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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 243)

Against all odds, it looks like Bernie Sanders might be the Democratic nominee after all

Westlake Legal Group 9K3B6DhQDApxqOj7eoOc4MuH0i_R-RABJDUr-CotgfQ Against all odds, it looks like Bernie Sanders might be the Democratic nominee after all r/politics

Was Bernie a likely nominee from the beginning?

In 2016, Bernie’s supporters saw him winning 46% of the vote and thought, “He was so close; next time he’ll do a little bit better and win!”

Others saw Sanders stuck at 18% in 2020 national polls, and just did some quick arithmetic:

46%-18%=28%

“I guess 28% of Democratic primary voters hate Hillary so much that they would vote for Sanders in a head-to-head match-up, even though he would never be their first choice.” The 2020 field has many not-Hillary-candidates to choose from so Sanders is in a weaker position than he was in 2016.


To be fair, they could both be right…sorta.

After a few early state contests, presidential primaries tend to become two-person races. Before Iowa votes, it is a wide-open field.

Right now, Sanders could be poised to win New Hampshire (and therefore become one of the two people we argue about until the convention) and simultaneously struggle to get the support of more than 75% of the primary voters.


…but also, a ton of this is based on the premise that ‘Biden couldn’t possibly win the nomination’ even though he is polling in the lead…but that is the same thing that people said about Trump during the 2016 primary. We should probably believe the polls.

Edit: Made it clear that the polls in the last paragraph reference primary polls, not general election polls.

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Fox News hosting Pete Buttigieg’s town hall, Chris Wallace moderating

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118501875001_6118497135001-vs Fox News hosting Pete Buttigieg's town hall, Chris Wallace moderating fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 1e476cc0-5236-5604-922e-cf899cda2afb

Fox News Channel will host a town hall with 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg in Iowa on Sunday, Jan. 26, an event set to be moderated by Chris Wallace, said Fox News president and executive editor Jay Wallace on Tuesday.

“We are pleased to host Mayor Buttigieg for the second time this election cycle for a timely town hall in the influential state of Iowa,” Wallace said. “Once again, we are looking forward to providing our millions of viewers with an insightful discussion ahead of the first major contest of the primary season.”

CNN PUTS ‘BUILDING A MOOD OF DOOM’ NARRATIVE AHEAD OF FACTS WITH ANTI-TRUMP IRAN COVERAGE, CRITICS SAY

The event will be the seventh town hall event of the current election season hosted by Fox News, and the sixth with a Democratic presidential candidate. Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum recently moderated a town hall with former HUD Secretary Julián Castro.

Other 2020 Democratic hopefuls to partake in Fox News town halls include Sens. Amy Klobuchar, Kirsten Gillibrand and Bernie Sanders.

“Fox News Sunday” host Wallace has participated in the coverage of nearly every major political event since joining Fox News in 2003. The veteran journalist became the first Fox News personality ever to moderate a general election presidential debate when he grilled Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in 2016.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The Emmy-nominated Wallace has landed multiple news-making interviews, including sit-downs with Russian President Vladimir Putin, French President Emmanuel Macron, then-President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the first interview with President Donald Trump after he was elected in 2016.

FNC finished 2019 as the most-watched basic cable network for the fourth consecutive year, averaging 1.4 million daily viewers.

The Buttigieg town hall will air live on Fox News Channel at 7 p.m. ET, one week prior to the Iowa caucuses.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118501875001_6118497135001-vs Fox News hosting Pete Buttigieg's town hall, Chris Wallace moderating fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 1e476cc0-5236-5604-922e-cf899cda2afb   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118501875001_6118497135001-vs Fox News hosting Pete Buttigieg's town hall, Chris Wallace moderating fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 1e476cc0-5236-5604-922e-cf899cda2afb

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Boeing Recommends 737 Max Flight Simulator Training for Pilots

Westlake Legal Group 07boeing1-facebookJumbo Boeing Recommends 737 Max Flight Simulator Training for Pilots Federal Aviation Administration Boeing Company Boeing 737 Max Groundings and Safety Concerns (2019) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters Airlines and Airplanes

Boeing recommended on Tuesday that pilots train in flight simulators before flying its 737 Max, a move it had previously resisted.

The Max has been grounded since March following two crashes that killed 346 people, and Boeing has been working for months on changes to the software that contributed to both accidents. The training requirement further complicates the company’s efforts to return the plan to service.

Boeing recently informed the administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, Stephen Dickson, of its recommendation. The final decision to require the simulator training would be made by the F.A.A., which is likely to follow the company’s advice. The regulator still has to complete testing of the plane.

The Max was designed, in part, to avoid having pilots train in simulators. The plane is the latest update to the 737, which has been flying since the 1960s. By making the plane similar to the 737 NG, the previous version of the plane, Boeing was able to persuade regulators that pilots did not need to train on simulators.

But Boeing did make fundamental changes to the plane, including the addition of software known as MCAS, which played a role in both crashes. Initially, pilots were not made aware that the software existed and were not trained on how to react if it was erroneously activated.

Avoiding simulator training was beneficial for Boeing. In negotiations with Southwest Airlines while the plane was being developed, Boeing agreed that if the Max required simulator training, it would give Southwest a discount of $1 million per plane. Southwest has ordered 280 Max jets.

The decision to recommend simulator testing comes as Boeing is facing continued delays in its effort to return the Max to the air. The company said it would temporarily shut down the Max factory this month, and new problems with the plane unrelated to the software that contributed to both crashes have recently been identified, raising the prospect of further delays. In December, it fired its chief executive, Dennis A. Muilenburg.

