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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 239)

Iraq’s Parliament calls for expulsion of US troops from the country following drone attack

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Soleimani-AP-Getty Iraq’s Parliament calls for expulsion of US troops from the country following drone attack Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox news fnc/world fnc article 456e7b30-1452-57f3-b94b-ea068f24e91f

Iraqi lawmakers approved a resolution Sunday calling to expel U.S. troops from the country, following an American drone attack that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Lawmakers approved a resolution asking the Iraqi government to end the agreement under which Washington sent forces to Iraq more than four years ago to help in the fight against the Islamic State terror group.

The majority of about 180 legislators present in Parliament voted in favor of the resolution. It was backed by most Shiite members of parliament, who hold a majority of seats. Many Sunni and Kurdish legislators did not show up for the session, apparently because they oppose abolishing the deal.

This is a developing story; check back for updates.

This is a developing story; check back for updates. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Soleimani-AP-Getty Iraq’s Parliament calls for expulsion of US troops from the country following drone attack Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox news fnc/world fnc article 456e7b30-1452-57f3-b94b-ea068f24e91f   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Soleimani-AP-Getty Iraq’s Parliament calls for expulsion of US troops from the country following drone attack Stephen Sorace fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox news fnc/world fnc article 456e7b30-1452-57f3-b94b-ea068f24e91f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iraqi Parliament Votes to Expel All American Troops and Submit UN Complaint Against US for Violation of Sovereignty. “What happened was a political assassination. Iraq cannot accept this.”

Westlake Legal Group IZXOGsKXD89GSexoaOM2QGKI3pwKz2e6nkJYYoUuBgc Iraqi Parliament Votes to Expel All American Troops and Submit UN Complaint Against US for Violation of Sovereignty. "What happened was a political assassination. Iraq cannot accept this." r/politics

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Iraqi Parliament Votes To Remove U.S. Troops

Westlake Legal Group 5e11fd662500003b1998fc9d Iraqi Parliament Votes To Remove U.S. Troops

BEIRUT (AP) — The latest on U.S.-Iran tensions (all times local):

4:45 p.m.

Iraq’s parliament has voted to expel the U.S. military from the country.

Lawmakers voted Sunday in favor of a resolution that calls for ending foreign military presence in the country. The resolution’s main aim is to get the U.S. to withdraw some 5,000 U.S. troops present in different parts of Iraq.

The vote comes two days after a U.S. airstrike killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani inside Iraq, dramatically increasing regional tensions.

The Iraqi resolution specifically calls for ending an agreement in which Washington sent troops to Iraq more than four years ago to help in the fight against the Islamic State group.

The resolution was backed by most Shiite members of parliament, who hold a majority of seats.

Many Sunni and Kurdish legislators did not show up for the session, apparently because they oppose abolishing the deal.

___

4:20 p.m.

The leader of Lebanon’s Hezbollah group says America’s military in the Middle East region, including U.S. bases, warships and soldiers are fair targets following the U.S. killing of Iran’s top general.

Hassan Nasrallah says evicting U.S. military forces from the region is now a priority.

The U.S. military, which recently killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani “will pay the price,” he added in a speech Sunday.

“The suicide attackers who forced the Americans to leave from our region in the past are still here and their numbers have increased,” Nasrallah added.

___

4:10 p.m.

Pope Francis is calling for dialogue and self-restraint in his first public comments amid soaring tensions between the U.S. and Iran, after a U.S. airstrike killed Iran’s top general in Iraq.

During his Sunday noon blessing, Francis warned: “War brings only death and destruction.” He led the tens of thousands of faithful gathered in St. Peter’s Square in a silent prayer for peace.

Speaking off the cuff, Francis said: “I call on all side to keep alive the flame of dialogue and self-control, and to avoid the shadows of enmity.”

Francis had hoped to visit Iraq this year to minister to the Christian minorities that have been targeted by the Islamic State group. Vatican officials and local Catholic bishops in Iraq have voiced concern about the impact of any new conflict on the weakest and most marginal in Iraq.

___

3:55 p.m.

Iraq’s parliament has begun an emergency session and will likely vote on a resolution requiring the government to ask foreign forces to leave Iraq. 

The resolution specifically calls for ending an agreement in which Washington sent troops to Iraq more than four years ago to help in the fight against the Islamic State group.

The resolution is backed by most Shiite members of parliament, who hold a majority of seats.

The request was put forward Sunday by the largest bloc in the legislature, known as Fatah. That bloc includes leaders associated with the Iran-backed paramilitary Popular Mobilization Units, which were a major force in the fight against IS.

Many Sunni and Kurdish legislators did not show up for the session, apparently because they oppose abolishing the deal.

At the start of the session, 180 legislators of the 329-member parliament were present.

3:40 p.m.

The leader of Lebanon’s Hezbollah group says the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general puts the entire region at the beginning of a “completely new phase.”

Speaking before thousands of supports at a rally in southern Beirut, Hassan Nasrallah has called the killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani a “clear, blatant crime” that will transform the Middle East.

Sunday’s comments were his first public statements since Soleimani was killed by a U.S. airstrike in Iraq Friday.

The Shiite militant group is Iran’s key proxy and most successful military export. Nasrallah, who has been in hiding fearing Israeli assassination since 2006, spoke to supporters through a large screen via satellite link.

__

2:10 p.m.

The daughter of Iran’s Gen. Qassem Soleimani says the death of her father will “not break us” and the United States should know that his blood will not go for free.

Zeinab Soleimani told Lebanon’s Al-Manar TV — which is linked with the Iran-backed Hezbollah group — that the “filthy” President Donald Trump will not be able to wipe out the achievements of the slain Iranian leader.

In the short interview aired Sunday, Zeinab Soleimani said Trump is not courageous because her father was targeted by missiles from afar and the U.S. president should have “stood face to face in front of him.”

The young woman, who spoke in Farsi with Arabic voice over, said that she knows that Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah will avenge the death of her father.

___

2:00 p.m.

