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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 231)

Dan Gainor: MSNBC and NY Times don’t let facts get in way of anti-Trump stories – Fiction is more interesting

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079218778001_6079209360001-vs Dan Gainor: MSNBC and NY Times don’t let facts get in way of anti-Trump stories – Fiction is more interesting fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor article 64086bb0-9058-5b73-938b-3223bc314557

MSNBC host Lawrence O’Donnell, who used to write for the fictional TV show “West Wing,” proved this week that he hasn’t lost his touch. He showed that he’s not limited to discussing real news – he can make it up and report his fictional version as if it were real.

Like much of what is wrong with the media, it began with a tweet. And then O’Donnell repeated his fictional claim on MSNBC Tuesday night.

In on-air conversation with Rachel Maddow, whose show immediately precedes his, O’Donnell said he had information about how years ago businessman Donald Trump was “able to obtain loans when no one else would loan him money.”

TRUMP TEARS INTO LAWRENCE O’DONNELL, MEDIA OVER ‘TOTALLY FALSE’ RUSSIA REPORT: ‘ALL APOLOGIZE!’

“I may have some information, in this next hour, which would add a great deal to their understanding of that, if true, and I’ll be discussing it here,” O’Donnell added. “I stress ‘if true,’ because this is a single source who has told me that Deutsche Bank obtained tax returns… this single source close to Deutsche Bank has told me that Donald Trump’s loan documents there show that he has co-signers. That’s how he was able to obtain those loans and that the co-signers are Russian oligarchs.”

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Ah, “if true.” If true, O’Donnell would be a legitimate TV journalist and not an embarrassment to his network.

Maddow’s reaction to O’Donnell was priceless. She seemed completely floored by the allegations and responded loudly: “What?” Then she continued by saying “that is a scenario that I have never contemplated.” Now we know why.

This was worse than a Joe Biden gaffe and the fallout was extensive.

O’Donnell was back the following night like a kid with his hand caught in the cookie jar. “Last night on this show, I discussed information that wasn’t ready for reporting,” he told viewers.

He added: “Saying ‘if true’ as I discussed the information was simply not good enough.”

This is what is known as a “Duh” moment. It’s especially hilarious that he explained his comment “did not go through the rigorous verification and standards process here at MSNBC.”

Standards? This is the same news station that employs Brian Williams, who lost his prestigious job as anchor of the “NBC Nightly News” for rewriting history more than Quentin Tarantino.

MSNBC also employs host Joy Reid for some reason, despite her own bizarre defense of anti-gay statements on her blog.

Besides, we now know that MSNBC wasn’t just trying to get a clean conscience.

President Trump’s lawyers sent a letter to NBC Wednesday stating: “We write concerning the false and defamatory statements published by Lawrence O’Donnell and NBC Universal. … Demand is hereby made that Mr. O’Donnell and NBCU immediately and prominently retract, correct and apologize for the aforementioned false and defamatory statements.”

The letter from Trump lawyer Charles B. Harder added: “Failure to do so will leave my clients with no alternative but to consider their legal options which could include immediate legal proceedings against Mr. O’Donnell and NBCU.”

Still no word whether MSNBC will discipline its incompetent host.

Washington Post Media Critic Erik Wemple slammed O’Donnell’s “uncorroborated, wish-fulfillment garbage.”

“With his repeated ‘if true’ caveats, O’Donnell was mocking the core idea of journalism – which is to say, the verification of stray tips and rumors,” Wemple wrote.

Wemple closed out his criticism by asking the key question regarding O’Donnell: “Is such a fellow fit to host an MSNBC program?”

Well, given the lack of standards at MSNBC, yes.

More incompetence at NBC

One definition of insanity is to do something the same way and expect a different result. Or, perhaps, it’s working in the NBC universe.

The network was part of an incompetent pile-on against the Trump administration over the claim that “children born to U.S. service members outside of the U.S. will no longer be automatically considered citizens.” That story was tweeted by NBC’s Ken Dilanian.

Washington Post Media Critic Erik Wemple slammed O’Donnell’s “uncorroborated, wish-fulfillment garbage.”

Turns out it’s not true and Dilanian had to issue a correction. The new rule actually only impacts about 100 children annually. Maybe get it right instead of getting it first.

New York Times doesn’t want scrutiny it gives to others

The New York Times has fallen on hard times. The prestigious left-wing newspaper came out this week against … journalism. Only it didn’t call it that.

The paper published a story headlined: “Trump Allies Target Journalists Over Coverage Deemed Hostile to White House.” The article called it an attempt “to undercut the influence of legitimate news reporting.”

Publisher A.G. Sulzberger responded with a strongly worded statement saying that the “unprecedented campaign appears designed to harass and embarrass anyone affiliated with independent news organizations that have asked tough questions and brought uncomfortable truths to light.”

While the Times had done a hit job on the conservative Western Journal just days before, its hypocrisy is even worse. In the fifth paragraph of Sulzberger’s 500-word whine, he actually pretends to welcome journalism about his organization. “No organization is above scrutiny, including The Times,” he wrote.

Why then the big freak-out? Is Sulzberger worried that there are even more open anti-Semites on his staff other than, say, Tom Wright-Piersanti who was outed by Breitbart for his slurs against Jews? Or perhaps Sulzberger is worried about readers discovering there are more anti-white bigots than editorial board member Sarah Jeong?

Politico’s Senior Media Writer Jack Shafer defended the practice of digging into what journalists have said on Twitter and elsewhere. “Journalists don’t deserve a get-out-of-bigotry-jail free card just because they’re journalists,” he wrote.

Amen.

