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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 242)

Mick Mulvaney’s Missteps Draw Scrutiny From Trump Allies

Westlake Legal Group 5daceb98200000d2195063b9 Mick Mulvaney’s Missteps Draw Scrutiny From Trump Allies

WASHINGTON (AP) — For Mick Mulvaney, the hits just keep on coming.

First, President Donald Trump’s acting chief of staff stirred up a tempest by acknowledging that the administration had held up aid to Ukraine in part to prod that country to investigate Democrats and the 2016 elections. Then Mulvaney went on television Sunday to defend his boss in effusive terms — and ended up making a new problematic comment.

Explaining why Trump had tried to steer an international summit to one of the president’s own properties before giving up on the idea, Mulvaney said Trump “still considers himself to be in the hospitality business.” That did nothing to allay concerns that the president has used his office to enrich his business interests.

The bookended performances over the span of a few days were panned by the president’s allies and cast doubt on Mulvaney’s job security at the White House.

Mulvaney denied on “Fox News Sunday” that there was any consideration of his resignation, “Absolutely, positively not.”

At a press conference Thursday, Mulvaney tried to put a positive spin on Trump’s selection of his Doral, Florida, golf resort to host next year’s Group of Seven world summit. It was also an opportunity for Mulvaney demonstrate his ability to defend the president.

He struggled, in the process offering fresh fodder to critics of a president already besieged by an impeachment inquiry.

Mulvaney asserted in the briefing that military aid to Ukraine was delayed partly because Trump wanted officials there to look into a security company hired by the Democratic National Committee that discovered that Russian agents had broken into the committee’s network in 2016.

“The look back to what happened in 2016 certainly was part of the thing that he was worried about in corruption with that nation,” Mulvaney told reporters. “Did he also mention to me in the past the corruption that related to the DNC server? Absolutely, no question about that.” Mulvaney continued: “That’s why we held up the money.” Trump’s personal lawyers quickly dissociated themselves from the chief of staff’s comments.

Mulvaney’s description of the administration’s handling of the Ukraine aid amounted to a quid pro quo, though he later claimed his comments had been misconstrued.

“That’s not what I said,” Mulvaney told “Fox News Sunday” as host Chris Wallace repeatedly confronted him with his own comments. “That’s what people said that I said.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo refused to defend the comments in an interview Sunday with ABC’s “This Week.”

“I will leave to the chief of staff to explain what it is he said and what he intended,” Pompeo said.

Mulvaney is not aware of any effort to replace him, according to a person close to him who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal conversations. The president has also expressed his support for Mulvaney to the acting chief of staff’s team, the person said. Press secretary Stephanie Grisham said Sunday afternoon that Mulvaney still has the confidence of the president.

The news conference on Thursday left aides in the West Wing dumbfounded at the former South Carolina congressman’s performance and some quarters of Trump’s orbit — the Justice Department and Trump’s personal attorney, among them — dissociating themselves from his account. The president himself, already angry that Republicans were not defending him on Syria and Doral, was also displeased that Mulvaney only made the headlines worse, according to three White House officials and Republicans close to the White House not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations.

Still, a swift dismissal doesn’t appear on the horizon, according to nine staffers and outside advisers, who noted the difficulties Trump has faced attracting and retaining high quality White House staff even before the impeachment episode. The shortage of viable replacements has kept other officials in their posts months after he soured on them.

Even before Democrats launched the impeachment inquiry, Mulvaney was on thin ice, with diminished status in the White House. Holding the job of acting chief of staff since January, Mulvaney has frustrated aides who saw him as less willing than his predecessors to challenge the president.

Once Democrats began investigations meant to remove Trump from office, Mulvaney drew the brunt of criticism from presidential allies who felt the White House wasn’t prepared to fight back forcefully.

He has also clashed with White House counsel Pat Cipollone, sometimes mentioned as a potential Mulvaney successor, over strategy and tactics in response to impeachment. Mulvaney has complained that he had been iced out of the process, which the lawyer was treating as a legal, not political, matter.

Trump’s decision late Saturday to reverse course on his much-criticized plan to host the G-7 at Doral was the latest move that called into question Mulvaney’s job security.

Mulvaney had insisted that White House staff concluded that Doral was “far and away the best physical facility” and tried to push back at concerns raised by Democrats and some Republicans that Trump was using the presidency to enrich himself.

