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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 236)

‘Bleak’ U.N. Report on a Planet in Peril Looms Over New Climate Talks

Westlake Legal Group 26CLI-EMISSIONS1-facebookJumbo ‘Bleak’ U.N. Report on a Planet in Peril Looms Over New Climate Talks United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Greenhouse Gas Emissions Global Warming Coal Alternative and Renewable Energy

With world leaders gathering in Madrid next week for their annual bargaining session over how to avert a climate catastrophe, the latest assessment issued by the United Nations said Tuesday that greenhouse gas emissions are still rising dangerously.

“The summary findings are bleak,” said the annual assessment, which is produced by the United Nations Environment Program and is formally known as the Emissions Gap Report. Countries have failed to halt the rise of greenhouse gas emissions despite repeated warnings from scientists, with China and the United States, the two biggest polluters, further increasing their emissions last year.

The result, the authors added, is that “deeper and faster cuts are now required.”

As if to underscore the gap between reality and diplomacy, the international climate negotiations, scheduled to begin next week, are not even designed to ramp up pledges by world leaders to cut their countries’ emissions. That deadline is still a year away.

Rather, this year’s meetings are intended to hammer out the last remaining rules on how to implement the 2015 Paris climate accord, in which every country pledged to rein in greenhouse gases, with each setting its own targets and timetables.

“Madrid is an opportunity to get on course to get the speed and trajectory right,” said Rachel Kyte, a former United Nations climate diplomat who is now dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University. “What the Emissions Gap Report does is take away any remaining plausible deniability that the current trajectory is not good enough.”

The world’s 20 richest countries, responsible for more than three-fourths of worldwide emissions, must take the biggest, swiftest steps to move away from fossil fuels, the report emphasized. The richest country of all, the United States, however, has formally begun to pull out of the Paris accord.

For more climate news sign up for the Climate Fwd: newsletter or follow @NYTClimate on Twitter.

Global greenhouse gas emissions have grown by 1.5 percent every year over the last decade, according to the annual assessment. The opposite must happen if the world is to avoid the worst effects of climate change, including more intense droughts, stronger storms and widespread hunger by midcentury. To stay within relatively safe limits, emissions must decline sharply, by 7.6 percent every year, between 2020 and 2030, the report warned.

Separately, the World Meteorological Organization reported on Monday that emissions of three major greenhouse gases — carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide — have all swelled in the atmosphere since the mid-18th century.

“We are sleepwalking toward a climate catastrophe and need to wake up and take urgent action,” said Alden Meyer, director of policy and strategy at the Union of Concerned Scientists, on a phone call with reporters Tuesday after the publication of the report.

Even if every country fulfills its current pledges under the Paris Agreement — and many, including the United States, Brazil and Australia, are currently not on track to do so — the Emissions Gap Report found average temperatures are on track to rise by 3.2 degrees Celsius from the baseline average temperature at the start of the industrial age.

According to scientific models, that kind of temperature rise sharply increases the likelihood of extreme weather events, the accelerated melting of glaciers and swelling seas — all endangering the lives of billions of people.

The Paris Agreement resolved to hold the increase in global temperatures well below 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit; last year, a United Nations-backed panel of scientists said the safer limit was to keep it to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

There are many ways to reduce emissions: quitting the combustion of fossil fuels, especially coal, the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel; switching to renewable energy like solar and wind power; moving away from gas- and diesel-guzzling cars; and halting deforestation.

In fact, many countries are headed in the wrong direction. A separate analysis made public this month looked at how much coal, oil and natural gas the world’s nations have said they expect to produce and sell through 2030. If all those fossil fuels were ultimately extracted and burned, the report found, countries would collectively miss their climate pledges, as well as the global 2 degree Celsius target, by an even larger margin than previously thought.

A number of countries around the world, including Canada and Norway, have made plans to reduce emissions at home while expanding fossil-fuel production for sale abroad, that report noted.

“At a global level, it doesn’t add up,” said Michael Lazarus, a lead author of the report and director of the Stockholm Environment Institute’s United States Center. To date, he noted, discussions on whether and how to curb the production of fossil fuels have been almost entirely absent from international climate talks.

The International Energy Agency recently singled out the proliferation of sport utility vehicles, noting that the surge of S.U.V.s, which consume more gasoline than conventional cars, could wipe out much of the oil savings from a nascent electric-car boom.

“For 10 years, the Emissions Gap Report has been sounding the alarm — and for 10 years, the world has only increased its emissions,” the United Nations Secretary General, António Guterres, said in a statement. “There has never been a more important time to listen to the science. Failure to heed these warnings and take drastic action to reverse emissions means we will continue to witness deadly and catastrophic heat waves, storms and pollution.”

