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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 25)

75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Westlake Legal Group 4-img_8439-edit-d33d46d939437cc69e37f07fde63b990f377b2cb-s1100-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, “Work sets you free.” More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, “Work sets you free.” More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Alina Dabrowska was 20 years old when she first heard about Auschwitz. She was an inmate at a prison in Nazi-occupied Poland — incarcerated for helping Allied forces — and one day in 1943, while walking the grounds, a new arrival warned her about it.

“She said, ‘You’re all going to Auschwitz! Do you know what kind of camp that is?'” Dabrowska recalls. “She told us that if someone is out of strength, they were immediately killed. She told us many horrible things. None of us believed her.”

Westlake Legal Group 1-img_8384-5890ca86b673b97e77ea236c3808cb974445f303-s1100-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Auschwitz survivor Alina Dabrowska, 96, shows her Auschwitz prisoner number tattoo at her home in Warsaw. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was caught by the Nazis helping the allied forces in German-occupied Poland during World War II. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Auschwitz survivor Alina Dabrowska, 96, shows her Auschwitz prisoner number tattoo at her home in Warsaw. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was caught by the Nazis helping the allied forces in German-occupied Poland during World War II.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Of the estimated 1.3 million people sent to Auschwitz, some 1.1 million died at the camp, including 960,000 Jews. It was the largest extermination camp run by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland during World War II. The Soviet Army liberated Auschwitz 75 years ago, on Jan. 27, 1945.

Now 96, Dabrowska is among a handful of Auschwitz survivors still alive. For her, the importance of sharing her stories has only grown with time. She raised a family and had a fulfilling career with Poland’s foreign ministry, but only in recent years decided to speak publicly about the memories of Auschwitz that still haunt her. She and other survivors fear the world will forget the Holocaust’s horrors if their stories are not made public.

When German soldiers first imprisoned Dabrowska, they executed her accomplices, including her brother. She spent a year in prison, and then the Nazis transferred her in June 1943 to Auschwitz.

“When we got off the train, we were taken to a large hall, where we stripped down completely,” she remembers. “Our hair was shaved and they tattooed numbers on our arms.”

She rolls up her sleeve to show hers: a small, faded black “44165” etched into her forearm. Dabrowska remembers the next morning, taking stock of the camp, beginning to realize what she’d heard about it was true.

Westlake Legal Group 5-img_8474_custom-ffcff8e9e12a687fa226c3db9d35152b4cbf1b0f-s800-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Thousands of shoes from those exterminated at Auschwitz make up one of the many exhibits at the museum on the site of the former death camp. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Thousands of shoes from those exterminated at Auschwitz make up one of the many exhibits at the museum on the site of the former death camp.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

“I noticed an electric fence around the camp,” she recalls. “Whenever we came back from working in the mornings, there was usually someone glued to it. If someone couldn’t take it anymore, they jumped over the ditch and threw themselves onto the electric fence and their lives were over.”

A year later, she says, she had had enough of the cold, the hunger and the death surrounding her. She too found herself in front of the fence. She was about to jump when a guard yelled at her. She instinctively turned around and never tried it again.

“I focused on doing whatever I could to survive,” Dabrowska says. “I had hope, but sometimes an officer with a cane selected some of us to go to the gas chamber. What left the deepest impression on me was watching those marches to the chambers where so many were murdered.”

Some 865,00 Jews were sent to their deaths in the gas chambers upon arrival at the camp. Dabrowska remembers the horror of noticing a friend’s body among a pile of bodies of the executed. “I saw her lying in that pile of naked bodies,” she says, “and I approached. There she was, just lying there. I grasped her cold hand, and that’s how I said goodbye to my friend.”

Another Auschwitz survivor, Janina Iwanska, now 89 and living in Warsaw, was deported to the camp at the height of the killing in 1944. In an eight-week period between May and July, guards killed 330,000 people.

