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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 238)

Uber Launches An App To Connect Job Seekers With Gig Work

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1171375696-2fb11ed5adee2272b8dfd7a0357719267c13151a-s1100-c15 Uber Launches An App To Connect Job Seekers With Gig Work

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi speaks at an Uber products launch in San Francisco on Sept. 26. The company is launching its Uber Works app in Chicago, aiming to make it easier for workers to find temporary shifts. Philip Pacheco /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Pacheco /AFP/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Uber Launches An App To Connect Job Seekers With Gig Work

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi speaks at an Uber products launch in San Francisco on Sept. 26. The company is launching its Uber Works app in Chicago, aiming to make it easier for workers to find temporary shifts.

Philip Pacheco /AFP/Getty Images

Uber can zip you around town, bring sushi to your door and ship your company’s goods across the country. Now, it will also connect gig workers with employers looking for temporary staff.

The company is launching its Uber Works app Thursday in Chicago in an effort to make it easier to find temporary shifts for work like bartending, warehouse work and commercial cleaning, it said in a blog post.

“We believe a new, technology-first approach can provide faster and easier means for people to get work, while offering greater insight into the many opportunities for work that are out there — improving the experience for workers and businesses alike,” the company said.

Uber is continuing to expand its businesses during a tough time. It continues to struggle to turn a profit and laid off more than 400 workers last month. It’s also poised to fight a California law passed in September that threatens its contractor-based business model.

But Uber Works may not be the answer to the company’s problems. Len Sherman, an adjunct professor of business at Columbia Business School, said he doubts the app will have a meaningful positive effect on the company’s finances.

“Uber is sucking cash out of the business every year they operate,” he said. “They can’t invest in growth without just deepening their losses.”

Uber has sought to bill itself as “the Amazon of transportation.” Over the years, Uber has expanded into businesses unrelated to its start as a ride-sharing service, but Sherman called the comparison to Amazon preposterous.

He said it could take years for Uber Works to make a profit, and in the meantime, the cash Uber is using to invest in it is dwindling.

Uber is using new technology to try to solve the problems of staffing agencies, just as it used new tech to make ride hailing easier. In its blog post, Uber refers to workers dealing with rigid scheduling and a lack of information about pay and where they can pick up shifts.

Uber claims its app will make it easier to find and take a shift while also giving businesses more flexibility to increase staff when it gets busy and make scheduling easier. It will also include information for workers about the skills and possible attire required for the job and allows them to track their hours.

The company said it’s partnering with staffing agencies that “employ, pay and handle worker benefits.”

It’s unclear if Uber plans to expand Uber Works to other cities. In an email, Uber spokesman Xavier Van Chau said the company is focused on making its launch in Chicago a success.

“We are concentrating on building the Uber Works platform well in the Chicagoland area and delivering value to local workers and businesses,” Van Chau said. “We’re excited about the potential of Uber Works and will share more on possible expansion as we continue to grow.”

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Warren, Gabbard knock Harris’ bid to ban Trump from Twitter

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6091427107001_6091428463001-vs Warren, Gabbard knock Harris' bid to ban Trump from Twitter Paul Steinhauser fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 51bec8ba-11d7-54d0-9abd-360e8189a4b5

Two of Sen. Kamala Harris’ rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination disagree with the California senator’s calls for the suspension of President Trump’s Twitter account.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii told Fox News she’s not on board with that effort.  “I will stand up for every American’s right and freedom of speech, no matter how strongly I may disagree with that speech. This freedom is the First Amendment of the Constitution for a reason and I will do all I can to stand up for it,” Gabbard said Thursday while campaigning in New Hampshire.

WARREN LAUGHS OFF HARRIS SUGGESTION TO BOOT TRUMP FROM TWITTER

And Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts offered a simple  “no” when asked by reporters if she thought the Republican president should be booted from Twitter. The Massachusetts Democrat chuckled as she gave her one-word answer on Wednesday.

Harris called this week for the president’s Twitter account to be shut down. This followed a storm of tweets by Trump critical of the whistleblower who filed a complaint against him over the Ukraine controversy. That controversy has spurred a House impeachment inquiry.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

Trump, in a tweet, also questioned whether House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff should be arrested for “treason.” And on Wednesday he called the House Democrats’ investigation “BULLS—” in one tweet and a “COUP” in another.

“The words of a president matter. Trump has again shown he is irresponsible and endangering others with his tweets. He should lose the privilege to be on Twitter,” Harris wrote on Twitter on Monday.

She urged Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to take action.

Gabbard’s comments weren’t the first time she’s disagreed with Harris.

The two candidates clashed in a viral moment at July’s Democratic primary debate, when Gabbard took aim at the former California attorney general over her record as a prosecutor.

Asked if her pushback against Harris’ suggestion to suspend Trump from Twitter was personal, Gabbard quickly answered, “No. I don’t know why anyone would think that.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6091427107001_6091428463001-vs Warren, Gabbard knock Harris' bid to ban Trump from Twitter Paul Steinhauser fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 51bec8ba-11d7-54d0-9abd-360e8189a4b5   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6091427107001_6091428463001-vs Warren, Gabbard knock Harris' bid to ban Trump from Twitter Paul Steinhauser fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/tulsi-gabbard fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 51bec8ba-11d7-54d0-9abd-360e8189a4b5

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Great Pacific Garbage Patch cleanup is underway, finally

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Great Pacific Garbage Patch cleanup is underway, finally

This odd vessel looks like a cross between an oil rig and a floating swimming pool and may help clean up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. USA TODAY

It’s working! The “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” cleanup is finally underway.