The U.S. has warned American citizens in Saudi Arabia “of the heightened risk of missile and drone attacks” amid soaring tensions with Iran.

A security alert message sent Sunday by the U.S. mission there said that in the past “regional actors hostile to Saudi Arabia have conducted missile and drone attacks against both civilian and military targets inside the kingdom.”

It warned that U.S. citizens living and working near military bases, oil and gas facilities and other critical civilian infrastructure are at heightened risk of attack, particularly in the Eastern Province where the oil giant Aramco is headquartered and areas near the border with Yemen.

___

1:55 p.m.

Britain’s foreign minister says it is trying to “de-escalate” a volatile situation after a U.S. drone strike killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said on Sunday in an interview with broadcaster Sky News that Soleimani “was a regional menace.”

Raab added that the UK understood the U.S.’s “position” and “right to exercise self-defense.”

But Raab said the UK was discussing with top officials in the U.S. and Europe, as well as Iran and Iraq, about how to avoid a war, which he said wouldn’t be in anyone’s interests. Britain’s Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said late Saturday that he had ordered two British Navy warships, the HMS Montrose frigate and the HMS Defender destroyer, to return to the Strait of Hormuz amid the soaring regional tensions.

___

1:40 p.m.

Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman says that officials in the Islamic Republic plan to meet Sunday night to discuss their next step out of the nuclear deal and that it will be even bigger than initially planned.

Abbas Mousavi made the comment Sunday during a briefing with journalists after a U.S. airstrike killed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Mousavi said the step would be greater than planned as “in the world of politics, all developments are interconnected.”

If taken, it would be the fifth step to break terms of Tehran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, which saw Iran limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions.

Mousavi did not elaborate on what that step could be. Iran previously has broken limits of its enrichment, its stockpiles and its centrifuges, as well as restarted enrichment at an underground facility.

___

12:15 p.m.

Major stock markets in the Middle East are trading down on fears of a conflict between Iran and the U.S. after an American drone strike killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

The Boursa Kuwait closed down 4%. The Dubai Financial Market closed down just over 3%. Riyadh’s Tadawul was down over 2% as trading continued. The Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange fell 1.42%.

Egypt’s stock exchange also fell 4%.

Meanwhile, oil prices continued to rise. Brent crude traded up 3.5% to $68.60 a barrel.

The U.S. killed Soleimani on Friday. Early Sunday, as Iran threatened “harsh retaliation,” President Donald Trump tweeted the U.S. was prepared to strike 52 sites in the Islamic Republic if any Americans are harmed.

___

11:50 a.m.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says President Donald Trump is “worthy of all appreciation” for ordering the killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Netanyahu told his Cabinet Sunday that Soleimani “initiated, planned and carried out many terror attacks” in the Middle East and beyond. Israel has long accused Soleimani of being the mastermind of Iran’s belligerency in the region.

Netanyahu said Israel stood alongside the United States in its current campaign against Iran.

Netanyahu has been among the strongest voices against Iran’s Islamic rulers in recent years. The Israeli leader pushed hard against the nuclear deal Western powers signed with Tehran in 2015 and which Trump later reversed.

The United States killed Soleimani in a drone airstrike at Baghdad’s international airport early Friday. The Iranian commander was widely seen as the architect of Tehran’s proxy wars in the Middle East.

___

11:45 a.m.

The deputy leader of Lebanon’s militant Hezbollah group says the United States carried out a “very stupid act” by killing Iran’s Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Sheikh Naim Kassem made his comments on Sunday after paying a visit to the Iranian embassy in Beirut where he paid condolences. He said the attack will make Tehran and its allies stronger.

Kassem told reporters “now we have more responsibilities” adding that the United States will discover that “its calculations” were wrong.

Heazbollah is a close ally of Iran’s and considered part of a regional Iranian-backed alliance of proxy militias.

___

11:40 a.m.

Iranian officials are criticizing President Donald Trump’s threats to target sites important to Iran’s culture.

Trump threatened Iranian cultural sites would be hit fast and hard if Tehran attacks U.S. assets to avenge the killing of a powerful Iranian general.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif wrote on Twitter Sunday that after committing “grave breaches” in the killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, Trump is threatening new breaches of international law.

Zarif wrote: “Targeting cultural sites is a WAR CRIME.”

Telecommunications minister Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi compared Trump’s threats to the Islamic State group, Adolf Hitler and Genghis Khan.

“They all hate cultures. Trump is a ‘terrorist in a suit’,” Jahromi wrote on Twitter, warning that nobody can defeat Iran.

___

11:30 a.m.

Iraq’s Iran-backed militias say that some remains of the Iranian top general and Iraqi militant leader killed in the U.S. drone strike in Iraq were sent to Iran for DNA tests to identify their corpses.

The Popular Mobilization Forces said in a statement Sunday that the bodies of the two commanders as well as an Iraqi bodyguard were torn to pieces and mangled by the explosion of the American missiles near Baghdad’s international airport.

It said the test will take few days after which the remains of the Iraqi commander, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, will be brought back to Iraq for burial in the holy Shiite city of Najaf.

Al-Muhandis was closely allied with Iran for decades.

Iran has declared three days of public mourning over Gen. Qassem Soleimani’s death in the U.S. attack.

___

6:45 a.m.

The body of a top Iranian commander, who was killed in a U.S. drone strike, has arrived in Iran as the crisis between the two countries escalates.

Throngs of mourners carried Sunday the flag-draped casket of Gen. Qassem Soleimani off a plane in Ahvaz in southwestern Iran.

The U.S. drone strike targeting Soleimani in Iraq Friday also killed a leader of an Iran-backed Iraqi militia, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.

President Donald Trump threatened to bomb 52 sites in Iran if it retaliates by attacking Americans.