New York Times rewrites history

When it’s not going back hundreds of years to spin American history, the New York Times is content with rewriting recent history – in this case the history of the Tea Party.

The Times did a 10-years-after story on the conservative grassroots movement under the headline: “The Tea Party Didn’t Get What It Wanted, but It Did Unleash the Politics of Anger.”

The article even called the rise of the Tea Party “a summer of rage,” and began with how “the country seemed to lose its mind.”

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But we’ve learned that The Times can never be liberal enough for its conservative-hating readers. As a result, the story got updated … and meaner. Here’s the Times’ politics Twitter account: “We have updated this story assessing the policy failures of the Tea Party movement 10 years after its rise to include context about attacks on President Barack Obama and racist displays at some Tea Party rallies.”

This is an example of how The New York Times and many in the left-wing media, now regularly attack conservatives as racist simply for being conservatives.

It is also an example of the newspaper bowing once more to the liberal Twitteratti, upset that the Times was insufficiently harsh to its opponents.

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The paper’s own staff know who is editing the news now. Opinion Staff Writer and Editor Bari Weiss told CNN that Twitter “becomes almost like an assigning editor, sometimes.”

Or, in the case of the Times, a thought-control editor. Like you used to have with Pravda in the old Soviet Union.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY DAN GAINOR

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079218778001_6079209360001-vs Dan Gainor: MSNBC and NY Times don’t let facts get in way of anti-Trump stories – Fiction is more interesting fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor article 64086bb0-9058-5b73-938b-3223bc314557   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6079218778001_6079209360001-vs Dan Gainor: MSNBC and NY Times don’t let facts get in way of anti-Trump stories – Fiction is more interesting fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fox news fnc/opinion fnc Dan Gainor article 64086bb0-9058-5b73-938b-3223bc314557

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Intelligence veterans are pulling their hair out over Trump’s ‘outrageous’ and ‘moronic’ decision to tweet out a photo from a classified briefing

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Gaffes pile up for Biden’s 2020 campaign as Trump team takes aim

Westlake Legal Group Joe-Biden-Getty Gaffes pile up for Biden’s 2020 campaign as Trump team takes aim fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 6b64c890-8a1e-50d9-bbad-731f1da4c28e

Former Vice President Joe Biden, the current frontrunner in the 2020 Democratic race, has been hit by a new wave of gaffes and errors over just a few days – something that President Trump and his reelection campaign are increasingly pointing to as a problem for the potential White House rival.

Biden was hit by a Washington Post report this week that found that a moving military story – which the former senator called “God’s truth” – was not true.

JOE BIDEN TOLD MOVING MILITARY STORY AT CAMPAIGN STOP — BUT ‘IT NEVER HAPPENED,’ REPORT SAYS

The story was an emotional account of Biden’s decision to travel to Afghanistan, despite concerns about visiting a war-torn area, in order to honor a Navy captain for retrieving the body of his dead comrade during battle.

According to Biden, he brushed off concerns about the risk of him traveling to the deadly area. “We can lose a vice president,” he said, recounting his words to a crowd during an event on Friday. “We can’t lose many more of these kids. Not a joke.” His story involved the captain dramatically telling Biden he didn’t want the medal because his comrade ended up dying.

But after speaking with more than a dozen military and campaign sources, the Post determined the event “never happened” and that “almost every detail in the story appears to be incorrect.”

The gaffe bemused even sympathetic analysts, with MSNBC host Chris Matthews insisting that a reporter would be fired for making such errors.

“I mean, he’s not Ernest Hemingway. You don’t get to make it up based upon facts. You have to have the facts,” he said.

Biden, 76, later told The Post that he “was making the point how courageous these people are, how incredible they are, this generation of warriors, these fallen angels we’ve lost.”

Biden also drew scrutiny this week when he said in South Carolina that he didn’t know U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

“I don’t know the new prime minister of England. He looks like Donald Trump, I know that,” he said at a town hall.

Apart from being a swipe at someone with whom he may need to forge good ties with as president, the comment is notable because Johnson has long been an internationally known politician. He recently served as the country’s foreign secretary and was mayor of London when Biden was vice president. It also isn’t Biden’s only British-related gaffe. In May, he said the prime minister was Margaret Thatcher (who served as prime minister from 1979 until 1990), not then-PM Theresa May. He quickly corrected himself.

Biden has long had a reputation for gaffes, but they appear to have grown in number during this campaign, leading to some speculation about whether his age could become a factor in the 2020 campaign. Trump has called Biden by the nickname “Sleepy Joe” for some time.

Last weekend, Biden said in New Hampshire: “I love this place, what’s not to like about Vermont?” He later appeared to have difficulty recalling where he had just spoken.

Last year he admitted to being a gaffe “machine,” but said it was better than what he described as President Trump’s repeated lies in public.

“I am a gaffe machine, but my God what a wonderful thing compared to a guy who can’t tell the truth,” he said.

BIDEN, STILL LEADING, BELIEVES HE CAN SURVIVE ANY NEW GAFFES, DEM POLLSTER SAYS

The gaffes so far appear not to have too much effect on his polling status. While some polls have shown the race tightening, particularly between Biden and rival Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Kamala Harris, D-Calif., the former vice president remains in the lead in most polls. A number of those polls also show him beating President Trump in a prospective 2020 matchup.

Yet as the campaign progresses, he is likely to face more scrutiny for the gaffes both from rival Democratic campaigns and the Trump campaign – which will be keen to take down Biden if they view him as the presumptive future opponent.

In recent weeks, Trump has made a series of comments about Biden’s presumed mental state. Earlier this month, he said that “Joe is not playing with a full deck.”