“Our ocean cleanup system is now finally catching plastic, from one-ton ghost nets to tiny microplastics,” Boyan Slat, 25, the Dutch inventor and university dropout who created the Ocean Cleanup Project, tweeted Wednesday.

His cleanup system failed in late December when a 60-foot length of the device broke off. That necessitated towing the entire 2,000-foot device back to Hawaii for testing and inspection.

The cleanup system includes a barrier that holds a 10-foot screen below it to catch plastics without interfering with marine life, The Guardian reported. 

The self-contained system uses natural currents of the sea to passively collect plastic debris in an effort to reduce waste in the ocean.

The project was started in 2013, and its design has undergone several major revisions. It is hoped the final design will be able to clean up half of the debris in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, The Guardian said.

The results are promising enough to begin designing a second system to send to the garbage patch. Slat sounded a note of caution: “If the journey to this point taught us anything, it is that it’s definitely not going to be easy.”

Garbage patch: World’s largest collection of ocean garbage is twice the size of Texas

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a collection of plastic, floating trash halfway between Hawaii and California, is more than 600,000 square miles in size. That’s twice the size of Texas and is the largest collection of plastic in the world’s oceans. 

First discovered in the early 1990s, the trash in the patch comes from around the Pacific Rim, including nations in Asia and North and South America.

The patch is not a solid mass of plastic. It includes about 1.8 trillion pieces and weighs 88,000 tons – the equivalent of 500 jumbo jets.

Slat said the next move is to scale up the device and make it stronger, so it can stay at sea for longer and hold onto all the plastic it collects for a year or more before a ship collects the trash.

“There’s a lot of work still ahead of us,” he said.

Contributing: Elizabeth Weise, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

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Fox News analyst Andrew Napolitano says Trump’s Ukraine call was both criminal and impeachable

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Fox News analyst Andrew Napolitano says Trump's Ukraine call was both criminal and impeachable

Ensnarled in an impeachment probe over his request for Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, President Donald Trump is now calling on another nation to do the same: China. There is no evidence of any wrongdoing by the Bidens. (Oct. 3) AP, AP

WASHINGTON – Fox News’ senior judicial analyst, Andrew Napolitano, said Thursday that the summary released by the White House of a July 25 phone call between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky demonstrates “both criminal and impeachable behavior” by Trump. 

Though the president has said it was a “perfect call” and that the summary exonerates him, Napolitano said in an opinion piece that the call showed that Trump was guilty of violating campaign finance law, bribery and intimidating witnesses. 

The former New Jersey judge’s opinion made a social media splash because he works for a cable news network that is home to pro-Trump media figures like Sean Hannity, Tucker Carlson, Jeanine Pirro and the hosts of “Fox & Friends.” The article repeated several points Napolitano has made on-air since the scandal broke. 

Napolitano has bucked his conservative colleagues before, particularly with his view that special counsel Robert Mueller also revealed impeachable offenses. 

Perilous times for Trump: By 45%-38%, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations, poll finds

“The criminal behavior to which Trump has admitted is much more grave than anything alleged or unearthed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and much of what Mueller revealed was impeachable,” Napolitano wrote Thursday about Trump’s call to Zelensky.

The call is at the center of an impeachment inquiry after a whistleblower complaint accused Trump of “using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election.” Trump is alleged to have used approved military aid as leverage to demand that Ukraine investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, who has generally led in Democratic primary polling. 

Though the president and his defenders have denied evidence of a “quid pro quo” in the phone call, Napolitano said that Trump’s request for a “favor” after Zelensky spoke of his need for anti-tank missiles was a “clear unmistakable inference” that approved military aid “would be held up until the favor was delivered.” 

“The favor he sought was dirt on Biden.” 

Impeachment pressure: Trump says China should investigate Joe Biden, family

Napolitano also said the “president need not have committed a crime in order to be impeached, but he needs to have engaged in behavior that threatens the constitutional stability of the United States or the rule of law as we have come to know it.” 

The judge decried Trump’s verbal attacks on the whistleblower and “suggesting that the whistleblower and those who have helped him are spies and ought to be treated as spies were in ‘the old days’ (Trump’s phrase) – that is, by hanging.”

He called Trump’s “allusions to violence are palpably dangerous” and said they “will give cover to crazies who crave violence, as other intemperate words of his have done.” 

And he said that Trump’s retweet of a pastor’s suggestion that impeachment could lead to civil war was “a dog whistle to the deranged.” 

Napolitano expressed shock that Trump would try to engage a country to interfere in the 2020 election immediately after Mueller’s investigation, which outlined a “sweeping and systematic” Russian campaign to sway the 2016 election. 

“Now he has attempted in one phone call to bring the Ukrainian government into the 2020 election! Does he understand the laws he has sworn to uphold?” Napolitano asked. “It was to remedy just such reckless, constitutionally destructive behavior that impeachment was intended.” 

Napolitano’s opinion sparked the ire of many Fox News viewers as well as Fox News contributor and former U.S. Attorney Joe DiGenova who called Napolitano “a fool” during an appearance on “Tucker Carlson Tonight.” 

