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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 225)

Today on Fox News: Jan. 3, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Stay with Fox News for the latest developments of the escalating tension between the U.S. and Iran on all platforms

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: This week’s violent protests led by Iran-backed militants outside the U.S. embassy in Iraq and the killing of a top Iranian general by U.S airstrikes have further escalated American tensions with Iran. Fox News contributor Dan Hoffman weighs in on why violence in the Middle East is ratcheting up and what steps the US can take to handle Iran’s aggression.

Also on the Rundown: Anti-Semitic incidents are increasing in the U.S. including the recent attacks in New York. Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of Anti-Defamation League, and Rabbi Marvin Hier at the Simon Wiesenthal Center join Friday’s podcast to discuss what needs to be done to address the issue.

Don’t miss the good news with Tonya J. Powers. Plus, commentary by “Fox News Sunday” host, Chris Wallace.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include: U.S. Rep. Michael Waltz, R-Fla.; Geraldo Rivera, Fox News correspondent-at-large; Shannon Bream, host of “Fox News @ Night”; Susan Li, Fox Business correspondent and more.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Jan. 3, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc c27ecbce-ff78-5fc6-82ef-3604d4099562 article   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Jan. 3, 2019 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc c27ecbce-ff78-5fc6-82ef-3604d4099562 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ancient Mayan palace lost for 1,000 years and used by ‘elites’ uncovered near Cancun

A lost Mayan palace likely used by the ancient civilization’s most elite citizens has been unearthed.

The structure was found near Mexico’s popular resort city of Cancun and was last used around 1,000 years ago.

Archaeologists found the palace during a dig at the ancient ruined city of Kuluba, in the Yucatan state.

CLICK ON THE SUN FOR MORE

The building itself is six meters (20 feet) tall, 55 meters (180 feet) long and 15 meters (49 feet) wide.

It’s believed that the structure was used over two separate Mayan periods, dating as far back as 600 AD.

“This work is the beginning,” said archaeologist Alfredo Barrera, speaking to Reuters.

“We’ve barely began uncovering one of the most voluminous structures on the site.”

Westlake Legal Group Kuluba-2-Reuters Ancient Mayan palace lost for 1,000 years and used by ‘elites’ uncovered near Cancun The Sun Sean Keach fox-news/columns/digging-history fnc/science fnc Digital Technology and Science Editor article 772c80c7-b5ff-52e0-8083-5e38039b7c47

(Credit: Reuters)

The Mayans dominated huge areas of Central America, creating an empire long before the arrival of Spanish conquerors.

Their rise, rule and fall stretched over several centuries.

This particular palace was possibly used during the Late Classic period (600-900 AD) and the Terminal Classic period (850-1050AD), according to experts at the National Institute of Anthropology and History.

Kuluba, where the palace was found, was a key Mayan site that had links to the nearby cities of Chichen Itza and Ek’ Balam.

Experts are examining several structures at the site, including an altar, two homes and a round oven.

There’s also talk of a plan to reforest parts of the area, due to concerns over damage from wind and sun.

The site was first discovered by American archaeologist Wyllys Andrews IV in 1939.

This story originally appeared in The Sun.

Westlake Legal Group Kuluba-1-Reuters Ancient Mayan palace lost for 1,000 years and used by ‘elites’ uncovered near Cancun The Sun Sean Keach fox-news/columns/digging-history fnc/science fnc Digital Technology and Science Editor article 772c80c7-b5ff-52e0-8083-5e38039b7c47   Westlake Legal Group Kuluba-1-Reuters Ancient Mayan palace lost for 1,000 years and used by ‘elites’ uncovered near Cancun The Sun Sean Keach fox-news/columns/digging-history fnc/science fnc Digital Technology and Science Editor article 772c80c7-b5ff-52e0-8083-5e38039b7c47

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hong Kong Considers the Future: ‘If You Can Afford It, Leave’

Westlake Legal Group 00hkfuture-1-facebookJumbo Hong Kong Considers the Future: ‘If You Can Afford It, Leave’ Politics and Government parenting Labor and Jobs Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Economic Conditions and Trends Demonstrations, Protests and Riots China

HONG KONG — Everywhere Ivan Lam looks, he sees his possible future.

On the news, he watches the Hong Kong police beating demonstrators. He sees masked protesters vowing to fight on. He reads reports of the growing power of the Chinese Communist Party and its campaign to lock away Muslims.

Conspiracy sites whisper about disappearances and suicides. On the street, outside the gleaming office tower where Mr. Lam, 24, just started his career at a multinational company, he sees officers in riot armor lining the sidewalk and watching for trouble.

Mr. Lam wants to stay in Hong Kong. But he is saving his money. He is making plans. If he has to, he will leave.

“I don’t know how all of this conflict is going to end,” he said, “so my future, like Hong Kong’s future, is unpredictable.”

Months of political turmoil have turned Hong Kong from a city of possibilities into a place of doubt and disillusion. Peaceful demonstrations have turned violent. Its economy is shrinking. Yet China’s leaders seem as determined as ever to do away with the high degree of autonomy they once promised, threatening to put Hong Kong further under Beijing’s authoritarian control.

That reality has upended the lives of the city’s seven million people. Plans to buy homes or have children have been put off. Families and friendships have been strained or broken.

And some — at least, those who have the option — wonder whether they should leave it all behind.

“Before this movement, things were already bad,” said Bessy Chan, a 45-year-old events manager, who is considering moving to Germany.

Ms. Chan, a Hong Kong native, was studying in Britain two decades ago when China took back the British colony after Beijing promised to preserve its freedoms and rule of law. She returned to Hong Kong, with hesitation, and found little had changed. Work kept her busy.

But the city’s high cost of living kept her from changing careers. She grew frustrated that Hong Kong officials devoted money to expensive but problem-plagued train and bridge projects that linked the city to the mainland instead of on affordable housing or education. She began to resent the crowds of mainland tourists.

This year, her sister’s husband got a job in Germany. Ms. Chan has begun to research graduate programs there. She is single, she reasoned, and the changing city has left her unmoored. Her parents, rather than mourning a family split, are happy about the move, she said.

“I have a niece who is 16 right now,” Ms. Chan said. “For a youngster at that age, I don’t see a future for her.”

Hong Kong’s future once looked bright. It benefited from China’s booming economy while maintaining its own system of laws. Its eventual absorption into the mainland, set to take place in 2047, seemed far away.