He made that remark after Biden told a crowd in Iowa that “poor kids are just as bright and talented as white kids.” Biden quickly corrected himself after some applause from the crowd at the Asian & Latino Coalition PAC, and finished, “wealthy kids, black kids, Asian kids.”

“This is not somebody you can have as your president, but if he got the nomination I’d be thrilled,” Trump said.

The Trump team has also drawn attention to Biden’s most recent set of errors and suggested they represent more than just gaffes.

“These are not gaffes, it is a problem with Joe Biden and it is causing a lot of Democrats to start to rethink their frontrunner,” Mark Lotter, the Trump campaign’s strategic communications director, said on Fox News’ “America’s Newsroom” Friday.

“He’s still the frontrunner at this point but he’s struggling to get through these primaries right now,” Lotter said, adding that the challenges of battling through a primary don’t compare to challenging a sitting president.

“If he’s struggling, imagine what’s going to happen next year,” he said.

However, others dismissed the concerns that it could affect Biden’s chances. Colin Reed, a Republican strategist, wrote in a Fox News op-ed that the many years of Biden missteps are “an ingredient already baked in the cake” for voters.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He instead pointed to next week’s debate in Houston, Texas — where Biden will share the sage with Warren for the first time – as a much bigger threat to his frontrunner status.

“Unlike Biden, Warren is in her element on the debate stage. Where he stammers and stumbles, she relishes cutting down rivals under the klieg lights,” he wrote. “In Houston, for the first time, she will get to face Biden in her natural setting.”

Democratic pollster Doug Schoen said that Biden’s team isn’t too concerned with the gaffes, but believes it could ultimately hurt his fundraising – and could give a much-needed boost to the rapidly gaining Warren.

“I think with these gaffes, too, as they hurt Biden’s fundraising, they hurt his crowds and they make this a much more difficult contest even though his numbers have stayed steady,” Schoen said.

Fox News’ Mike Emanuel and Sam Dorman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Joe-Biden-Getty Gaffes pile up for Biden’s 2020 campaign as Trump team takes aim fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 6b64c890-8a1e-50d9-bbad-731f1da4c28e   Westlake Legal Group Joe-Biden-Getty Gaffes pile up for Biden’s 2020 campaign as Trump team takes aim fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc article Adam Shaw 6b64c890-8a1e-50d9-bbad-731f1da4c28e

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‘I Am on My Way to Being Very Well,’ Justice Ginsburg Tells Thousands of Fans

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160000092_272764d6-43e2-4cbb-909f-a12a24428ef7-facebookJumbo ‘I Am on My Way to Being Very Well,’ Justice Ginsburg Tells Thousands of Fans Trump, Donald J Supreme Court (US) Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas Ginsburg, Ruth Bader cancer

WASHINGTON — “How am I feeling?” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg asked on Saturday, articulating the question on the minds of nervous liberals and many of the 4,000 people who had stood in line for hours to see her interviewed in a cavernous convention center.

“This audience can see,” she said, “that I am alive.” The statement was greeted with thunderous applause. “And I am on my way to being very well,” she added as the room quieted down.

Justice Ginsburg was assisted as she climbed the stairs to the stage, at a book festival sponsored by the Library of Congress. But she was relaxed, alert and cheerful in discussing her life and work.

The interview was part of a remarkably busy public schedule for Justice Ginsburg after the Supreme Court announced last week that she had been treated for pancreatic cancer. The appearances have given liberals hope that she will remain on the court longer than President Trump will be in the White House, allowing a Democrat to name her successor.

Justice Ginsburg, 86, was in Buffalo on Monday to receive an honorary degree. She is scheduled to be in North Little Rock, Ark., on Tuesday. Demand for tickets was so high that the event was moved to a sports arena with a capacity of about 18,000.

Nina Totenberg, the NPR correspondent who interviewed Justice Ginsburg on Saturday, said there were another 16,000 people on the waiting list for her appearance in Arkansas.

Over the next three weeks, Justice Ginsburg will also appear in Raleigh, N.C., Chicago, twice in New York and again in Washington.

The appearances tend to follow a pattern: a standing ovation from an adoring crowd, followed by questioning from a sympathetic interviewer. Justice Ginsburg tells nicely honed anecdotes about her earlier career as a feminist professor and litigator, her marriage, the Supreme Court and the law. She lands a couple of jokes. She describes her unlikely friendship with Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in 2016.

But the tone was a little different on Saturday in light of her recent medical setback.

“I love my job,” she said. “It has kept me going through four cancer bouts. Instead of concentrating on my aches and pains, I just know that I have to read a set of briefs and go over a draft opinion. Somehow, I have to surmount whatever is going on in my body and concentrate on the court’s work.”

The latest string of public appearances was scheduled before the announcement that Justice Ginsburg had undergone three weeks of radiation treatment for a malignant tumor on her pancreas. “The tumor was treated definitively and there is no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body,” the court’s statement said.

This was Justice Ginsburg’s fourth brush with cancer, following surgery in December to remove two malignant nodules from her left lung, surgery for early-stage pancreatic cancer in 2009 and treatment for colon cancer in 1999.

Medical experts said the court’s statement about Justice Ginsburg’s recent tumor was vague enough to make it difficult to pinpoint her precise diagnosis, much less to speculate on how her disease might progress.

But most experts agreed that the tumor, described as a localized malignant tumor, was likely to have been a new lesion in the pancreas, rather than a recurrence of the earlier pancreatic cancer or a cancer from another organ that had spread.

Though surgery is typically the preferred treatment for a tumor in the pancreas, Justice Ginsburg appears to have chosen radiation, which is generally less disruptive. Surgery can be grueling and tough on someone of Justice Ginsburg’s age and health.