“Nothing that the president said on that call or what we think he said on that call constitutes a crime,” DiGenova said. “And even if he had said you’re not going to get the money it would not be a crime.” 

Explainer: Biden, allies pushed out Ukrainian prosecutor because he didn’t pursue corruption cases

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Trump Goes on Live Television to Do Exact Thing Whistleblower Said He Did

Westlake Legal Group vdCD5_FVpFdqJexUsysXGTICHddVOLm8XM0eGWzQckQ Trump Goes on Live Television to Do Exact Thing Whistleblower Said He Did r/politics

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Beto O’Rourke faces fresh round of mockery after posting video of him getting flu shot

Westlake Legal Group beto Beto O'Rourke faces fresh round of mockery after posting video of him getting flu shot Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox news fnc/media fnc b6583d33-1324-5dbe-9419-ebc591ac54fb article

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, seemed to make another attempt at connecting with voters as he posted a video of himself getting a flu shot.

The video, which was widely mocked after it was posted on Wednesday, showed a seemingly nervous O’Rourke before getting the jab. In the video, O’Rourke takes a deep breath and closes his eyes before receiving the vaccination.

After receiving the shot, O’Rourke said “That’s it,” in a hushed tone. The video was posted to his Instagram, prompting a round of criticism from people on social media.

Many took aim at the size of O’Rourke’s arms while joking about his gun confiscation plan.

“At least he’s walking the walk and showing he’s not in possession of any guns of any kind,” one user tweeted.

BETO LIVESTREAMS HIS OWN HAIRCUT, MASSAGE DAY AFTER LAMENTING IMAGE OF ‘PRIVILEGE’

BETO O’ROURKE POSTS BIZARRE VIDEO OF DENTIST VISIT TO HIGHLIGHT LIFE ON THE BORDER

O’Rourke has a history of offering voters a candid look at his life. The 2020 hopeful has live-streamed himself getting a haircut and going to the dentist. The haircut incident similarly earned him mockery online.

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The dentist video, posted in January, showed O’Rourke with his mouth wide open as a hygienist gave him a cleaning.

Westlake Legal Group beto Beto O'Rourke faces fresh round of mockery after posting video of him getting flu shot Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox news fnc/media fnc b6583d33-1324-5dbe-9419-ebc591ac54fb article   Westlake Legal Group beto Beto O'Rourke faces fresh round of mockery after posting video of him getting flu shot Sam Dorman fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/beto-orourke fox news fnc/media fnc b6583d33-1324-5dbe-9419-ebc591ac54fb article

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Facebook Can Be Forced to Delete Content Worldwide, E.U.’s Top Court Rules

LONDON — Europe’s top court said on Thursday that individual countries can order Facebook to take down posts, photographs and videos not only in their own countries but elsewhere, in a ruling that extends the reach of the region’s internet-related laws beyond its own borders.

The European Court of Justice said Facebook could be forced to remove a post globally by a national court in the European Union’s 28-member bloc if the content was determined to be defamatory or otherwise illegal. Its decision cannot be appealed.

The ruling stemmed from a case involving an Austrian politician, Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek, who sued the social network to expunge online comments that called her a “lousy traitor,” “corrupt oaf” and member of a “fascist party.” After an Austrian court found the comments violated defamation laws, she demanded Facebook erase the original comments worldwide, not just within the country, as well as posts with “equivalent” remarks.

The decision sets a new benchmark for the purview of European laws that govern the internet, giving European countries the power to apply takedown requests internationally. That foreshadows future disputes over Europe’s role in setting rules on the internet, especially as other nations increasingly pass their own laws to deal with privacy, hate speech and disinformation.

The judgment deals a blow to big internet platforms like Facebook, placing more responsibility on them to patrol their sites for wrongdoing as they contend with the swell of often-competing laws and regulations.

“There is this impulse in Europe that is trying to set global regulatory standards,” said Ben Wagner, director of the Privacy and Sustainable Computing Lab at Vienna University. The effort, he said, is a “pushback against the self-regulatory impulses of these platforms.”

Facebook said in a statement that the European court’s decision “undermines the longstanding principle that one country does not have the right to impose its laws on speech on another country.” It added that the judgment raised questions about freedom of expression and “the role that internet companies should play in monitoring, interpreting and removing speech that might be illegal in any particular country.”

Ms. Glawischnig-Piesczek, the former leader of the Austrian Green Party, who brought the original lawsuit, did not respond to requests for comment.

Europe has long been more proactive than other regions — including the United States — in passing laws that regulate the internet. As Europe has enacted tougher policies, its courts are being asked to clarify their scope, including whether Facebook, Google and others must apply the rules beyond the European Union’s borders.

Last week, the European Court of Justice limited the reach of the privacy law known as the “right to be forgotten,” which lets European citizens demand that Google remove links to sensitive personal data from search results. The court said Google could not be ordered to remove links to websites globally, except in certain circumstances when weighed against the rights to free expression and the public’s right to information.

On Thursday, the Luxembourg-based court turned its attention to the reach of European defamation laws through Ms. Glawischnig-Piesczek’s case, which she filed in 2016. Facebook initially refused to take down the post that criticized her. In many countries the comments about her would have been considered acceptable, if vulgar, political speech.