Mulvaney said Sunday that Trump was “honestly surprised at the level of pushback” on his choice of Doral.

That notion struck some Trump allies as hollow, because the uproar was resounding in August when the president first floated the idea of choosing Doral. They argued that the president’s aides, Mulvaney first among them, either should have persuaded him not to hold it there or devised a better communications strategy.

“Could we have put on an excellent G-7 at Doral? Absolutely,” Mulvaney concluded on Fox. “Will we end up putting on an excellent G-7 someplace else? Yes we will.”

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Battle of Midway: Second World War II-era Japanese carrier apparently found in Pacific

Deep-sea explorers and historians on Sunday announced they apparently found a second World War II-era Japanese aircraft carrier that sank during the infamous Battle of Midway.

A review of sonar data captured Sunday showed either the Japanese carrier Akagi or the Soryu resting in nearly 18,000 feet of water in the Pacific Ocean more than 1,300 miles northwest of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Vulcan Inc. director of undersea operations Rob Kraft said.

The researchers used an autonomous underwater vehicle, or AUV, equipped with sonar to find the ship. The vehicle had been out overnight collecting data, and the image of a warship appeared in the first set of readings on Sunday morning.

Westlake Legal Group AP19291195986705 Battle of Midway: Second World War II-era Japanese carrier apparently found in Pacific fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Bradford Betz article 6e069949-a858-5a5e-8186-1c87599eea57

In this June 4, 1942 file photo provided by the U.S. Navy, the USS Astoria (CA-34) steamed by USS Yorktown (CV-5), shortly after the carrier had been hit by three Japanese bombs in the Battle of Midway.  (U.S. Navy via AP, File)

The crew planned to deploy the AUV for another eight-hour mission where it will capture high-resolution sonar images of the site to measure the ship and confirm its identity, officials said.

GROUP SCOURS PACIFIC FOR SUNKEN WWII BATTLESHIPS, LOST WAR GRAVES

The finding came on the heels of last week’s discovery, another Japanese aircraft carrier, the Kaga, which U.S. forces also sank during the Battle of Midway in June 1942.

Until now, only one of the seven ships that went down in the air-and-sea battle — five Japanese vessels and two American ships — had been found.

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The crew of the research vessel Petrel was hoping to find and survey all lost ships from the 1942 Battle of Midway, which historians considered a pivotal fight for the U.S. in the Pacific during WWII.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19291195986705 Battle of Midway: Second World War II-era Japanese carrier apparently found in Pacific fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Bradford Betz article 6e069949-a858-5a5e-8186-1c87599eea57   Westlake Legal Group AP19291195986705 Battle of Midway: Second World War II-era Japanese carrier apparently found in Pacific fox-news/us/us-regions/west/hawaii fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Bradford Betz article 6e069949-a858-5a5e-8186-1c87599eea57

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Francis Ford Coppola backs Martin Scorsese’s critique of ‘despicable’ Marvel superhero movies

Director Francis Ford Coppola some angry rebukes this weekend after he went a step further than Martin Scorsese in his criticism of Marvel superhero movies, calling them “despicable.”

The 80-year-old “Godfather” director made the incendiary comments while in Lyon, France, to receive the Prix Lumiere for contributions to cinema, AFP reported.

Earlier this month, Scorsese had likened popular superhero flicks to “theme parks” rather than true cinema.

Westlake Legal Group AP19291734316285-1 Francis Ford Coppola backs Martin Scorsese's critique of 'despicable' Marvel superhero movies fox-news/topic/marvel fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Bradford Betz article 521434c8-e6e4-5457-9558-7e70d96a3d37

US director Francis Ford Coppola holds his award during the Lumiere Award ceremony of the 11th Lumiere Festival, in Lyon, central France. 

“I don’t see them,” Scorsese said during an interview with Empire magazine. “I tried, you know? But that’s not cinema. Honestly, the closest I can think of them, as well-made as they are, with actors doing the best they can under the circumstances, is theme parks.”

He added: “It isn’t the cinema of human beings trying to convey emotional, psychological experiences to another human being.”

His comments drew a slew of backlash, including from some of the writers and directors of the films he criticized.

But for Coppola, Scorsese was being too kind.

“When Martin Scorsese says that the Marvel pictures are not cinema, he’s right, because we expect to learn something from cinema, we expect to gain something, some enlightenment, some knowledge, some inspiration,” Coppola said while speaking to a journalist in Lyon. “I don’t know that anyone gets anything out of seeing the same move over and over again. Martin was kind when he said it’s not cinema. He didn’t say it’s despicable, which I just say it is.”