Soaring housing costs, fewer job opportunities and a rising income gap began to sully that image. But fewer people describe financial pressures as their main reason for wanting to leave the city these days, said Paul Yip, a professor and director at Hong Kong University whose studies show increased unhappiness and depression.

“Rather, they are talking about whether Hong Kong is a place where you want to raise your children,” Mr. Yip said. “That is more subtle and more serious.”

For those reasons, many residents have paused their life plans. Edmond Chan, a 29-year-old math teacher, and his girlfriend do not talk about getting married or starting a family anymore. They have discussed moving to Taiwan but cannot afford to.

Mr. Chan’s role has changed over the year from educator to counselor for students who cannot talk to their parents about the protests. He can no longer talk about the unrest with his own parents, who he says would rather not watch the news or discuss politics.

“We are very confused about how to teach a child that Hong Kong is a good place to live,” Mr. Chan said as he watched a recent lunchtime protest. When his own students come to him for guidance, he does not know what to say.

Official figures do not show whether more people are leaving Hong Kong than before, but the signs of interest are there. Applications for a certificate required to change citizenship have jumped by nearly three-quarters from a year ago, according to local data. Immigration consultants describe a flurry of requests for information. Fliers advertising investment-for-citizenship programs in other countries can be found in the lobbies of luxury apartment buildings.

Edward Suen, the 42-year-old owner of a marketing firm, is encouraging friends to explore that possibility, especially if they have children. “If you can afford it,” he said, “leave.”

Mr. Suen has himself vowed to stay and support the protests. He was galvanized after participating in Hong Kong’s first major street march this year, in June, which organizers said had drawn one million people. City leaders rejected their demands.

Days later, during a meeting on a work trip, Mr. Suen held his phone surreptitiously under the table and watched a video of police officers firing tear gas at protesters surrounding Hong Kong’s legislative building.

“I almost cried in my meeting,” he said, “to see how the police were against all the peaceful protesters.”

Mr. Suen now spends weekends coordinating drivers who ferry protesters to and from demonstrations. He has built a network of volunteers. He tries to be optimistic.

“In Hong Kong, everyone wants to win the lottery,” Mr. Suen said. “We know we won’t win, so why do we keep buying tickets? Because we have hope.”

Gary Fung has chosen to stay as well. Once pro-establishment, the spry 59-year-old barrister began to participate in protests — “Only the legal demonstrations!” he said — and has been shocked at the police’s behavior.

“I saw many of them breaching the law,” Mr. Fung said.

He obtained a British passport in 1991 ahead of the 1997 handover, but he chose to confront his fears of China instead. In 2007, he traveled to Tiananmen Square in Beijing and sat in quiet protest on the anniversary of the 1989 massacre. Now, he wants to fight to preserve Hong Kong’s legal autonomy.

“I’m proud of our legal system because of my background,” Mr. Fung said. “I want to turn it back.”

Protests have ebbed since November’s elections for district councils gave the pro-democracy movement a decisive victory. Still, tensions lurk in offices and homes.

Carrie Lai, a 45-year-old events and public relations executive, has trouble avoiding shouting matches at family dinners. On the day of the elections, over appetizers, her brother-in-law suggested that one pro-democracy candidate had organized an attack against himself by hammer-wielding thugs to win sympathy. Ms. Lai froze, soup spoon suspended midair and face flushed, and opened her mouth to speak. Her sister-in-law jumped in and changed the subject.

“Everyone is on alert mode,” Ms. Lai said.

Ms. Lai has an Australian passport because she lived there as a teenager, but for now she plans to stay in Hong Kong. Her husband lacks an Australian passport. She also cannot imagine leaving now, at a time when she feels the protest movement needs her.

“It’s not that moment yet,” she said. If things get really bad, Ms. Lai said, her participation in protests could make a difference.

Mr. Lam is less certain he can change the future.

The son of a civil servant and a retail manager, Mr. Lam took all the right steps to climb Hong Kong’s social and economic ladders. He went to school abroad, in Manchester, England. He got a job as a recruiter at a prominent agency. He started dating someone seriously. His life in Hong Kong appeared to be set.

Now, he watches with dismay at Beijing’s increasing role in the city’s affairs. He fears the Communist Party will harness Hong Kong’s growth engine while squelching its culture.

“They want to use us,” he said, “but at the same time they want to change us.”

The protests at times have consumed Hong Kong’s central business district, where Mr. Lam works. During a recent lunchtime protest, he watched as an older man crossing the street was suddenly tackled by riot police officers. As the man was searched, a wailing police van arrived. Officers pushed the man inside. An older woman shouted that the man had done nothing wrong.

“That’s our future,” Mr. Lam said.

Mr. Lam consumes the news. He reads rumor sites and chat rooms and fires off links to acquaintances, even as he acknowledges that he does not know whether they are true.

Mr. Lam and his girlfriend discuss where they might go. She wants to go into a tourism-related business, a skill set that he reasons is portable. Japan comes up a lot in their talks. Britain, too.

Still, Mr. Lam doesn’t want to leave. At least, not yet.

“I love this place, and I wanted to develop my career here,” he said. “This is my home.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death

Video vixen Bobbie Brown can poke fun at her love life today, but things weren’t always a laughing matter for the “Cherry Pie” star.

The model and Sunset Strip sex symbol recently released her second book titled “Cherry on Top” after experiencing a devastating fall that could have ended her life.

The 50-year-old insisted the horrifying experience inspired her to check off her bucket list, including pursuing an unlikely career in stand-up comedy. She also reflected on her past experiences, including her former marriage to Warrant rocker Jani Lane, who passed away in 2011 at age 47 from alcohol intoxication.

Brown spoke to Fox News about her life-changing injury, pursuing comedy, how Lane could have benefitted from the #MeToo movement in his lifetime and what dating is really like today.

RONNIE WOOD’S EX-WIFE JO WOOD RECALLS PHOTOGRAPHING THE ROLLING STONES OVER THE YEARS: ‘THEY DIDN’T NOTICE’

ACTRESS GABRIELLE STONE EXPLAINS WHY SHE LEFT THE COUNTRY AFTER HUSBAND’S AFFAIR, HEARTBREAKING RELATIONSHIP

Fox News: Was there ever a point where you wanted to escape the “Cherry Pie” girl persona?
Bobbie Brown: There was a time when I would go, “Oh God, not that again.” I had done so many other things beyond just being in a music video and yet I was just the “Cherry Pie” girl. It was bulls–t, I thought. But the older I got, the more I embraced it.

