attack carried out by the “Beltway Snipers.”
  • 2018: President Trump declares that the U.S. would start cutting aid to three Central American countries he accuses of failing to stop thousands of migrants heading for the U.S. border. 

2018: A bomb is found in a mailbox at the suburban New York home of liberal billionaire philanthropist George Soros; federal agents safely detonate the device after being summoned by a security officer.

Westlake Legal Group ShahIran1979 This Day in History: Oct. 22 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 57900844-c6e4-5409-845b-67df6e26c778   Westlake Legal Group ShahIran1979 This Day in History: Oct. 22 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc article 57900844-c6e4-5409-845b-67df6e26c778

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Leia Speaks 1 Word In Final ‘Star Wars’ Trailer And It Reduced Fans To Tears

Westlake Legal Group 5daea50f210000ba1e34aa3a Leia Speaks 1 Word In Final ‘Star Wars’ Trailer And It Reduced Fans To Tears

Star Wars” fans found plenty of reasons to be emotional on Monday as the last trailer dropped for “The Rise Of Skywalker,” the ninth and final episode in the saga that began in 1977.

At one point, C-3PO ― the droid who has appeared in every installment of the main episodic series ― utters what some fans thought could be a farewell:

But it was a single word that really got fans in their feels.

Thanks to previously unused footage shot for “The Force Awakens,” Carrie Fisher, who died in 2016, will reprise her role as Gen. Leia Organa in the movie, which hits theaters Dec. 20. She’s shown in the trailer embracing Rey (Daisy Ridley), but doesn’t speak until the end when the voice of an unseen Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) uses the phrase made famous by the franchise. 

“The Force will be with you,” he says.

Leia’s voice adds: “Always.”   

Bringing even more emotion to the moment, the trailer was released on what would have been Fisher’s 63rd birthday. 

Fans struggled to keep it together:

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Iraq’s military says US troops leaving Syria don’t have permission to stay in country

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096600491001_6096597836001-vs Iraq's military says US troops leaving Syria don't have permission to stay in country fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a03314ee-4592-50aa-be55-eabbe2dde4aa

Iraq’s military says U.S. troops leaving Syria and heading to neighboring Iraq do not have permission to stay in the country.

Tuesday’s statement says that American troops currently withdrawing from Syria have acquired permission from the Iraqi Kurdish regional government to enter Iraq to later be transferred out of the country.

It added that these troops do not have any approval to stay in Iraq.

The statement appears to contradict U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper who has said that under the current plan, all U.S. troops leaving Syria will go to western Iraq and the military will continue to conduct operations against the Islamic State group to prevent its resurgence.

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Esper said he has spoken to his Iraqi counterpart about the plan to shift the more than 700 troops leaving Syria into western Iraq.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096600491001_6096597836001-vs Iraq's military says US troops leaving Syria don't have permission to stay in country fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a03314ee-4592-50aa-be55-eabbe2dde4aa   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096600491001_6096597836001-vs Iraq's military says US troops leaving Syria don't have permission to stay in country fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fnc/world fnc Associated Press article a03314ee-4592-50aa-be55-eabbe2dde4aa

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Trudeau rival says Canadian Liberals put ‘on notice’ after narrow PM victory

Westlake Legal Group Justin-Trudeau-AP19292575143427 Trudeau rival says Canadian Liberals put 'on notice' after narrow PM victory fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/person/justin-trudeau fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 7763fa58-c449-5337-85f5-bfb65209aeba

The Conservative candidate defeated by Justin Trudeau Monday warned that although the prime minister managed to secure a second term, he has effectively been placed on notice after losing control of the majority following nail-biting Parliamentary elections in Canada.

TRUMP CONGRATULATES TRUDEAU ON SECOND-TERM WIN AFTER CANADIAN PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS

Trudeau defeated Andrew Scheer and won a second term as prime minister in Canada’s national elections Monday, delivering unexpectedly strong results despite having been weakened by a series of scandals that tarnished his image as a liberal icon.