The pressure on world leaders to pivot away from fossil fuels and rebuild the engine of the global economy comes at a time when the appetite for international cooperation is extremely low, nationalist sentiments are on the rise, and several world leaders have deep ties to the industries that are the biggest sources of planet-warming emissions.

If there’s any good news in the report, it’s that the current trajectory is not as dire as it was before countries around the world started taking steps to cut their emissions. The 2015 Emissions Gap Report said that, without any climate policies at all, the world was likely to face around 4 degrees Celsius of warming.

Coal use is declining sharply, especially in the United States and Western Europe, according to an analysis by Carbon Brief. Renewable energy is expanding fast, though not nearly as fast as necessary. City and state governments around the world, including in the United States, are rolling out stricter rules on tailpipe pollution from cars.

Young people are protesting by the millions in rich and poor countries alike. Even in the United States, with its persistent denialist movement, how to deal with climate change is a resonant issue in the presidential campaign.

Brad Plumer contributed reporting.

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Tom Hanks reacts to ‘Jeopardy!’ contestants who didn’t recognize him as Mister Rogers

“Who is Tom Hanks?”

During a recent appearance on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!,” the 63-year-old star did not hold back his feelings after he was shown a clip from last Monday’s “Jeopardy!” episode.

The viral moment showed the contestants not being able to correctly identify Hanks as the actor playing children’s television icon Fred Rogers in the new movie “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.”

HIGHEST-EARNING ‘JEOPARDY!’ CHAMPS TO PLAY FOR A SHARE OF $1.5 MILLION

“You are kidding me! You are kidding me!” a shocked Hanks said while laughing.

Westlake Legal Group Tom-Hanks-as-Mr-Rogers Tom Hanks reacts to 'Jeopardy!' contestants who didn't recognize him as Mister Rogers Mariah Haas fox-news/shows/jeopardy fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article af6c68e2-5d65-53b8-95e3-b3dfaa455427

Tom Hanks portrays Mister Rogers in ‘A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.’ (Sony Pictures)

‘FREDDIE PRINZE Jr. SAYS TOM HANKS WAS SUPPOSED TO PLAY SANDY ON ‘FRIENDS’

“They didn’t even have any wrong suggestions? Bing, Woody Harrelson? Bing, Mahershala Ali?” he jokingly asked. “What was the name of the category? Washed up career choices for 800? Bad casting for 1000, Alex?” Hanks teasingly added.

Kimmel, 52, then offered a suggestion as to why the contents were unable to name the actor: “I look at it as you inhabited that character so beautifully that even they were absorbed instantaneously!” he told Hanks.

Agreeing with the late-night host, Hanks said: “OK, I’ll take that, I’ll take that. Thank you!”

TOM HANKS ON PARTING WITH ‘TOY STORY’ CHARACTER WOODY: ‘IT WAS TERRIBLE’

He then joked: “I think actually they were blinded by the red sweater. They couldn’t make anything out.”

On the Nov. 18 “Jeopardy!” episode, contestant Beverly picked the “Biopic” category and the competitors were then shown a video clip of Hanks as Mister Rogers. “In A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, beloved children’s TV show host Mr. Rogers is played by this beloved actor,” said host Alex Trebek.

Trebek, 79, was met with silence. Although Beverly did buzz in she was a tad too late. “The film opens Friday. That’s Tom Hanks. Not quickly enough, Beverly,” stated Trebek.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” is a feature film inspired by the relationship between Rogers and Tom Junod, a jaded journalist who embarks on a life-changing experience when he takes on the assignment of writing Rogers’ profile and spends some time with him.

“I disliked that when it got announced it was characterized as [a biopic]. It’s really not,” Hanks previously said of the flick. “It’s a movie that’s largely focused on a reporter and [Mr. Rogers’] relationship to his life, and how [the reporter’s] whole world changes when coming in contact with Fred Rogers.”

“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” is currently playing in theaters.

Fox News’ Andy Sahadeo contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group hanks Tom Hanks reacts to 'Jeopardy!' contestants who didn't recognize him as Mister Rogers Mariah Haas fox-news/shows/jeopardy fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article af6c68e2-5d65-53b8-95e3-b3dfaa455427   Westlake Legal Group hanks Tom Hanks reacts to 'Jeopardy!' contestants who didn't recognize him as Mister Rogers Mariah Haas fox-news/shows/jeopardy fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article af6c68e2-5d65-53b8-95e3-b3dfaa455427

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Why the Big Balloons Might Not Fly at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade

Westlake Legal Group 26macysparade1-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Why the Big Balloons Might Not Fly at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade Wind Thanksgiving Day Parades Manhattan (NYC) Macy's Inc Balloons

Astronaut Snoopy might not be cleared for take off. The usually buoyant SpongeBob SquarePants may wind up deflated and depressed. Olaf, the garrulous snowman from “Frozen,” could find himself melting into a heaping puddle on the pavement.