The tensions take root in Trump pulling out of Iran’s nuclear deal with world powers. That accord soon likely will further unravel as Tehran is expected to announce as soon as Sunday another set of atomic limits the country will break.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Patriots’ Bill Belichick takes issue with question about fan base going through ‘thick and thin’

Westlake Legal Group Bill-Belichick3 Patriots' Bill Belichick takes issue with question about fan base going through 'thick and thin' Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc cc87cae6-0a7f-5550-a976-9f9a0e97ef3c article

New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick appeared to take issue with a question about the team’s fan base Saturday night after a playoff loss to the Tennessee Titans.

Belichick was asked whether he had a message for fans who have been with the team through “thick and thin,” according to NESN. Belichick had a problem with the “thin” part of the question.

TOM BRADY DISMISSES RETIREMENT TALK AFTER PLAYOFF LOSS, ADMITS HE’S UNSURE OF FUTURE

“We appreciate our fans,” he replied. “I wouldn’t say it’s been all that thin around here, personally. Maybe you feel differently, but I haven’t heard too many fans say that. Of course we appreciate our fans. We have a great relationship with them, they’re here for us and we always try to perform our best so they can be proud of the way we perform.”

Belichick may have a point in this regard.

TITANS OUST TOM BRADY AND PATRIOTS 20-13, ADVANCE TO NEXT ROUND OF NFL POSTSEASON

He took over the team prior to the start of the 2000 season after spurning the New York Jets. The Patriots went 5-11 that first year but haven’t had a losing season since.

New England has won six Super Bowls and nine AFC championships with Belichick at the helm and Tom Brady as the quarterback. New England has not won fewer than 10 games since 2002, when they were 9-7.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Belichick and Brady have built one of the greatest dynasties throughout sports. The Patriots and their fans haven’t really experienced so-called “thin” times compared to the likes of teams that have been at the bottom of the barrel for years.

Westlake Legal Group Bill-Belichick3 Patriots' Bill Belichick takes issue with question about fan base going through 'thick and thin' Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc cc87cae6-0a7f-5550-a976-9f9a0e97ef3c article   Westlake Legal Group Bill-Belichick3 Patriots' Bill Belichick takes issue with question about fan base going through 'thick and thin' Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc cc87cae6-0a7f-5550-a976-9f9a0e97ef3c article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iraqi Parliament Votes To Remove US Troops

Westlake Legal Group 5e11fd662500003b1998fc9d Iraqi Parliament Votes To Remove US Troops

BEIRUT (AP) — The latest on U.S.-Iran tensions (all times local):

4:45 p.m.

Iraq’s parliament has voted to expel the U.S. military from the country.

Lawmakers voted Sunday in favor of a resolution that calls for ending foreign military presence in the country. The resolution’s main aim is to get the U.S. to withdraw some 5,000 U.S. troops present in different parts of Iraq.

The vote comes two days after a U.S. airstrike killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani inside Iraq, dramatically increasing regional tensions.

The Iraqi resolution specifically calls for ending an agreement in which Washington sent troops to Iraq more than four years ago to help in the fight against the Islamic State group.

The resolution was backed by most Shiite members of parliament, who hold a majority of seats.

Many Sunni and Kurdish legislators did not show up for the session, apparently because they oppose abolishing the deal.

___

4:20 p.m.

The leader of Lebanon’s Hezbollah group says America’s military in the Middle East region, including U.S. bases, warships and soldiers are fair targets following the U.S. killing of Iran’s top general.

Hassan Nasrallah says evicting U.S. military forces from the region is now a priority.

The U.S. military, which recently killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani “will pay the price,” he added in a speech Sunday.

“The suicide attackers who forced the Americans to leave from our region in the past are still here and their numbers have increased,” Nasrallah added.

___

4:10 p.m.

Pope Francis is calling for dialogue and self-restraint in his first public comments amid soaring tensions between the U.S. and Iran, after a U.S. airstrike killed Iran’s top general in Iraq.

During his Sunday noon blessing, Francis warned: “War brings only death and destruction.” He led the tens of thousands of faithful gathered in St. Peter’s Square in a silent prayer for peace.

Speaking off the cuff, Francis said: “I call on all side to keep alive the flame of dialogue and self-control, and to avoid the shadows of enmity.”

Francis had hoped to visit Iraq this year to minister to the Christian minorities that have been targeted by the Islamic State group. Vatican officials and local Catholic bishops in Iraq have voiced concern about the impact of any new conflict on the weakest and most marginal in Iraq.

___

3:55 p.m.

Iraq’s parliament has begun an emergency session and will likely vote on a resolution requiring the government to ask foreign forces to leave Iraq. 

The resolution specifically calls for ending an agreement in which Washington sent troops to Iraq more than four years ago to help in the fight against the Islamic State group.

The resolution is backed by most Shiite members of parliament, who hold a majority of seats.

The request was put forward Sunday by the largest bloc in the legislature, known as Fatah. That bloc includes leaders associated with the Iran-backed paramilitary Popular Mobilization Units, which were a major force in the fight against IS.

Many Sunni and Kurdish legislators did not show up for the session, apparently because they oppose abolishing the deal.

At the start of the session, 180 legislators of the 329-member parliament were present.

3:40 p.m.

The leader of Lebanon’s Hezbollah group says the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general puts the entire region at the beginning of a “completely new phase.”

Speaking before thousands of supports at a rally in southern Beirut, Hassan Nasrallah has called the killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani a “clear, blatant crime” that will transform the Middle East.

Sunday’s comments were his first public statements since Soleimani was killed by a U.S. airstrike in Iraq Friday.

The Shiite militant group is Iran’s key proxy and most successful military export. Nasrallah, who has been in hiding fearing Israeli assassination since 2006, spoke to supporters through a large screen via satellite link.

__

2:10 p.m.

The daughter of Iran’s Gen. Qassem Soleimani says the death of her father will “not break us” and the United States should know that his blood will not go for free.

Zeinab Soleimani told Lebanon’s Al-Manar TV — which is linked with the Iran-backed Hezbollah group — that the “filthy” President Donald Trump will not be able to wipe out the achievements of the slain Iranian leader.