Scheer said when Trudeau first won in 2015 he looked unstoppable, but he said the times have changed. Trudeau will likely rely on Conservatives to push through legislation.

“Tonight Conservatives have put Justin Trudeau on notice,” Scheer said. “And Mr. Trudeau when your government falls, Conservatives will be ready and we will win.”

Trudeau reasserted the country’s liberal identity in 2015 after almost 10 years of Conservative rule and has been viewed as a beacon of hope for liberals in the Trump era. Scheer declared Tuesday that Conservatives are ready to pounce in the next elections.

Polls showed Scheer had a chance for victory after a combination of scandals and high expectations damaged Trudeau’s prospects. Trudeau faced an uphill electoral battle after old photos of him in blackface and brownface surfaced last month, casting doubt on his judgment.

The handsome son of liberal icon and late Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau also was hurt by a scandal that erupted earlier this year, when his former attorney general said he pressured her to halt the prosecution of a Quebec company. Trudeau has said he was standing up for jobs, but enough damage was done to give the Conservatives an opening.

“Andrew is what I call a severely normal Canadian,” Jason Kenney, Alberta’s conservative premier and the godfather of one of Scheer’s five kids, told The Associated Press. “His personality is the opposite of Justin’s. Andrew is not at home naturally preening for the cameras.”

https://twitter.com/AndrewScheer/status/1183870618145611776

In the words of Canada’s former Conservative foreign minister, John Baird: “He’s not the sizzle, he’s the steak.”

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President Trump congratulated Trudeau on his second-term victory early Tuesday on Twitter.

“Congratulations to @JustinTrudeau on a wonderful and hard fought victory. Canada is well served. I look forward to working with you toward the betterment of both of our countries!” Trump tweeted after midnight.

Trudeau was championed for securing the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which was perhaps his most noteworthy accomplishment during his first term as prime minister. Canada relies on the U.S. for 75 percent of its exports.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Justin-Trudeau-AP19292575143427 Trudeau rival says Canadian Liberals put 'on notice' after narrow PM victory fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/person/justin-trudeau fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 7763fa58-c449-5337-85f5-bfb65209aeba   Westlake Legal Group Justin-Trudeau-AP19292575143427 Trudeau rival says Canadian Liberals put 'on notice' after narrow PM victory fox-news/world/world-regions/canada fox-news/person/justin-trudeau fox news fnc/world fnc Danielle Wallace article 7763fa58-c449-5337-85f5-bfb65209aeba

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Elisa Martinez: If Elizabeth Warren really understood Native Americans, she’d know socialism doesn’t work

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096121789001_6096120100001-vs Elisa Martinez: If Elizabeth Warren really understood Native Americans, she'd know socialism doesn’t work fox-news/us/economy/jobs fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Elisa Martinez article a2e72c07-74d9-5018-b64c-685b2d00bba7

Gallup, N.M., is known as “the heart of Indian country.” It’s sadly one of the poorest areas in the nation and has an important lesson for all Americans about our nation’s future.

My grandparents owned one of the first trading posts in Gallup. I grew up working in my dad’s small business.

I’m a Latina with New Mexico roots over 15 generations deep on dad’s side of the family and on my mother’s side we’re Zuni and Navajo. I’m an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation and … I’m a Republican.

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My life experience made me a Republican. Growing up I witnessed firsthand the poverty and destruction government policies had on my people and my peoples’ land — the Indian reservation.

Overlapping, paternalistic federal and state programs, including fully funded and inefficient healthcare, dominate the reservations’ economies. The restrictions the government places on land use, ownership and business development are microcosms of socialist failure in its purest form.

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The government “help” has never encouraged financial self-sufficiency. If anything, the programs have been a disincentive to economic freedom and prosperity.

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While I firmly believe all Americans should benefit from a safety net, I also know government handouts are never as powerful as a hand up. The federal government set up the reservations more than 100 years ago and, just like liberal democrats today, created these subsidized economies because they think they know what’s best for us.

The result of more than 100 years of government assistance is Indian Reservations drowning in poverty. These well-intended programs have made our people the poorest Americans. Some reservations have unemployment rates close to 85 percent, and 29 percent of employed Native Americans nationwide live below the poverty level.

