web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 243)

Jennifer Lawrence and Cooke Maroney got married on Saturday. Who is this guy?

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Jennifer Lawrence and Cooke Maroney got married on Saturday. Who is this guy?

Academy Award-winning actress Jennifer Lawrence is engaged to art gallerist Cooke Maroney. The “Hunger Games” star’s rep, Liz Mahoney, confirmed the news to USA TODAY Tuesday. Time

Jennifer Lawrence and Cooke Maroney are officially married – but who is the lucky guy?

Maroney, 33, had been dating the “Red Sparrow” actress, 28, since last spring, when outlets like People and Cosmopolitan confirmed they were seeing each other. Page Six says the couple was introduced by Lawrence’s friend, Laura Simpson.

According to People and The Cut, Maroney is part of New York’s art scene and is a director at Gladstone 64, a gallery on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The artists he represents include Lena Dunham’s father, People says.

He’s also worked with Richard Prince, Anish Kapoor and Bjork’s ex-boyfriend, sculptor Matthew Barney.

Before his work at Gladstone, he worked at the Gagosian gallery after studying art history at NYU, according to Elle and The Cut. And before that, he grew up with his parents in Vermont, Elle and Us Weekly report.

They’re married! Jennifer Lawrence weds art dealer Cooke Maroney

Much like Lawrence, Maroney is not a big fan of social media and has no public accounts. He doesn’t shy away from real-life social gatherings, however. Page Six and The Cut report he has been spotted mingling at his fair share of art parties and gallery openings.

Also like his actress wife, he is no stranger to interviews. He gave one to Artsy in 2015, where he talked about online art sales.

“In the art world, the way information is shared is rapidly changing,” he said at the time. “A growing group of internet-savvy collectors are searching for art online with galleries eager to provide it.”

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

In addition to being spotted out in New York with Lawrence, the lovebirds have also been photographed together in Paris and Rome.

They were also spotted attending the premiere of “The Favourite” together, which stars Lawrence’s ex, Nicholas Hoult – so Maroney seems to be pretty cool when it comes to Lawrence’s past relationships.

Before Maroney, Lawrence was also involved with Darren Aronofsky, who directed her in 2017’s “mother!”

Contributing: Bill Keveney

See our full coverage of entertainment news

More: Chris Pratt wants ‘lots of kids’ with Katherine Schwarzenegger

More: Alice Marie Johnson, inmate freed with help by Kim Kardashian West, gets book deal

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/10/20/jennifer-lawrences-husband-cooke-maroney-everything-you-need-know/4047796002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Chris Wallace challenges Pete Buttigieg on big-money donor, perception among African-American voters

Westlake Legal Group Buttigieg-fox-5 Chris Wallace challenges Pete Buttigieg on big-money donor, perception among African-American voters Nick Givas fox-news/shows/fox-news-sunday fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc fdf42d1e-8f2e-5fb0-9ee7-11b8b6975d17 article

Fox News Sunday” anchor Chris Wallace challenged 2020 presidential candidate and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg this week about thousands of dollars in campaign contributions he received from a Chicago attorney who previously had tried to block the release of footage from Laquan McDonald’s 2014 police shooting.

Buttigieg’s campaign returned the money. Still, Wallace asked if the mayor’s ties to the donor, Steve Patton, will hurt his chances to make inroads with the black community.

“You were supposed to attend a big fundraiser in Chicago on Friday, and one of the hosts was the same city attorney who worked very hard to block [the] release of this video of police shooting Laquan McDonald,” Wallace said. “The lawyer backed out of the fundraiser. He also donated $5,600 to your campaign. Particularly at a time when African-Americans are trying to get to know you — isn’t that the kind of mistake… that you can’t afford to make?”

“This came to my attention in the morning and within an hour it had been taken care of,” Buttigieg replied. “The situation there, and justice and transparency for Laquan McDonald, is much more important to me than a campaign contribution, and we did the right thing as soon as it came to my attention.”

PETE BUTTIGIEG DODGES QUESTION ON MANDATORY ‘ASSAULT WEAPON’ BUYBACK DURING CNN INTERVIEW

A jury found former Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke guilty of murder last year after he shot McDonald 16 times in a span of fewer than 30 seconds. This past January he was sentenced to 81 months in prison. Three of his fellow Chicago police officers were accused of trying to cover up the murder but were acquitted on all counts.