Westlake Legal Group 3-img_8417-edit-3a379bbeb10fe60f36dea596b69150f5e39fa3bb-s800-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Janina Iwanska, 89, is photographed in her Warsaw apartment. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was separated from her parents at the age of 14 during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944 when the Nazis laid siege to the city. She arrived to the death camp at the height of its exterminations, when the SS guards killed 330,000 people in a span of eight weeks. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Janina Iwanska, 89, is photographed in her Warsaw apartment. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was separated from her parents at the age of 14 during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944 when the Nazis laid siege to the city. She arrived to the death camp at the height of its exterminations, when the SS guards killed 330,000 people in a span of eight weeks.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

She was 14 years old. She had been separated from her parents during the Warsaw Uprising against Nazi forces and arrived at Auschwitz alone, packed among hundreds of strangers in a train car.

“We were taken off the train at night, and the air was thick with smoke that smelled like burning hair,” remembers Iwanska. “We walked through a forest and I asked a prisoner, ‘What are those bonfires?’ and she said, ‘You’ll find out, child.’ It was only later that I learned they were burning bodies because they couldn’t keep up with the crematoriums alone.”

Iwanska, who is Roman Catholic, slept in the children’s dorm, and she quickly made herself useful by taking care of the younger children at the camp. This, and the fact that she isn’t Jewish, were the reasons she believes she survived.

Westlake Legal Group 6-img_8514-e93f22c14ca636495f3206b9cf6b4c1cd65a6cbf-s1100-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The former site of the Auschwitz death camp has been preserved to appear the same as it looked 75 years ago, when it was liberated by the Soviet Army. Some 1.3 million people were deported to the camp, and 1.1 million died there. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The former site of the Auschwitz death camp has been preserved to appear the same as it looked 75 years ago, when it was liberated by the Soviet Army. Some 1.3 million people were deported to the camp, and 1.1 million died there.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Today, Auschwitz is a museum commemorating the evil humans are capable of inflicting on each other. Tour groups quietly shuffle from an exhibit holding two tons of hair shaved from the victims of the gas chambers to the gallows where the former commandant of Auschwitz was hanged after he was tried by a military tribunal in 1947.

Pawel Sawicki, a guide at the museum, has seen thousands of tourists come from all over the world. “Sometimes I think that when they leave a candle or a stone or they put the flower or they say a prayer and they leave the memorial, and they go back to their lives, they think: ‘Our job is done. We remembered,'” he says. “But I think there should be a next step. People should look at this place and think about our moral responsibility. This is not an anthropological discovery of ‘Oh, people 75 years ago were able to do something like this,’ and we are surprised. They [still] are able to do it. They did it before. And people still hate each other.”

Each December, Piotr M.A. Cywinski, the Polish director of the Auschwitz museum, sends a holiday card with a similar reminder. This year, the card, with a message wishing a peaceful holiday season, included a photograph of Chinese soldiers marching past Uighur children in Xinjiang, where China’s government has sent an estimated 1 million ethnic Muslims to internment camps.

But talking about the lessons of Auschwitz can be painful, especially for those who lived through it.

Berlin Rabbi Daniel Fabian’s grandmother survived Auschwitz but never talked about her time there.

“We did not talk about it at home,” Fabian says. “The Holocaust was never a topic, as I remember it.”

It was only when he was required to sign up for German military service that he says he began to realize what his grandmother had been through. Fabian’s mother gave him an envelope to hand-deliver to the German officers in charge of registering him. Inside were his grandmother’s liberation papers from Auschwitz.

After the German officers saw the documents, they exempted Fabian from service. From then on, he says, he began to think in earnest about what Germany had done to Jews during the war.

“When I lived in the United States, I realized that the Holocaust is a very big part of Jewish identity in America,” says Fabian. “And that seemed strange to me, because in Germany, it is not.”

Fabian says that doesn’t mean German Jews ignore it — on the contrary, he says, there are reminders everywhere. It’s just that not much is said about it, he says.