The reality is that this is how most people know me. This is why most people are interested in me. And frankly, this is probably why we’re talking right now. It’s gotta be something I need to embrace. And it was never a negative experience in my life so there’s no need to have negative feelings towards it. I don’t need to make it a negative experience. I’ve embraced it. I’m totally OK with it today.

Fox News: What inspired you to write this book?
Brown: I had just gone through a devastating life change. I’ve fallen down the stairs [in 2018] and almost killed myself. I literally was like, “What am I doing with my life?” I had a rude awakening. The doctors said 50 percent of people who’ve had my type of fall and hit their head die instantly. I landed headfirst into a table. So I was very lucky.

‘THREE’S COMPANY’ STAR SUZANNE SOMERS RECALLS HER CANCER DIAGNOSIS: ‘YOU THINK OF YOUR MORTALITY FOR THE FIRST TIME’

Westlake Legal Group MG_8780 ‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6afa6813-4d53-50ab-b71c-6ea498c94155

Bobbie Brown today. (Photo courtesy of Bobbie Brown.)

RISQUÉ STORIES WRITTEN BY ED WOOD REVEALED DECADES AFTER FILMMAKER’S TRAGIC DEATH

I was looking like the Elephant Man for the next three months. I would look in the mirror every day and say, “What am I doing? What’s my purpose? What’s my point? What am I doing for joy?” I just came to a decision that I needed to make a change and check off my bucket list. I had so many fans who wrote to me about my first book “Dirty Rocker Boys.” I just felt I needed a second book. There were more stories to tell. So I picked up where I left off.

Fox News: How are you doing today?
Brown: My head’s OK *laughs*. I had a permanent dent in my forehead for a really long time. No permanent damage, thank God. But it made me question everything. It made me realize I wasn’t living really. I was just going through the motions. I needed to make some major decisions and fulfill myself.

I feel like we sometimes get stuck in a rut and just live day-to-day without really being happy. Nothing’s really happening and there’s no joy. So I just pushed myself to live. I started doing stand-up comedy. I wrote this second book. I started a podcast. Dating is probably the last thing on my list. But I don’t really have time. So it’s kind of good *laughs*.

HUMPHREY BOGART’S EX-WIFE MAYO METHOT STRUGGLED TO BOUNCE BACK IN HOLLYWOOD AFTER DIVORCE, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-156168428 ‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6afa6813-4d53-50ab-b71c-6ea498c94155

Jani Lane and Bobbie Brown attend BMI Awards Gala on May 21, 1991, at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California. ((Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images)

MARIE OSMOND RECALLS HER WEIGHT STRUGGLES, BEING TOLD SHE NEEDED TO ‘KEEP THE FOOD OUT OF MY FAT FACE’

Fox News: How difficult was it to relive some of your memories with ex Jani Lane in this book?
Brown: It’s always cathartic. Usually, when I’m talking about it, it’s because I still have those feelings of non-closure with him on so many levels. To be able to talk about it gives me some closure. And it’s therapeutic in the same sense.

I also feel like it will help other people out there who might be feeling the same way or have had the same experience with their spouses, their friends, whoever. It’s good for me to be honest because somebody out there is going through the same type of feelings I’m experiencing. It’s comforting for people to know they’re not alone in their thoughts and experiences. They’re not crazy. I feel like it gives people a sense of a connection that we’re all the same.

Fox News: You describe there was no #MeToo movement during the time when Jani could have used it the most.
Brown: At the moment that he admitted [he was drugged and raped by a member of a famous heavy metal band and their manager], it was devastating to hear. He admitted this to me before his death. It was traumatizing to watch him reveal those things and how much it had affected his life up to that point. When we were married I had no clue. This occurred when he was just starting out on the Strip. So when I’m hearing all of this with him, I’m crying with him. I was going, “We have to do something, we have to say something.” He was like, “No! No!” It was a humiliation for a man to be in that position.

DEAN MARTIN’S DAUGHTER DEANA RECALLS GROWING UP WITH ‘THE KING OF COOL,’ THE RAT PACK AND JERRY LEWIS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-120882914 ‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6afa6813-4d53-50ab-b71c-6ea498c94155

Jani Lane of Warrant performs at Rock The Bayou on August 31, 2008, in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Jay West/WireImage/Getty)

MICHAEL HUTCHENCE’S SISTER RECALLS GROWING UP WITH INXS SINGER, FINAL TRAGIC YEARS FOLLOWING BRAIN INJURY

It’s so emasculating and humiliating. It would have been humiliating for him. So we couldn’t say anything. Instead he lived with this anger inside. He felt like he couldn’t say anything because he was a man. He was raised to be a man, not to cry. It was all mind-f–king. I could see how it would have been devastating and humiliating for him to speak up. I got his perspective from it, but at the same time, I felt so hopeless for him, knowing that he felt he couldn’t say anything. And wouldn’t. That affected him greatly his whole life. It was part of the reason he drank. It’s sad really.

Fox News: You wrote how you considered comedy professionally after your fiancé got high and married another blonde. 
Brown: So that’s referring to Tommy Lee marrying Pamela Anderson. At the moment, it seemed like the most tragic, bulls–t to ever happen to somebody. But when I look back at it today, just like with a lot of my experiences, I have to laugh at it. I mean, who the f–k does that? Who marries somebody after four days? Why does that kind of s–t happen to me?

It’s funny now. It’s not really funny, haha. It’s more like, who does that? I have a lot of moments in my life that make me question things. Like doing laundry and then falling down the stairs headfirst. Who does that? My life is kind of laughable, in a way. I have to make light of it. Otherwise, it could be pretty tragic. If I don’t make light of it, I will probably go down a dark path.

MARLON BRANDO AND MYSTERIOUS FIRST WIFE ANNA KASHFI HAD VIOLENT RELATIONSHIP, BOOK CLAIMS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-104178523 ‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6afa6813-4d53-50ab-b71c-6ea498c94155

Tommy Lee of Motley Crue and then-girlfriend Bobbie Brown. (Photo by Dave Benett/Getty Images)

JANIS JOPLIN ENJOYED ‘THE MANY PLEASURES THAT CAME HER WAY’ TO COPE WITH INSECURITIES, BOOK CLAIMS

Fox News: A lot of comics poke fun at their personal lives. You initially didn’t. Why?
Brown: I am self-deprecating in my stand-up. I’m starting to use more of my personal life in my stand-up. In the beginning, I just felt like I touched on everything I needed to share in my first book. My comedy wasn’t a continuation of that. I just didn’t think it was really funny.