That’s because though New York City plays Thanksgiving host to the annual Macy’s parade, it has a strict and specific set of balloon-flight regulations that have been in place since 1997, when a windswept inflatable Cat in the Hat caused destruction that left one woman in a coma for nearly a month.

So as omnipresent as the mammoth character balloons are, so, too, are weather forecasters, police officers and others trying to guess which way the wind will blow.

Macy’s has a licensed meteorologist — armed with a laptop and an open line to the National Weather Service — on hand every year to observe weather conditions, monitor gusts and help make decisions about the floating characters in the procession.

The Police Department assigns trained officers to balloons and has seven wind-monitoring devices, called anemometers, to measure gusts along the route and guide the parade accordingly.

“We are always attuned to weather conditions for Parade Day,” Orlando Veras, a Macy’s spokesman, said. “We monitor the weather on a daily basis, but at this time, it is too early to make any determinations.”

This year, with high winds in the forecast, parade enthusiasts are particularly anxious that the most famous balloons in America might get grounded.

Maneuvering a massive helium-filled balloon down the two-mile parade route can be a challenge even in the best of conditions. The biggest of the balloons measures between 50 and 60 feet tall and can be just as long.

The giant balloons also weigh hundreds of pounds and require dozens of trained handlers to guide them through streets lined with gawking spectators and hulking buildings.

To help avoid crashes and other catastrophes each year, every floating behemoth is assigned a supervisor, according to Chief Rodney Harrison, the Police Department’s chief of patrol. He added that each balloon had its own “predetermined flight risk” based on its size and weight.

As the inflated characters hover their way downtown, the supervisors are fed information from the anemometers. They then instruct handlers to reel balloons lower or higher based on changing wind conditions, Chief Harrison said.

According to city regulations, the giant balloons cannot fly at all if there are sustained winds above 23 miles per hour or if gusts exceed 34 m.p.h. Though guidelines for balloon handling had long in been place, the rules became more severe after the accident in 1997.

On that Thanksgiving, balloon handlers were grappling with winds that reached speeds in excess of 40 m.p.h., when a six-story Cat in the Hat balloon was pushed by the gusts into a lamppost.

One part of the lamppost broke off and fell onto parade spectators, injuring four people, including a 33-year-old woman who suffered a serious head injury and spent more than three weeks in a coma.

While balloon accidents had caused some chaos in the past — even as early as 1931, when a Felix the Cat balloon that was released from the parade later drifted into telephone wires and caught fire — the severity of the 1997 incident caused then-Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani to open a city investigation that led to the current rules.

The regulations have not prevented further collisions. In 2005, a giant M&M balloon smacked into a light pole in Times Square and pulled off a fixture that crashed to the ground and injured two spectators.

As of Tuesday afternoon, the National Weather Service was predicting that Thanksgiving Day would bring winds of up to 25 m.p.h, with gusts nearing 40 m.p.h. throughout the New York region.

Matthew Wunsch, a meteorologist at the Weather Service, warned that gusts in the densely built parts of Manhattan, where tall buildings create a wind tunnel, could rise even higher.

“It’s going to be windy regardless,” Mr. Wunsch said. “But the buildings make it a lot more variable.”

If the giant balloons are grounded, Mr. Veras said, it would be only the second time in the history of the Macy’s parade that they were forbidden to take flight. The first was in 1971, when a cold, wet and windy Thanksgiving kept the balloons on the ground. (There were also no balloons between 1942 and 1944, when the parade was suspended because rubber and helium were needed for World War II.)

The character balloons have been a staple of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade since 1927. This year’s, Macy’s is hoping to feature new versions of two parade fixtures, Snoopy and SpongeBob, and the return of Smokey Bear for the first time since 1993.

Even if winds are high, Macy’s still plans to bring out 40 smaller inflatable figures. The themed floats will still sail down the street and Broadway performers, musicians and marching bands from across the country will still serenade the assembled crowds.

The final decision on whether the parade’s 16 giant balloons get pulled from the lineup this year won’t be made until Thursday morning, officials said.

“It’s going to be a game-day decision,” Chief Harrison said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Cows don’t have fingers and can’t insult Devin Nunes on Twitter, court filing says

Westlake Legal Group Oz7ZenCHIb0n3rvr051W6TKtY_r6VaVUanS_DXdT798 Cows don’t have fingers and can’t insult Devin Nunes on Twitter, court filing says r/politics

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Officials still puzzled about ‘hovering’ object that prompted lockdown in DC

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6101504663001_6101502395001-vs Officials still puzzled about 'hovering' object that prompted lockdown in DC fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/politics fnc Chad Pergram article Andrew O'Reilly 58ed9981-b3b3-53dc-aa08-db297e9e3ad8

Security officials on Capitol Hill are still puzzled by what sparked the security threat to be issued Tuesday morning that put both the White House and the Capitol on lockdown.