“The Holocaust is something that’s part of them, but they don’t base their Jewish identity on the Holocaust, or not exclusively on the Holocaust,” he explains. “But there are many other things also that, you know, remind them of being Jewish. And they identify with being Jewish. And so this is just this is one important aspect of it, but it’s just one aspect of many.”

Fabian thinks more personal stories should be shared while the few remaining survivors are still alive.

Many of those survivors agree, though it has taken decades for them to want to speak publicly about their experiences. Iwanska now does so during regular visits to Germany.

She tells stories like this one from the end of the war — when she and four friends kept each other from freezing to death while Nazi soldiers transferred them to other camps on a death march.

“We were put into open train cars and we huddled together — standing because there was no room to sit or lie down — to keep warm,” says Iwanska. “When it snowed, we collected it to drink, because they didn’t give us water. We were in such complete solidarity that when one of us fell asleep standing, none of the others would steal the snow that accumulated on her. That snow belonged to her. Thanks to our solidarity, we lived.”

It’s also taken decades for Dabrowska to share her stories of Auschwitz.

“I was seeing my camp friends, but I didn’t want to talk about it,” she says. “I was always hiding the number on my arm, so that I wouldn’t have to talk about it. One time, a Jewish woman recognized me and said, ‘You were there!’ and I answered, ‘No, you have mistaken me for someone else.’ It took 50 years before I made the conscious decision to go to Auschwitz.”

It was only when she returned to the camp for the first time in 2001 that she felt strong enough to share her memories of it.

Like Iwanska, she travels to Germany twice a year to speak to young people about her memories of the camp.

“Those children will grow up one day and they will be the ones deciding about how to rule the world,” she says. “It is important [to talk about it] in order to develop the conviction that war is not a good thing, in order to seek peace and try to talk about it, in order to think that it is us who are responsible for this earth and for passing it on, undamaged, to the next generations.”

Grzegorz Sokol contributed to this report from Warsaw and Austin Davis contributed from Berlin.

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Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds

Seven in 10 millennials consider themselves “plant parents,” according to new research.

While millennial demand for houseplants is high, a poll of 2,000 millennials (aged 25–39) revealed that 67 percent say taking care of plants is more of a challenge than they bargained for.

MILLENNIALS CLEAN THEIR BATHROOMS LESS FREQUENTLY THAN OTHER AGE GROUPS: STUDY

Almost half don’t currently own plants because they don’t know how to take care of them — and 20 percent would sooner sit through a root canal than take care of a plant because of the pressure.

Westlake Legal Group PlantWoman2Istock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

Not her, though! (iStock)

The study, conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Article, examined the attitudes and behaviors of millennials toward plants and uncovered that 22 percent are apprehensive about owning a plant because they’ve accidentally killed one in the past.

With the great responsibility of having a plant come great benefits — but also great challenges. And according to study’s results, we could all benefit from a crash course in the art of keeping plants alive.

In fact, the average plant parent has killed seven plants they’ve brought into their home.

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The most challenging part about taking care of plants was found to be knowing the proper amount of sunlight needed. But the challenges don’t end there — respondents were also clueless on how much water a plant needs, whether the plant should live inside or outside, and the practice of pruning a plant.

Three in 10 respondents revealed one of hardest lessons that comes with being a good “plant parent” is how easy it can be to accidentally kill your plant. This leads to a bit of anxiety, as three in five often worry about making sure their plants have enough sunlight, while a further 56 percent say they often worry about whether their plants have enough water.

“Plants are an easy way to add color and life to any space,” said Zoe Garred, director of product development at Article. “The survey revealed millennials’ desire to incorporate plants into their home despite the apprehension and challenges associated with plant care.”

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According to the survey results, half of respondents said they decided to add plants to their space because it complemented their overall aesthetic and decor, while a further 47 percent said they incorporate greenery into their home because it’s trendy. And 81 percent of those surveyed said that adding plants to their space has had a positive effect on mental and physical health.