A stent was inserted in Justice Ginsburg’s bile duct, the court’s statement said, indicating that the tumor was in the head of the pancreas, according to experts. Surgery to remove that kind of tumor is a complex four- to 12-hour procedure with a high rate of complications and even death. It often leaves the patient with diabetes and entails a long recovery period.

“It’s a surgery we do often, but you’re in the hospital for a week, and you’d not be 100 percent yourself for six to eight weeks, and maybe three months,” said Dr. Daniel Labow, the chairman of surgical oncology at Mount Sinai Health System.

The type of radiation treatment Justice Ginsburg had, called stereotactic ablative radiation therapy, concentrates radiation on the tumor, limiting damage to the surrounding organs, and is generally less disruptive to patients’ lives.

Justice Ginsburg is loath to miss work or cut back on her public schedule. Despite her health setbacks over the years, she had never missed an argument in her 25 years on the court until January, when she was absent from the bench for two weeks after her lung surgery. She participated in the cases argued then by reading briefs and transcripts.

On Saturday, Justice Ginsburg discussed only one recent Supreme Court decision, the ruling in June that determined federal courts are powerless to address partisan gerrymandering, the practice of drawing voting districts to aid the party in power.

It was a 5-to-4 decision, and Justice Ginsburg and the other three liberal members of the court were in dissent. She denounced a practice that she called rigged elections. “That’s not the way a democracy should run,” she said.

Were Justice Ginsburg to leave the court during Mr. Trump’s first term, it would give him an opportunity to name a third justice. The last president to appoint more than two justices in his first term was Richard M. Nixon, who put four on the court from 1969 to 1972. Those appointments spelled the end of the liberal court that had been led by Chief Justice Earl Warren and created a conservative majority that remains to this day.

The current court is closely divided, with five Republican appointees and four Democratic ones. A third Trump appointee would not only make the balance more lopsided but would also almost certainly move the court’s ideological center to the right.

On Saturday, Justice Ginsburg seemed committed to staying on the job while marveling at her celebrity. “It’s amazing,” she said. “At the advanced age of 86, everyone wants to take a picture with me.”

Carla Hayden, the librarian of Congress, said she had been inclined to introduce the justice as “the Beyoncé of jurisprudence.” But Justice Ginsburg had a different idea, Ms. Hayden said, indicating a preference for “the J. Lo of jurisprudence.”

A little later, Justice Ginsburg described meeting Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez in her judicial chambers. She shared with the celebrity couple her mother-in-law’s secret for a happy marriage: “It helps sometimes to be a little deaf.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘I Am on My Way to Being Very Well,’ Justice Ginsburg Tells Thousands of Fans

Westlake Legal Group merlin_160000092_272764d6-43e2-4cbb-909f-a12a24428ef7-facebookJumbo ‘I Am on My Way to Being Very Well,’ Justice Ginsburg Tells Thousands of Fans Trump, Donald J Supreme Court (US) Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas Ginsburg, Ruth Bader cancer

WASHINGTON — “How am I feeling?” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg asked on Saturday, articulating the question on the minds of nervous liberals and many of the 4,000 people who had stood in line for hours to see her interviewed in a cavernous convention center.

“This audience can see,” she said, “that I am alive.” The statement was greeted with thunderous applause. “And I am on my way to being very well,” she added as the room quieted down.

Justice Ginsburg was assisted as she climbed the stairs to the stage, at a book festival sponsored by the Library of Congress. But she was relaxed, alert and cheerful in discussing her life and work.

The interview was part of a remarkably busy public schedule for Justice Ginsburg after the Supreme Court announced last week that she had been treated for pancreatic cancer. The appearances have given liberals hope that she will remain on the court longer than President Trump will be in the White House, allowing a Democrat to name her successor.

Justice Ginsburg, 86, was in Buffalo on Monday to receive an honorary degree. She is scheduled to be in North Little Rock, Ark., on Tuesday. Demand for tickets was so high that the event was moved to a sports arena with a capacity of about 18,000.

Nina Totenberg, the NPR correspondent who interviewed Justice Ginsburg on Saturday, said there were another 16,000 people on the waiting list for her appearance in Arkansas.

Over the next three weeks, Justice Ginsburg will also appear in Raleigh, N.C., Chicago, twice in New York and again in Washington.

The appearances tend to follow a pattern: a standing ovation from an adoring crowd, followed by questioning from a sympathetic interviewer. Justice Ginsburg tells nicely honed anecdotes about her earlier career as a feminist professor and litigator, her marriage, the Supreme Court and the law. She lands a couple of jokes. She describes her unlikely friendship with Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in 2016.

But the tone was a little different on Saturday in light of her recent medical setback.

“I love my job,” she said. “It has kept me going through four cancer bouts. Instead of concentrating on my aches and pains, I just know that I have to read a set of briefs and go over a draft opinion. Somehow, I have to surmount whatever is going on in my body and concentrate on the court’s work.”

The latest string of public appearances was scheduled before the announcement that Justice Ginsburg had undergone three weeks of radiation treatment for a malignant tumor on her pancreas. “The tumor was treated definitively and there is no evidence of disease elsewhere in the body,” the court’s statement said.

This was Justice Ginsburg’s fourth brush with cancer, following surgery in December to remove two malignant nodules from her left lung, surgery for early-stage pancreatic cancer in 2009 and treatment for colon cancer in 1999.

Medical experts said the court’s statement about Justice Ginsburg’s recent tumor was vague enough to make it difficult to pinpoint her precise diagnosis, much less to speculate on how her disease might progress.