“Can you understand where people would say, ‘well this is a guy who wants our vote, but he was taking money and was attending a fundraiser being held by this city attorney?'” Wallace asked Buttigieg.

Buttigieg repeated himself and said the campaign “took care of it” before shifting the focus to President Trump.

More from Media

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“And then we took care of it,” he repeated. “Look, I think the biggest question on voters’ minds is, ‘how is my life going to be different?’ Especially when that sun comes up that first day after Donald Trump is president.”

“The agenda that I’m putting forward — the issues that I want to tackle, I think will speak to black voters and to all voters who are seeking a better life in this country, and seeking to turn the page from the chaos and the corruption that we’re living under right now,” Buttigieg added.

Fox News’ Nicole Darrah contributed to this report 

Westlake Legal Group Buttigieg-fox-5 Chris Wallace challenges Pete Buttigieg on big-money donor, perception among African-American voters Nick Givas fox-news/shows/fox-news-sunday fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc fdf42d1e-8f2e-5fb0-9ee7-11b8b6975d17 article   Westlake Legal Group Buttigieg-fox-5 Chris Wallace challenges Pete Buttigieg on big-money donor, perception among African-American voters Nick Givas fox-news/shows/fox-news-sunday fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc fdf42d1e-8f2e-5fb0-9ee7-11b8b6975d17 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Jennifer Lawrence and Cooke Maroney got married on Saturday. Who is this guy?

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Jennifer Lawrence and Cooke Maroney got married on Saturday. Who is this guy?

Academy Award-winning actress Jennifer Lawrence is engaged to art gallerist Cooke Maroney. The “Hunger Games” star’s rep, Liz Mahoney, confirmed the news to USA TODAY Tuesday. Time

Jennifer Lawrence and Cooke Maroney are officially married – but who is the lucky guy?

Maroney, 33, had been dating the “Red Sparrow” actress, 28, since last spring, when outlets like People and Cosmopolitan confirmed they were seeing each other. Page Six says the couple was introduced by Lawrence’s friend, Laura Simpson.

According to People and The Cut, Maroney is part of New York’s art scene and is a director at Gladstone 64, a gallery on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The artists he represents include Lena Dunham’s father, People says.

He’s also worked with Richard Prince, Anish Kapoor and Bjork’s ex-boyfriend, sculptor Matthew Barney.

Before his work at Gladstone, he worked at the Gagosian gallery after studying art history at NYU, according to Elle and The Cut. And before that, he grew up with his parents in Vermont, Elle and Us Weekly report.

They’re married! Jennifer Lawrence weds art dealer Cooke Maroney

Much like Lawrence, Maroney is not a big fan of social media and has no public accounts. He doesn’t shy away from real-life social gatherings, however. Page Six and The Cut report he has been spotted mingling at his fair share of art parties and gallery openings.

Also like his actress wife, he is no stranger to interviews. He gave one to Artsy in 2015, where he talked about online art sales.

“In the art world, the way information is shared is rapidly changing,” he said at the time. “A growing group of internet-savvy collectors are searching for art online with galleries eager to provide it.”

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

In addition to being spotted out in New York with Lawrence, the lovebirds have also been photographed together in Paris and Rome.

They were also spotted attending the premiere of “The Favourite” together, which stars Lawrence’s ex, Nicholas Hoult – so Maroney seems to be pretty cool when it comes to Lawrence’s past relationships.

Before Maroney, Lawrence was also involved with Darren Aronofsky, who directed her in 2017’s “mother!”

Contributing: Bill Keveney

See our full coverage of entertainment news

More: Chris Pratt wants ‘lots of kids’ with Katherine Schwarzenegger

More: Alice Marie Johnson, inmate freed with help by Kim Kardashian West, gets book deal

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/10/20/jennifer-lawrences-husband-cooke-maroney-everything-you-need-know/4047796002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Pacific Crest Trail hiker, 50, rescued after bad storm hits, says he ‘wouldn’t have survived another night’

A hiker who got lost in a snowstorm on the perilous Pacific Crest Trail in Oregon says he wouldn’t have lived another night if deputies didn’t answer his desperate call for help.