Ms. Glawischnig-Piesczek then sued Facebook in Austrian courts, which concluded the comments were defamatory and intended to damage her reputation. She also demanded that Facebook remove posts that were similar in tone to the original insults, taking the case all the way to the European Court of Justice.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157052235_4efd8465-225a-4c64-947c-3cc72314df18-articleLarge Facebook Can Be Forced to Delete Content Worldwide, E.U.’s Top Court Rules Social Media Privacy News and News Media Facebook Inc Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek European Union European Court of Justice Europe Computers and the Internet Austria

Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek, a former leader of Austria’s Green Party, had argued that Facebook needed to delete comments posted online about her and limit worldwide access.CreditMichael Debets/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

The court said on Thursday that while Facebook wasn’t liable for the disparaging comments posted about Ms. Glawischnig-Piesczek, the company had an obligation to take them down after an Austrian court found them defamatory. Facebook, the court said, “did not act expeditiously to remove or to disable access to that information.”

The court left to national court systems in each European Union country to decide what cases merit forcing an internet company to take down content in foreign countries. That raised questions about what other laws Facebook and other internet platforms can be forced to comply with by governments in Europe.

French regulators have tested the expansion of privacy laws beyond the European Union. Germany has adopted strict laws to remove hate speech from social media platforms. Britain is considering new restrictions against “harmful” internet content.

“The key thing about this case is what preventive measures can be imposed on Facebook,” said Martin Husovec, an assistant law professor at Tilburg University’s Institute for Law, Technology and Society in the Netherlands.

But the decision is not likely to not lead to a flood of orders against Facebook to take down content globally, said David Erdos, deputy director of the Center for Intellectual Property and Information Law at Cambridge University. The opinion was narrowly crafted, he said, and urged national courts to weigh any bans carefully against international laws.

“Courts will be feeling their way for years to come,” he said.

Critics of the ruling said a global ban would require the use of automated content filters. Civil society groups and others have cautioned that such filters are ineffective and could lead to the takedown of legitimate material because filters cannot detect nuances in satire and some political commentary. They also argued that calling for the removal of posts considered “equivalent” added further confusion.

Supporters countered that defamation laws hadn’t been enforced appropriately in the internet age and were needed to force companies like Facebook to do more to combat internet trolls, hate speech and other personal attacks that spread on the web.

Facebook has long argued that it should not be held legally responsible for material posted by its more than two billion users. Yet with increased scrutiny from policymakers around the world, the social network has taken steps to limit hate speech and extremism on its site. Last month, it outlined its plans for an oversight board to review content decisions.

Dr. Wagner at Vienna University said Thursday’s ruling raised broad concerns about restricting political speech, especially because Ms. Glawischnig-Piesczek is a public figure.

“We’re talking about a politician who is being insulted in a political context. That’s very different than a normal citizen,” he said. “There needs to be a greater scope for freedom of opinion and expression.”

Facebook Tests Hiding ‘Likes’ on Social Media Posts

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Westlake Legal Group 26facebook-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Facebook Can Be Forced to Delete Content Worldwide, E.U.’s Top Court Rules Social Media Privacy News and News Media Facebook Inc Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek European Union European Court of Justice Europe Computers and the Internet Austria
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Westlake Legal Group 20fbprivacy-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v2 Facebook Can Be Forced to Delete Content Worldwide, E.U.’s Top Court Rules Social Media Privacy News and News Media Facebook Inc Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek European Union European Court of Justice Europe Computers and the Internet Austria
‘Right to Be Forgotten’ Privacy Rule Is Limited by Europe’s Top Court

Sept. 24, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 24FORGOTTEN-threeByTwoSmallAt2X Facebook Can Be Forced to Delete Content Worldwide, E.U.’s Top Court Rules Social Media Privacy News and News Media Facebook Inc Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek European Union European Court of Justice Europe Computers and the Internet Austria

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How a Fringe Theory About CrowdStrike Took Root in the White House

In an April 2017 interview with The Associated Press, President Trump suddenly began talking about the hack of the Democratic National Committee a year earlier, complaining that the F.B.I. had not physically examined the compromised server.

“They brought in another company that I hear is Ukrainian-based,” the president said.

“CrowdStrike?” the surprised reporter asked, referring to the California cybersecurity company that investigated how Russian government hackers had stolen and leaked Democratic emails, disrupting Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

“That’s what I heard,” Mr. Trump resumed. “I heard it’s owned by a very rich Ukrainian; that’s what I heard.”

More than two years later, Mr. Trump was still holding on to this false conspiracy theory. In his July call with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine, he summed it up in a sort of shorthand — at least according to the White House memorandum, labeled “not a verbatim transcript.”

“I would like you to find out what happened with this whole situation with Ukraine, they say CrowdStrike … I guess you have one of your wealthy people …,” the president said. It is unclear whether the ellipses indicate that words were omitted or that Mr. Trump’s voice was trailing off.

Then he added one novel detail: “The server, they say Ukraine has it.”

Now, Mr. Trump’s call for Ukraine to look into his CrowdStrike story forms the background to the House impeachment inquiry, which is focused on the second request he made: that Mr. Zelensky investigate Mr. Trump’s possible 2020 opponent, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Mr. Trump has placed a concoction of disprovable claims, of the kind usually found on the fringes of the web, squarely in the middle of American politics and diplomacy.

The tale of the supposedly hidden server may have appealed to Mr. Trump because it undercut a well-established fact that he has resented and resisted for three years: The Russian government interfered in the 2016 election to help him win, an effort thoroughly documented by American intelligence agencies and amply supported by public evidence.