But most experts agreed that the tumor, described as a localized malignant tumor, was likely to have been a new lesion in the pancreas, rather than a recurrence of the earlier pancreatic cancer or a cancer from another organ that had spread.

Though surgery is typically the preferred treatment for a tumor in the pancreas, Justice Ginsburg appears to have chosen radiation, which is generally less disruptive. Surgery can be grueling and tough on someone of Justice Ginsburg’s age and health.

A stent was inserted in Justice Ginsburg’s bile duct, the court’s statement said, indicating that the tumor was in the head of the pancreas, according to experts. Surgery to remove that kind of tumor is a complex four- to 12-hour procedure with a high rate of complications and even death. It often leaves the patient with diabetes and entails a long recovery period.

“It’s a surgery we do often, but you’re in the hospital for a week, and you’d not be 100 percent yourself for six to eight weeks, and maybe three months,” said Dr. Daniel Labow, the chairman of surgical oncology at Mount Sinai Health System.

The type of radiation treatment Justice Ginsburg had, called stereotactic ablative radiation therapy, concentrates radiation on the tumor, limiting damage to the surrounding organs, and is generally less disruptive to patients’ lives.

Justice Ginsburg is loath to miss work or cut back on her public schedule. Despite her health setbacks over the years, she had never missed an argument in her 25 years on the court until January, when she was absent from the bench for two weeks after her lung surgery. She participated in the cases argued then by reading briefs and transcripts.

On Saturday, Justice Ginsburg discussed only one recent Supreme Court decision, the ruling in June that determined federal courts are powerless to address partisan gerrymandering, the practice of drawing voting districts to aid the party in power.

It was a 5-to-4 decision, and Justice Ginsburg and the other three liberal members of the court were in dissent. She denounced a practice that she called rigged elections. “That’s not the way a democracy should run,” she said.

Were Justice Ginsburg to leave the court during Mr. Trump’s first term, it would give him an opportunity to name a third justice. The last president to appoint more than two justices in his first term was Richard M. Nixon, who put four on the court from 1969 to 1972. Those appointments spelled the end of the liberal court that had been led by Chief Justice Earl Warren and created a conservative majority that remains to this day.

The current court is closely divided, with five Republican appointees and four Democratic ones. A third Trump appointee would not only make the balance more lopsided but would also almost certainly move the court’s ideological center to the right.

On Saturday, Justice Ginsburg seemed committed to staying on the job while marveling at her celebrity. “It’s amazing,” she said. “At the advanced age of 86, everyone wants to take a picture with me.”

Carla Hayden, the librarian of Congress, said she had been inclined to introduce the justice as “the Beyoncé of jurisprudence.” But Justice Ginsburg had a different idea, Ms. Hayden said, indicating a preference for “the J. Lo of jurisprudence.”

A little later, Justice Ginsburg described meeting Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez in her judicial chambers. She shared with the celebrity couple her mother-in-law’s secret for a happy marriage: “It helps sometimes to be a little deaf.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Seventh illegal immigrant accused of sex crimes in Maryland county since July 25

A Honduran national in the United States illegally has been accused of raping his 15-year-old stepdaughter in suburban Maryland, the seventh such case in the area over the past five weeks.

Emilio Carrasco-Hernandez, 37, is charged with second-degree rape, sex abuse of a minor, third-degree sex offense and fourth-degree sex offense, according to WJLA.

Westlake Legal Group Emilio-Carrasco-Hernandez-Montgomery-County-Police Seventh illegal immigrant accused of sex crimes in Maryland county since July 25 Sam Dorman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/immigration/enforcement fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/topic/sanctuary-cities fox news fnc/us fnc article 4f9c81da-520d-57ae-ad59-b684fd122151

Emilio Carrasco-Hernandez (Montgomery County Police)

The alleged victim spoke to Montgomery County police and claimed that her stepfather sexually assaulted her multiple times between Aug. 16 and Aug. 25. She alleged that she was unable to use the bathroom after one of the assaults because it was “very painful” and left her with a “stinging” feeling.

ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT RAPED MARYLAND GIRL, 16, AT KNIFEPOINT IN HER BEDROOM, POLICE SAY

“Victim A stated that she could not move and Emilio Carrasco-Hernandez was squishing her with his body,” detectives reportedly said of the incident. The 200-lb. Carrasco-Hernandez allegedly kissed the girl’s body and even bit her shirt in one incident.

The victim’s mother reportedly booted Carrasco-Hernandez from their Wheaton home after finding the two of them together in a bedroom. While the age of consent in Maryland is 16 years old, the mother said she believed it was a consensual act fueled by alcohol.

In a statement to WJLA, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said that Carrasco-Hernandez was previously deported in April 2017, but re-entered the United States “sometime thereafter.”

Carrasco-Hernandez could face up to 56 years in state prison in convicted on all charges. He also faces up to 20 years in federal prison for re-entering the U.S. having been previously deported, an ICE official told WJLA.

The agency reportedly placed a detainer on the Honduran national and he was put in jail without bond. He faces charges of second-degree rape, third and fourth degree sex offenses, and sex abuse of a minor.

ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT RAPE SUSPECT RELEASED FROM MARYLAND JAIL, VIOLATING DETAINER POLICY, ICE SAYS

Since July 25, Montgomery County Police have arrested at least seven confirmed undocumented immigrants for alleged rapes and sexual assaults. Montgomery County Executive Marc Elrich signed an executive order last month designating the county a “sanctuary” jurisdiction.

The order states that no county agency – including police departments – can cooperate with ICE. Immigration agents are barred from entering secure portions of county jails, and must take custody of illegal immigrants in public areas, such as jail parking lots.