The incident caused an abrupt security situation, with jets being scrambled and officers warning people outside Capitol facilities to stay far away. The U.S. Secret Service said personnel at the White House were told to remain in place.

“We don’t know what the hell it was,” one security source told Fox News. Officials said the alert could have been sparked by birds, a drone, or possibly a “weather anomaly.”

AT HELM OF DHS CHAD WOLF VOWS TO CONFRONT GANGS BEHIND ILLEGAL DRUGS, GUNS, MIGRANTS

Security officials received different information regarding the location and speed of the object in question. Officials heard it was “hovering” and were even given “knots” measuring its speed, sources said.

Fox News is told by security officials that the situation went to “Air Con Orange,” which means a suspicious aircraft piercing the Washington security bubble. But security personnel are only supposed to stay at Air Con Orange for a few minutes, before either upgrading the alert or downgrading the problem.

Neither occurred with Tuesday morning’s alert, but Capitol Police sent a notification of a potential threat shortly after 8:30 a.m. People were allowed back in after about 30 minutes.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Law enforcement sources initially told Fox News the lockdown was triggered after an aircraft moving east violated restricted airspace. But Fox News is now told officials may have to go back and review the radar to determine what exactly prompted the scare, with sources saying they got “mixed signals at best” as to what the potential aircraft could have been.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6101504663001_6101502395001-vs Officials still puzzled about 'hovering' object that prompted lockdown in DC fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/politics fnc Chad Pergram article Andrew O'Reilly 58ed9981-b3b3-53dc-aa08-db297e9e3ad8   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6101504663001_6101502395001-vs Officials still puzzled about 'hovering' object that prompted lockdown in DC fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/washington-dc fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox news fnc/politics fnc Chad Pergram article Andrew O'Reilly 58ed9981-b3b3-53dc-aa08-db297e9e3ad8

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House?

Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6109316692001_6109311688001-vs Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House? Tom Basile fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc bb648e3e-4a2a-52cd-8b06-2d675ec2a60e article

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has become the latest entry into the 2020 Democratic primaries, in an attempt to save the flailing party from itself. It’s a big gamble for the big-spending billionaire businessman.

Bloomberg has called President Trump “incompetent,” but will need more than money to beat Trump if he can first vanquish other Democratic presidential hopefuls.

Across party lines, there are undoubtedly many in the New York City metro area who will largely remember the three-term mayor fondly, especially in comparison to the far-left administration of current mayor and failed presidential candidate Bill de Blasio.

DANIEL TURNER: PRESIDENT BLOOMBERG? UH, NO THANKS – AMERICA DESERVES MUCH BETTER

Bloomberg is a self-made man. He deserves credit for his business acumen and meteoric rise in the private sector. He deserves credit for putting New York City back in the black by getting the city’s finances in order.

More from Opinion

He bought his way into elected office when he ran for mayor and he will try to do it again now. But he would do well to understand that America is not New York City.

In Bloomberg, there is an elitism, sense of entitlement and disconnect with average people that is similar to Hillary Clinton. You can’t picture Mike Bloomberg pumping gas or shopping in a supermarket.

As mayor, Bloomberg would famously often leave the city – and the country – on Friday afternoons, flying off in his jet to Bermuda to spend weekends at this home there.

When Mitt Romney was the Republican nominee for president in 2012 Democrats pounded him for having six homes. In 2014 Business Insider reported Bloomberg owned 14 properties and had HSBC bank accounts in London, Paris, Bermuda and Hong Kong.

Even more detrimental to Bloomberg’s ability to build a voter coalition is his “government knows best” attitude that will make him anathema to the voters he needs to win.

Bloomberg will be liberal enough for centrist Democrats, but the patina of independence is long gone for the mayor-turned-policy activist. Big bucks won’t manufacture appeal beyond the higher income earners and more liberal coasts that largely aren’t in play in 2020.

Bloomberg will have a hard time appealing to minorities and blue-collar Democrats, who are increasingly soft targets for Trump’s populist message about protecting workers, tax cuts, paring back regulations and fighting for the middle class. 

The former mayor’s infamous New York City ban on large soda servings, restrictions on salt in restaurants and other regulations all smack of the Nanny State policies that minimize personal freedom and responsibility in favor of government intervention.

In addition, Bloomberg has pledged millions of dollars of his own money to support the Paris Climate Accords that President Trump rightly believes would cost American jobs.