In the short interview aired Sunday, Zeinab Soleimani said Trump is not courageous because her father was targeted by missiles from afar and the U.S. president should have “stood face to face in front of him.”

The young woman, who spoke in Farsi with Arabic voice over, said that she knows that Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah will avenge the death of her father.

___

2:00 p.m.

The U.S. has warned American citizens in Saudi Arabia “of the heightened risk of missile and drone attacks” amid soaring tensions with Iran.

A security alert message sent Sunday by the U.S. mission there said that in the past “regional actors hostile to Saudi Arabia have conducted missile and drone attacks against both civilian and military targets inside the kingdom.”

It warned that U.S. citizens living and working near military bases, oil and gas facilities and other critical civilian infrastructure are at heightened risk of attack, particularly in the Eastern Province where the oil giant Aramco is headquartered and areas near the border with Yemen.

___

1:55 p.m.

Britain’s foreign minister says it is trying to “de-escalate” a volatile situation after a U.S. drone strike killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said on Sunday in an interview with broadcaster Sky News that Soleimani “was a regional menace.”

Raab added that the UK understood the U.S.’s “position” and “right to exercise self-defense.”

But Raab said the UK was discussing with top officials in the U.S. and Europe, as well as Iran and Iraq, about how to avoid a war, which he said wouldn’t be in anyone’s interests. Britain’s Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said late Saturday that he had ordered two British Navy warships, the HMS Montrose frigate and the HMS Defender destroyer, to return to the Strait of Hormuz amid the soaring regional tensions.

___

1:40 p.m.

Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman says that officials in the Islamic Republic plan to meet Sunday night to discuss their next step out of the nuclear deal and that it will be even bigger than initially planned.

Abbas Mousavi made the comment Sunday during a briefing with journalists after a U.S. airstrike killed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Mousavi said the step would be greater than planned as “in the world of politics, all developments are interconnected.”

If taken, it would be the fifth step to break terms of Tehran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers, which saw Iran limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions.

Mousavi did not elaborate on what that step could be. Iran previously has broken limits of its enrichment, its stockpiles and its centrifuges, as well as restarted enrichment at an underground facility.

___

12:15 p.m.

Major stock markets in the Middle East are trading down on fears of a conflict between Iran and the U.S. after an American drone strike killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

The Boursa Kuwait closed down 4%. The Dubai Financial Market closed down just over 3%. Riyadh’s Tadawul was down over 2% as trading continued. The Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange fell 1.42%.

Egypt’s stock exchange also fell 4%.

Meanwhile, oil prices continued to rise. Brent crude traded up 3.5% to $68.60 a barrel.

The U.S. killed Soleimani on Friday. Early Sunday, as Iran threatened “harsh retaliation,” President Donald Trump tweeted the U.S. was prepared to strike 52 sites in the Islamic Republic if any Americans are harmed.

___

11:50 a.m.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says President Donald Trump is “worthy of all appreciation” for ordering the killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Netanyahu told his Cabinet Sunday that Soleimani “initiated, planned and carried out many terror attacks” in the Middle East and beyond. Israel has long accused Soleimani of being the mastermind of Iran’s belligerency in the region.

Netanyahu said Israel stood alongside the United States in its current campaign against Iran.

Netanyahu has been among the strongest voices against Iran’s Islamic rulers in recent years. The Israeli leader pushed hard against the nuclear deal Western powers signed with Tehran in 2015 and which Trump later reversed.

The United States killed Soleimani in a drone airstrike at Baghdad’s international airport early Friday. The Iranian commander was widely seen as the architect of Tehran’s proxy wars in the Middle East.

___

11:45 a.m.

The deputy leader of Lebanon’s militant Hezbollah group says the United States carried out a “very stupid act” by killing Iran’s Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

Sheikh Naim Kassem made his comments on Sunday after paying a visit to the Iranian embassy in Beirut where he paid condolences. He said the attack will make Tehran and its allies stronger.

Kassem told reporters “now we have more responsibilities” adding that the United States will discover that “its calculations” were wrong.

Heazbollah is a close ally of Iran’s and considered part of a regional Iranian-backed alliance of proxy militias.

___

11:40 a.m.

Iranian officials are criticizing President Donald Trump’s threats to target sites important to Iran’s culture.

Trump threatened Iranian cultural sites would be hit fast and hard if Tehran attacks U.S. assets to avenge the killing of a powerful Iranian general.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif wrote on Twitter Sunday that after committing “grave breaches” in the killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, Trump is threatening new breaches of international law.

Zarif wrote: “Targeting cultural sites is a WAR CRIME.”

Telecommunications minister Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi compared Trump’s threats to the Islamic State group, Adolf Hitler and Genghis Khan.

“They all hate cultures. Trump is a ‘terrorist in a suit’,” Jahromi wrote on Twitter, warning that nobody can defeat Iran.

___

11:30 a.m.

Iraq’s Iran-backed militias say that some remains of the Iranian top general and Iraqi militant leader killed in the U.S. drone strike in Iraq were sent to Iran for DNA tests to identify their corpses.

The Popular Mobilization Forces said in a statement Sunday that the bodies of the two commanders as well as an Iraqi bodyguard were torn to pieces and mangled by the explosion of the American missiles near Baghdad’s international airport.

It said the test will take few days after which the remains of the Iraqi commander, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, will be brought back to Iraq for burial in the holy Shiite city of Najaf.

Al-Muhandis was closely allied with Iran for decades.

Iran has declared three days of public mourning over Gen. Qassem Soleimani’s death in the U.S. attack.

___

6:45 a.m.

The body of a top Iranian commander, who was killed in a U.S. drone strike, has arrived in Iran as the crisis between the two countries escalates.

Throngs of mourners carried Sunday the flag-draped casket of Gen. Qassem Soleimani off a plane in Ahvaz in southwestern Iran.

The U.S. drone strike targeting Soleimani in Iraq Friday also killed a leader of an Iran-backed Iraqi militia, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.

President Donald Trump threatened to bomb 52 sites in Iran if it retaliates by attacking Americans.