“Safety is Boeing’s top priority,” the company’s interim chief executive, Greg Smith, said in a statement. “Public, customer and stakeholder confidence in the 737 Max is critically important to us and with that focus Boeing has decided to recommend Max simulator training combined with computer-based training for all pilots prior to returning the Max safely to service.”

The F.A.A. said that it would consider Boeing’s recommendation, adding in a statement that it was, “following a thorough process, not a set timeline, to ensure that any design modifications to the 737 Max are integrated with appropriate training and procedures.”

Boeing’s decision stems from its analysis of flight simulator tests of the Max it conducted with airline pilots from United, Aeromexico, American Airlines and Southwest last month, according to a person familiar with the matter.

In the tests, which were part of the work involved in evaluating the software update, many of the pilots did not use the correct procedures to handle emergencies, instead relying on their flying skills. Those results raised questions about whether simply informing pilots of which procedures to use would be sufficient to prepare them to fly the plane.

There are currently 34 certified Max flight simulators worldwide, according to a person familiar with the matter. Getting pilots trained in the machines, which are designed to replicate emergency scenarios, will add another hurdle for airlines, who have struggled with mounting losses throughout the Max crisis.

Airlines may also be able to use the more than 200 737 NG simulators to conduct the training, though it isn’t clear yet whether that is possible.

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Mark Levin blasts critics of Trump’s Iran strike: ‘Our enemies are rooting for the Democrat Party’

Westlake Legal Group Mark-Levin1 Mark Levin blasts critics of Trump's Iran strike: 'Our enemies are rooting for the Democrat Party' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc be4e3618-d72e-5781-b4eb-a46b141f5c79 article

Conservative commentator Mark Levin said Monday that America’s enemies are rooting for the Democratic Party to win the 2020 election over President Trump.

On his radio program “The Mark Levin Show,” Levin called the Democrats an “evil force” in the history of the United States.

“With certain exceptions,” he admitted. “But, it’s been an evil force and it still is.”

POMPEO REJECTS CLAIM OF SOLEIMANI DIPLOMATIC MISSION AS ‘PROPAGANDA’

In reference to last week’s killing of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani, the “Life, Liberty & Levin” host urged his listeners to remember that “the same Democrat Party that claims to be tough on Russia and upset with Trump over Ukraine immediately comes to the defense of a terrorist.”

“They pretend they don’t, but they do and they are because now they’re trying to tie the commander-in-chief’s hands,” he said.

White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham told Fox News Tuesday that President Trump ordered the takedown of Soleimani by U.S. forces at Baghdad International Airport after the administration obtained intelligence claiming Soleimani was plotting to kill American diplomats and military personnel in the region.

The decision was met with condemnation from most Democrats — some of whom alleged that the president had attacked a foreign military leader to distract Americans from the impeachment process in the House of Representatives.

In addition, many were frustrated that the president did not notify Congress before conducting the airstrike.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Who do you think Iran wants to win the election?” Levin asked. “Donald Trump or the Democrats?”

“Our enemies are rooting for the Democrat Party. They’d love nothing more than Joe Biden or Bernie Sanders or Mike Bloomberg, as he disarms the American people,” he said.

“It’s unequivocal,” Levin added. “There is no debate. They hate the country because you, the voter, won’t give them power.”

“The unpatriotic America-hating Democrat Party — look, if you Democrats disagree with me, you need to change your leadership,” he advised. “Don’t look at me. You’ve got leaders from New York and San Francisco and LA…Get some real, decent, American-supporting politicians in there.”

Westlake Legal Group Mark-Levin1 Mark Levin blasts critics of Trump's Iran strike: 'Our enemies are rooting for the Democrat Party' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc be4e3618-d72e-5781-b4eb-a46b141f5c79 article   Westlake Legal Group Mark-Levin1 Mark Levin blasts critics of Trump's Iran strike: 'Our enemies are rooting for the Democrat Party' Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc be4e3618-d72e-5781-b4eb-a46b141f5c79 article

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Atlanta Hawks’ Trae Young campaigns for NBA great’s dunk contest participation

Atlanta Hawks star Trae Young is hoping to get a certain NBA great into February’s dunk contest one last time before he retires.

Young took to Twitter on Monday to try and get Vince Carter back to the dunk contest.

WESTBROOK SET TO RETURN TO FACE A THUNDER TEAM THAT IS OK

“Vince Carter To The NBA Dunk Contest…. NEEEED IT!! #ThatsMyVote,” he wrote.

The only person that was set to be in this year’s dunk contest is Los Angeles Lakers center Dwight Howard, according to The Athletic. Howard won the event three consecutive times from 2007 to 2009 when he was a member of the Orlando Magic and leading the team to deep NBA playoff runs.

EMBIID, WITH DISLOCATED FINGER, LEADS 76ERS PAST THUNDER

Westlake Legal Group Vince-Carter2 Atlanta Hawks' Trae Young campaigns for NBA great's dunk contest participation Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nba/atlanta-hawks fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc article 056cd878-24a6-59b1-8b19-8e052486295a

Atlanta Hawks guard Vince Carter (15) congratulates guard Brandon Goodwin (0) after an NBA basketball game against the Orlando Magic, Monday, Dec. 30, 2019, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

Carter, 42, is the oldest active player in the NBA and in his second season with the Hawks. He is the first player to play in four different decades having made his debut with the Toronto Raptors in 1999.