Bloomberg’s positions on gun control are a decidedly big-city liberal, and he has funded advocacy for Second Amendment restrictions.

While Trump is publicly fighting Chinese trade abuses to protect American jobs, Bloomberg has defended the communist regime time and again, going as far as stating that the Chinese Communist Party is responsive to the public and that Chinese President Xi Jinping is not a dictator. “He has to satisfy his constituents or he’s not going to survive,” Bloomberg once said in an interview.

Since when do communist leaders have “constituents” other than the elites that make up the central committee? They don’t.

As mayor, Bloomberg was known for being tough on crime and an advocate for law and order, but has now disavowed the “stop-and-frisk” policies that helped drive down crime in the Big Apple. He was known for strong fiscal management, but today is better known for gun control and climate change activism that could kill middle-income jobs.

Like him or not, President Trump has spent decades developing a persona that deftly straddles the line between billionaire real estate tycoon, television star, and cheerleader for the shrinking blue-collar middle class.

Trump is a self-styled “blue-collar billionaire,” far more at home hanging out with construction workers, cops, soldiers and the average American, than in the stuffy surroundings of Washington.

Yes, at times Trump does not act presidential in the traditional way, and is rough and unconventional. But for all the Beltway blowback and chatter on the coasts about Trump’s unacceptable behavior, he has exhibited an ability to speak to the American people in terms that resonate. There is part of him that’s still the kid who grew up in a small house in Queens in New York City.

Bloomberg will have a hard time appealing to minorities and blue-collar Democrats, who are increasingly soft targets for Trump’s populist message about protecting workers, tax cuts, paring back regulations and fighting for the middle class.

The former mayor’s entry into the fray for the Democratic presidential nomination lays bare just how weak and chaotic the Democratic field is and how worried traditional liberals are that the election is slipping away due to the radical left’s strength within the party.

If Democratic primary voters abandon the more centrist candidates for Bloomberg, it may be out of necessity. The Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee have raised more than $300 million in 2019, while the Democratic National Committee just reported less than $9 million cash on hand and $7 million in debt.

Bloomberg could do for the Democrats what he did for New York Republicans in 2001 – close a funding gap by writing a big check.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In the end, though, if you’re going to vote for a billionaire mogul, the majority of Americans will vote for the guy who has their back, not the one talking about global climate compacts.

Countering bombast with smugness won’t work, no matter how big the check is.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM TOM BASILE

Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6109316692001_6109311688001-vs Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House? Tom Basile fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc bb648e3e-4a2a-52cd-8b06-2d675ec2a60e article   Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6109316692001_6109311688001-vs Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House? Tom Basile fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc bb648e3e-4a2a-52cd-8b06-2d675ec2a60e article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House?

Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6109316692001_6109311688001-vs Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House? Tom Basile fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc bb648e3e-4a2a-52cd-8b06-2d675ec2a60e article

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has become the latest entry into the 2020 Democratic primaries, in an attempt to save the flailing party from itself. It’s a big gamble for the big-spending billionaire businessman.

Bloomberg has called President Trump “incompetent,” but will need more than money to beat Trump if he can first vanquish other Democratic presidential hopefuls.

Across party lines, there are undoubtedly many in the New York City metro area who will largely remember the three-term mayor fondly, especially in comparison to the far-left administration of current mayor and failed presidential candidate Bill de Blasio.

DANIEL TURNER: PRESIDENT BLOOMBERG? UH, NO THANKS – AMERICA DESERVES MUCH BETTER

Bloomberg is a self-made man. He deserves credit for his business acumen and meteoric rise in the private sector. He deserves credit for putting New York City back in the black by getting the city’s finances in order.

More from Opinion

He bought his way into elected office when he ran for mayor and he will try to do it again now. But he would do well to understand that America is not New York City.

In Bloomberg, there is an elitism, sense of entitlement and disconnect with average people that is similar to Hillary Clinton. You can’t picture Mike Bloomberg pumping gas or shopping in a supermarket.

As mayor, Bloomberg would famously often leave the city – and the country – on Friday afternoons, flying off in his jet to Bermuda to spend weekends at this home there.

When Mitt Romney was the Republican nominee for president in 2012 Democrats pounded him for having six homes. In 2014 Business Insider reported Bloomberg owned 14 properties and had HSBC bank accounts in London, Paris, Bermuda and Hong Kong.

Even more detrimental to Bloomberg’s ability to build a voter coalition is his “government knows best” attitude that will make him anathema to the voters he needs to win.

Bloomberg will be liberal enough for centrist Democrats, but the patina of independence is long gone for the mayor-turned-policy activist. Big bucks won’t manufacture appeal beyond the higher income earners and more liberal coasts that largely aren’t in play in 2020.