Westlake Legal Group PlantMillennialIstock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

She’s probably one of them! (iStock)

Many millennials (three in four) also said that taking on plants is a good indicator of whether they’re responsible enough to take on a real pet. It even improves self-care, as four in five said that taking care of their plants has caused them to start taking better care of themselves.

“We’ve seen a rising home decor trend of pairing bold tropical leaf plants with natural elements like dark wood and raw concrete,” said Zoe Garred, director of product development at Article. “It doesn’t come as a surprise that the No. 1 reason millennials own plants is because they complement their overall home decor aesthetic. A touch of greenery is a simple way to make any modern space more beautiful.”

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Being a plant owner seems to be addicting, too: Forty-one percent of survey respondents say they plan on adding to their plant collection in the coming year.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Westlake Legal Group PlantWoman2Istock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE   Westlake Legal Group PlantWoman2Istock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

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This Day in History: Jan. 27

On this day, Jan. 27 …

1967: Astronauts Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom, Edward H. White and Roger B. Chaffee die in a flash fire during a test aboard their Apollo spacecraft.

Also on this day:

  • 1756: Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is born in Salzburg, Austria.
  • 1832: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who would write “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” under the pen name Lewis Carroll, is born in Cheshire, England.
  • 1880: Thomas Edison receives a patent for his electric incandescent lamp.
  • 1943: Some 50 bombers strike Wilhelmshaven in the first all-American air raid against Germany during World War II.
  • 1945: During World War II, Soviet troops liberate the Nazi concentration camps Auschwitz and Birkenau in Poland.
  • 1951: An era of atomic testing in the Nevada desert begins as an Air Force plane drops a one-kiloton bomb on Frenchman Flat.
  • 1967: More than 60 nations sign a treaty banning the deploying of nuclear weapons in outer space.
  • 1973: The Vietnam peace accords are signed in Paris.
  • 1977: The Vatican issues a declaration reaffirming the Roman Catholic Church’s ban on female priests.
  • 1984: Michael Jackson suffers serious burns to his scalp when pyrotechnics set his hair on fire during the filming of a Pepsi-Cola TV commercial at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.
  • 1991: Super Bowl XXV: The New York Giants beat Buffalo Bills, 20-19 at Tampa Stadium in Tampa, Fla.
  • 1998: First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, on NBC’s “Today” show, charges the sexual misconduct allegations against her husband, President Bill Clinton, are the work of a “vast right-wing conspiracy.”
  • 2014: Folk singer and activist Pete Seeger, 94, dies in New York.
  • 2018: Casino mogul Steve Wynn resigns as finance chairman of the Republican National Committee amid allegations of sexual harassment and assault.
  • 2018: Comic strip artist Mort Walker, a World War II veteran who satirized the Army with the antics of the lazy private “Beetle Bailey,” dies in Connecticut at age 94.  
Westlake Legal Group AstronautsGetty012720 This Day in History: Jan. 27 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c02910cd-5d87-543c-a41a-f4a622b80384 article   Westlake Legal Group AstronautsGetty012720 This Day in History: Jan. 27 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c02910cd-5d87-543c-a41a-f4a622b80384 article

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Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say

A Florida man was arrested Wednesday after shining a laser pointer at multiple pilots making their approaches at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport, police said.

Charlie James Chapman Jr, 41, faces multiple charges after police said he temporarily blinded one of the pilots. Video claims to show him throwing rocks and directing the laser at a Manatee County Sheriff’s helicopter attempting to locate him.

“Pointing a laser at multiple aircraft didn’t end well for Charlie Chapman Jr.,” the MCSO said on Facebook. “He was arrested after pointing one at planes heading into SRQ Airport last night, and then at our MCSO Aviation Unit helicopter. He even tried throwing rocks at the helicopter!”