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James Gunn, who directed the Guardians of the Galaxy, took to Instagram on Sunday to argue that Scorsese and Coppola essentially were repeating the same line of criticism that older generations gave them when they were younger.

He noted that gangster movies, which have been closely associated with Coppola and Scorsese, were once called “despicable” by “our grandfathers,” who also regarded the films of John Ford, Sam Peckinpah, and Sergio Leone as “exactly the same.”

“Some superhero films are awful, some are beautiful,” Gunn wrote. “Like westerns and gangster movies (and before that, just MOVIES), not everyone will be able to appreciate them, even some geniuses. And that’s okay.”

Fox News’ Jessica Napoli contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19291734316285-1 Francis Ford Coppola backs Martin Scorsese's critique of 'despicable' Marvel superhero movies fox-news/topic/marvel fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Bradford Betz article 521434c8-e6e4-5457-9558-7e70d96a3d37   Westlake Legal Group AP19291734316285-1 Francis Ford Coppola backs Martin Scorsese's critique of 'despicable' Marvel superhero movies fox-news/topic/marvel fox-news/entertainment/movies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc Bradford Betz article 521434c8-e6e4-5457-9558-7e70d96a3d37

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Warren says she’ll reveal plan to pay for ‘Medicare-for-all’ soon, amid fears of rising middle-class taxes

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096316584001_6096312158001-vs Warren says she'll reveal plan to pay for 'Medicare-for-all' soon, amid fears of rising middle-class taxes Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8e5ad3bf-0801-5603-98ac-e0793f6202b1

Sen. Elizabeth Warren said Sunday that in the upcoming weeks she would detail how to pay for her proposal for a government-run “Medicare-for-all” plan.

The Massachusetts Democrat and White House candidate said at a town hall in Indianola, Iowa: “What I see … is that we need to talk about the cost, and I plan over the next few weeks to put out a plan that talks about specifically the cost of ‘Medicare-for-all,’ and specifically how we pay for it.”

Estimates place the 10-year cost of the “Medicare-for-all” plans at $32-34 trillion.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

She added about the universal health insurance plan: “This is something I’ve been working on for months and months, and it’s got just a little more work until it’s finished.”

Warren, whose status has risen in recent months, making her a presidential primary frontrunner, came under attack from her 2020 White House rivals at Tuesday night’s primary debate over her refusal to discuss whether taxes would go up for Americans to pay for her proposal.

POLL: VOTERS OPPOSE ‘MEDICARE-FOR-ALL’ SYSTEM THAT ELIMINATES PRIVATE INSURANCE

On Sunday at the town hall, she reiterated her promise that the financial burden of “Medicare-for-all” wouldn’t be on everyday Americans: “I will not sign a bill into law that does not reduce the cost of health care for middle-class families.”

After the town hall, she added: “The whole plan will be out; you’ll be able to look at it.”

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The intraparty battle over implementing “Medicare-for-all” versus strengthening the nation’s health-care law – known as the Affordable Care Act – has been a leading and divisive issue in the race for the presidential nomination.

“Every single person who is running for president of the United States on the Democratic side right now knows that families are getting crushed by the cost of health care,” Warren said during the town hall. “They also know that the cheapest possible way to make sure that everyone gets the health care they need is ‘Medicare-for-all,’ and that’s why I support ‘Medicare-for-all.'”

Fox News’ Tara Prindiville and Ben Florance contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096316584001_6096312158001-vs Warren says she'll reveal plan to pay for 'Medicare-for-all' soon, amid fears of rising middle-class taxes Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8e5ad3bf-0801-5603-98ac-e0793f6202b1   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096316584001_6096312158001-vs Warren says she'll reveal plan to pay for 'Medicare-for-all' soon, amid fears of rising middle-class taxes Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/iowa fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/elizabeth-warren fox news fnc/politics fnc article 8e5ad3bf-0801-5603-98ac-e0793f6202b1

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Florida Atlantic coach Lane Kiffin fined, reprimanded for tweeting photo of blind referees

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Florida Atlantic coach Lane Kiffin fined, reprimanded for tweeting photo of blind referees

USA TODAY Sports’ Paul Myerberg breaks down the latest Amway Coaches Poll. USA TODAY

If Lane Kiffin was going to be fined for criticizing Conference USA officials, he was going to have some fun with it.