Carter has had a stellar career playing for eight teams from 1999 to 2020. He is most famous for his incredible performance in the 2000 dunk contest where he put his elbow in the rim among other crazy slams.

Carter has appeared in 30 games for the Hawks this season. He is averaging 5 points and 2 rebounds per game.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

This year’s NBA All-Star Game takes place in Chicago.

Westlake Legal Group Trae-Young2 Atlanta Hawks' Trae Young campaigns for NBA great's dunk contest participation Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nba/atlanta-hawks fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc article 056cd878-24a6-59b1-8b19-8e052486295a   Westlake Legal Group Trae-Young2 Atlanta Hawks' Trae Young campaigns for NBA great's dunk contest participation Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nba/atlanta-hawks fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc article 056cd878-24a6-59b1-8b19-8e052486295a

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Australia wildfires bring over 100 firefighters from US, including elite crew from California

Firefighters battling out-of-control wildfires that have killed at least 25 people, hundreds of thousands of animals and scorched millions of acres across Australia are getting well-needed reinforcements from the U.S., including a team of veteran fire crews from California.

The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, which is mobilizing U.S. resources in response to Australia’s requests for international firefighting aid, said the new batch of 20 veteran firefighters based in the Angeles National Forest north of Los Angeles departed on Monday for the region.

“As the extreme fire danger continues across Australia, the Department of the Interior will continue to do all that we can to support requests for assistance,” Craig Leff, director of the Department of the Interior’s Office of Wildland Fire, said in a statement. “Our focus remains on helping the people of Australia and keeping people safe in these unprecedented conditions.”

AUSTRALIAN OFFICIALS CHARGED NEARLY 200 WITH FIRE OFFENSES AS DEADLY WILDFIRES RAGE

Federal agencies such as the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management already have provided a few dozen people, most of them with experience managing fires, a forest service spokesperson said Saturday.

Westlake Legal Group international-team-nifc-fire Australia wildfires bring over 100 firefighters from US, including elite crew from California Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/world/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/world/disasters fox news fnc/world fnc article 9348e9b7-7a2d-5ff9-95bd-ee9b8a0f9160

A crew of firefighters from the U.S. that have arrived in Australia to help combat the deadly blazes. (National Interagency Fire Center)

The crew that left on Monday who left on Monday from Los Angeles International Airport will replace a group of personnel sent to Australia in early December. They include hot-shot and helicopter crew members with experience attacking fires early before they grow into large infernos, according to Angeles National Forest Fire Chief Robert Garcia.

The firefighters, 18 men and two women, said they were anticipating “strong fire behavior” and were preparing on what to expect based on their own experience battling wildfires in Southern California.

“We’re in an area where we are getting fires all the time, we’re kinda known for it, for getting fires, so I think we can translate that over [and] just see what the lay of the land would be out there,” Forest Service Firefighter Jorge Perez told FOX11.

The Pacific Northwest Region of the Forest Service said that over 100 fire personnel from the U.S. have been working with counterparts in Australia as they struggle to combat the devasting blazes.

“We send well-wishes of rain, lower temperatures & decreased winds,” the agency recently tweeted. “Thank you for your efforts!”

Australia and New Zealand have been sending firefighters to the United States for more than 15 years, most recently in August 2018, when 138 came to help battle fires in Northern California and the Northwest. The last time U.S. firefighters worked in Australia was 2010.

“Our thoughts and prayers, with our deepest condolences, are with the Australia firefighters and public who have lost their lives and homes,” U.S. Forest Service Fire Director Shawna Legarza said in a statement. “We are proud to provide personnel from the United States and will continue to support Australia with the resources needed during this unprecedented fire situation.”

AUSTRALIA WILDFIRES MAY MERGE INTO ‘MEGA BLAZE’ AS DEATH TOLL CLIMBS, GOVERNMENT VOWS ‘WHATEVER IT TAKES’

The fires, fueled by drought and the country’s hottest and driest year on record, have been raging since September, months earlier than is typical for Australia’s annual wildfire season. So far, the blazes have killed 25 people, destroyed 2,000 homes and scorched an area twice the size of the state of Maryland.

Westlake Legal Group AusWildfireSmoke1 Australia wildfires bring over 100 firefighters from US, including elite crew from California Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/world/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/world/disasters fox news fnc/world fnc article 9348e9b7-7a2d-5ff9-95bd-ee9b8a0f9160

Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison called up about 3,000 reservists as the threat of wildfires escalated last weekend. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

In the New South Wales state, 130 fires were still burning on Tuesday, around 50 of which were uncontrolled. Among those killed in the blazes are volunteer firefighter Andrew O’Dwyer, who perished on Dec. 19 after a tree fell into the path of the fire engine he was traveling in with colleague Geoffrey Keaton, 32, who was also killed.

During his funeral in Sydney on Tuesday, his young daughter Charlotte was presented with a service medal and was pictured wearing her father’s hat.

Nineteen-month-old Charlotte received the medal from rural fire service commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons, who wept as he read out a tribute to her 36-year-old father during the service, according to Sky News.

“Charlotte should know her father was a selfless and special man, who only left because he was a hero,” Fitzsimmons said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

On Tuesday, cooler and rainier weather was providing thousands of weary firefighters a “psychological and emotional” reprieve as they scrambled to strengthen containment lines around the blazes before temperatures rise again, according to Fitzsimmons.