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Earlier this month, another undocumented immigrant was arrested on second-degree rape and assault charges but was released days later after the Montgomery County Jail ignored ICE’s detainer request.

Westlake Legal Group Emilio-Carrasco-Hernandez-Montgomery-County-Police Seventh illegal immigrant accused of sex crimes in Maryland county since July 25 Sam Dorman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/immigration/enforcement fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/topic/sanctuary-cities fox news fnc/us fnc article 4f9c81da-520d-57ae-ad59-b684fd122151   Westlake Legal Group Emilio-Carrasco-Hernandez-Montgomery-County-Police Seventh illegal immigrant accused of sex crimes in Maryland county since July 25 Sam Dorman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/maryland fox-news/us/immigration/enforcement fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/topic/sanctuary-cities fox news fnc/us fnc article 4f9c81da-520d-57ae-ad59-b684fd122151

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Fast food can be healthy without sauce and soda, Harvard study reports

Dieting is easy — all you have to do is remove every trace of the flavor, satisfaction and general happiness from the fast-food indulgences you love.

A new study out of Harvard breaks the news that drive-through fare is pretty unhealthy. But, its lead researcher points out, the food can be made healthier, just as long as you strip the sauce and toppings, leaving yourself with a pathetic patty on a bun with a glass of water — to wash the dry mass down.

The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that at the 34 fast-food chains they analyzed, the average combo meal contains 1,193 calories, and that the quantities of sodium, saturated fat and sugar are through the roof.

TACO BELL TO REMOVE 9 ITEMS FROM MENU

But all a person has to do is hold the dipping sauce; remove toppings, such as cheese; and opt for water over soda — and you’ll be good as gravy, says lead author Kelsey Vercammen of Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in an interview with Reuters Health.

“We were surprised at just how much realistic customer modifications can change the nutrient profile of a meal,” Vercammen told the outlet.

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Vercammen’s stance is very optimistic, but it stands to benefit both humans and crows alike. (Our feathered friends were recently found to have higher-than-usual cholesterol thanks to the deep-fried detritus they scavenge!) Fast food has been blamed for everything from obesity to an early death.

Just don’t try to tell that to the hordes of people chasing that infamous fried chicken sandwich.

Westlake Legal Group Popeyes-Chicken-Sandwich Fast food can be healthy without sauce and soda, Harvard study reports New York Post Lauren Steussy fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fnc/food-drink fnc article 4b3460ae-eec2-5623-b8a9-f0268ef04640

Popeyes’ new chicken sandwich has sold out across the country in less than a month because apparently, it’s just that good. (Popeyes)

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This story originally appeared in the New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5763191452001_5763187942001-vs Fast food can be healthy without sauce and soda, Harvard study reports New York Post Lauren Steussy fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fnc/food-drink fnc article 4b3460ae-eec2-5623-b8a9-f0268ef04640   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5763191452001_5763187942001-vs Fast food can be healthy without sauce and soda, Harvard study reports New York Post Lauren Steussy fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/health fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fnc/food-drink fnc article 4b3460ae-eec2-5623-b8a9-f0268ef04640

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October Democratic presidential primary debate to be held in Ohio, state party says

The Democrats will hold their October presidential debate in Ohio, the state party announced Saturday.

The debate will be held Oct. 15 and, if needed, Oct. 16, Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper said. The city is not being announced at this time, Pepper said.

The large Democratic field narrowed to 20 candidates this week. Only 10 qualified for the Democratic National Committee’s third primary debate, on Sept. 12 in Houston.

Those 10 will qualify for the October debate in Ohio. If more candidates qualify by the Oct. 1 deadline, the debate could stretch into two nights. 

To qualify, candidates must get at least 2% in four state or national polls approved by the DNC and receive contributions from at least 130,000 donors among at least 20 states.

Former President Barack Obama won Ohio twice. But Donald Trump won Ohio in 2016 by 8 points and Republicans swept all but one statewide partisan office in 2018, prompting politicos to debate whether Ohio has lost its perennial battleground state status.

Westlake Legal Group  October Democratic presidential primary debate to be held in Ohio, state party says

Pepper, who has argued Ohio is very much in play, points to polls showing 43 percent approval for the president among Ohio voters and Trump’s approval rating has slipped since January 2017.

“As is happening across the nation, Democrats are energized, formerly Republican suburbs are trending blue and voters across the state are waking up to Donald Trump’s many broken promises,” Pepper said in a news release. 

The following candidates will appear onstage in September and are also qualified for the Ohio debate: 

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden
  • Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey
  • South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg
  • Former HUD Secretary Julián Castro
  • Sen. Kamala Harris of California
  • Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota
  • Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts
  • Andrew Yang, entrepreneur

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Now Streaming on YouTube: Confessions From a Presidential Hit Squad in Gambia

SEREKUNDA, Gambia — The day Malick Jatta confessed to shooting one of Gambia’s best-known journalists, he wore the camouflage uniform of the armed forces and said the kill order came right from the former president. The testimony was streamed live, and tens of thousands watched.

“I’m sorry,” he said. Then he hung his head.

Gambia, a nation of two million people on the West African coast, is in the midst of a highly public truth and reconciliation commission designed to investigate atrocities committed during the 22-year reign of Yahya Jammeh, a leader who created a culture of fear and misinformation so deep that many still take care to call him a gentleman.

Two years after Mr. Jammeh lost an election and fled, investigators are holding what some experts have hailed as the most accessible truth commission in history. Officials have been methodically interviewing killers and victims, eliciting testimony into the deaths and disappearances of hundreds of people. Central to their effort is a live feed that sends that testimony through YouTube, Facebook, television and radio — directly into phones and homes around the country.