The Florida Atlantic coach’s wallet will be $5,000 lighter after a photo he posted to social media in the aftermath of the Owls’ 36-31 loss to Marshall on Friday night.

Kiffin was upset with several calls, which resulted in his team being called for nine penalties. He said after the game he wouldn’t comment on the officiating because he didn’t want to get fined. But he couldn’t resist getting a jab in on Twitter the following day with a photo of three officials … in dark glasses … accompanied by seeing-eye dogs.

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The outspoken coach might have gotten away with it — if he hadn’t tagged the conference’s official account in the tweet.

“Conference USA has specific rules and standards regarding sportsmanship which have been adopted by our membership,” commissioner Judy MacLeod said in a statement. “We have an obligation to enforce our rules, including the prohibition of public criticism of officiating.” 

Before the fine — and a formal reprimand from the conference — were announced on Sunday, Kiffin responded to a comment about the photo he shared by saying simply: “Freedom of tweet.”

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It’s Time for an Americans’ March | Another Moment for Public Protest Has Arrived.

Westlake Legal Group 8xyzhZVAgdcoT9hxGgmN8DXsUPBLuy6zjkjxdeAUSJw It’s Time for an Americans’ March | Another Moment for Public Protest Has Arrived. r/politics

By David Leonhardt, Opinion Columnist

On Nov. 9, 2016, the day after Donald Trump’s election, Obamacare looked to be doomed. Millions of Americans, it seemed, were going to lose their health insurance.

Trump had campaigned on a promise to repeal the law, as had many other Republicans, and their party was about to control every branch of the federal government. All Republicans had to do was pass a law that Trump would sign. Democrats had no way to stop it.

Or at least they had no way to stop it using only the inside game of politics — congressional hearings, committee votes, presidential vetoes and so on.

Fortunately, some progressives understood that politics isn’t only an inside game. The outside game — of public protest and grass-roots lobbying — matters, too.

Even before Trump took office, activists began planning a strategy to make repeal as politically painful as possible. On the day after Trump’s inauguration, some four million Americans took to the streets for Women’s Marches (which obviously were about much more than repeal). In the months that followed, groups like Indivisible organized people to attend town halls, visit Capitol Hill and inundate members of Congress with phone calls. The efforts transformed the debate. Obamacare repeal was no longer a bloodless legislative matter, in which public opinion was measured merely with poll results and pundit analysis. The story became rawer, more human and much harder for politicians and ordinary citizens to ignore.

In the end, just enough Republican senators responded to the pressure, and Obamacare survived. The outside game had changed the math of the inside game.

The impeachment inquiry has reached the stage when it needs an outside game. We all know where the inside game is likely to lead: House Democrats will impeach Trump; Senate Republicans will acquit him; and he will claim vindication. But Trump’s presidency has become too dire for Americans to accept that outcome without trying to change it.

Consider what happened last week alone. Trump created a foreign-policy disaster in Turkey and Syria, for no apparent reason, while multiple administration officials testified that he views diplomacy largely as a way to advance his personal interests. His attitude, evidently, is: America, c’est moi. Even more so than a month ago, Trump is a national emergency, flagrantly violating his oath of office and daring the country to stop him.

Yet the chances of removing him appear as dim as Obamacare’s chances of survival did on Nov. 9, 2016. Trump even has plausible paths to re-election, some of which involve again losing the popular vote.

L.A. Kauffman, a historian of protest movements, has said that effective ones often throw “a monkey wrench into a process that was otherwise going to just unfold smoothly.” That’s the role that an outside game can now play in the impeachment saga.

It can wake up more Americans to the gravity of the situation. It can mobilize progressives to work as hard as they did during the 2018 midterms. It can confront congressional Republicans with their cowardice.

Do you remember the images showing throngs of people taking to the streets for the Women’s March? The size of the crowds, especially compared with Trump’s inauguration, reinforced the fact that most Americans rejected Trumpism. The marches also helped inspire the so-called resistance movement, which in turn created a network of dedicated activists, as the social scientists Lara Putnam and Theda Skocpol have pointed out.

And do you remember the viral moments from the save-Obamacare movement, like the disability-rights activists visiting Congress or the citizens speaking up at town halls? Jessi Bohon, a teacher in central Tennessee, created one of those moments by connecting the fight to her Christian faith. It was one of many ways that ordinary people held up for a vision of America as decent and communal as Trump is vulgar and selfish.