“It really is about shoring up protection to limit the damage potential and the outbreak of these fires over the coming days,” he told the Australian Broadcasting Corp.

The rain was also complicating firefighters’ attempts to strategically backburn certain areas and was making the ground slippery for fire trucks.

Victoria state Emergency Services Minister Lisa Neville said on Monday at least 8 inches of rain would need to fall in a short time to snuff out the fires — around 20 times what has fallen across the region in the past day. And officials warned that Australia’s wildfire season, which generally lasts through March, is nowhere near its end.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group international-team-2 Australia wildfires bring over 100 firefighters from US, including elite crew from California Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/world/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/world/disasters fox news fnc/world fnc article 9348e9b7-7a2d-5ff9-95bd-ee9b8a0f9160   Westlake Legal Group international-team-2 Australia wildfires bring over 100 firefighters from US, including elite crew from California Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/australia fox-news/world/disasters/fires fox-news/world/disasters/disaster-response fox-news/world/disasters fox news fnc/world fnc article 9348e9b7-7a2d-5ff9-95bd-ee9b8a0f9160

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‘Prozac Nation’ author Elizabeth Wurtzel dead at 52

Westlake Legal Group elizabeth-wurtzell-getty 'Prozac Nation' author Elizabeth Wurtzel dead at 52 New York Post Gabrielle Fonrouge fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fnc/entertainment fnc dff37d80-b741-5633-9f22-fe2757a8d764 article

Elizabeth Wurtzel, the famed author behind “Prozac Nation,” died Tuesday in Manhattan at age 52 after a long battle with breast cancer, according to reports.

Wurtzel, who rose to stardom after her breakout 1994 memoir detailing her battle with depression and drug addiction, was diagnosed with the disease in 2015 and underwent a double mastectomy but the cancer spread to her brain, her husband Jim Freed told the Washington Post.

LINDSAY DE FELIZ, BEST-SELLING AUTHOR, FOUND DEAD IN DOMINICAN REPUBLIC IN SHALLOW GRAVE: REPORTS

The author’s immediate cause of death was “complications from leptomeningeal disease” — an illness that occurs when cancer spreads to the cerebrospinal fluid, the outlet reported.

Fans of Wurtzel took to Twitter to remember her poignant writing and the lasting effect she had on the personal memoir genre.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Upon hearing of the incredibly-too-soon death of Elizabeth Wurtzel, I’m reminded of this sentence that just gets me: ‘I wanted to love and be loved, but I behaved badly, and I had terrible taste,’” Julie Garcia wrote, linking to a 2014 article she wrote in the New York Times.

This article originally appeared in The New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group elizabeth-wurtzell-getty 'Prozac Nation' author Elizabeth Wurtzel dead at 52 New York Post Gabrielle Fonrouge fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fnc/entertainment fnc dff37d80-b741-5633-9f22-fe2757a8d764 article   Westlake Legal Group elizabeth-wurtzell-getty 'Prozac Nation' author Elizabeth Wurtzel dead at 52 New York Post Gabrielle Fonrouge fox-news/entertainment/events/departed fnc/entertainment fnc dff37d80-b741-5633-9f22-fe2757a8d764 article

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Updates to the r/Politics Rules

Articles must be published within the last two weeks (decreased from one month)

Old content is often misleading because the political landscape changes rapidly. We therefore require all submissions in r/politics to be published within the last two weeks. For example, if the date is January 29 and the article submitted was written before January 15, then the submission is out of date.

No Copy-Pasted Articles Rule

Submissions which are entirely a copy-paste of the original reporting, or that add one paragraph or less with a “read more at” link to the original content, are not permitted. Articles or videos that add another take on a subject, or include different verbiage or context, are otherwise allowed.

The full r/politics rules can be viewed here.

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Pompeo Says Iran Posed Continued Threat to the U.S.: Live Updates

Here are the latest developments:

Video

transcript

‘It Was the Right Decision’: Pompeo Defends Attack Against Suleimani

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo addressed the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, but did not provide new details about what led to the drone strike against the Iranian commander.

So if you’re looking for imminence you need look no further than the days that led up to the strike that was taken against Suleimani. And then you in addition to that, have what we could clearly see were continuing efforts on behalf of this terrorist to build out a network of campaign activities that were going to lead, potentially, to the death of many more Americans. It was the right decision — we got it right — the Department of Defense did excellent work. All of the others were prepared for what might happen if Iran decided to make choices that were bad for the Iranian people, and then you saw more tactically just these last few days, the president’s response when the Iranians made a bad decision to kill an American. We hope — we hope they won’t make another bad decision just like that one.

Westlake Legal Group 07iran-briefing-sub3-videoSixteenByNine3000 Pompeo Says Iran Posed Continued Threat to the U.S.: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Iran Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Defense and Military Forces

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo addressed the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, but did not provide new details about what led to the drone strike against the Iranian commander.CreditCredit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_135400473_22f64a81-8061-449f-a318-71d25012008e-articleLarge Pompeo Says Iran Posed Continued Threat to the U.S.: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Iran Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Defense and Military Forces

A training session in Baghdad for Iraqi police offers led by NATO forces in 2018.Credit…Ahmed Jalil/Epa-Efe, via Shutterstock

NATO is removing some of the trainers who have been working with Iraqi soldiers battling the Islamic State, in the wake of the American killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

On Monday, the NATO secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg, announced that training had been temporarily suspended.