Robert Campbell, of Philadelphia, was rescued by two Marion County Sheriff’s deputies Friday, a day after the first winter storm of the year buried the trail he had been traversing. He was soaked, freezing and curled up in his wet sleeping bag in the shelter of a pit toilet. Part of his feet and toenails had turned blue.

CALIFORNIA HIKERS UNEARTH ‘MYSTERY’ HUMAN SKELTON BENEATH SECOND-HIGHEST PEAK

“You count your blessings,” the 50-year-old told the Salem Statesman Journal on Saturday. “You thank your lucky stars. Not to be overly dramatic, because people have been through much worse, I’m sure, but I wouldn’t have survived another night. I’m convinced of that.”

Westlake Legal Group robert-campbell-hiker-lost Pacific Crest Trail hiker, 50, rescued after bad storm hits, says he 'wouldn't have survived another night' Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 6c875424-5532-5ee7-aad7-0da24a5518fb

Campbell warming up after Marion County Sheriff’s deputies rescued him Friday. (Marion County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

Campbell set out on the famed trail near the Mexican border in early May with plans to trek all the way to the Canadian border some 2,650 miles away.

But, Campbell encountered trouble Wednesday night when snow began to fall. By Thursday, the snow had buried the trail. Not even a navigational smartphone app was able to keep him from straying miles off the trail and into a boulder field.

HIKER DIES IN CALIFORNIA AFTER RUNNING OUT OF WATER ALONG TRAIL, OFFICIALS SAY

“You just know, if anything happens, I’m dead,” Campbell told the paper. “No one’s going to find me until spring.”

Many hikers have died trying to navigate the treacherous trail in similar conditions.

In 2017, the body of Chaocui Wang, who had quit her job in Shanghai, China, to hike the trail, turned up in a creek made swift by melting snowpack. In February, another hiker died after falling on ice. A falling tree killed a German hiker this year as well.

Campbell acknowledged the danger he faced and called 911 on Thursday. But, the call dropped partway through and he lost his phone signal. The Marion County Sheriff’s Office deployed a search-and-rescue team to find him after the distress call.

Meanwhile, Campbell said he trudged into an empty campground and found the only available shelter: a pit toilet. Cold and wet, he waited. Friday afternoon, rescuers passed the campground and finally found his footprints.

“I really think I owe them my life because … I couldn’t have made it another night,” Campell told The Associated Press from his motel room in Oregon. “My sleeping bag and tent are just completely soaked and probably ruined and I have no dry clothes.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

But, Cambell said his adventure wasn’t finished yet, declaring, “Canada or bust.”

“I’m going to be doing it a lot more smartly,” he told The AP. “Any chance of snow, I’m not going to even mess around with it.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group robert-campbell-hiker-lost Pacific Crest Trail hiker, 50, rescued after bad storm hits, says he 'wouldn't have survived another night' Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 6c875424-5532-5ee7-aad7-0da24a5518fb   Westlake Legal Group robert-campbell-hiker-lost Pacific Crest Trail hiker, 50, rescued after bad storm hits, says he 'wouldn't have survived another night' Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/oregon fox-news/travel/general/camping-hiking fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/us fnc article 6c875424-5532-5ee7-aad7-0da24a5518fb

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

CNN’s Brian Stelter calls out ABC News’ gun-range video error: Network ‘has not explained what happened’

Westlake Legal Group Stelter-ABC CNN's Brian Stelter calls out ABC News' gun-range video error: Network 'has not explained what happened' Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/kentucky fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f67c5177-ba0a-5d7e-b029-3189824ad969 article

ABC News still hasn’t explained how it mistook footage from a Kentucky gun range for authentic video of fighting between Syria and Turkish forces but has promised to dole out internal “consequences” for the error, CNN’s Brian Stelter said Sunday.

“Let’s talk about the most egregious media error of the week,” he said during “Reliable Sources.” “This involves ABC News, showing video from a gun range in Kentucky that they said was video of a slaughter in Syria.”

“It’s actually from a Kentucky gun range,” Stelter added. “Now ABC says it regrets the error, but it has not explained what happened.”