As a Native American woman, when I heard Sen. Elizabeth Warren speak of her heritage, I was intrigued. Then the tragic irony became apparent. Her policies proved she knew nothing about us.

As a Native American woman, when I heard Sen. Elizabeth Warren speak of her heritage, I was intrigued. Then the tragic irony became apparent. While she claimed to be one of us, her policies proved she knew nothing about us.

She’s never experienced firsthand how big government programs fail our people. In fact, she now advocates those failed policies for all Americans.

Over 10 years “Medicare-for-All” will cost $32 trillion. Green New Deal? $93 trillion. Her Green Manufacturing Deal; $2 trillion. In total about $127 trillion.

Economists say the new taxes she has proposed would generate only $3 trillion over 10 years. So where will she find the missing $124 trillion? Warren doesn’t explain that it will require raising taxes on all Americans.

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To improve peoples’ lives we can’t force them to rely on the government.  Tax cuts and the free-market economy foster growth and opportunity, creating jobs and lifting the poor out of poverty.

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Is it a perfect system? No, but to see more families prosper and have better opportunities, free-market economic policies, especially tax cuts, are proven to work. Socialist government-controlled economies, with handouts and higher taxes, only lead to poverty and misery.

Today, the U.S. unemployment rate is at its the lowest point in 50 years.  The jobless rate for Hispanics hit a record low of 3.9 percent in September. African Americans maintained their lowest rate ever at 5.5 percent and adult women came in at 3.1 percent.

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Our incredibly strong economy came about in no small part from President Trump’s tax cuts and deregulation of business. We need to preserve the working families’ tax cuts and expand them. That’s what will help all of America’s families and that is one of the biggest reasons I am considering running for U.S. Senate in New Mexico.

I’ve seen socialism, up close and personal. It’s not what America needs.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096121789001_6096120100001-vs Elisa Martinez: If Elizabeth Warren really understood Native Americans, she'd know socialism doesn’t work fox-news/us/economy/jobs fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Elisa Martinez article a2e72c07-74d9-5018-b64c-685b2d00bba7   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096121789001_6096120100001-vs Elisa Martinez: If Elizabeth Warren really understood Native Americans, she'd know socialism doesn’t work fox-news/us/economy/jobs fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning/trump-2020-campaign fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Elisa Martinez article a2e72c07-74d9-5018-b64c-685b2d00bba7

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Ex-JetBlue employee faces 20 years in prison for scamming airline of nearly $1M

A former JetBlue employee is facing up to 20 years in prison after pleading guilty in a Boston federal court on Friday to scamming the airline of nearly $1 million in flights.

Tiffany Jenkins, a former gate agent, used her position to convert low-cost flights to more expensive flights and destinations for friends, family, and acquaintances, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Massachusetts.

Jenkins, 31, pleaded guilty to three counts of wire fraud. She was arrested and charged in November 2018.

Jenkins had access to JetBlue’s computer reservation database and had the ability to use the special code, “INVOL,” which is short for involuntary exchange, to change flights for customers at no additional cost.

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This code is meant to be used by agents to change flights for customers who miss their flights or experience a death in the family.

During a 15-month period, Jenkins used the code approximately 505 times for more than 100 different passengers. The U.S. attorney’s office said many of those exchanges occurred after the passenger first booked low-price domestic flights. Jenkins exchanged those tickets for more expensive international flights instead.

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The charge for wire fraud carries a penalty of up to 20 years in prison, three years of supervised release and a fine of $250,000.

Jenkins is scheduled to be sentenced in January 2020.

Westlake Legal Group jettblue-THUMB Ex-JetBlue employee faces 20 years in prison for scamming airline of nearly $1M Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article 0f5c0217-dc65-51b7-9659-8d0332efff02   Westlake Legal Group jettblue-THUMB Ex-JetBlue employee faces 20 years in prison for scamming airline of nearly $1M Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article 0f5c0217-dc65-51b7-9659-8d0332efff02

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