The only thing my comedy really revolves around is my love life, or lack thereof, specifically what it’s like to actually pursue dating in this day and age with dating apps. How weird it is for people to meet through dating apps. And what that does to a guy. It’s all shocking what they really think and say to you. I make jokes about that, the comments I get and the dates I’ve had.

Fox News: What do you make of modern dating?
Brown: It’s annoying. To have to keep up with that type of interaction, just dating apps in itself – it’s ridiculous to me. It blows my mind. It’s frustrating to have to keep up with that stuff just to maintain relevance in the dating world… I think at this point, I just might die alone. I don’t know if I want to go through all this trouble to have a boyfriend or date somebody. It’s kind of ridiculous. Can’t we just do things like we used to? I guess not.

JUDY GARLAND’S EX-LOVER JOHN MEYER RECALLS THE STAR’S FINAL TUMULTUOUS MONTHS

Westlake Legal Group tumblr_lv2h4rG5jd1qkp83so1_500 ‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6afa6813-4d53-50ab-b71c-6ea498c94155

“Cherry Pie” girl Bobbie Brown is pursuing stand-up comedy today. (Photo courtesy of Bobbie Brown.)

MARGARET, DUCHESS OF ARGYLL, WAS A VICTIM OF REVENGE PORN THAT FOLLOWED HER UNTIL DEATH, BOOK CLAIMS

Fox News: Are you still pursuing stand-up?
Brown: I am! I’m not as heavily into it as I was in the beginning. I have other projects in the works. But I still go up about twice a month now… But my podcast is freaking hilarious. Sharise Neil and I have been friends for over 30 years. She was previously married to Vince Neil. That’s how we all met.

I am considering turning “Dirty Rocker Boys” into a movie right now. I’m pitching that right now… Nobody served me in the first book as far as attorneys go. You can’t be sued for telling the truth. I’ve heard people say, “She’s lucky I don’t sue her.” Well, try to. I didn’t lie about anything. If anything, I omitted a lot of things you should be grateful that I didn’t mention.

Fox News: Who would play you in a film?
Brown: God, people ask that all the time. I can honestly say there’s not one person that makes me go, “Her for sure.” People say Jennifer Lawrence a lot. I think it’s her personality… But I haven’t thought about it on that level yet. I’m not sure. But there’s a new famous somebody every week now. So who the hell knows?

MISS AMERICA 2016 BETTY MAXWELL SAYS SHE MET HER HUSBAND ON TINDER: ‘GOD HAS A PLAN’

TODD RUNDGREN EXPLAINS WHY HE’S NEVER TAKEN THE ROCK & ROLL HALL OF FAME SERIOUSLY

Fox News: What’s your relationship like with your daughter today?
Brown: She and I are very close. I’ve been very honest with her my whole life. Of course, I wasn’t able to be the mom that I wanted to be. I do have regrets when it comes to that. But she is a wonderful, well-developed child who is forgiving, loving — all the things I instilled in her. I’m just so proud of her. I’m incredibly lucky.

Fox News: How important has it been to been for you to be completely open and honest with her?
Brown: That’s my motto with everyone in my life. I’m so honest that it’s too much sometimes. I tell too much of the truth. That can be loved or hated. There’s no gray area with that kind of personality trait. Some people are offended by it and some people totally cherish it. That’s just who I am. I’ve always been this way. And I thought it was a good way to be with my child.

BILL HALEY’S SON CLAIMS ‘ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK’ SINGER HAD A DARK SIDE, STRUGGLED FROM ALCOHOLISM IN MEMOIR

It kept her from having to experience a lot of the things that I did growing up. My mom and I just didn’t have that kind of relationship. I feel like it’s really important to have that with your children. That way, they don’t have to go through so much s–t growing up. It’s hard being a kid. Other kids are hateful. Society is crazy. So I think it’s very important to have that type of level of communication with your children and your family. At the end of the day, they’re the ones who love you the most.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-156168428_1 ‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6afa6813-4d53-50ab-b71c-6ea498c94155   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-156168428_1 ‘Cherry Pie’ girl Bobbie Brown says Warrant rocker Jani Lane was haunted by past before death Stephanie Nolasco fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/then-and-now fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 6afa6813-4d53-50ab-b71c-6ea498c94155

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Today on Fox News: Jan. 3, 2019

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Stay with Fox News for the latest developments of the escalating tension between the U.S. and Iran on all platforms

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: This week’s violent protests led by Iran-backed militants outside the U.S. embassy in Iraq and the killing of a top Iranian general by U.S airstrikes have further escalated American tensions with Iran. Fox News contributor Dan Hoffman weighs in on why violence in the Middle East is ratcheting up and what steps the US can take to handle Iran’s aggression.

Also on the Rundown: Anti-Semitic incidents are increasing in the U.S. including the recent attacks in New York. Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of Anti-Defamation League, and Rabbi Marvin Hier at the Simon Wiesenthal Center join Friday’s podcast to discuss what needs to be done to address the issue.

Don’t miss the good news with Tonya J. Powers. Plus, commentary by “Fox News Sunday” host, Chris Wallace.

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U.S. Strike in Iraq Kills Qassim Suleimani, Commander of Iranian Forces

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Iran’s top security and intelligence commander was killed early Friday in a drone strike at Baghdad International Airport that was authorized by President Trump, American officials said.

The commander, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, who led the powerful Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, was killed along with several officials from Iraqi militias backed by Tehran when an American MQ-9 Reaper drone fired missiles into a convoy that was leaving the airport.

General Suleimani was the architect of nearly every significant operation by Iranian intelligence and military forces over the past two decades, and his death was a staggering blow for Iran at a time of sweeping geopolitical conflict.

The strike was also a serious escalation of Mr. Trump’s growing confrontation with Tehran, one that began with the death of an American contractor in Iraq in late December.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v2 U.S. Strike in Iraq Kills Qassim Suleimani, Commander of Iranian Forces Popular Mobilization Forces (Iraq) Iraq Baghdad International Airport (Iraq)

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last eight days.