In Gambia, an overwhelmingly young and quickly urbanizing nation that now has one of the highest rates of mobile phone use in Africa, listeners stretch from the capital, Banjul, into the countryside and abroad to the diaspora. Many have been devastated by the testimony; others doubt its veracity.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_159792393_6b35a5a0-d464-493e-8c42-5329004cc631-articleLarge Now Streaming on YouTube: Confessions From a Presidential Hit Squad in Gambia Truth and Reconciliation Commissions Politics and Government Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Jammeh, Yahya Gambia Freedom of the Press extradition Africa

A market in Serekunda, where many business owners, and their customers, are glued to the hearings.CreditYagazie Emezi for The New York Times

But for all the excitement about the stream, some Gambians are questioning whether simply hearing the truth will be enough to deliver justice. It’s unclear if the commission will lead to trial or prison for perpetrators. Admitted killers are being released after their testimony. Mr. Jammeh is in exile, and no one knows if he will ever be prosecuted.

For Baba Hydara, the son of the Deyda Hydara, the murdered journalist, the confessions have brought only hollow relief.

“They say that it helps with closure,” he said. “That’s a lie.”

What he wants is to see his father’s killers before a judge.

The truth and reconciliation hearings began in January and are expected to last two years. Witnesses are testifying in English and local languages, including Mandinka and Wolof; a sign language interpreter follows along.

Some of the most searing testimony has come this summer. Mr. Jatta and other members of Mr. Jammeh’s hit squad, called “the junglers,” have told of the murder of Mr. Hydara, an influential editor who the regime code-named “Magic Pen.”

They’ve confessed to the killing of 56 West African migrants whom the government accused of being mercenaries.

And they’ve admitted to taking part in the assassinations of two American citizens, Alhagie Ceesay and Ebou Jobe, who the junglers were told were plotting a coup.

Mr. Ceesay, a father of two, was a Chevron employee who had been living in Houston; Mr. Jobe, a father of three, was an operations manager for Wal-Mart.

“They have to be in prison,” said Ya Mamie Ceesay, 67, whose son was one of two Gambian-Americans to disappear in 2013. “You cannot kill someone, take someone’s life, and then go free.”CreditYagazie Emezi for The New York Times

Mr. Ceesay’s family has said that they had returned to their native Gambia to start a business.

Cameras rolling, one member of the hit squad, Omar Jallow, testified that Mr. Jammeh had ordered that the Americans be killed and “chopped into pieces.”

Mr. Jallow described how his team “took plastic bags and they put them over their heads and they strangulated them.”

Two junglers “cut off their heads,” he went on. “We took them and put them inside the grave and we buried them.”

A representative for Mr. Jammeh hung up the phone when called for comment.

Mr. Jammeh, who was Gambia’s second president since the country gained independence from Britain, took power in 1994 following a coup, and went on to win four presidential elections. His supporters hailed him for bringing roads, lights and education to areas in need.

The former President Yahyah Jammeh waved to a crowd of supporters before leaving the country in 2017.CreditAndrew Renneisen/Getty Images

But he also jailed dissidents and called journalists the “illegitimate sons of Africa.” He subjected Gambian AIDS patients to a self-proclaimed cure — a body rub and a banana. He sent his soldiers to hunt down people he accused of being sorcerers. He raped a former beauty queen named Fatou Jallow, according to her testimony, and he coerced other women into sex with cash, gifts and privileges, according to former officials.

Over time, his claims became so wild that the truth seemed to simply disappear.

Gambians voted Mr. Jammeh out in 2016 and after refusing to accept the results for weeks, he finally fled, only to reappear recently on Instagram, dancing the night away with a Congolese pop star and the president of Equatorial Guinea.

The president of that nation, Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo, has granted Mr. Jammeh refuge. Extradition would be difficult.

Since he left, Gambians have tried to put their country back together. Part of that process has been the truth commission, an 11-member body charged with examining the regime. It is not a trial, but rather an investigation. At the end, the commission will make recommendations as to who holds the greatest responsibility for atrocities, and the attorney general will decide whom to prosecute. But a major point of contention is that some perpetrators will go free in exchange for their testimony.

The country’s attorney general, Abubacarr Tambadou, said it was his decision to push for the live streaming of the testimony.CreditYagazie Emezi for The New York Times

The goal of the hearings, said Abubacarr Tambadou, the attorney general, is to negate “a sense of disbelief in the country,” about the facts of the last two decades. The reality, he went on, is that to get to the facts — and to the worst offenders — some smaller players will have to be given amnesty.

Governments around the world have used truth commissions to investigate painful histories for decades. But early inquiries, like the one in Argentina in 1983, following the Dirty War, often happened behind closed doors, with a report made public afterward.

It is only more recently that technology and political pressure have pushed officials to open these commissions. South Africa, in 1996, after apartheid ended, allowed video cameras inside its hearings. Radio has also played a role. Then came the internet.

In recent years, other countries have begun experimenting with live streams, including Tunisia and Colombia, with varying degrees of reach. Part of what seems to have made Gambia’s stream so popular, said Eduardo Gonzalez, a transitional justice expert, is its inclusion of perpetrators. Not all commissions do this.

In Gambia, after years of silence and secrecy left people hungry for information, taxi drivers crowd around TV sets, glued to the testimony. Vendors in market stalls listen through earbuds. Even supporters of the former leader said that they were hooked.