Describing security of NATO personnel, the organization said in a statement that it would be taking precautions — including “the temporary repositioning of some personnel to different locations both inside and outside Iraq.’’

NATO “maintains a presence in Iraq’’ and remains committed “to fighting international terrorism,” an official said, but refused to provide “operational details’’ about troop movements.

NATO has had roughly 500 soldiers doing the training.

Some NATO countries, like Germany and Croatia, have announced that they are moving troops out of Iraq altogether, at least temporarily, because of security concerns.

Thirty of the 120 German soldiers in Iraq will be sent to Jordan and Kuwait, while others will remain positioned in the less volatile Kurdistan region, the German defense and foreign ministries said in a joint letter to the German parliament, the Bundestag.

“When the training is able to resume, the military personnel can be reinstated,” the letter said.

Croatia has also moved its small contingent of soldiers — 14 — from Iraq, with seven bound for Kuwait and the rest headed home, the Croatian Defense Ministry said. Slovakia has also removed its seven soldiers.

Some NATO troops began leaving Baghdad’s Green Zone in helicopters Monday night. The NATO training mission began in 2018 at Iraq’s request.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 07iran-briefing5-videoSixteenByNine3000-v2 Pompeo Says Iran Posed Continued Threat to the U.S.: Live Updates Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Iran Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Defense and Military Forces

As Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani’s body was taken home for burial, a crush is believed to have killed dozens of mourners who crowded the streets of Kerman, Iran.CreditCredit…Atta Kenare/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

In an appearance on Tuesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo did not provide any new details on what prompted the killing of General Suleimani. But he said that Iran posed a threat to American lives.

Mr. Pompeo, a former C.I.A. director, said in a television appearance on Friday after the strike on General Suleimani that there had been intelligence showing an “imminent attack” on Americans and United States interests across the Middle East, which justified the deadly drone strike.

But since then, American officials have failed to provide any evidence to show what might have been targeted, or how soon an attack was expected.

“If you’re looking for imminence, you need look no further than the days that led up to the strike that was taken against Suleimani,” Mr. Pompeo told reporters at the State Department on Tuesday. “And then you, in addition to that, have what we can clearly see were continuing efforts on behalf of this terrorist to build out a network of campaign activities that were going to lead potentially to the death of many more Americans.”

Some Pentagon officials have said the intelligence did not show an imminent attack. The alerts on threat streams were not unusual, they said.

“It was the right decision, we got it right,” Mr. Pompeo said as reporters quizzed him on President Trump’s decision to carry out the attack.

Mr. Pompeo scoffed at the idea that General Suleimani was in Baghdad on a diplomatic mission and said, given his discussions with the Saudi defense minister on Monday, Riyadh also did not believe that.

“Anybody here believe that? Is there any history that would indicate it was remotely possible that this kind gentleman, this diplomat of great order, Qassim Suleimani traveled to Baghdad for the idea of conducting a peace mission?” Mr. Pompeo said sarcastically to journalists at the State Department. “I made you reporters laugh this morning, that’s fantastic.”

He added: “We’ve heard these same lies before. It is fundamentally false. He was not there on a diplomatic mission trying to resolve a problem.”

Iranian state-run news outlets reported a deadly stampede during the funeral procession for General Suleimani in his hometown, Kerman, in southeastern Iran, on Tuesday.

Millions were reported to have flooded the town’s streets to witness the procession for the general, who was killed in an American drone strike in Baghdad last week. His death has fanned smoldering tensions between the United States and Iran, and fueled fears of a broader conflict.

The crowding and subsequent stampede in Kerman led to General Suleimani’s burial being postponed, state news media reported. It is still unclear when he will be buried.

Photographs of the procession showed an elaborately decorated truck carrying General Suleimani’s coffin through streets packed densely with mourners, many wearing black and carrying pictures of the dead commander.

“Unfortunately, as a result of a stampede, some of our compatriots have been injured and some have been killed during the funeral processions,” Pirhossein Koulivand, head of the Iranian emergency medical services, told the news agency IRIB.

Fifty-six people died and 213 were injured, the broadcaster IRIB reported on its website.

Images and videos posted on social media showed the aftermath of the crush, with emergency workers and bystanders attempting to resuscitate people lying on the ground. The lifeless bodies of other victims, jackets covering their faces, could be seen nearby.

The general’s body had been flown to Kerman after a funeral in Tehran on Monday that had brought even bigger crowds into the streets of the Iranian capital.

In a fiery speech made in General Suleimani’s hometown on Tuesday, the leader of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps vowed to “set ablaze” places where Americans and their allies live.

“We will take revenge — a revenge that will be tough, strong, decisive and finishing and will make them regret,” the corps’s leader, Hossein Salami, said on Tuesday in a front of a crowd of mourners. “We will set ablaze the place they like, and they know where it is.”

“Today, the seeds of hatred for the U.S. have been sown in the hearts of Muslims,” he added, according to Fars, an Iranian news agency associated with the Revolutionary Guards.

The pledge to seek vengeance echoed the rhetoric of many of the country’s leaders since General Suleimani’s killing on Friday. “Death to Israel,” the crowd chanted back, according to news reports. Israel, a close ally of the United States, has long been an enemy of Iran.

Thousands of mourners, dressed in black and carrying photos of General Suleimani, crowded the central square of Kerman, where the general’s body was taken for burial after a funeral procession on Monday in Tehran, the capital.

Before arriving in Kerman, the general’s remains were taken to the holy city of Qom, where thousands of residents came out, hoping for a chance to touch the coffin of a man the state has declared a martyr.