The network issued a correction Monday after reportedly using video from the Knob Creek Gun Range in West Point, while the words “CRISIS IN SYRIA. ISIS prisoners escape as death toll rises in attacks,” appeared beneath it.

ABC APOLOGIZES FOR MISTAKING KENTUCKY GUN RANGE VIDEO FOR TURKISH BOMBING OF SYRIA

The footage first aired on Sunday‘s “World News Tonight” as anchor Tom Llamas claimed it showed a Turkish attack on a group of Kurdish civilians in a Syrian border town.

Both “Good Morning America” and “World News Tonight” issued an identical statement on Twitter expressing regret over the mistake.

More from Media

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“CORRECTION: We’ve taken down video that aired on ‘World News Tonight’ Sunday and ‘Good Morning America’ this morning that appeared to be from the Syrian border immediately after questions were raised about its accuracy. ABC News regrets the error,” the tweet read.

“What went wrong here?” Stelter asked. “An ABC source said to me, ‘there will be consequences internally,’ but they won’t say what that means.”

Westlake Legal Group Stelter-ABC CNN's Brian Stelter calls out ABC News' gun-range video error: Network 'has not explained what happened' Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/kentucky fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f67c5177-ba0a-5d7e-b029-3189824ad969 article   Westlake Legal Group Stelter-ABC CNN's Brian Stelter calls out ABC News' gun-range video error: Network 'has not explained what happened' Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/kentucky fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc f67c5177-ba0a-5d7e-b029-3189824ad969 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country

Several Yemeni expats in the Detroit area who pleaded guilty to transferring millions of dollars to their war-torn native country unlawfully will not be going to prison — after the judge cited a need for “compassion,” according to a report Sunday.

One by one, U.S. District Judge Avern Cohn declined to send them to prison, even though the men had failed to register their activities as a money transfer business. Failing to do so usually carries up to five years behind bars.

Regarding his recent rulings, Cohn noted that Yemen’s financial system has been in ruins and people inside the country needed help.

Westlake Legal Group AP19293536462754 Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 035c5be4-e023-50ba-b312-90eeb1e5146f

U.S. District Judge Avern Cohn, seen in a photo last week, defended his decisions not to sentence Yemeni men to jail time for sending millions of dollars to their home country. (AP)

“Only people without compassion” would object to the light sentences, Cohn, 95, told The Associated Press. “As I’ve been here longer, I’ve come to the realization that the rules are flexible — at least to me.”

The Detroit area has the highest concentration of Yemenis, a demographic that has risen amid a war in Yemen that has killed tens of thousands of people and left millions more with inadequate food and health care.

The World Bank estimates that Yemenis received at least $3.3 billion in 2018 – a conservative figure by some estimates.

FEAR US WEAPONS ARE FALLING INTO THE ‘WRONG HANDS’ DURING CHAOTIC YEMENI WAR

Since 2018, federal prosecutors in Detroit have charged nine people in an investigation of cash transfers to Yemen. Bank accounts were opened in the names of shell businesses, then used to deposit and wire roughly $90 million over a seven-year period, according to plea agreements.

All nine men have pleaded guilty to failing to register money transfer businesses or making false statements to agents.

Cohn, who has been a judge since 1979, has described the conditions in Yemen as “horrendous,” noting that sending men to prison could cause hardship in conservative Muslim families where wives often don’t work outside the home.

NEARLY 100,000 HAVE BEEN KILLED IN ONGOING YEMEN WAR, REPORT FINDS

It’s unfair to “shed the traditions and practices of your homeland,” Cohn said to one of the men.

Prosecutors said they had no evidence the scheme was anything more than sending money to relatives and possibly avoiding taxes, but they believed sentences within the guidelines were appropriate.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Judges don’t have to follow sentencing guidelines, and Cohn rejected prison terms.

He placed six men on supervised release. Three others awaited sentencing.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19293536462754 Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 035c5be4-e023-50ba-b312-90eeb1e5146f   Westlake Legal Group AP19293536462754 Detroit-area Yemeni expats avoid prison time for sending millions of dollars to native country fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/michigan fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 035c5be4-e023-50ba-b312-90eeb1e5146f

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths

A San Diego man was arrested Friday for allegedly starting a suspicious house fire that killed his parents, sister and injured two siblings last weekend — despite initially claiming he tried to save his family.