Bekai Saidy, a lawyer, watches the hearings most nights with his friends. “You cannot shape your future,” he said, “if you do not know your past.”CreditYagazie Emezi for The New York Times

The commission is held in Serekunda, outside Gambia’s capital, in a hotel draped with bougainvillea. The streams are run by a national broadcaster and a team of young journalists from the channel QTV.

On a recent day, 10,000 people were watching on QTV’s YouTube page. The channel’s truck, parked in the hotel courtyard, buzzed with a sense of national duty.

“I come from a family of big-time Jammeh supporters,” said Ansumana S.O. Nyassi, 29, a reporter. When the commission began, his own father called the hearings a “witch hunt” designed to malign Mr. Jammeh.

Then his father watched the hearings. He no longer supports the former president, Mr. Nyassi said.

Shortly after the junglers testified last month, the state released them from custody. Mr. Tambadou, the attorney general, said he could not reasonably ask for them to be held without charges. This angered many.

Baba Hydara below a portrait of his father, a prominent journalist who was killed in 2004.CreditYagazie Emezi for The New York Times

“They have to be in prison,” said Ya Mamie Ceesay, 67, whose son was one of the disappeared Gambian-Americans. “You cannot kill someone, take someone’s life, and then go free.”

In recent weeks, a coalition of victims has also questioned some testimony, accusing Mr. Jatta of downplaying his role in one of the massacres.

Because of this alleged lie — a violation of commission rules — victims say he should be put on trial.

If one purpose of the live feed is to put all Gambians on the same page, it’s plain that the country is not there. Months in, deep divisions remains over Mr. Jammeh’s legacy.

In the streets of Serekunda, some said they didn’t believe the testimony.

“I don’t see any use for it,” said Cherno Ceesay, 24. Anyone the regime punished, he added, probably “did something wrong.”

Further out in the countryside, several villages had lined the road with green flags, a show of support for Mr. Jammeh’s party, the Alliance for Patriotic Reorientation and Construction.

Abdou Ceesay, left, listens regularly to the hearings. “I listen to know what is right or wrong. People can forgive, but we must know what happened,” he said.CreditYagazie Emezi for The New York Times

In one village, Sintet, Habibou Tamba, 33, said that he had been listening to the hearings religiously. “I agree, he committed crimes, heinous crimes,” he said of Mr. Jammeh.

But Mr. Tamba had been working for the Alliance party for years. It’s where he learned everything he knows about being a strong, confident man, he said. A poster of the former president still hangs in his bedroom.

He believes Gambians should forgive their former leader.

“It’s a man I loved,” he said. And when you love a man, he went on, “it’s hard to abandon him.”

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg: I’m ‘alive and on my way to being very well’

Westlake Legal Group RBG Ruth Bader Ginsburg: I'm 'alive and on my way to being very well' Melissa Leon fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/person/ruth-bader-ginsburg fox news fnc/us fnc article 796ea957-ae10-5419-ab9b-24258b56ecb5

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg made a much-anticipated appearance at the National Book Festival on Saturday, and she was not short on humor.

“As this audience can see I am alive… and I’m on my way to being very well,” she said at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., much to the audience’s delight.

Ginsburg, 86, recently completed three weeks of radiation therapy at a New York City hospital to treat a malignant tumor on her pancreas. The Supreme Court said last week there’s no evidence the disease remains.

At the National Book Festival, Ginsburg discussed her career, as well as what keeps her motivated.

“For one thing, I love my job,” she told the audience. “It’s the best and the hardest job I’ve ever had. [It] keeps me going.”

Rather than concentrate on her “aches and pains,” Ginsburg said, she concentrates “on the court’s work,” which has kept her going through four bouts with cancer.

RUTH BADER GINSBURG TREATED FOR MALIGNANT TUMOR ON PANCREAS, SUPREME COURT SAYS

Ginsburg even shared her marriage advice, saying she got a call from singer Jennifer Lopez to meet her and Alex Rodriguez.

Lopez asked what her secrets were to a happy marriage, Ginsburg said.

“My mother-in-law took me aside and she responded telling me it helps sometimes to be a little deaf,” she said.

Ginsburg was introduced by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, who posted a photo earlier in the day of the thousands of people who had waited to see the Supreme Court justice.

“Just WOW! More than 4,000 people to see Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the [Liberary of Congress] #NatBookFest,” she wrote. “Some lined up at 4 a.m. Thank you!!!”

On Monday, Ginsburg received an honorary law degree from the University of Buffalo in New York. It was her first public appearance since completing cancer treatment.

Ginsburg is a leader of the Supreme Court’s liberal wing and has earned the nickname “Notorious RBG.”

RUTH BADER GINSBURG MARVELS AT ‘NOTORIOUS RBG’ NICKNAME AFTER GETTING HONORARY LAW DEGREE

“It was beyond my wildest imagination that I would one day become ‘Notorious RBG.’ I am now 86 years old, yet people of all ages want to take their picture with me — amazing,” she said Monday in New York.

Ginsburg is a Brooklyn, N.Y., native. She was appointed to the Supreme Court by then-President Bill Clinton in 1993.

The next Supreme Court term begins Oct. 7.

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Fox News’ Louis Casiano contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group RBG Ruth Bader Ginsburg: I'm 'alive and on my way to being very well' Melissa Leon fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/person/ruth-bader-ginsburg fox news fnc/us fnc article 796ea957-ae10-5419-ab9b-24258b56ecb5   Westlake Legal Group RBG Ruth Bader Ginsburg: I'm 'alive and on my way to being very well' Melissa Leon fox-news/politics/judiciary/supreme-court fox-news/person/ruth-bader-ginsburg fox news fnc/us fnc article 796ea957-ae10-5419-ab9b-24258b56ecb5

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