By contrast, there is no evidence to support the president’s vague suggestion that Ukraine, not Russia, might be responsible for the hacking, or that CrowdStrike somehow connived in it. But his alternate history has provided a psychological shield for the president against facts that he believes tarnish his electoral victory.

Mr. Trump has long called for better relations with Vladimir V. Putin’s Russia and brushed aside complaints about its conduct. So there is a certain symmetry to his suggestion that Ukraine, Russia’s opponent and the victim of its territorial grab, may somehow have framed Russia for the 2016 election activity.

“Ukraine is the perfect scapegoat for him, because it’s the enemy of Russia,” said Nina Jankowicz, a fellow at the Wilson Center in Washington who regularly visits Ukraine and is writing a book called “How to Lose the Information War.”

She noted that a number of Ukraine-linked stories, some of them distorted or exaggerated, have been pulled together by Mr. Trump’s supporters into a single narrative.

For example, there is the idea, promoted by the president’s lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani, that Ukraine’s government actively sabotaged Mr. Trump’s 2016 campaign. A Ukrainian-American lawyer who consulted for the D.N.C. looked into the finances of Paul Manafort and spoke with Ukrainian embassy officials. But there appears to have been no organized Ukrainian government effort to intervene — certainly nothing comparable to the activities of Russian intelligence agencies ordered by Mr. Putin.

It is true that a Ukrainian legislator helped publicize documents on Mr. Manafort’s multimillion-dollar payments from a Ukrainian political party, leading to his resignation as Mr. Trump’s campaign chairman. But the claim of Mr. Manafort’s wrongdoing turned out to be justified. He is now serving seven and a half years in prison for financial fraud and other crimes.

In May, Mr. Trump recalled the American ambassador to Kiev, Marie L. Yovanovitch, appointed by President Barack Obama in 2016, telling others she was scheming against his administration. She has denied it.

And Mr. Trump has repeatedly charged that Mr. Biden, who handled Ukrainian affairs as vice president, tried to get a prosecutor fired for investigating a Ukrainian energy company that paid his son, Hunter, handsomely as a board member despite a lack of experience in Ukraine. In fact, multiple countries were pressing for the firing of the prosecutor, who they thought was turning a blind eye to corruption.

“Now it seems like all of these conspiracy theories are merging into one,” Ms. Jankowicz said. She studies disinformation, she said, but Mr. Trump produced one claim she’d never come across.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_161614164_ab1b1ada-cb55-4a9c-8ffb-6c95b22c2b1e-articleLarge How a Fringe Theory About CrowdStrike Took Root in the White House Zelensky, Volodymyr Yovanovitch, Marie L United States Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Russia Rumors and Misinformation Reddit Inc Presidential Election of 2016 Mueller, Robert S III Giuliani, Rudolph W Federal Bureau of Investigation Facebook Inc Democratic Party democratic national committee Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Cyberwarfare and Defense CrowdStrike Inc Clinton, Hillary Rodham Biden, Joseph R Jr Biden, Hunter Atlantic Council 4chan

The Democratic National Committee’s servers came under attack by Russian hackers in 2016.CreditPaul Holston/Associated Press

“I do this for a living, and I’d never heard anyone say the servers were in Ukraine,” she said.

In the 27 months between Mr. Trump’s two citations of the CrowdStrike-Ukraine conspiracy theory, it has survived despite many denials from CrowdStrike, the F.B.I. and people directly involved in the investigations. It has survived despite the fact that the D.N.C. put one of its hacked servers on display — not in Ukraine but in its Washington offices beside the filing cabinet pried open in 1972 by the Watergate burglars (and a photo of the two artifacts ran on The Times’s front page). It has survived despite the indictment prepared last year by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, laying out in extraordinary detail the actions of 12 named Russian military intelligence officers who hacked the D.N.C. and other election targets.

The speculation springs from what Mr. Trump has called a “big Dem scam” — the false notion that the F.B.I. never really investigated the D.N.C. hack. In fact, according to people directly involved, CrowdStrike was in regular contact with the bureau in spring 2016 as it examined dozens of servers used by both the D.N.C. and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

It is true, as Mr. Trump has often tweeted, that F.B.I. agents never took physical possession of the Democrats’ servers. But CrowdStrike supplied the F.B.I. with digital copies of the servers so that the bureau could assess the Russian malware infecting them. The Mueller investigation later confirmed CrowdStrike’s findings.

Still, the president has clung to the theory linking CrowdStrike, Ukraine and the D.N.C. servers despite the repeated efforts of his aides to dissuade him, Thomas Bossert, his former homeland security adviser, said on Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “The D.N.C. server and that conspiracy theory has got to go,” he said. “If he continues to focus on that white whale, it’s going to bring him down.”

To go in search of the roots of Mr. Trump’s CrowdStrike-Ukraine conspiracy theory is to travel the internet’s most peculiar provinces and the darkest threads on Twitter and Facebook. On 4chan and pro-Trump spaces on Reddit, on websites like ZeroHedge.com and Washington’s Blog, you can find plenty of speculation about evil manipulation by CrowdStrike and secret maneuvers by Ukrainians — often inflamed by Mr. Trump’s own statements.