Bloomberg will have a hard time appealing to minorities and blue-collar Democrats, who are increasingly soft targets for Trump’s populist message about protecting workers, tax cuts, paring back regulations and fighting for the middle class. 

The former mayor’s infamous New York City ban on large soda servings, restrictions on salt in restaurants and other regulations all smack of the Nanny State policies that minimize personal freedom and responsibility in favor of government intervention.

In addition, Bloomberg has pledged millions of dollars of his own money to support the Paris Climate Accords that President Trump rightly believes would cost American jobs.

Bloomberg’s positions on gun control are a decidedly big-city liberal, and he has funded advocacy for Second Amendment restrictions.

While Trump is publicly fighting Chinese trade abuses to protect American jobs, Bloomberg has defended the communist regime time and again, going as far as stating that the Chinese Communist Party is responsive to the public and that Chinese President Xi Jinping is not a dictator. “He has to satisfy his constituents or he’s not going to survive,” Bloomberg once said in an interview.

Since when do communist leaders have “constituents” other than the elites that make up the central committee? They don’t.

As mayor, Bloomberg was known for being tough on crime and an advocate for law and order, but has now disavowed the “stop-and-frisk” policies that helped drive down crime in the Big Apple. He was known for strong fiscal management, but today is better known for gun control and climate change activism that could kill middle-income jobs.

Like him or not, President Trump has spent decades developing a persona that deftly straddles the line between billionaire real estate tycoon, television star, and cheerleader for the shrinking blue-collar middle class.

Trump is a self-styled “blue-collar billionaire,” far more at home hanging out with construction workers, cops, soldiers and the average American, than in the stuffy surroundings of Washington.

Yes, at times Trump does not act presidential in the traditional way, and is rough and unconventional. But for all the Beltway blowback and chatter on the coasts about Trump’s unacceptable behavior, he has exhibited an ability to speak to the American people in terms that resonate. There is part of him that’s still the kid who grew up in a small house in Queens in New York City.

Bloomberg will have a hard time appealing to minorities and blue-collar Democrats, who are increasingly soft targets for Trump’s populist message about protecting workers, tax cuts, paring back regulations and fighting for the middle class.

The former mayor’s entry into the fray for the Democratic presidential nomination lays bare just how weak and chaotic the Democratic field is and how worried traditional liberals are that the election is slipping away due to the radical left’s strength within the party.

If Democratic primary voters abandon the more centrist candidates for Bloomberg, it may be out of necessity. The Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee have raised more than $300 million in 2019, while the Democratic National Committee just reported less than $9 million cash on hand and $7 million in debt.

Bloomberg could do for the Democrats what he did for New York Republicans in 2001 – close a funding gap by writing a big check.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In the end, though, if you’re going to vote for a billionaire mogul, the majority of Americans will vote for the guy who has their back, not the one talking about global climate compacts.

Countering bombast with smugness won’t work, no matter how big the check is.

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Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6109316692001_6109311688001-vs Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House? Tom Basile fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc bb648e3e-4a2a-52cd-8b06-2d675ec2a60e article   Westlake Legal Group 854081161001_6109316692001_6109311688001-vs Tom Basile: Can billionaire Bloomberg buy his way into the White House? Tom Basile fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc bb648e3e-4a2a-52cd-8b06-2d675ec2a60e article

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Cows don’t have fingers and can’t insult Devin Nunes on Twitter, court filing says

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Michael Bloomberg Has Used His Fortune to Help Republicans, Too

Westlake Legal Group 26Bloomberg-Republicans-01-facebookJumbo Michael Bloomberg Has Used His Fortune to Help Republicans, Too Presidential Election of 2020 Bloomberg, Michael R

WASHINGTON — In 2016, Democrats thought they had found the perfect candidate to win a United States Senate seat in Pennsylvania and put them within striking distance of taking back the majority. But Katie McGinty, an environmental policy expert with degrees in chemistry and law, ran into an overwhelming obstacle: Michael R. Bloomberg’s fortune.

The former mayor of New York poured in $11.7 million to help re-elect the Republican incumbent, Senator Pat Toomey, who had led an effort, albeit unsuccessful, to expand background checks for gun purchasers, a top priority of Mr. Bloomberg’s.

Mr. Toomey won by less than two percentage points, handing a key victory to the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell: The Republicans held on to control of the chamber by two seats. At the time, it was the most expensive Senate race the country had ever seen, and Mr. Bloomberg’s money was one of the largest influxes of outside influence.

As Mr. Bloomberg begins his campaign for the White House with a promise to spend as much as it takes to defeat President Trump, his Democratic rivals are accusing him of trying to buy his way into the Oval Office. But his political spending on behalf of Republicans is also coming under attack from Democrats who say that his overlapping political goals with Republicans in Washington, and in particular with Mr. McConnell, are disqualifying.