In Iran, the leadership convened an emergency security meeting. And the country’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, issued a statement calling for three days of public mourning and then retaliation.

“His departure to God does not end his path or his mission,” the statement said, “but a forceful revenge awaits the criminals who have his blood and the blood of the other martyrs last night on their hands.”

United States officials were braced for potential Iranian retaliatory attacks, possibly including cyberattacks and terrorism, on American interests and allies.

Israel, too, was preparing for Iranian strikes. Some of the country’s most popular tourist sites, including the ski resort at Hermon, were closed, and the armed forces went on alert, officials said.

From the start of the Syrian civil war, General Suleimani was one of the chief leaders of an effort to protect President Bashar al-Assad of Syria — an important Iranian ally — that brought together disparate militias, national security forces and regional powers, including Russia in recent years.

But that was far from the only front he operated on. American officials accuse General Suleimani of causing the deaths of hundreds of soldiers during the Iraq war, when he provided Iraqi insurgents with advanced bomb-making equipment and training. They also say he has masterminded destabilizing Iranian activities that continue throughout the Middle East and are aimed at the United States, Israel and Saudi Arabia.

“General Suleimani was actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region,” the Pentagon said in a statement. “General Suleimani and his Quds Force were responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American and coalition service members and the wounding of thousands more.”

It did not elaborate on the specific intelligence that led them to carry out General Suleimani’s killing. The highly classified mission was set in motion after the American contractor’s death on Dec. 27 during a rocket attack by an Iranian-backed militia, a senior American official said.

In killing General Suleimani, Mr. Trump took an action that Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama had rejected, fearing it would lead to war between the United States and Iran.

While many Republicans said that the president had been justified in the attack, Mr. Trump’s most significant use of military force to date, critics of his Iran policy called the strike a reckless unilateral escalation that could have drastic and unforeseen consequences that could ripple violently throughout the Middle East.

“Soleimani was an enemy of the United States. That’s not a question,” Senator Christopher S. Murphy, Democrat of Connecticut, wrote on Twitter, using an alternate spelling of the Iranian’s name. “The question is this – as reports suggest, did America just assassinate, without any congressional authorization, the second most powerful person in Iran, knowingly setting off a potential massive regional war?”

Iran’s foreign minister, Javad Zarif, called the killing of General Suleimani an act of “international terrorism” and warned it was “extremely dangerous & a foolish escalation.”

“The US bears responsibility for all consequences of its rogue adventurism,” Mr. Zarif tweeted.

Speaking to reporters while on vacation at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla., on Tuesday night, hours after an assault on the American Embassy in Baghdad that United States officials said was orchestrated by Iran, Mr. Trump, who has repeatedly vowed to end American entanglements in the Middle East, insisted that he did not want war.

“I don’t think that would be a good idea for Iran. It wouldn’t last very long,” Mr. Trump said. “Do I want to? No. I want to have peace. I like peace.”

After initial reports of the strike emerged on Thursday, Mr. Trump was unusually cryptic, but he appeared to revel in the news when he posted a tweet that consisted only of the image of an American flag.

Within minutes, Twitter accounts associated with Iranian figures were responding in kind, sending images of Iran’s flag — often accompanied by dire threats of revenge.

The strikes followed a warning on Thursday afternoon from Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper, who said the United States military would pre-emptively strike Iranian-backed forces in Iraq and Syria if there were signs the paramilitary groups were planning more attacks against American bases and personnel in the region.

“If we get word of attacks, we will take pre-emptive action as well to protect American forces, protect American lives,” Mr. Esper said. “The game has changed.”

“This strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans,” the Pentagon statement said late Thursday. “The United States will continue to take all necessary action to protect our people and our interests wherever they are around the world.”

In Iran, state television interrupted its programing to announce General Suleimani’s death, with the news anchor reciting the Islamic prayer for the dead — “From God we came and to God we return” — beside a picture of the general.

Hawkish Iran experts said the strike would be deeply painful for Iran’s leadership. “This is devastating for the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps, the regime and Khamenei’s regional ambitions,” said Mark Dubowitz, the chief executive of the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, referring to Ayatollah Khamenei.

“For 23 years, he has been the equivalent of the J.S.O.C. commander, the C.I.A. director and Iran’s real foreign minister,” Mr. Dubowitz said, using an acronym for the United States’ Joint Special Operations Command. “He is irreplaceable and indispensable” to Iran’s military establishment.

For those same reasons, other regional analysts warned, Iran is likely to respond with an intensity of dangerous proportions.

“From Iran’s perspective, it is hard to imagine a more deliberately provocative act,” said Robert Malley, the president and chief executive of the International Crisis Group. “And it is hard to imagine that Iran will not retaliate in a highly aggressive manner.”

“Whether President Trump intended it or not, it is, for all practical purposes, a declaration of war,” added Mr. Malley, who served as White House coordinator for the Middle East, North Africa and the gulf region in the Obama administration.

Some United States officials and Trump administration advisers offered a less dire scenario, arguing that the show of force might convince Iran that its acts of aggression against American interests and allies have grown too dangerous, and that a president the Iranians may have come to see as risk-averse is in fact willing to escalate.

One senior administration official said the president’s senior advisers had come to worry that Mr. Trump had sent too many signals — including when he called off a planned missile strike in late June — that he did not want a war with Iran.

Tracking Mr. Suleimani’s location at any given time had long been a priority for the American and Israeli spy services and militaries. Current and former American commanders and intelligence officials said that Thursday night’s attack, specifically, drew upon a combination of highly classified information from informants, electronic intercepts, reconnaissance aircraft and other surveillance.

The strike killed five people, including the pro-Iranian chief of an umbrella group for Iraqi militias, Iraqi television reported and militia officials confirmed. The militia chief, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, was a strongly pro-Iranian figure.

The public relations chief for the umbrella group, the Popular Mobilization Forces in Iraq, Mohammed Ridha Jabri, was also killed.

American officials said that multiple missiles hit the convoy in a strike carried out by the Joint Special Operations Command.

American military officials said they were aware of a potentially violent response from Iran and its proxies, and were taking steps they declined to specify to protect American personnel in the Middle East and elsewhere around the world.

Two other people were killed in the strike, according to a general at the Baghdad joint command, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the news media.

The Iraqi general said that General Suleimani and Mr. Ridha, the militia public relations official, arrived by plane at Baghdad International Airport from Syria.