“Protests work,” as Kauffman has said — not always, of course, but often “when groups are willing to be bold in their tactics and persistent in their approach within the broad discipline of non-violent action.” As Vox’s Matthew Yglesias wrote last week, public protest “serves as a powerful signal to the rest of society that something extraordinary is happening.” If anything, protest may be more important than in the past, because the elite institutions that helped bring down Richard Nixon, like political parties and the national media, are weaker today.

So it’s time for a sequel to that first Women’s March — an Americans’ March, in which millions of people peacefully take to the streets to say that President Trump must go. And it’s time for a more intense grass-roots campaign directed at his congressional enablers, one that conjures the respectful intensity of the save-Obamacare campaign. Even if the Senate still acquits Trump, a new protest movement can help galvanize people to defeat him, and his enablers, next year.

The country is in crisis. Right now, that crisis feels all too normal.

Hear, hear!

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Prince Harry gets candid about his relationship with Prince William, moving to Africa

Westlake Legal Group 39a2ad09-6b2a-449a-b997-bd84e046ec9f-AFP_1LG16G Prince Harry gets candid about his relationship with Prince William, moving to Africa

rince Harry and Duchess Meghan recently wrapped a 10-day trip to Africa, a place the prince has been open about his affinity for. But would the royal couple ever pack up their Frogmore Cottage home in favor of another continent? 

“I don’t know where we could live in Africa at the moment, you know,” Harry said in a clip from an interview with ITV, which aired Sunday night in the U.K. The documentary film “Harry & Meghan: An African Journey” chronicles their recently concluded tour of southern Africa. It’s scheduled to air in the U.S. on Wednesday (ABC, 10 EDT/PDT).

In the couple’s first royal visit as new parents, they toured five countries to meet with community members working to fix issues of global warming, poverty, gender-based violence and access to education. 

“We just came from Cape Town, that would be an amazing place for us to base ourselves,” Prince Harry said. “But with all the problems going on there, I just don’t see how we’d really be able to make as much of a difference as we want to without the issues and the judgment of how we would be with those surroundings. It’s a very hard place to live when you know what’s going on, but then you’re slightly disconnected from it.” 

Still, the Sussexes plan on making Africa a huge part of their future. Prince Harry has been vocal about his passion for environmental conservation and battling climate change. As a frequent visitor to Africa, Harry previously called Botswana a place of “escapism” for him since his first visit after his mother, Princess Diana, died in a Paris car crash in 1997.

“The rest of our lives, especially our life’s work, will be predominantly focused on Africa, on conservation,” he added. “There’s a lot of things to be done and a lot of problems here, but there’s also huge potential.”

Also in the show, Harry addressed the rumored rift between him and his brother, Prince William.

“Part of this role and part of this job and this family being under the pressure that it’s under … stuff happens. But, look, we’re brothers, we’ll always be brothers,” he said, acknowledging the difficulty of the job of being a royal.

“We’re certainly on different paths at the moment,” Harry continued. “But I’ll always be there for him and, as I know, he’ll always be there for me. We don’t see each other as much as we used to because we’re so busy, but I love him dearly.”

The new husband and father added, “The majority of stuff is created out of nothing. As brothers, we have good days and we have bad days.”

See our full coverage of entertainment news

Prince Harry, Duchess Meghan:  The royals speak out about ‘challenging’ media backlash in TV interview

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‘He still considers himself to be in the hospitality business’: Mulvaney explains Trump’s Doral decision

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'He still considers himself to be in the hospitality business': Mulvaney explains Trump's Doral decision

In announcing the Doral pick just days earlier, White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney described the resort as “the best place”. Wochit, Wochit

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney said Sunday that President Donald Trump was “honestly surprised at the level of pushback” on plans to host next year’s G-7 summit at his Doral resort in Miami. 

Democrats and some Republicans, as well as government watchdogs, decried the administration’s decision to award the event to one of the president’s properties. Critics rejected Mulvaney’s claim that Doral had been selected as the “perfect” location after an exhaustive search. Many, including former White House officials, said it had the appearance of impropriety and others said it was a violation of the Constitution. 

Trump backed down in the wake of the criticism and declared the event would not be held at his resort “based on both Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility.” 