“For many he went too far when he gave money to Pat Toomey,” said Jim Manley, a Democratic consultant and former senior aide to Harry Reid, the previous Senate leader, pointing out that Ms. McGinty also favored stricter gun regulations and that the race was so close.

“He tries to play both sides, and he ends up burning Democrats,” Mr. Manley added. “If that makes you feel good, I’m glad. But the reality is there are no free shots.”

Federal records show that political committees funded by Mr. Bloomberg have spent more than $86 million since 2012 — the bulk devoted to promoting Democrats. Yet more than $17 million went to boost Republicans. In addition, Mr. Bloomberg has personally donated another $950,000 to Republican campaigns and political action committees.

A review of Mr. Bloomberg’s giving shows that he has not only backed Republicans in competitive and pivotal races like Mr. Toomey’s, but that he has also sunk money into Republican primaries on behalf of McConnell allies. They include Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina — Mr. Bloomberg helped Mr. Graham in 2014 by giving $250,000 to a PAC supporting him — and the late Senator Thad Cochran of Mississippi, who in 2014 fought off a Tea Party insurgent by just a few thousand votes and had $250,000 in support from Mr. Bloomberg.

Mr. Bloomberg, who has been a Democrat, a Republican and an independent over the last two decades, has taken by far the most unusual approach to political donations of any Democrat now running for the 2020 nomination. With huge resources, he has tended to back candidates who share his views on priorities like gun control and climate change.

In 2014, as several vulnerable Democratic senators in conservative leaning states were defeated — and Republicans took control of the Senate for the first time since 2006 — some party leaders believed Mr. Bloomberg made an inhospitable political climate even worse. He wrote a letter to some of the wealthiest contributors in the Democratic Party in New York, urging them not to donate to four Democrats who voted to block background check legislation. And his donations helped pay for ads that attacked them.

A Mayors Against Illegal Guns ad from 2013, funded by Mr. Bloomberg, pushing senators in key states, including Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota.

Three of the four — Mark Pryor of Arkansas, Mark Begich of Alaska and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota — eventually lost their seats. The fourth, Max Baucus of Montana, chose not to seek re-election and became President Barack Obama’s ambassador to China.

A statement issued by Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign Tuesday said that the former mayor worked with Republicans to “get things done,” citing his efforts to push for gun reform as well as financial support for the city following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and after Superstorm Sandy.

“He doesn’t share their values,” read the statement, referring to Republicans, “and spent approximately $100 million of his own money to help flip Congress to the Democrats in 2018 and, more recently, help flip the Virginia legislature in 2019. But after he asked people to buck their party, do the right thing and be on the right side of history, committees he’s supported have sometimes reflected that.”

Mr. Bloomberg’s supporters say his backing of Republicans is the kind of act that defines his approach to politics and makes him an appealing presidential candidate: contrarian, independent and unburdened about whether he will anger key allies. And donating to both parties is a longstanding practice for many elite donors and businessmen — including Mr. Trump, before he became president — who want to have the ear of whichever party is in power.

People on both sides of the aisle who have worked with Mr. Bloomberg’s political operation said that he was always strategic about his alliances on Capitol Hill. He was in constant contact with Republican and Democratic leaders, who tried to keep him close and sought out his help in key races even when his contributions were working against them elsewhere.

“They didn’t ever operate completely in a silo,” said Josh Holmes, Mr. McConnell’s former chief of staff. “They were talking with Republicans; they were talking with Democrats. And they wanted to win. I probably disagree with 90 percent of what they’re doing. But they’re extremely effective.”

For example, even as he made Mr. Toomey’s re-election a priority in 2016, his money — nearly $4.3 million — simultaneously went toward defeating Senator Kelly Ayotte in New Hampshire, a Republican who opposed the background check bill.

Mr. Bloomberg’s giving fits with his political background. He was a longtime Democrat when he switched his registration to run for mayor as a Republican in 2001. He left the Republican Party in 2007 and chose to be unaffiliated with either party until 2018 when he rejoined the Democratic Party.

The Toomey-McGinty race in Pennsylvania is the one that left the most bitter taste for many Democrats because they saw no path to retaking the Senate without winning that seat. Some said they found it frustrating that Mr. Bloomberg did not agree that it would be more helpful to his long term goals on gun control to have a Democrat in that seat and be one step closer to a Democratic-controlled Senate than it would be to see Mr. Toomey re-elected.

In an interview with The New York Times in 2013, Mr. Bloomberg explained his logic, saying that if Democrats could not get senators on board with something as popular with the public as background checks, they should pay a political price. “What I would suggest is that they have all of their members vote for things that the public wants,” he said. “And if they don’t do that, the voters should elect different senators who will listen to them.’’