Two cars stopped at the bottom of the airplane steps and picked them up. Mr. al-Muhandis was in one of the cars. As the cars left the airport, they were struck, the general said.

The strike was the second attack at the airport within hours.

The New York Times

An earlier attack, late Thursday, involved three rockets that did not appear to have caused any injuries.

The strikes come days after American forces bombed three outposts of Kataib Hezbollah, an Iranian-supported militia in Iraq and Syria, in retaliation for the death of an American contractor in a rocket attack last week near the Iraqi city of Kirkuk.

The United States said that Kataib Hezbollah fired 31 rockets into a base in Kirkuk Province last week, killing an American contractor and wounding several American and Iraqi servicemen.

The Americans responded by bombing three of the militia’s sites near Qaim in western Iraq, and two sites in Syria. Kataib Hezbollah denied involvement in the attack in Kirkuk.

Pro-Iranian militia members then marched on the American Embassy on Tuesday, effectively imprisoning its diplomats inside for more than 24 hours while thousands of militia members thronged outside. They burned the embassy’s reception area, planted militia flags on its roof and scrawled graffiti on its walls.

No injuries or deaths were reported, and the militia members did not enter the embassy building.

They withdrew late Wednesday afternoon.

The Pentagon statement Thursday night said that General Suleimani “had orchestrated attacks on coalition bases in Iraq over the last several months,” including the one that killed the American contractor last week.

General Suleimani also “approved the attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad,” the statement said.

Mr. Trump said on Tuesday that Iran would “be held fully responsible” for the attack on the embassy, in which protesters set fire to a reception building on the embassy compound, which covers more than 100 acres. He also blamed Tehran for directing the unrest.

In the past several months, Iranian-supported militias have increased rocket attacks on bases housing American troops. The Pentagon has dispatched more than 14,000 troops to the region since May.

Caught in the middle is the Iraqi government, which is too weak to establish any military authority over some of the more established Iranian-supported Shiite militias.

On Thursday, Mr. Esper said the Iraqi government was not doing enough to contain them. The Iraqis need to “stop these attacks from happening and get the Iranian influence out of the government,” Mr. Esper said.

Representative Andy Kim, Democrat of New Jersey, who served as the National Security Council’s director for Iraq under Mr. Obama, said the strike would most likely elicit “a very serious backlash” from a number of Iraqi leaders for taking the action on Iraqi soil, as well as from Shiite communities “that already were protesting and upset in recent days.”

“This is something that is going to make it very difficult for our diplomatic presence there, our military presence there,” Mr. Kim said in an interview.

General Suleimani, who led the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps’ Quds Force, a special forces unit responsible for Iranian operations outside Iran’s borders, was long a figure of intense interest.

He was not only in charge of Iranian intelligence gathering and covert military operations, he was regarded as one of Iran’s most cunning and autonomous military figures. He was also believed to be very close to Ayatollah Khamenei, and was seen as a potential future leader of Iran.

The United States and Iran have long been involved in a shadow war in battlegrounds across the Middle East — including in Iraq, Yemen and Syria. The tactics have generally involved using proxies to carry out the fighting, providing a buffer from a direct confrontation between Washington and Tehran that could draw America into yet other ground conflict with no discernible endgame.

The potential for a regional conflagration was a basis of the Obama administration’s push for a 2015 agreement that froze Iran’s nuclear program in return for sanctions relief.

Mr. Trump withdrew from the deal in 2018, saying that Mr. Obama’s agreement had emboldened Iran, giving it economic breathing room to plow hundreds of millions of dollars into a campaign of violence around the region. Mr. Trump responded with a campaign of “maximum pressure” that began with punishing new economic sanctions, which began a new era of brinkmanship and uncertainly, with neither side knowing just how far the other was willing to escalate violence and risk a wider war. In recent days, it has spilled into the military arena.

General Suleimani once described himself to a senior Iraqi intelligence official as the “sole authority for Iranian actions in Iraq,” the official later told American officials in Baghdad.

In a speech denouncing Mr. Trump, General Suleimani was even less discreet — and openly mocking.

“We are near you, where you can’t even imagine,” he said. “We are ready. We are the man of this arena.”

Michael Crowley reported from West Palm Beach, Fla.; Falih Hassan from Baghdad; and Eric Schmitt from Washington. Reporting was contributed by Ronen Bergman from Tel Aviv, Israel; Alissa J. Rubin from Paris; Farnaz Fassihi from New York; Thomas Gibbons-Neff, Helene Cooper, Mark Mazzetti, Catie Edmondson and Edward Wong from Washington; and Tim Arango from Los Angeles.

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Hong Kong Considers the Future: ‘If You Can Afford It, Leave’

Westlake Legal Group 00hkfuture-1-facebookJumbo Hong Kong Considers the Future: ‘If You Can Afford It, Leave’ Politics and Government parenting Labor and Jobs Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Economic Conditions and Trends Demonstrations, Protests and Riots China

HONG KONG — Everywhere Ivan Lam looks, he sees his possible future.

On the news, he watches the Hong Kong police beating demonstrators. He sees masked protesters vowing to fight on. He reads reports of the growing power of the Chinese Communist Party and its campaign to lock away Muslims.

Conspiracy sites whisper about disappearances and suicides. On the street, outside the gleaming office tower where Mr. Lam, 24, just started his career at a multinational company, he sees officers in riot armor lining the sidewalk and watching for trouble.

Mr. Lam wants to stay in Hong Kong. But he is saving his money. He is making plans. If he has to, he will leave.

“I don’t know how all of this conflict is going to end,” he said, “so my future, like Hong Kong’s future, is unpredictable.”

Months of political turmoil have turned Hong Kong from a city of possibilities into a place of doubt and disillusion. Peaceful demonstrations have turned violent. Its economy is shrinking. Yet China’s leaders seem as determined as ever to do away with the high degree of autonomy they once promised, threatening to put Hong Kong further under Beijing’s authoritarian control.

That reality has upended the lives of the city’s seven million people. Plans to buy homes or have children have been put off. Families and friendships have been strained or broken.

And some — at least, those who have the option — wonder whether they should leave it all behind.

“Before this movement, things were already bad,” said Bessy Chan, a 45-year-old events manager, who is considering moving to Germany.