Wilber Romero, 26, faced homicide and arson charges, Fox 5 reported.

The fire ignited just before 4:30 a.m. on Oct. 13, tearing through their small home in Logan Heights with at least five members of the Romero family still inside.

Westlake Legal Group San-Diego-Fire San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 20f49c0e-c8fd-504a-a6c6-0cbb5f642fef

The charred remains of the Romeo family home in Logan Heights. Three members of the family were killed during a deadly fire last Sunday and the oldest son is now a suspect. (Fox 5)

CALIFORNIA WILDLIFE COMPENSATION DEADLINE LOOMS, 70,000 VICTIMS MAY MISS OUT ON PAYMENTS

Wilber’s father, Jose Antonio Romero, 44, turned up dead inside the home.

His mother, Nicolasa Mayo, 46, died in the hospital, as did his sister, Iris “Krystal” Romero, 21 — following a heroic attempt to use her body as a human shield — to protect her younger brother, 17-year-old Angel Romero, from being burnt, relative Tania Flores told KNSD.

Iris had become brain dead and was pronounced dead on Wednesday night, police told the outlet.

Angel and his sister, Wendy Romero, 24, are expected to recover from their injuries. Wendy had tried so hard to escape that she broke her fingers beating on the door, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

Wilber reportedly escaped unhurt.

He told KGTV he awoke to find his bed on fire and tried yelling at his family to get them out of the burning home.

“My dogs were jumping on me, trying to wake me up. I woke up. When I woke up, my bed was on fire. I jumped out of bed and started screaming the house is on fire,” Romero told the outlet.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA OIL FACILITY FIRE CAUSES AUTHORITIES TO DECLARE HAZMAT EMERGENCY, ORDER RESIDENTS TO STAY INSIDE

Later, in an interview with KFMB, Wilber continued to deny he had anything to do with the fire.

“You can lock me up, but you’re not going to take me in for me to say this: ‘I did it,'” he said. “I’m not going to say it because I didn’t do it.”

Wilber was questioned by police after the fire, but they let him go before his eventual arrest, KNSD added. Neighbors say they saw Wilber running down the street screaming when they recalled the heartbreaking scene.

“I thought it was like a scary movie. I thought it was a nightmare, honestly. I’m just like, ‘This is not real. This is not really happening,'” Jamie Felix, a family friend living next door, said.

A nearby church had a vigil on Tuesday to support the family, while neighbors raised money for the funeral by holding a car wash and a couple of fundraisers.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Wilber spoke at the funeral, thanking everyone for their thoughts and prayers.

He was booked into county jail and expected to make his first court appearance on Oct. 22.

Westlake Legal Group San-Diego-Fire San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 20f49c0e-c8fd-504a-a6c6-0cbb5f642fef   Westlake Legal Group San-Diego-Fire San Diego man who said he tried saving relatives from fire is arrested in their deaths fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/fires fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 20f49c0e-c8fd-504a-a6c6-0cbb5f642fef

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States

Arkansas reaped a windfall when a Walmart founder, James L. Walton, known as Bud, died in 1995 with a fortune estimated by Forbes at $1.65 billion in today’s money. The next year, state estate tax receipts jumped 425 percent, to about $183 million in current dollars.

In an age when bigger fortunes are being made, the states’ prize is getting richer. Research by Enrico Moretti of the University of California, Berkeley, and Daniel J. Wilson of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco estimates that if Jeff Bezos of Amazon died today at his home in the Seattle suburbs, the state tax bill on his estate, estimated by Forbes at more than $100 billion, would add up to almost $12 billion. Washington State’s entire budget for two years is $52 billion.

There’s a hitch to state estate taxes: The rich can move to avoid their reach. That makes counting on the revenues a bit of a crapshoot. If an aging Mr. Bezos moved before he died, establishing his residence in California, his fortune would produce no estate tax revenue.

And yet the payoff from estate taxes can be so big that it’s worthwhile for states to impose them anyway.