Until the president’s statements, however, even internet speculation did not attribute CrowdStrike’s ownership to a rich Ukrainian or suggest that the D.N.C. servers were hidden in Ukraine.

George Eliason, an American journalist who lives in eastern Ukraine, where pro-Russian separatists fought Ukrainian forces, has written extensively about what he considers to be a “coup attempt” against President Trump involving American and Ukrainian intelligence agencies and CrowdStrike. He said he did not know if his writings for obscure websites might have influenced the president.

“CrowdStrike and Ukrainian Intel are working hand in glove,” he wrote in an email. “Is Ukrainian Intelligence trying to invent a reason for the U.S. to take a hardline stance against Russia? Are they using CrowdStrike to carry this out?”

Mr. Eliason and other purveyors of Ukraine conspiracies often point to the Atlantic Council, a research group in Washington, as the locus of the schemes. The Ukrainian oligarch Viktor Pinchuk has made donations to the council and serves on its international advisory board; Dmitri Alperovitch, CrowdStrike’s co-founder, who was born in Russia and came to the United States as a child, is an Atlantic Council senior fellow.

That connection seems slender, but it may be the origin of Mr. Trump’s association of a wealthy Ukrainian with CrowdStrike.

Pro-Trump media leaped last week to defend the president’s Ukraine theories. Rush Limbaugh said on his radio show that Mr. Trump’s “reference to CrowdStrike, mark my words, is momentous,” though he did not say why.

And Russian state news outlets are always ready to cheer on Mr. Trump’s efforts to point the blame for the 2016 hack away from Moscow. On Sept. 25, after the White House released its memo on the Zelensky call, Russia’s Sputnik news website ran a story supporting Mr. Trump’s remarks.

The Sputnik article cited Mr. Eliason’s writings and suggested that CrowdStrike might have framed Russia for the D.N.C. hack — if it occurred at all. It quoted a Twitter account called “The Last Refuge” declaring: “The D.N.C. servers were never hacked.”

All this mythmaking about the 2016 hack frustrates Robert Johnston, who was the lead investigator for CrowdStrike on the D.N.C. inquiry. Mr. Johnston, a former Marine and Cyber Command operator, said he could make no sense of Mr. Trump’s assertions.

“It doesn’t connect with anything in my experience,” he said. “I’d be interested in the president of Ukraine’s impression.”

Mr. Johnston, now chief executive of the cybersecurity company Adlumin, said he was weary of the conspiracies surrounding what he considered a straightforward conclusion. Having seen the digital fingerprints of Russian intelligence in earlier hacking cases, he felt there was little doubt about the identity of the perpetrators.

“I don’t know how you get to this point,” Mr. Johnston said of the fantasies Mr. Trump has promoted. “This is a story that just won’t die.”

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Varney: Bernie Sanders’ hospitalization may tip Democratic nomination to Elizabeth Warren

Westlake Legal Group Sanders-Warren-AP Varney: Bernie Sanders' hospitalization may tip Democratic nomination to Elizabeth Warren Yael Halon fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 34972b01-6711-5564-904f-6b4bbca208d7

Fox Business host Stuart Varney believes Sen. Elizabeth Warren D-Mass., will be the Democratic nominee for president in 2020.

“Maybe I’m jumping the gun, but it sure seems to me that Elizabeth Warren is real close to locking up the Democrat nomination,” Varney said on his Fox Nation show, “My Take.” “… Look at what’s happened just in the last few days. Bernie Sanders has had heart surgery for a blocked artery. All campaign events canceled until further notice,”

TRUMP BACKERS TORMENT WARREN IN NEVADA

A series of polls released this week shows Warren leading Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden both among national voters and in early primary and caucus states.

BERNIE SANDERS HAS STENTS INSERTED AFTER DOCTORS FIND BLOCKAGE

Sanders took a break from the trail this week after he ended up in the hospital with heart complications and underwent an emergency procedure Tuesday to repair a blocked artery, according to his campaign.

“We are canceling his events and appearances until further notice, and we will continue to provide appropriate updates,” Sanders’ campaign said in a statement.

Varney argued that Sanders’ hospital visit lends credence to those questioning whether his age will get in the way of securing a spot in the Oval Office.

WARREN CONTINUES ATTACK ON FACEBOOK AFTER ZUCKERBERG REVEALS IT WOULD SUE GOVERNMENT IF SHE BECOMES PRESIDENT

“There are now obvious questions about whether a 78-year-old can endure months of exhausting campaigning,” he said.

Varney then turned to Biden, who has come under fire since the launch of a formal impeachment investigation against President Trump over the content of a phone call during which Trump spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky about Biden and son Hunter’s business dealings in Ukraine.

“He is a casualty of the impeachment, he is collateral damage,” said Varney. “All the attention given to the Ukraine call has brought back the question about Hunter Biden, and the money he received in Ukraine and China.”

“It all happened so quickly,” he continued, “but as of now, it’s Elizabeth Warren’s nomination to lose.”

However, Varney said he didn’t think Warren could win the general election in November 2020 “for two reasons.”

“I don’t think Americans will elect as president someone who wants to destroy our economic system,” he said. “Elizabeth Warren is a socialist. Her proposals would destroy capitalism, and with it, the prosperity we enjoy today.”