The tensions take root in Trump pulling out of Iran’s nuclear deal with world powers. That accord soon likely will further unravel as Tehran is expected to announce as soon as Sunday another set of atomic limits the country will break.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iraqi Parliament Votes to Expel All American Troops and Submit UN Complaint Against US for Violation of Sovereignty. “What happened was a political assassination. Iraq cannot accept this.”

Westlake Legal Group IZXOGsKXD89GSexoaOM2QGKI3pwKz2e6nkJYYoUuBgc Iraqi Parliament Votes to Expel All American Troops and Submit UN Complaint Against US for Violation of Sovereignty. "What happened was a political assassination. Iraq cannot accept this." r/politics

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Iraqi Lawmakers Vote to Expel U.S. Troops as Iran Mourns a Slain General

Westlake Legal Group 05Iran-iraq1-facebookJumbo Iraqi Lawmakers Vote to Expel U.S. Troops as Iran Mourns a Slain General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Suleimani, Qassim Iraq Iran Funerals and Memorials Europe Defense and Military Forces

BAGHDAD — Lawmakers in Iraq heeded the demands of angry citizens and voted on Sunday to expel United States troops from the country, as hundreds of thousands of mourners poured into the streets of Iran to pay their respects to the slain leader of the elite Quds Force, Maj. General Qassim Suleimani.

The vote is not final until Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi signs the draft bill. Earlier on Sunday, however, Mr. Mahdi indicated that he would do so, having urged lawmakers to oust the United States-led coalition after President Trump ordered a fatal drone strike against General Suleimani in Baghdad.

Members of Iraq’s Parliament were divided on the demands to expel American troops from the country. While factions that grew out of Shiite militia organizations have pushed hard for the expulsion, Sunni Muslim factions and the Kurds want the United States to stay.

The vote was 170-0 in Parliament, but many of its 328 members, primarily Kurds and Sunnis, did not attend the session and did not vote.

American troops are in Iraq “at the invitation” of the Iraqi government, according to the legal agreement between Baghdad and Washington. Presumably, if Baghdad withdrew that invitation, the United States would have to withdraw.

The body of General Suleimani, the most powerful figure in Iran after the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, was brought back early Sunday from Iraq, where he was killed on Friday near the Baghdad airport. Among the others killed in the attack was Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the deputy head of the Iraqi Popular Mobilization Forces, which includes at least half a dozen pro-Iranian militias.

The general’s killing unleashed calls for vengeance in both Iraq and Iran, and reinforced a general solidarity among hard-liners and moderates in Iran against the United States. In Iraq, the attack was seen as a violation of the nation’s sovereignty. On Sunday, Iraq’s Foreign Ministry said it had summoned the American ambassador in Baghdad.

In Iran, it was viewed as tantamount to an act of war. Hossein Dehghan, a military adviser to Mr. Khamenei, told CNN that Iran’s response would include an attack on “U.S. military targets.”

As the Middle East braced for Iranian retaliation, which analysts said was all but inevitable and American officials said they expected within weeks, Tehran and Washington ratcheted up the rhetoric.

Members of Iran’s Parliament chanted, “Death to America!” en masse in the chamber on Sunday in protest over General Suleimani’s killing, television footage showed.

The chants came as President Trump, who ordered the drone strike, fired off a series of Twitter ripostes to the growing anger, including that the United States had pinpointed 52 targets in Iran, including cultural sites, if there were any retaliation for the killing. He said the sites represented the 52 Americans hostages “taken by Iran many years ago” at the United States Embassy.

That led Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, to respond on Twitter that “targeting cultural sites is a war crime.” He said that the “end of U.S. malign presence in West Asia has begun.”

Iran summoned the Swiss envoy representing American interests in Tehran on Sunday to protest Mr. Trump’s threat that Washington would target Iranian sites. And Mr. Trump’s tweet became a rallying car among Iranians sharing it widely on social media and phone applications with the message, “Attend the funeral for our cultural heritage.”

Iran’s information and telecommunications minister, Mohammad Javad Azari-Jahromi, tweeted on Sunday that Mr. Trump was “a terrorist in a suit.”

“Like ISIS, Like Hitler, Like Genghis! They all hate cultures. Trump is a terrorist in a suit. He will learn history very soon that NOBODY can defeat ‘the Great Iranian Nation & Culture,’” Mr. Jahromi wrote.

The drone attack left America’s European allies scrambling to address the safety of their troops in the Middle East and complaining that they had been given no warning about the strike. But European leaders also called for de-escalation between Iran and the United States.

The European Union’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell, invited Mr. Zarif to Brussels for talks. Mr. Borrell said in a statement that he had spoken to Iran’s foreign minister, urging “Iran to exercise restraint and carefully consider any reaction to avoid further escalation, which harms the entire region and its people.”

Germany’s foreign minister, Heiko Maas, said he would seek direct talks with Iran after the American killing of General Suleimani. Europe wants to continue the fight against the Islamic State, Mr. Maas said, and Germany is anxious about the safety of its troops training Iraqi fighters against the Islamic State militants.

The European outreach came as the United States and its NATO allies suspended training Iraqi forces for security reasons after the killing of General Suleimani.

Germany’s defense minister, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, said in a statement: “Iraq cannot be allowed to sink into chaos, and certainly not under the control of extremists. Therefore, it is important not to let up now in the fight against Islamic State.”

In general, the Europeans did not specifically criticize Mr. Trump for his decision, and generally share the American view that Iran has been a destabilizing force in the Middle East and a supporter of terrorism. At the same time, no European government praised the killing of General Suleimani, emphasizing instead the increased risks to their citizens, troops and interests.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain was reported to be angry with Mr. Trump for not informing him or other allies with troops in Iraq about the decision to kill General Suleimani. While carried out by the Americans, the killing is thought to have put all European citizens and troops in Iraq and the wider region at heightened risk.