Though it may have worked against individual Democratic candidates, Mr. Bloomberg’s tactic of punishing those who did not support gun control created a new dynamic in the Democratic Party. The National Rifle Association had long employed the same tactics, and Mr. Bloomberg and his aides believed they needed to create the same fear of retribution on their side.

Some Democrats said this was a laudable goal. “Don’t get me wrong, I do not support the idea of the Bloomberg candidacy,” said Brian Fallon, a former aide to Senator Chuck Schumer now running Demand Justice, a group that works to counter conservative influence in the federal courts. “But as someone who is now working on issue advocacy, I can sort of appreciate the approach he took to try to shame people into prioritizing an issue that was viewed for a long time as something Democrats should soft pedal for political reasons.”

By 2018, it appears, Mr. Bloomberg had decided that this strategy needed to be supplemented with broader electoral goals. He spent heavily on 24 Democratic congressional candidates in a successful effort to help deliver the House to Democrats. At the time, he defended his previous efforts to help Republicans he described as serious, “like my friend John McCain,” he wrote in an op-ed article. “But too many,” he added, “have been absolutely feckless.”

But his disillusion with the Republican Party is fairly recent. Over the years he has supported Republican candidates ranging from President George Bush in 1992 to Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts in 2012 — the beneficiary of a fund-raiser at Mr. Bloomberg’s Manhattan townhouse that year.

Mr. Brown lost to Senator Elizabeth Warren, who now appears to be on a collision course with Mr. Bloomberg in the Democratic primary. He has said her proposal to hit billionaires like him with a wealth tax is probably unconstitutional.

Still, some Democrats view Mr. Bloomberg’s past support of Republicans as a potential drag on his campaign, but not a deal breaker.

“I think he’s going to have to answer, but I would hope that Democrats would be willing to accept anybody in our party these days who is willing to evolve,” said Lachlan McIntosh, a South Carolina political operative. “The country is in desperate shape. We’ve got to beat Trump.”

Rachel Shorey and Annie Daniel contributed reporting.

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Tokyo sushi restaurant made famous in ‘Jiro Dreams of Sushi’ removed from Michelin Guide

A popular sushi restaurant has lost its status as a three-star Michelin location.

The latest edition of the prestigious Michelin Guide will not include Sukiyabashi Jiro in Tokyo, often considered the “world’s best sushi restaurant.”

The decision, however, has nothing to do with the quality of the food or the service.

Westlake Legal Group Jiro-sushi Tokyo sushi restaurant made famous in 'Jiro Dreams of Sushi' removed from Michelin Guide Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc cf1e7619-4f06-5bf2-8900-5246a03d7252 article

Sukiyabashi Jiro will no longer be included in the Michelin Guide because it is not open to the public. (OSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP via Getty Images)

Sukiyabashi Jiro was removed and will no longer be included as a three-star Michelin restaurant because it does not take reservations from the public, The Guardian reported Tuesday.

The restaurant had received three stars in the Michelin Guide every year since 2007, when the first Tokyo edition of the guide was released.

Another branch of the restaurant, which is open to the public, will still be listed as a two-star restaurant in the 2020 Michelin Guide.

SOUTH KOREAN CHEF SUES MICHELIN GUIDE FOR INCLUDING RESTAURANT IN 2020 EDITION, CALLS IT AN ‘INSULT’

The original restaurant, located in a subway station, was featured in the 2011 documentary “Jiro Dreams of Sushi,” which followed the owner and his two sons, who are also sushi chefs.

The popular yet exclusive restaurant only seats about 10 diners at a time.

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In a statement obtained by The Guardian, a spokesperson for the Michelin Guide said: “We recognize Sukiyabashi Jiro does not accept reservations from the general public, which makes it out of our scope. It was not true to say the restaurant lost stars but it is not subject to coverage in our guide. Michelin’s policy is to introduce restaurants where everybody can go to eat.”

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Former President Obama once ate at the restaurant during a 2014 visit to Tokyo, where he claimed that the sushi was “the best he ever had,” per The Guardian.

Westlake Legal Group Jiro-sushi Tokyo sushi restaurant made famous in 'Jiro Dreams of Sushi' removed from Michelin Guide Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc cf1e7619-4f06-5bf2-8900-5246a03d7252 article   Westlake Legal Group Jiro-sushi Tokyo sushi restaurant made famous in 'Jiro Dreams of Sushi' removed from Michelin Guide Michael Hollan fox-news/food-drink/food/restaurants fox news fnc/food-drink fnc cf1e7619-4f06-5bf2-8900-5246a03d7252 article

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