VARNEY: HONG KONG ENGAGED IN URBAN WARFARE

Varney said the second reason was due to Warren’s “demeanor,”

“Anger is Senator Warren’s frequent theme, hating capitalism, the rich, the billionaires, Wall Street — that plays well to socialists, but on your screens, every day for four years, anger is not so attractive,” he said. “… You’ve got to be good on TV to win these days.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

Varney also issued a warning to Democrats, saying they should be “very worried,” should “far-left” Warren win the nomination.

“Far-left Warren is now very likely to be the nominee and outside of California and New York, Democrats should be very worried,” he concluded.

 To see Stuart Varney’s full remarks on  “My Take”, and for more episodes of his daily commentary, visit Fox Nation and join today.

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Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Ainsley Earhardt, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group Sanders-Warren-AP Varney: Bernie Sanders' hospitalization may tip Democratic nomination to Elizabeth Warren Yael Halon fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 34972b01-6711-5564-904f-6b4bbca208d7   Westlake Legal Group Sanders-Warren-AP Varney: Bernie Sanders' hospitalization may tip Democratic nomination to Elizabeth Warren Yael Halon fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 34972b01-6711-5564-904f-6b4bbca208d7

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The CrowdStrike Plot: How a Fringe Theory Took Root in the White House

In an April 2017 interview with The Associated Press, President Trump suddenly began talking about the hack of the Democratic National Committee a year earlier, complaining that the F.B.I. had not physically examined the compromised server.

“They brought in another company that I hear is Ukrainian-based,” the president said.

“CrowdStrike?” the surprised reporter asked, referring to the California cybersecurity company that investigated how Russian government hackers had stolen and leaked Democratic emails, disrupting Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

“That’s what I heard,” Mr. Trump resumed. “I heard it’s owned by a very rich Ukrainian; that’s what I heard.”

More than two years later, Mr. Trump was still holding on to this false conspiracy theory. In his July call with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine, he summed it up in a sort of shorthand — at least according to the White House memorandum, labeled “not a verbatim transcript.”

“I would like you to find out what happened with this whole situation with Ukraine, they say CrowdStrike … I guess you have one of your wealthy people …,” the president said. It is unclear whether the ellipses indicate that words were omitted or that Mr. Trump’s voice was trailing off.

Then he added one novel detail: “The server, they say Ukraine has it.”

Now, Mr. Trump’s call for Ukraine to look into his CrowdStrike story forms the background to the House impeachment inquiry, which is focused on the second request he made: that Mr. Zelensky investigate Mr. Trump’s possible 2020 opponent, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Mr. Trump has placed a concoction of disprovable claims, of the kind usually found on the fringes of the web, squarely in the middle of American politics and diplomacy.

The tale of the supposedly hidden server may have appealed to Mr. Trump because it undercut a well-established fact that he has resented and resisted for three years: The Russian government interfered in the 2016 election to help him win, an effort thoroughly documented by American intelligence agencies and amply supported by public evidence.

By contrast, there is no evidence to support the president’s vague suggestion that Ukraine, not Russia, might be responsible for the hacking, or that CrowdStrike somehow connived in it. But his alternate history has provided a psychological shield for the president against facts that he believes tarnish his electoral victory.

Mr. Trump has long called for better relations with Vladimir V. Putin’s Russia and brushed aside complaints about its conduct. So there is a certain symmetry to his suggestion that Ukraine, Russia’s opponent and the victim of its territorial grab, may somehow have framed Russia for the 2016 election activity.

“Ukraine is the perfect scapegoat for him, because it’s the enemy of Russia,” said Nina Jankowicz, a fellow at the Wilson Center in Washington who regularly visits Ukraine and is writing a book called “How to Lose the Information War.”

She noted that a number of Ukraine-linked stories, some of them distorted or exaggerated, have been pulled together by Mr. Trump’s supporters into a single narrative.

For example, there is the idea, promoted by the president’s lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani, that Ukraine’s government actively sabotaged Mr. Trump’s 2016 campaign. A Ukrainian-American lawyer who consulted for the D.N.C. looked into the finances of Paul Manafort and spoke with Ukrainian embassy officials. But there appears to have been no organized Ukrainian government effort to intervene — certainly nothing comparable to the activities of Russian intelligence agencies ordered by Mr. Putin.

It is true that a Ukrainian legislator helped publicize documents on Mr. Manafort’s multimillion-dollar payments from a Ukrainian political party, leading to his resignation as Mr. Trump’s campaign chairman. But the claim of Mr. Manafort’s wrongdoing turned out to be justified. He is now serving seven and a half years in prison for financial fraud and other crimes.

In May, Mr. Trump recalled the American ambassador to Kiev, Marie L. Yovanovitch, appointed by President Barack Obama in 2016, telling others she was scheming against his administration. She has denied it.

And Mr. Trump has repeatedly charged that Mr. Biden, who handled Ukrainian affairs as vice president, tried to get a prosecutor fired for investigating a Ukrainian energy company that paid his son, Hunter, handsomely as a board member despite a lack of experience in Ukraine. In fact, multiple countries were pressing for the firing of the prosecutor, who they thought was turning a blind eye to corruption.