The study by Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson, to be published by the National Bureau of Economic Research on Monday, explores the main drawback of this kind of wealth tax: The rich will deploy all sorts of tactics to avoid them. The arsenal includes charitable bequests, trusts, the creative valuation of assets and, apparently, moving out of state to die.

The older the wealthy get, the less likely they are to continue to live in states that charge estate taxes. Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson estimate that from 2001 to 2017, a 40-year-old billionaire on the Forbes list had a 22 percent chance of living in a state with an estate tax. By age 70, the odds were only 14 percent. By age 90, they had fallen to only 9 percent.

But over the long run, Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson conclude, the state estate tax can be a useful tool. From 1982 to 2017, the death of the average Forbes billionaire generated $165 million in revenue in states with estate taxes. Lots of billionaires moved to avoid them. But estate taxes raised more money for states that had them than they lost in income-tax revenue when billionaires left.

“The behavioral response is very high, but despite the strong response it is still worth it for the states,” Mr. Moretti said.

Taxing the wealth of America’s ultrarich is a central issue in the campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. Senator Bernie Sanders proposed an annual tax ranging from 1 percent on fortunes worth $32 million to $50 million to 8 percent on those above $10 billion. Senator Elizabeth Warren is calling for a comparatively modest annual tax of 2 percent on fortunes above $50 million, with an additional 1 percent on wealth over $1 billion.

Not all Democrats are on board. But even Democratic economists who have pushed back against these ideas say federal estate and gift taxes, the only taxes on wealth in the United States today, could be applied much more broadly and aggressively. reducing exemptions and increasing tax rates on large estates.

Westlake Legal Group arkansas-estate-tax-280 Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States Wilson, Daniel J tax evasion States (US) Moretti, Enrico Inheritance and Estate Taxes High Net Worth Individuals Economics (Theory and Philosophy)

Arkansas estate tax revenue

Bud Walton dies in 1995, generating a windfall for the state the next year.

The state eliminates the tax in 2005, creating a haven for wealth inheritance.

Westlake Legal Group arkansas-estate-tax-335 Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States Wilson, Daniel J tax evasion States (US) Moretti, Enrico Inheritance and Estate Taxes High Net Worth Individuals Economics (Theory and Philosophy)

Arkansas estate tax revenue

Bud Walton dies in 1995, generating a windfall for the state the next year.

The state eliminates the tax in 2005, creating a haven for wealth inheritance.

Westlake Legal Group arkansas-estate-tax-600 Estate Taxes Are Easy to Flee, but They Still Help States Wilson, Daniel J tax evasion States (US) Moretti, Enrico Inheritance and Estate Taxes High Net Worth Individuals Economics (Theory and Philosophy)

Estate tax revenue

in Arkansas

Bud Walton dies in

1995, generating a

windfall for the

state the next year.

The state eliminates

the tax in 2005,

creating a haven for

wealth inheritance.

Source: Enrico Moretti (University of California, Berkeley)

By The New York Times

Currently, federal estate and gift taxes apply beyond a threshold of $11.4 million per person. They are levied at a top rate of 40 percent and raised $23 billion in 2018.

Unlike the issues with state taxes, the rich can’t move out of the country to avoid federal estate taxes because United States citizens are liable for the tax no matter where they live.

For many years, there was no reason for rich people to flee state estate taxes because they paid the same no matter where they lived. Before 2001, the government offered a federal tax credit to cover the state tax liability. Many states passed estate taxes that exactly matched the available federal credit.

But President George W. Bush’s tax-cut package of 2001 phased out the credit over the next three years. And as the federal system changed, a wealthy person’s state of residence started to matter. By 2010, more than one in five billionaires from states that kept estate taxes had moved to a state without one, while only 1.2 percent had moved in the opposite direction. And by 2017, only 13 states had an estate tax.

Gabriel Zucman, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, who with his colleague Emmanuel Saez has advised the Warren campaign on taxation issues, argues that “people who dislike taxes like to create circumstances for tax competition.”

If the rich can avoid taxes by moving to the lower-tax state or country next door, states and countries will race to cut taxes to poach one another’s wealthy. Such competition is the main reason European countries have all but abandoned wealth taxes, Mr. Zucman said.