On Monday, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei wept and offered prayers over General Suleimani’s coffin at the enormous state funeral. The ayatollah, Iran’s supreme leader, had a close relationship with the general, who was widely considered to be the country’s second-most powerful man.

General Suleimani’s successor swore revenge during Monday’s ceremony, while chants of “Death to America” rang out from the crowds in the capital.

State-run news outlets reported that millions had gathered in Tehran, and images showed a sea of mourners, many wearing black and waving the Iranian flag.

“God the almighty has promised to get his revenge, and God is the main avenger,” said Esmail Ghaani, the Iranian general who will succeed General Suleimani as head of the Quds Force, the foreign expeditionary arm of the Revolutionary Guards. “Certainly, actions will be taken,” he added.

Mohammad Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, said on Tuesday that he had been rejected for a visa to attend a Security Council meeting at the United Nations headquarters in New York, confirming reports from American news outlets that he would be barred.

Mr. Zarif, in an interview with the Iranian news outlet Press TV, said that his office had requested a visa weeks ago to participate in the meeting on Thursday, rejecting claims by American officials that they had not had time to process the application.

“The Americans are trying to create the impression that our request to attend the meeting was put forth following the assassination of General Suleimani,” Mr. Zarif said, according to the news outlet, adding, “The question everyone needs to be asking this lawbreaking administration is: What are they so scared of?”

Mr. Zarif later posted on Twitter about the situation, taking aim at Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump.

During a Tuesday morning news conference, Mr. Pompeo was asked about the visa but said he would not comment specifically on visa matters. He added that the United States would “comply with our obligations” under United Nations rules.

Robert C. O’Brien, the American national security adviser, was asked on “Fox & Friends” on Tuesday morning about the visa.

“I don’t think Secretary Pompeo thought that this was the right time for Mr. Zarif to come to the United States, and whenever he comes to New York, he spreads propaganda,” Mr. O’Brien said.

The New York meeting plans to focus on the topic of upholding the Charter of the United Nations, and comes as Iran and the United States are engaged in a heated back-and-forth over the American drone strike last week that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

The office of the United Nations secretary general did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

Mr. Zarif visited New York in September to attend the United Nations General Assembly, after claims that his visa had been intentionally delayed. In August, the United States announced sanctions on Mr. Zarif, a seasoned diplomat who helped negotiate the 2015 nuclear deal.

In Jerusalem and elsewhere across the Middle East, United States embassies warned Americans of potential attacks from Iran, as Iranian generals vowed to avenge the senior commander killed in an American drone strike.

In Jerusalem, the embassy told Americans on Monday to watch out for “mortars and rocket fire.” A day earlier, the United States Mission in Saudi Arabia had warned citizens to be prepared for “missile and drone attacks.”

The security alerts follow the targeted killing on Friday of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leading figure in Iran’s foreign-facing intelligence and military operations.

At General Suleimani’s funeral in Tehran on Monday, military commanders promised vengeance. Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, told advisers that any retaliation against the United States should be direct, proportional and carried out openly by Iran.

That is a startling departure for the Iranian leadership, which has typically cloaked its attacks behind the actions of proxies it has cultivated around the region. But in the fury generated by the killing of General Suleimani, a close ally and personal friend of the supreme leader, the ayatollah was apparently willing to cast aside those traditional cautions.

In Israel, the United States Embassy on Monday issued a security alert for the entire country and warned Americans of potential mortar and rocket attacks.

“Out of an abundance of caution, the embassy strongly encourages U.S. citizens to remain vigilant and take appropriate steps to increase their security awareness, as security incidents, including rocket fire, often take place without warning,” the embassy said in an alert published on its website.

The United States Mission to Saudi Arabia on Sunday warned Americans in the kingdom to be aware of a “heightened risk of missile and drone attacks.”

American embassies across the region have been on heightened alert since Dec. 31, when militants, backed by the Iranian government, stormed the embassy in Baghdad. President Trump said the assault was organized by General Suleimani.

Last week, embassies in Baghdad and in Beirut, Lebanon, issued security alerts. Some airlines have halted flights to the Iraqi capital, including EgyptAir, which on Tuesday announced that its flights in and out of the city would stop from Wednesday through Friday.

The Iranian Parliament on Tuesday passed a bill declaring the American military’s top leadership to be “terrorists,” subject to Iranian sanctions, according to news reports in state media.

The bill aimed at the Pentagon’s top brass mirrored a Trump administration policy implemented in April that imposed economic and travel sanctions on the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps as well as organizations, companies and individuals with ties to it.

That policy represented the first time an arm of a sovereign government had been designated a terrorist organization.

The Defense Department said the killing of General Suleimani was justified in part because of the corps’s terrorist designation. General Suleimani led the Quds Force, a unit of the Revolutionary Guards that conducted intelligence-gathering and attacks outside Iran’s borders.

Parliament expedited the bill through an emergency process, according to the semiofficial Iranian news agency Tasnim.

Also on Tuesday, Parliament allocated $223 million to the Quds Force to “avenge” General Suleimani’s death, according to Fars, the state news agency.

An official letter from the Defense Department informing Iraq that American troops were “repositioning forces” for “movement out of Iraq” produced headlines around the world saying that an American withdrawal had begun.

But the letter, drafted by the United States military command in Baghdad, was sent out by mistake. The furor it caused prompted Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark A. Milley, to call an urgent news conference to deny the reports.