“Now it seems like all of these conspiracy theories are merging into one,” Ms. Jankowicz said. She studies disinformation, she said, but Mr. Trump produced one claim she’d never come across.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_161614164_ab1b1ada-cb55-4a9c-8ffb-6c95b22c2b1e-articleLarge The CrowdStrike Plot: How a Fringe Theory Took Root in the White House Zelensky, Volodymyr Yovanovitch, Marie L United States Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Russia Rumors and Misinformation Reddit Inc Presidential Election of 2016 Mueller, Robert S III Giuliani, Rudolph W Federal Bureau of Investigation Facebook Inc Democratic Party democratic national committee Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Cyberwarfare and Defense CrowdStrike Inc Clinton, Hillary Rodham Biden, Joseph R Jr Biden, Hunter Atlantic Council 4chan

The Democratic National Committee’s servers came under attack by Russian hackers in 2016.CreditPaul Holston/Associated Press

“I do this for a living, and I’d never heard anyone say the servers were in Ukraine,” she said.

In the 27 months between Mr. Trump’s two citations of the CrowdStrike-Ukraine conspiracy theory, it has survived despite many denials from CrowdStrike, the F.B.I. and people directly involved in the investigations. It has survived despite the fact that the D.N.C. put one of its hacked servers on display — not in Ukraine but in its Washington offices beside the filing cabinet pried open in 1972 by the Watergate burglars (and a photo of the two artifacts ran on The Times’s front page). It has survived despite the indictment prepared last year by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, laying out in extraordinary detail the actions of 12 named Russian military intelligence officers who hacked the D.N.C. and other election targets.

The speculation springs from what Mr. Trump has called a “big Dem scam” — the false notion that the F.B.I. never really investigated the D.N.C. hack. In fact, according to people directly involved, CrowdStrike was in regular contact with the bureau in spring 2016 as it examined dozens of servers used by both the D.N.C. and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

It is true, as Mr. Trump has often tweeted, that F.B.I. agents never took physical possession of the Democrats’ servers. But CrowdStrike supplied the F.B.I. with digital copies of the servers so that the bureau could assess the Russian malware infecting them. The Mueller investigation later confirmed CrowdStrike’s findings.

Still, the president has clung to the theory linking CrowdStrike, Ukraine and the D.N.C. servers despite the repeated efforts of his aides to dissuade him, Thomas Bossert, his former homeland security adviser, said on Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “The D.N.C. server and that conspiracy theory has got to go,” he said. “If he continues to focus on that white whale, it’s going to bring him down.”

To go in search of the roots of Mr. Trump’s CrowdStrike-Ukraine conspiracy theory is to travel the internet’s most peculiar provinces and the darkest threads on Twitter and Facebook. On 4chan and pro-Trump spaces on Reddit, on websites like ZeroHedge.com and Washington’s Blog, you can find plenty of speculation about evil manipulation by CrowdStrike and secret maneuvers by Ukrainians — often inflamed by Mr. Trump’s own statements.

Until the president’s statements, however, even internet speculation did not attribute CrowdStrike’s ownership to a rich Ukrainian or suggest that the D.N.C. servers were hidden in Ukraine.

George Eliason, an American journalist who lives in eastern Ukraine, where pro-Russian separatists fought Ukrainian forces, has written extensively about what he considers to be a “coup attempt” against President Trump involving American and Ukrainian intelligence agencies and CrowdStrike. He said he did not know if his writings for obscure websites might have influenced the president.

“CrowdStrike and Ukrainian Intel are working hand in glove,” he wrote in an email. “Is Ukrainian Intelligence trying to invent a reason for the U.S. to take a hardline stance against Russia? Are they using CrowdStrike to carry this out?”

Mr. Eliason and other purveyors of Ukraine conspiracies often point to the Atlantic Council, a research group in Washington, as the locus of the schemes. The Ukrainian oligarch Viktor Pinchuk has made donations to the council and serves on its international advisory board; Dmitri Alperovitch, CrowdStrike’s co-founder, who was born in Russia and came to the United States as a child, is an Atlantic Council senior fellow.

That connection seems slender, but it may be the origin of Mr. Trump’s association of a wealthy Ukrainian with CrowdStrike.

Pro-Trump media leaped last week to defend the president’s Ukraine theories. Rush Limbaugh said on his radio show that Mr. Trump’s “reference to CrowdStrike, mark my words, is momentous,” though he did not say why.

And Russian state news outlets are always ready to cheer on Mr. Trump’s efforts to point the blame for the 2016 hack away from Moscow. On Sept. 25, after the White House released its memo on the Zelensky call, Russia’s Sputnik news website ran a story supporting Mr. Trump’s remarks.

The Sputnik article cited Mr. Eliason’s writings and suggested that CrowdStrike might have framed Russia for the D.N.C. hack — if it occurred at all. It quoted a Twitter account called “The Last Refuge” declaring: “The D.N.C. servers were never hacked.”

All this mythmaking about the 2016 hack frustrates Robert Johnston, who was the lead investigator for CrowdStrike on the D.N.C. inquiry. Mr. Johnston, a former Marine and Cyber Command operator, said he could make no sense of Mr. Trump’s assertions.

“It doesn’t connect with anything in my experience,” he said. “I’d be interested in the president of Ukraine’s impression.”

Mr. Johnston, now chief executive of the cybersecurity company Adlumin, said he was weary of the conspiracies surrounding what he considered a straightforward conclusion. Having seen the digital fingerprints of Russian intelligence in earlier hacking cases, he felt there was little doubt about the identity of the perpetrators.

“I don’t know how you get to this point,” Mr. Johnston said of the fantasies Mr. Trump has promoted. “This is a story that just won’t die.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com