Still, Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson pointed out that for most states the race to the bottom is probably pointless: The typical estate tax of 16 percent yields more revenue than the income tax that the states would have collected in the interim from the billionaires who fled.

In states without an income tax, like Florida and Texas, the argument for the estate tax is straightforward: There is no income tax revenue to lose if billionaires leave. But even in Arkansas, which stopped collecting an estate tax in 2005 and was home to five billionaires in 2017, the income tax revenue lost would be only about half of what the state would reap with a 16 percent estate tax, Mr. Moretti and Mr. Wilson estimate.

While the estate tax could generate additional losses if departing billionaires took their companies, investments and charitable contributions with them, Mr. Moretti argues that it is not likely that an aging Mr. Bezos moving to, say, Texas, will take Amazon with him. And estate taxes decades down the road seem unlikely to influence where young entrepreneurs decide to live.

The Moretti-Wilson argument doesn’t apply only to billionaires. In all but eight states, a 16 percent tax applied to estates larger than $5.5 million (the federal threshold before the 2017 tax law) would generate more money than would be lost in forgone income taxes. And if the merely rich were only half as likely as Forbes billionaires to cross state lines fleeing the estate tax, every state would gain from imposing one.

If all states imposed an estate tax, of course, the rich would have no choice but to pay it. Mr. Zucman suggests that an easy way to maximize states’ estate tax revenues would be to reintroduce the federal credit, eliminating interstate tax competition.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time

A New Mexico veteran who served with the Marines in Vietnam said a final goodbye last week to the beloved dog he had to put up for adoption when he entered hospice care.

John Vincent was reunited with Patch, a 5-year-old Yorkie, for one last time Thursday at the Hospice Center at the Raymond G. Murphy VA Medical Center in Albuquerque, according to reports.

“Yeah, that’s me, that’s daddy,” Vincent said as Patch licked his face, the Albuquerque Journal reported. “Are you so happy to see me? I’m so happy to see you.”

Westlake Legal Group john-vincent-2 Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44

Marine veteran John Vincent was reunited with his dog, Patch. (Albuquerque Animal Welfare Department)

Vincent, 69, was admitted to the hospice center last week and was forced to take Patch to an Albuquerque Animal Welfare shelter because he had no family in New Mexico. Shelter officials said Vincent may not have much time left.

BOY, 11, WITH TERMINAL BRAIN CANCER ASKS FOR ‘PATCHES AND PRAYERS’ FROM MILITARY, LAW ENFORCEMENT, FIRE COMMUNITIES

He told Amy Neal, a social worker at the hospice center, that he had only one request—to see Patch one last time.

“When the request came in, it was an immediate ‘absolutely,’ and let’s do whatever we can to get it done,” Animal Welfare director Danny Nevarez said, according to the paper. “It was as simple as getting Patch over here.”

Vincent enlisted in the Marines for three years and served in Vietnam, the paper reported.

DYING WOMAN GRANTED WISH TO SEE BELOVED PET HORSE

Westlake Legal Group john-vincent-3 Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44

He told the hospice center his only request was to see his dog one last time. (Albuquerque Animal Welfare Department)

He rode a Harley and would take Patch with him on rides. The dog had its own pair of tiny goggles, according to the paper.

Animal Welfare posted photos of the reunion on its Facebook page Friday with a post that reported Vincent and Patch were so happy to see each and to say their goodbyes.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

“It was an honor to make this veteran’s final wish come true,” the post continued.

The shelter reported that Patch has found a new owner and will be leaving for a new home soon.

Westlake Legal Group john-vincent Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44   Westlake Legal Group john-vincent Vietnam Marine veteran in New Mexico hospice care reunites with beloved dog one last time Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/us/military/veterans fox-news/us/military/military-families fox-news/us/military/marines fox news fnc/us fnc article 2c084dae-b251-5d04-a93f-5b3c37236f44

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Court dismisses charges stemming from 1939 Virginia sit-in

Westlake Legal Group 18021767_G Court dismisses charges stemming from 1939 Virginia sit-in

The city of Alexandria issued a news release about the decision late Saturday. It says that after recent research by Alexandria library staff determined that the disorderly conduct charges were technically still outstanding, although they were never prosecuted, the local commonwealth’s attorney asked a court to dismiss them.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com