“It was an honest mistake,” General Milley told reporters at the Pentagon. “That letter is a draft, it was a mistake, it was unsigned, it should not have been released.”

“There’s been no decision made to leave Iraq, period,” Mr. Esper said. “There is no decision to leave, nor did we issue any plans to leave.”

General Milley said military officials had begun making arrangements for a withdrawal in the event that a decision is made to pull out. The Iraqi Parliament voted on Sunday to expel American troops from the country, amid anger over the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani on Iraqi soil. But Iraq has not formally notified the United States that it must leave.

General Milley said the military was “moving forces around” to consolidate positions. Not only were they not withdrawing, he said, but more forces were arriving from Kuwait.

Mark T. Esper, the secretary of defense, said striking Iranian cultural sites with no military value would be a war crime, putting him at odds with President Trump, who has insisted that such places would be legitimate targets. The president’s threats generated condemnation at home and abroad while deeply discomfiting American military leaders who have made a career of upholding the laws of war.

“We will follow the laws of armed conflict,” the defense secretary said at a news briefing at the Pentagon on Monday when asked if cultural sites would be targeted, as the president had suggested over the weekend. When a reporter asked if that meant “no” because the laws of war prohibit targeting cultural sites, Mr. Esper agreed: “That’s the laws of armed conflict.”

The furor over the threat to Iranian antiquities was a classic controversy of Mr. Trump’s own creation, the apparent result of an impulsive threat and his refusal to back down in the face of criticism. While Mr. Trump declared on Saturday that the United States had identified 52 potential targets in Iran, none of them qualified as cultural sites, according to an administration official who asked not to be identified correcting the president.

Audrey Azoulay, the director-general of UNESCO, met with the Iranian ambassador to the organization on Monday to discuss the current situation, and issued a statement pointing to international agreements that condemn acts of destruction of cultural heritage.

“Ms. Azoulay stressed the universality of cultural and natural heritage as vectors of peace and dialogue between peoples, which the international community has a duty to protect and preserve for future generations,” UNESCO said in the statement.

Reporting was contributed by Megan Specia, Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, David D. Kirkpatrick, Melissa Eddy, Edward Wong, Lara Jakes, Peter Baker, Maggie Haberman, Alissa J. Rubin, Ben Hubbard, Mark Landler, Helene Cooper and Thomas Gibbons-Neff.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Transcript: NPR’s Full Interview With Iran’s Foreign Minister

Westlake Legal Group 180423_mohammadjavadzarif_008-edit11_custom-ee280964be7a4efc9bc2e4d70a59cf9f24bd1720-s1100-c15 Transcript: NPR's Full Interview With Iran's Foreign Minister

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in 2018. He was interviewed by NPR on Tuesday. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Transcript: NPR's Full Interview With Iran's Foreign Minister

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in 2018. He was interviewed by NPR on Tuesday.

Elias Williams for NPR

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif talks to All Things Considered’s Mary Louise Kelly in Iran about heightened tensions between Tehran and Washington after the U.S. killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani. Here’s the full transcript of their conversation.

Mary Louise Kelly: Foreign Minister, thank you. Our time is short, so I will be direct. Does Iran consider the U.S. killing of Qassem Soleimani an act of war?

Mohammad Javad Zarif: It’s an act of terrorism and an act of war.

It is both —

Both.

Terrorism and war, you believe, on behalf of the U.S.?

Yes. But it has three basically characteristics. One against Iraq. It violated territorial integrity and sovereignty of Iraq. And it also violated the agreement that they had with the Iraqis. And that is why the Iraqis decided to kick them out.

It hurt the feeling of many people across Iran and the rest of the world. And the reaction to that would be to make it almost impossible for the U.S. to continue to stay in this region. That is why I say the days of the United States in our region are numbered.

Third is they attacked a citizen and a senior official of Iran. We’re responsible under international law for protection of our citizens. This was an act of aggression, an armed attack, albeit a cowardly armed attack, against an Iranian official in foreign territory. It amounts to war, and we will respond according to our own timing and choice.

But we were on the streets in Tehran yesterday, we saw flags, banners with the words deep revenge written across them.

Yes.

What does that look like?

Well, that looks like the United States has committed a grave error. A grave error. And it will pay for that grave error.

Can you be specific?

Well, I was very specific. The Parliament of Iraq asked them to leave. The people of the region are asking them to leave. And the people of Iran are asking their government to do what it takes for the United States to pay for its crimes.

But what would Iran’s response look like?

Well, we will decide. We will decide. The United States, you see —

There’s nothing on or off the table?

Well, you see, in exercising our right to self-defense, we are only bound by international law, unlike the United States, which is not bound by international law.

The U.S. would differ. But go on.

U.S. would differ? Well, tell them to explain how they want to attack cultural sites. That’s a war crime. How do they want to — I mean, these are not off the record. These are statements made by the president of the United States. Disproportionate manner.

The defense secretary, as you well know, Mark Esper has said in the United States, the U.S. will not be attacking cultural sites.

Well, I’ve heard that the president in the United States is the commander in chief. And as you say, the buck stops here. So, unless President Trump changes his own threats, I don’t think that. … The defense secretary works on behalf of the president, not as a as an independent entity. But the point is, the United — the secretary of state, of all people, has said if Iran wants its people to eat, it has to listen to the United States. That’s a crime against humanity. Starvation is a crime against humanity, creating individual responsibility before the International Criminal Court. These are the statements that are being made. I’m not making them up. I mean, the Newsweek headlines — they’re, I mean, they’re headlines in the United States.