Ms. Chan, a Hong Kong native, was studying in Britain two decades ago when China took back the British colony after Beijing promised to preserve its freedoms and rule of law. She returned to Hong Kong, with hesitation, and found little had changed. Work kept her busy.

But the city’s high cost of living kept her from changing careers. She grew frustrated that Hong Kong officials devoted money to expensive but problem-plagued train and bridge projects that linked the city to the mainland instead of on affordable housing or education. She began to resent the crowds of mainland tourists.

This year, her sister’s husband got a job in Germany. Ms. Chan has begun to research graduate programs there. She is single, she reasoned, and the changing city has left her unmoored. Her parents, rather than mourning a family split, are happy about the move, she said.

“I have a niece who is 16 right now,” Ms. Chan said. “For a youngster at that age, I don’t see a future for her.”

Hong Kong’s future once looked bright. It benefited from China’s booming economy while maintaining its own system of laws. Its eventual absorption into the mainland, set to take place in 2047, seemed far away.

Soaring housing costs, fewer job opportunities and a rising income gap began to sully that image. But fewer people describe financial pressures as their main reason for wanting to leave the city these days, said Paul Yip, a professor and director at Hong Kong University whose studies show increased unhappiness and depression.

“Rather, they are talking about whether Hong Kong is a place where you want to raise your children,” Mr. Yip said. “That is more subtle and more serious.”

For those reasons, many residents have paused their life plans. Edmond Chan, a 29-year-old math teacher, and his girlfriend do not talk about getting married or starting a family anymore. They have discussed moving to Taiwan but cannot afford to.

Mr. Chan’s role has changed over the year from educator to counselor for students who cannot talk to their parents about the protests. He can no longer talk about the unrest with his own parents, who he says would rather not watch the news or discuss politics.

“We are very confused about how to teach a child that Hong Kong is a good place to live,” Mr. Chan said as he watched a recent lunchtime protest. When his own students come to him for guidance, he does not know what to say.

Official figures do not show whether more people are leaving Hong Kong than before, but the signs of interest are there. Applications for a certificate required to change citizenship have jumped by nearly three-quarters from a year ago, according to local data. Immigration consultants describe a flurry of requests for information. Fliers advertising investment-for-citizenship programs in other countries can be found in the lobbies of luxury apartment buildings.

Edward Suen, the 42-year-old owner of a marketing firm, is encouraging friends to explore that possibility, especially if they have children. “If you can afford it,” he said, “leave.”

Mr. Suen has himself vowed to stay and support the protests. He was galvanized after participating in Hong Kong’s first major street march this year, in June, which organizers said had drawn one million people. City leaders rejected their demands.

Days later, during a meeting on a work trip, Mr. Suen held his phone surreptitiously under the table and watched a video of police officers firing tear gas at protesters surrounding Hong Kong’s legislative building.

“I almost cried in my meeting,” he said, “to see how the police were against all the peaceful protesters.”

Mr. Suen now spends weekends coordinating drivers who ferry protesters to and from demonstrations. He has built a network of volunteers. He tries to be optimistic.

“In Hong Kong, everyone wants to win the lottery,” Mr. Suen said. “We know we won’t win, so why do we keep buying tickets? Because we have hope.”

Gary Fung has chosen to stay as well. Once pro-establishment, the spry 59-year-old barrister began to participate in protests — “Only the legal demonstrations!” he said — and has been shocked at the police’s behavior.

“I saw many of them breaching the law,” Mr. Fung said.

He obtained a British passport in 1991 ahead of the 1997 handover, but he chose to confront his fears of China instead. In 2007, he traveled to Tiananmen Square in Beijing and sat in quiet protest on the anniversary of the 1989 massacre. Now, he wants to fight to preserve Hong Kong’s legal autonomy.

“I’m proud of our legal system because of my background,” Mr. Fung said. “I want to turn it back.”

Protests have ebbed since November’s elections for district councils gave the pro-democracy movement a decisive victory. Still, tensions lurk in offices and homes.

Carrie Lai, a 45-year-old events and public relations executive, has trouble avoiding shouting matches at family dinners. On the day of the elections, over appetizers, her brother-in-law suggested that one pro-democracy candidate had organized an attack against himself by hammer-wielding thugs to win sympathy. Ms. Lai froze, soup spoon suspended midair and face flushed, and opened her mouth to speak. Her sister-in-law jumped in and changed the subject.

“Everyone is on alert mode,” Ms. Lai said.

Ms. Lai has an Australian passport because she lived there as a teenager, but for now she plans to stay in Hong Kong. Her husband lacks an Australian passport. She also cannot imagine leaving now, at a time when she feels the protest movement needs her.

“It’s not that moment yet,” she said. If things get really bad, Ms. Lai said, her participation in protests could make a difference.

Mr. Lam is less certain he can change the future.

The son of a civil servant and a retail manager, Mr. Lam took all the right steps to climb Hong Kong’s social and economic ladders. He went to school abroad, in Manchester, England. He got a job as a recruiter at a prominent agency. He started dating someone seriously. His life in Hong Kong appeared to be set.

Now, he watches with dismay at Beijing’s increasing role in the city’s affairs. He fears the Communist Party will harness Hong Kong’s growth engine while squelching its culture.

“They want to use us,” he said, “but at the same time they want to change us.”

The protests at times have consumed Hong Kong’s central business district, where Mr. Lam works. During a recent lunchtime protest, he watched as an older man crossing the street was suddenly tackled by riot police officers. As the man was searched, a wailing police van arrived. Officers pushed the man inside. An older woman shouted that the man had done nothing wrong.

“That’s our future,” Mr. Lam said.

Mr. Lam consumes the news. He reads rumor sites and chat rooms and fires off links to acquaintances, even as he acknowledges that he does not know whether they are true.

Mr. Lam and his girlfriend discuss where they might go. She wants to go into a tourism-related business, a skill set that he reasons is portable. Japan comes up a lot in their talks. Britain, too.

Still, Mr. Lam doesn’t want to leave. At least, not yet.

“I love this place, and I wanted to develop my career here,” he said. “This is my home.”

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It’s 2020 And The Actor Who Played Baby Emma In ‘Friends’ Says Her Nap Is Over

Westlake Legal Group 5e0ed00025000079bad31a8c It’s 2020 And The Actor Who Played Baby Emma In ‘Friends’ Says Her Nap Is Over

It looks like Monica and Chandler can finally head off on their romantic weekend to Vermont. 