Mr. Johnson, who was said to be returning early from a vacation in the Caribbean, is expected to discuss the issues with Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, President Emmanuel Macron of France and Mr. Trump in the next few days, a Downing Street spokeswoman said.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo complained that the response by European allies had not been “helpful.” He told Fox News in an interview: “Frankly, the Europeans haven’t been as helpful as I wish that they could be. The Brits, the French, the Germans all need to understand that what we did, what the Americans did, saved lives in Europe as well.”

Dominic Raab, Britain’s foreign minister, who is scheduled to travel to Washington this week to meet Mr. Pompeo, said any country had a right to defend itself.

Asked in an interview with the BBC whether the killing was legal, Mr. Raab said, “There is a right of self-defense.” He said he did not agree that the killing was an act of war, and described General Suleimani to Sky News, another British broadcaster, as a “regional menace.”

But Mr. Raab also said that he had spoken to Iraq’s prime minister and president to urge a de-escalation of tensions in the region, and that he planned to speak to Iran’s foreign minister.

In particular, the Europeans are trying to persuade Iran to keep to the 2015 nuclear deal, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, which Mr. Trump pulled the United States out of in May 2018, reimposing harsh economic sanctions on Tehran. Since then, Iran has slowly abandoned its adherence to parts of the deal.

On Sunday, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, Abbas Mousavi, said Iran was ready to decide its next step to further roll back its commitments to the deal. The National Security Council would hold an emergency meeting Sunday evening to make a final decision about the nuclear deal, he said.

“There will be an important meeting tonight about decreasing our commitments in J.C.P.O.A., taking the fifth step and making a final decision,” Mr. Mousavi said, according to the state news agency IRNA, using the acronym for the nuclear deal.

The Europeans are also working to keep the Strait of Hormuz open to shipping. About one-third of the world’s oil tankers use the waterway, which Iran has intermittently threatened to close. Last July, Iranian forces boarded and seized a British-flagged tanker in the Strait, trying to pressure the world to allow its oil exports despite American sanctions.

On Saturday, Britain’s defense minister, Ben Wallace, said he had ordered the country’s Navy to accompany all British-flagged ships through the Strait of Hormuz.

France has also stepped up diplomatic initiatives to ease tensions. Mr. Macron spoke to President Barham Salih of Iraq and the de facto ruler of the United Arab Emirates, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed of Abu Dhabi.

Even as the Europeans scrambled on several fronts, the coffin of General Suleimani arrived in Ahvaz, in southwestern Iran, which has a significant ethnic Arab population. The region has not always supported the government, and many citizens joined the recent protests against the regime. But they are united in their support for General Suleimani, a figure they viewed as larger than life.

Amir, a 35-year-old businessman and resident of Ahvaz who asked that his last name not be used for security reasons, attended the funeral and said that although he did not support Iran’s government, General Suleimani’s killing had touched a nationalist nerve.

“The attack really wounded and insulted the national pride of Iranians,” he said. “I went to show my solidarity and to say no to war with Iran.”

After Ahvaz, the general’s body will be flown to Mashhad, a major religious center for Shiites in northeastern Iran. It will then be taken to Tehran, where a highway was named after General Suleimani on Sunday. A state funeral will be held on Monday. He will be buried in his hometown, Kerman, on Tuesday.

The body of Mr. al-Muhandis is with the general’s, but it is not clear whether he will also be buried in Iran or if his body will return to Najaf, Iraq, where almost all Iraqi Shiites are buried. Mr. al-Muhandis married an Iranian and became an Iranian citizen.

Also Sunday, Kataib Hezbollah, the armed group arguably closest to Iran, warned Iraqi troops on bases that also house United States troops that they should stay at least 3,000 feet from American counterparts starting on Sunday evening, and not allow themselves to be used as human shields.

Alissa J. Rubin reported from Baghdad, Steven Erlanger from Brussels, and Farnaz Fassihi from New York.

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Patriots’ Bill Belichick takes issue with question about fan base going through ‘thick and thin’

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New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick appeared to take issue with a question about the team’s fan base Saturday night after a playoff loss to the Tennessee Titans.

Belichick was asked whether he had a message for fans who have been with the team through “thick and thin,” according to NESN. Belichick had a problem with the “thin” part of the question.

TOM BRADY DISMISSES RETIREMENT TALK AFTER PLAYOFF LOSS, ADMITS HE’S UNSURE OF FUTURE

“We appreciate our fans,” he replied. “I wouldn’t say it’s been all that thin around here, personally. Maybe you feel differently, but I haven’t heard too many fans say that. Of course we appreciate our fans. We have a great relationship with them, they’re here for us and we always try to perform our best so they can be proud of the way we perform.”

Belichick may have a point in this regard.

TITANS OUST TOM BRADY AND PATRIOTS 20-13, ADVANCE TO NEXT ROUND OF NFL POSTSEASON

He took over the team prior to the start of the 2000 season after spurning the New York Jets. The Patriots went 5-11 that first year but haven’t had a losing season since.

New England has won six Super Bowls and nine AFC championships with Belichick at the helm and Tom Brady as the quarterback. New England has not won fewer than 10 games since 2002, when they were 9-7.

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Belichick and Brady have built one of the greatest dynasties throughout sports. The Patriots and their fans haven’t really experienced so-called “thin” times compared to the likes of teams that have been at the bottom of the barrel for years.

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Raphael Cohen: Baghdad siege wasn’t Benghazi, and never will be — here’s how the embassy attacks differ

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The siege of the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad is over at least for the moment. The militia has withdrawn and while the Middle East awaits what comes next, especially after the United States’ strike on Qods Force Gen. Qasem Solem Solemaini, the narrative surrounding the attack on the embassy is already forming.

President Donald Trump tweeted, “The Anti-Benghazi!” a reference to the 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic outpost in Benghazi, Libya, that claimed the lives of four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens. And Trump is not alone in making the Benghazi analogy. Multiple media outlets from across the political spectrum have made the comparison.

On a superficial level, the comparison holds — both are American diplomatic outposts in the Arab world attacked by angry throngs — and both are rife with symbolic significance.