You were supposed to have —

They can differ with me. But I don’t think they have any grounds to differ with me.

You were supposed to be able to make this case in New York, at the United Nations this week, you were set to address the United Nations Security Council.

Not this case. Actually, the president of the Security Council invited me over 20 days ago. The current president.

Will you be able to go?

No, unfortunately, because Mike Pompeo decided that I was too dangerous for the United States.

How did — has he communicated that directly to you? How did you find out?

Not to us, to the secretary-general of the United States [sic]. He has said we didn’t have enough time to issue a visa. I don’t know how terrible bureaucracy the State Department has that in 25 days, they couldn’t issue a visa for a foreign minister. I’m not an unknown entity.

But you are — this is final, this is definite? Because I know there has been confusion in past about visas.

From his point of view it is. And I’m not that crazy about going to the United States anyway.

You’re just, just happy to skip this trip.

Well, I’m not happy to skip this trip because that was part of my obligation as the foreign minister of Iran to go to that session of the Security Council and talk about the need to respect international law, because that’s the title: the need to respect the principles of the U.N. Charter.

Secretary Pompeo, in past, when this has been an issue with Iranian diplomats such as yourself coming to the United Nations in New York and visa issues have been difficult, has said a nation that has killed U.S. citizens, that has knowingly killed hundreds of Americans — why should they be allowed to come to the U.S.? Why should a nation that knowingly supports international terrorist groups, why should they be allowed to come address the United Nations?

Well, now, I mean, these allegations are easy to make. But when we see who is killing and who is maiming and who has killed a thousand Iraqi scientists —

Iran has sent weapons that have killed hundreds of Americans in Iraq. You know this.

Who killed — who killed 290 Iranians, civilians in a civil airliner?

You’re referring to an airplane bombing.

Yes. The record is clear. The record of the United States in this region is clear. They have killed a lot of Iraqis. They’ve killed a lot of Afghanis. They’ve killed a lot of people elsewhere in this region. They are killing a lot of people in Yemen. The weapons that the United States provides to Saudi Arabia is killing and maiming people.

Many sides are killing a lot of people in Yemen, unfortunately.

Unfortunately, it’s a war that the United States —

Including the Houthis, who Iran backs.

The Houthis have always asked — they didn’t start a war. They’re defending themselves. You cannot equate somebody who’s defending themselves, but with somebody who’s attacking them.

May I turn you to the nuclear deal? We have heard from Iran that Iran will suspend compliance with the remaining limits in the nuclear deal. Is this the end of the deal?

No, we didn’t say we will suspend complying with the remaining limits. We said that we have taken four steps. Our fifth step would be to suspend compliance with the limit on the number of centrifuges. That means effectively that all limits on our centrifuge program are now suspended.

Why do this now?

Huh?

Why?

Because it’s it’s at the two-month period that we have said before that if the Europeans do not comply with their own obligations, we will take measures.

You see, JCPOA was negotiated not in an —

You’re using the formal name for the nuclear deal. Go on.

Yeah. Not in an atmosphere of trust, but in an atmosphere of mistrust. That is why we put in place the mechanisms for dealing with violations. And that mechanism was triggered by Iran after U.S. withdrawal. And in November of 2018, we informed that we have exhausted that mechanism, and we have no other choice but to start reducing our level of compliance. But we made it very clear that we are ready to go back to full compliance the minute they start complying with their own. Doesn’t mean that the United States should comply. Means that Europe should comply.

MLK: Still, it’s not good news for the nuclear deal which you personally negotiated.

Well, it’s not good news. Certainly not. And we’re not happy about this, but it’s a remedy. When you execute somebody or you imprison somebody for committing an offense, you certainly are not happy for depriving somebody of their life or their liberty. But you have to do it because it’s a remedy that the law has provided in order to prevent lawlessness. This is a remedy provided in the deal.

So this is not —

Unpleasant.

— Iran racing to build a nuclear bomb.

No. If we wanted to build a nuclear bomb, we would have to be, would have done it a long time ago. Iran does not want a nuclear bomb, does not believe that nuclear bombs create security for anybody. And we believe it’s time for everybody to disarm rather than to arm.

Last question. There’s something like five U.S. citizens still being detained in Iran, including the aging Baquer Namazi, who is in ill health.

He’s not detained.

He’s here.

He’s here, yet he —

He would probably prefer not to be.

Well, he’s an Iranian citizen.

Is there hope for future exchanges?

Well, I don’t think that this action by the United States helped. We had proposed a universal exchange of all prisoners and we were doing that in good faith. We released an American citizen for an Iranian citizen. That could have continued. But now —

You’re talking about the recent exchange of a Princeton graduate student who is an American held here.

And an Iranian professor —

Yes.

— who had been held without —

And those channels are still open?

I don’t think at this time we can discuss those issues. We have to deal with the present issue at hand, unfortunately.

If I’m hearing you correctly, you’re saying there will not be future exchanges while the situation is so tense between Washington —

Well I think those talks are certainly suspended now.

Foreign Minister Zarif, thank you for your time.

Thank you for being here.

Thank you.

Editor’s note: NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly described a 1988 attack on an Iranian civil airplane as a bombing. The U.S. Navy actually fired missiles at Iran Air Flight 655. Later in the conversation, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif mentioned the secretary-general of the United States. He was referring to the United Nations secretary-general.

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