Noelle Sheldon, now 17, played Ross and Rachel’s baby daughter on the hit TV sitcom “Friends” with her twin sister Cali in 2002 and 2003. On the first day of 2020, she made a priceless throwback to ring in the new decade.

Sheldon’s joke wrapped up a line made by Chandler in Season 10, Episode 4 of the show, where he snarked at the baby for delaying his and Monica’s getaway by taking a prolonged nap.

Leaving a video message for Emma to watch when she grows up, Chandler said: “Hi Emma. It’s the year 2020. Are you still enjoying your nap?”

Turns out, she’s not:

Monica followed Chandler’s line with: “We’re Aunt Monica and Uncle Chandler, by the way. You may not recognize us because we haven’t spoken to your parents in 17 years.”

“We used to be married but then we missed a weekend away together and things kind of unraveled… because of you,” Chandler added.

Both Cali and Noelle have continued to act since their “Friends” debut, most recently appearing in Jordan Peele’s film “Us.”

Cali also threw back to that fateful episode not too long ago to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the show.

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Ilhan Omar vows to stop Trump from creating ‘distraction’ war in Iran

Westlake Legal Group AP19308131645184 Ilhan Omar vows to stop Trump from creating 'distraction' war in Iran fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc f97e4c29-61b6-5151-afaa-f0ff54c2818a Danielle Wallace article

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., called on members of Congress late Thursday to join her in putting a stop to President Trump from starting a war as a “distraction” in Iran following the U.S. airstrike that killed the notorious Gen. Qassim Soleimani.

“So what if Trump wants war, knows this leads to war and needs the distraction?” the Democrat freshman “Squad” member said. “Real question is, will those with congressional authority step in and stop him? I know I will.”

IRAN VOWS ‘HARSH RETALIATION’ AFTER US AIRSTRIKE KILLS IRANIAN GEN. QASSEM SOLEIMANI

The Pentagon confirmed earlier Thursday evening that Trump had ordered the attack that killed Soleimani, the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ elite Quds Force, among other military officials at Baghdad International Airport in Iraq. Iran’s top “shadow commander” was responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American and coalition service members and the wounding of thousands more, the State Department said.

Omar responded to a tweet from Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., who questioned whether Trump acted within his right as Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces to authorize the attack. The U.S. Constitution divides war powers between the Executive and Legislative branches. Congress can declare war and raise support for the armed forces.

“Soleimani was an enemy of the United States. That’s not a question,” Murphy affirmed. “The question is this – as reports suggest, did America just assassinate, without any congressional authorization, the second most powerful person in Iran, knowingly setting off a potential massive regional war?”

Murphy, a member of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, said that while the justification for the attack is to “deter future Iranian attacks,” the U.S. usually doesn’t assassinate foreign officials because it could potentially cause more Americans to be killed.

“That should be our real, pressing and grave worry tonight,” he said.

He added that while no one knows what will happen next, “the neocons thumping their chest tonight should recall that the worst mistakes global powers make are when they strike militarily in complicated places with few friends, with no consideration of the consequences.”

Many Democrats admitted that no Americans would mourn Soleimani’s death but also raised concern that the escalation will put the U.S. on a crash course for a new conflict in the Mideast. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi released a statement saying that Trump ordered the airstrike “without the consultation of Congress.”

The State Department said the airstrike “was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans.”

“The United States will continue to take all necessary action to protect our people and our interests wherever they are around the world,” the agency said.

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Soleimani is suspected of directing a mob of hundreds of Iranian-backed militants to storm the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad this week, triggering a two-day faceoff with American forces at the most heavily fortified U.S. diplomatic mission in the world. On Tuesday, Trump vowed retaliation against the militia groups. He tweeted an American flag Thursday evening after Soleimani’s death was confirmed.

In April 2019, the State Department announced that Iranian and Iranian-backed forces led by Soleimani were responsible for killing 608 U.S. troops during the Iraq War.

Soleimani took over the external operations wing of the IRGC in 1998 and was known as one of the most powerful military leaders in the Middle East. The State Department believes he was the masterminded behind the major military operations, bombings and assassinations that accounted for at least 17 percent of all U.S. personnel deaths in Iraq between 2003 and 2011.

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on Friday warned that a “harsh retaliation is waiting” for the U.S. after the airstrike that killed Soleimani.

Fox News’ Vandana Rambaran and Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19308131645184 Ilhan Omar vows to stop Trump from creating 'distraction' war in Iran fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc f97e4c29-61b6-5151-afaa-f0ff54c2818a Danielle Wallace article   Westlake Legal Group AP19308131645184 Ilhan Omar vows to stop Trump from creating 'distraction' war in Iran fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/state-department fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc f97e4c29-61b6-5151-afaa-f0ff54c2818a Danielle Wallace article

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State Department urges U.S. citizens to leave Iraq immediately

The State Department issued a security alert early Friday morning urging Americans in Iraq to leave the country immediately.

The warning comes hours after Iran promised “harsh retaliation” against the United States for an airstrike that killed top Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani at the Baghdad International Airport.

IRAN VOWS ‘HARSH RETALIATION’ AFTER US AIRSTRIKE KILLS IRANIAN GEN. QASSEM SOLEIMANI

Westlake Legal Group AP20001377294352 State Department urges U.S. citizens to leave Iraq immediately fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc dfb38d1b-a5ee-54ea-be66-a5d3804e227d Brie Stimson article

Pro-Iranian militiamen and their supporters set a fire while U.S. soldiers fired tear gas during a sit-in in front of the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, Iraq, Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2020. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)

“Due to heightened tensions in Iraq and the region, we urge U.S. citizens to depart Iraq immediately,” the State Department said in the alert.

The alert also said all consular operations are suspended at the U.S. embassy in Baghdad “Due to Iranian-backed militia attacks at the U.S. Embassy compound.”

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“U.S. citizens should not approach the Embassy,” the alert said.

Westlake Legal Group AP20003121173306 State Department urges U.S. citizens to leave Iraq immediately fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc dfb38d1b-a5ee-54ea-be66-a5d3804e227d Brie Stimson article   Westlake Legal Group AP20003121173306 State Department urges U.S. citizens to leave Iraq immediately fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox news fnc/world fnc dfb38d1b-a5ee-54ea-be66-a5d3804e227d Brie Stimson article

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