BRIAN JENKINS: ALL-OUT US-IRAN WAR IS UNLIKELY – BUT LOW-LEVEL WAR EXPECTED TO CONTINUE

For the president and his supporters, the analogy highlights a success. Benghazi ended in disaster whereas Baghdad proved successful, thanks to a timely and robust American military response to reinforce a post under siege. To the president’s critics, the analogy has the opposite connotation — yet another data point proving that American Middle East policy has failed. Both sides, however, arguably miss the point:

Baghdad would never have been, nor will it ever be another Benghazi.

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For starters, there is the matter of size and scale. Benghazi was not a full-fledged embassy. It was a relatively small post comprised of a Temporary Mission Facility and Annex a mile away, with only a few dozen Americans present at the time of the attack in October 2012. By contrast, the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad is one of the largest embassies in the world, home at one point to 16,000 employees (although considerably smaller today) in a sprawling $750 million compound almost the size Vatican City.

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Then, there was a question of the adversary. The mob that attacked Benghazi was a mixture of diverse jihadi and militia groups. By contrast, the crowd that attacked the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad was from news accounts more unified and in some ways more formidable, linked to Iranian-sponsored militia Khaitab Hezbollah and other pro-Iranian factions. Indeed, the very fact that the crowd responded to an order to withdraw indicates that this was more than a mob. The clash outside of the embassy in Baghdad then was not just a terrorist attack, but a battle in a much larger proxy war playing out between the United States and Iran.

The overarching political contexts are also different. After the fall of Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi, Libya lacked a central authority capable of governing the country. Consequently, by the time of the Benghazi attacks, the United States could not expect much from Libya. Iraq has been an American “strategic” partner, with a coherent, albeit weak, government  since the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003 and the signature of the U.S. Iraq Strategic Framework Agreement in 2008. In Iraq, the United States would have expected more from the government to safeguard its diplomats. Iraq’s failure to do so may prove more consequential for the United States’ fight against terrorism, efforts to contain Iran and the United States’ reputation abroad.

Then there is the strategic context. The Obama administration was never fully invested in Libya. Despite its oil reserves, the country arguably was a relative strategic backwater. American military involvement consequently was half-hearted. It was, after all, characterized as the unfortunately phrased “leading from behind” strategy, where the United States would push its allies to do more by staying in the background.

Given the heightened tension between the United States and Iran and the ongoing instability in Iraq, the U.S. Embassy may very well be attacked again. In all likelihood, such an attack would fail.

By contrast, the United States is more invested in Iraq. Not only does the country have energy resources, but it also lies at the political, cultural and strategic heart of the Middle East.  It has played a defining role in American foreign policy for decades. Every American president since George H.W. Bush has sent American service members to fight in and over the country. Hundreds of thousands of Americans have served in the country and thousands sacrificed their lives there. And while both the Obama and Trump administrations have tried to leave Iraq, both have found themselves drawn back because American interests combating the so-called Islamic state dictated it.

Finally and most importantly, the Benghazi and Baghdad attacks differ on what comes next. After the Benghazi attack, the Obama administration could largely walk away from Libya. While the United States eventually apprehended and convicted some of the key perpetrators of the Benghazi attack, the U.S. engagement in the country remained relatively limited. In 2014, the United States even shut down its embassy in Tripoli when militias closed in on the Libyan capital.

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The United States cannot extricate from Iraq as it did Libya for some of the same reasons mentioned above. It is too big, too important, and has too much-shared history for the United States to simply pack up and leave cleanly and without jeopardizing its interests in combating terrorism and containing Iran, not to mention losing face.

Given the heightened tension between the United States and Iran and the ongoing instability in Iraq, the U.S. Embassy may very well be attacked again. In all likelihood, such an attack would fail. If for lack of the United States’ will, the strength of Iranian proxies or a combination of the two, such an attack did succeed, then the United States would be facing a strategic situation far more grim than Libya. If any historical analogy would be appropriate, it would have been more akin to the fall U.S. Embassy in Saigon than the U.S. mission in Benghazi.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119402470001_6119402798001-vs Raphael Cohen: Baghdad siege wasn't Benghazi, and never will be — here's how the embassy attacks differ Raphael Cohen fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c4075be9-a28e-574f-8450-40ae83991ffd article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119402470001_6119402798001-vs Raphael Cohen: Baghdad siege wasn't Benghazi, and never will be — here's how the embassy attacks differ Raphael Cohen fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc c4075be9-a28e-574f-8450-40ae83991ffd article

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Japan Defends Its Justice System After Carlos Ghosn’s Flight

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TOKYO — Japanese officials on Sunday defended the country’s justice system as fair and open and condemned Carlos Ghosn’s flight from criminal charges there, as its courts are put under a global spotlight for their treatment of suspects and a near-perfect conviction record by prosecutors.

In a statement issued near the end of the country’s weeklong New Year’s holiday, Masako Mori, Japan’s justice minister, said officials would investigate how Mr. Ghosn, the former automotive executive, fled the country last week. She said Japanese officials would tighten the processes through which people leave the country, though she disclosed no details.

“Since no record has been found that he left Japan, he may have left the country using illegal measures,” Ms. Mori said in the statement. “It’s truly regrettable.”

Takahiro Saito, deputy chief prosecutor for the city of Tokyo, said in a separate statement on Sunday that Mr. Ghosn “broke his own word” by jumping bail and leaving Japan.

Mr. Saito said Mr. Ghosn, who faces criminal charges of financial wrongdoing, would have received a fair and open trial, responding to Mr. Ghosn’s intense criticism of the country’s justice system.

“The act can never be justified,” Mr. Saito said.

The comments were the first public response by Japan’s government since Mr. Ghosn escaped to Lebanon early last week. Mr. Ghosn, the former chief of Nissan, the Japanese automaker, has long maintained his innocence, saying that he was set up by underlings who worried that he would essentially combine one of the crown jewels of Japan’s auto industry with its French partner, Renault.