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Mulvaney said on “Fox News Sunday” that “we are all surprised at the level of pushback” and that it was “the right decision to change.” 

“We’ll have to find someplace else. And my guess is we’ll find someplace else that the media won’t like either for another reason,” he said. 

Mulvaney said Trump “saw an opportunity to take the biggest leaders from around the world, and he wanted to put on the absolute best show.”

“At the end of the day, you know, he still considers himself to be in the hospitality business,” Mulvaney explained. 

“He’s the president of the United States,” host Chris Wallace replied. 

“Yes, but that’s his background. It’s like, I used to be in the real estate business,” Mulvaney said. He tried to get Wallace, the son of “60 Minutes” reporter Mike Wallace, to relate by asking him what he did “before you were in the media.” 

“Nothing. That’s all I’ve ever done,” Wallace said. 

“But he wanted to put on a show. He wanted to take care of folks,” Mulvaney said. “He’s in the hotel business, or at least he was before he was the president.” 

Wallace asked Mulvaney if Trump understood that at the very least, it was a bad choice in terms of appearance.

“Well, I think he knows. He thinks people think it looks lousy,” Mulvaney said. 

More: House Judiciary Committee to investigate Trump’s desire to use his Doral resort to host next G-7 summit

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Clinton mocks Trump’s Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke — but move quickly appears to backfire

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096040212001_6096038293001-vs Clinton mocks Trump's Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke -- but move quickly appears to backfire Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ab3e0ab-af7c-5ef5-b771-bb44977e70d7

Hillary Clinton on Sunday posted a flowery fake letter from President John F. Kennedy to Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to mock President Trump’s recent, casually worded missive to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, but the Twitter mockery quickly blew back in Clinton’s face, with commentators across the political spectrum suggesting the former secretary of state shouldn’t relish so openly in Twitter trolling.

What’s more, users quickly noted that Clinton’s team had lifted the letter, without attribution, from a segment on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” that aired this past Wednesday night.

The kerfuffle came as Clinton’s feud with Tulsi Gabbard has prompted speculation that she might enter the presidential race — and a dare from Gabbard to do just that.

“Dear Premier Kruschev,” the mock letter “from the archives” during the Cuban Missile Crisis began, “Don’t be a d–k, ok? Get your missiles out of Cuba. … Give you a jingle later. Hugs.”

In his Oct. 9 letter to Erdoğan, first obtained by the Fox Business Network’s Trish Regan, Trump adopted a similarly familiar tone.

“Let’s work out a good deal!” Trump began. “You don’t want to be responsible for slaughtering thousands of people, and I don’t want to be responsible for destroying the Turkish economy – and I will. I’ve already given you a little sample with respect to Pastor Brunson.” Brunson was held as a prisoner in Turkey for two years before the Trump administration secured his release.

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Trump continued: “Don’t let the world down. … History will look upon you favorably if you get this done the right and humane way. It will look upon you forever as the devil if good things don’t happen. Don’t be a tough guy. Don’t be a fool. I will call you later.”

Sources close to Erdoğan told the BBC Thursday that the Turkish strongman “thoroughly rejected” the letter. Erdoğan reportedly took the letter warning against being a “fool” and tossed it “in the bin,” the sources said.

But, Clinton’s jab itself inspired a slew of mockery — including a post that highlighted Clinton’s October 2016 tweet, featuring a photo of herself as a little girl with the caption: “Happy birthday to this future president.”

The Washington Examiner’s Jerry Dunleavy flagged that the letter had appeared on Jimmy Kimmel’s show. The Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler remarked dryly, “Sometimes silence is golden.”

Trump 2020 campaign senior adviser Lara Trump earlier this month welcomed a possible Clinton presidential run in 2020, saying she was confident the president would defeat Clinton again.

“First of all, I just want to double down on the president and say if Hillary Clinton would like round two with Donald Trump, please let’s do that,” the wife of the president’s son Eric Trump said on “Hannity.”

“I would love to see a ’round two’ between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton because I think we all remember, Sean, not too long ago, all the media said that she was going to be the next president. We see Donald Trump in the White House now.”

Clinton herself had sparked a wave of speculation about a possible run with a pointed Oct. 8 tweet.

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“I think that Crooked Hillary Clinton should enter the race to try and steal it away from Uber Left Elizabeth Warren,” the president wrote. “Only one condition. The Crooked one must explain all of her high crimes and misdemeanors including how & why she deleted 33,000 Emails AFTER getting ‘C’ Subpoena!”