Exactly how Mr. Ghosn eluded the Japanese authorities remained a mystery. Local news outlets have reported that surveillance cameras showed him leaving his rental home in a well-to-do neighborhood in central Tokyo by himself on Dec. 29. After that, media reports have said, he boarded a private jet in Osaka and flew to Istanbul, where he took a second plane and flew to Beirut.

The New York Times, citing a person familiar with the matter, reported on Friday that Mr. Ghosn was accompanied out of Japan by an American security consultant named Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret. Turkish news outlets have reported that Mr. Taylor and another American were the only people listed as passengers on a manifest for the flight that carried Mr. Ghosn from Japan to Turkey.

In Beirut, the Japanese government has begun discussing Mr. Ghosn’s escape with Lebanese officials. On Friday, its ambassador met with Lebanon’s minister for presidential affairs, according to the state-run National News Agency, and discussed “the ramifications” of Japan’s formal request through Interpol, known as a red notice, for help apprehending the former executive.

No details were released, and both sides agreed to maintain contact, the report said. Lebanon has insisted that it played no role in Mr. Ghosn’s escape.

Mr. Ghosn’s dramatic escape from Japan has put the country’s legal system itself on trial, at least in the realm of public opinion. “I have not fled justice,” he said in a statement last week. “I have escaped injustice and political persecution.”

Japanese defense attorneys have long complained that the system is stacked against them. Prosecutors win 99 percent of their cases. They enjoy broad powers to interview suspects without the presence of their lawyers. And many legal experts say the system depends too much on confessions extracted under heavy pressure.

In that environment, Mr. Ghosn’s case presented a quandary for prosecutors, said Steven Davidoff Solomon, a professor at the University of California Berkeley School of Law.

“Japan has a system where everyone pleads guilty,” he said.

Before making bail, Mr. Ghosn, 65, was held in solitary confinement with limited access to his lawyers. Once released, he was not allowed to meet with his wife and was forbidden to use the internet outside his lawyers’ offices. Surveillance cameras watched him come and go from his Tokyo residence.

“The restrictions they were putting on him were extraordinary,” Professor Davidoff Solomon said, “for someone who is not a terrorist and not accused of a violent crime like a mass murder.”

People familiar with Mr. Ghosn’s thinking said he had grown increasingly alarmed over the possibility that he could spend the rest of his life facing charges in Japan, as prosecutors there sought to try him on his four charges of financial wrongdoing in stages rather than all at once.

Takashi Takano, a member of Mr. Ghosn’s legal team, wrote online that he had repeatedly explained to Mr. Ghosn that it would be difficult for him to get a fair trial, but that there was still a strong possibility the court would find him not guilty.

On Christmas Eve, Mr. Ghosn spoke to his wife for an hour, only their second conversation in months. When the couple said their goodbyes, Mr. Takano said, “I had never felt so disappointed in Japan’s justice system.”

When he heard that Mr. Ghosn had fled, “At first, a fierce fury welled up in me. I thought I had been betrayed,” Mr. Takano wrote.

But when he reflected on Mr. Ghosn’s situation, he said, “my anger turned in another direction.”

“I was certainly betrayed,” he said. “But the betrayal was not by Carlos Ghosn.”

Mr. Saito on Sunday defended the system. He said that Mr. Ghosn had been guaranteed a swift trial in an open court, and that prosecutors must prove their allegations to win a conviction.

Conviction rates are high in Japan, Mr. Saito acknowledged in his statement. But he said he was “confident that fair trials are carried out in which the courts allow defendants to make their claims adequately, and can judge from a strictly independent stance whether cases have been proven beyond a reasonable doubt.”

“In this case,” he added, “prosecutors have been implementing the appropriate procedures as stipulated by the law and have been proceeding with the investigation and preparation for trials while guaranteeing the rights of Ghosn, the defendant.”

Mr. Saito also defended the strict limits on Mr. Ghosn’s conduct while on bail, citing his wealth and his connections in Japan and around the world.

“As Ghosn has ample funds and a number of bases abroad, it was easy to escape,” he said. “He also has various human networks and a huge amount of influence both inside and outside Japan, so there was a realistic danger of concealing and destroying the evidence.”

As Mr. Ghosn’s flight put the Japanese justice system under a spotlight, it also has put critics of the system in a difficult position. However unfair the process might be, Mr. Ghosn defied it by fleeing, an offense that would invite harsh punishment in any country.

“It’s certain that Japan’s legal system has some big problems from the standpoint of guaranteeing human rights,” Takashi Yamaguchi, a lawyer who famously defended an artist who was arrested on obscenity charges, said in a Twitter post, “but the place he ought to have made his criticisms was a Japanese court, not Lebanon.”

Mark Karpelès, an entrepreneur who fought his own yearslong battle in Japanese courts, said Mr. Ghosn might have lost an opportunity to change the system from within. Mr. Karpelès, the founder of cryptocurrency exchange Mt. Gox, was ultimately found guilty on a charge of falsifying data, which he is appealing, and received a suspended sentence of two and a half years in prison.

Despite the broad powers granted to prosecutors, “the judges are still impartial,” Mr. Karpelès said, adding that “it’s possible to prove your innocence in a Japanese court. I’ve been there, done that.”

Mr. Karpelès said he had met Mr. Ghosn socially in Tokyo on a handful of occasions, most recently in November at a dinner that was attended by Japanese politicians. Mr. Karpelès declined to name the other attendees.

During that dinner, Mr. Karpelès said in an interview on Sunday, there were discussions of how Mr. Ghosn’s case could help address some of the shortcomings of Japan’s justice system.

“There was hope that Carlos Ghosn would help move things in the right direction,” he said, adding that “some people were trying to build something around this to improve the system.”

Now, he wonders whether other suspects might have a harder time getting out of custody on bail. Being released on bail is a “basic requirement” for defending oneself, said Mr. Karpelès, who was detained for almost a year.

“That’s why I’m disappointed,” he said.

“I don’t think the court will be so inclined to let people be free on bail in the future.”

Emily Flitter contributed reporting from New York.

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