“Don’t tempt me. Do your job,” Clinton wrote back.

Fox News’ Victor Garcia contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096040212001_6096038293001-vs Clinton mocks Trump's Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke -- but move quickly appears to backfire Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ab3e0ab-af7c-5ef5-b771-bb44977e70d7   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096040212001_6096038293001-vs Clinton mocks Trump's Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke -- but move quickly appears to backfire Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ab3e0ab-af7c-5ef5-b771-bb44977e70d7

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Clinton mocks Trump’s Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke — but move quickly appears to backfire

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096040212001_6096038293001-vs Clinton mocks Trump's Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke -- but move quickly appears to backfire Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ab3e0ab-af7c-5ef5-b771-bb44977e70d7

Hillary Clinton on Sunday posted a flowery fake letter from President John F. Kennedy to Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to mock President Trump’s recent, casually worded missive to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, but the Twitter mockery quickly blew back in Clinton’s face, with commentators across the political spectrum suggesting the former secretary of state shouldn’t relish so openly in Twitter trolling.

What’s more, users quickly noted that Clinton’s team had lifted the letter, without attribution, from a segment on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” that aired this past Wednesday night.

The kerfuffle came as Clinton’s feud with Tulsi Gabbard has prompted speculation that she might enter the presidential race — and a dare from Gabbard to do just that.

“Dear Premier Kruschev,” the mock letter “from the archives” during the Cuban Missile Crisis began, “Don’t be a d–k, ok? Get your missiles out of Cuba. … Give you a jingle later. Hugs.”

In his Oct. 9 letter to Erdoğan, first obtained by the Fox Business Network’s Trish Regan, Trump adopted a similarly familiar tone.

“Let’s work out a good deal!” Trump began. “You don’t want to be responsible for slaughtering thousands of people, and I don’t want to be responsible for destroying the Turkish economy – and I will. I’ve already given you a little sample with respect to Pastor Brunson.” Brunson was held as a prisoner in Turkey for two years before the Trump administration secured his release.

GABBARD REVEALS WHY CLINTON’S COMING AFTER HER

Trump continued: “Don’t let the world down. … History will look upon you favorably if you get this done the right and humane way. It will look upon you forever as the devil if good things don’t happen. Don’t be a tough guy. Don’t be a fool. I will call you later.”

Sources close to Erdoğan told the BBC Thursday that the Turkish strongman “thoroughly rejected” the letter. Erdoğan reportedly took the letter warning against being a “fool” and tossed it “in the bin,” the sources said.

But, Clinton’s jab itself inspired a slew of mockery — including a post that highlighted Clinton’s October 2016 tweet, featuring a photo of herself as a little girl with the caption: “Happy birthday to this future president.”

The Washington Examiner’s Jerry Dunleavy flagged that the letter had appeared on Jimmy Kimmel’s show. The Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler remarked dryly, “Sometimes silence is golden.”

Trump 2020 campaign senior adviser Lara Trump earlier this month welcomed a possible Clinton presidential run in 2020, saying she was confident the president would defeat Clinton again.

“First of all, I just want to double down on the president and say if Hillary Clinton would like round two with Donald Trump, please let’s do that,” the wife of the president’s son Eric Trump said on “Hannity.”

“I would love to see a ’round two’ between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton because I think we all remember, Sean, not too long ago, all the media said that she was going to be the next president. We see Donald Trump in the White House now.”

Clinton herself had sparked a wave of speculation about a possible run with a pointed Oct. 8 tweet.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I think that Crooked Hillary Clinton should enter the race to try and steal it away from Uber Left Elizabeth Warren,” the president wrote. “Only one condition. The Crooked one must explain all of her high crimes and misdemeanors including how & why she deleted 33,000 Emails AFTER getting ‘C’ Subpoena!”

“Don’t tempt me. Do your job,” Clinton wrote back.

Fox News’ Victor Garcia contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096040212001_6096038293001-vs Clinton mocks Trump's Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke -- but move quickly appears to backfire Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ab3e0ab-af7c-5ef5-b771-bb44977e70d7   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096040212001_6096038293001-vs Clinton mocks Trump's Turkey letter with Jimmy Kimmel joke -- but move quickly appears to backfire Gregg Re fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc article 5ab3e0ab-af7c-5ef5-b771-bb44977e70d7

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