FAMILY OF FLORIDA DAD ANTHONY TODT FOUND DECOMPOSED WITH STAB WOUNDS IN HOME AS NEW DETAILS EMERGE

The MSCO Aviation unit helicopter eventually located the suspect on a forklift near the airport where they directed deputies on the ground to surround him. Chapman allegedly grabbed a hammer and made a striking motion towards the deputies who deployed a Taser and subdued the suspect.

“It was later learned that Chapman shot his laser pointer on a fixed-wing plane four times and one time at the MCSO helicopter,” police said. “One of the pilots of the plane advised that the laser hit him directly in the eyes, causing temporary blindness. The pilot stated he was still felt his eye sight was blurry from the laser.”

Westlake Legal Group Charlie-Chapman-Laser-Migshot Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 80eb13b5-139e-5608-aaae-0fefd19abde7

Charlie James Chapman Jr, 41 (Manatee County Sheriff’s Office)

FLORIDA ‘PILLOWCASE RAPIST’ CASE CRACKED WITH DNA FROM SUSPECT’S SON: PROSECUTORS

Chapman was transported to Lakewood Ranch Medical Center where he was cleared and sent to Manatee County Jail, police said. A laser pointer was found in his pocket,  police said.

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He was charged with aggravated assault on an officer, pointing a laser at pilot with and without injury, and resisting without violence.

Westlake Legal Group Charlie-Chapman-Laser-Migshot Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 80eb13b5-139e-5608-aaae-0fefd19abde7   Westlake Legal Group Charlie-Chapman-Laser-Migshot Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 80eb13b5-139e-5608-aaae-0fefd19abde7

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‘Doctor Who’ Makes History With The First Black Doctor And Fans Are Loving It

Westlake Legal Group 5e2eaa1d1f00002e008581d4 ‘Doctor Who’ Makes History With The First Black Doctor And Fans Are Loving It

Doctor Who” on Sunday night revealed its first-ever Black incarnation of the title character, known as The Doctor, portrayed by actor Jo Martin. 

And fans quickly took to social media to celebrate the moment. 

Note: Spoilers ahead

Sunday night’s “Fugitive of the Judoon” episode involved the Judoon ― a band of rhino-like mercenary cops from space ― chasing down a fugitive on Earth. 

The current Doctor, portrayed by Jodie Whittaker (the first female incarnation of the character) steps in to protect their target, a tour guide named Ruth Clayton. 

However, Ruth isn’t a tour guide at all. 

She’s The Doctor. 

The Doctor can regenerate when mortally wounded, giving the character a new face and new life, via a new actor. Whittaker is officially the 13th after taking over from Peter Capaldi at the end of 2017.

In this case, Martin is not taking over the role but instead seems to be part of the season’s arc surrounding the destruction of The Doctor’s home planet of Gallifrey. 

It’s not yet clear where Martin’s incarnation sits in the timeline. 

It’s implied she is an earlier Doctor ― perhaps prior to William Hartnell’s original ― but Whittaker’s incarnation clearly has no recollection of Martin’s form.  

One thing is clear, given the nature of the show: Martin’s Doctor will almost certainly turn up again this season given the events of Sunday night.   

A Doctor outside of the official numbered timeline is not without precedent. 

In 2013, in celebration of the show’s 50th anniversary, acclaimed actor John Hurt portrayed an incarnation known as the War Doctor in a crossover episode that included both David Tennant’s 10th Doctor and Matt Smith’s 11th.  

Given the tight-lipped nature of the show’s production, Martin had to keep a lid on her character… until last night, when she updated her Twitter pic in celebration:

Fans loved it:

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Iranian airliner skids into street; all 150 passengers safe: report

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — An Iranian passenger airliner carrying some 150 passengers skidded off the runway and into a street next to the airport in the southern city of Mahshahr on Monday, after apparently losing its landing gear in a hard landing.

No major injuries were reported.

The passengers calmly exited the plane from a front door and one over the wing, still with carry-on baggage in hand, according to footage posted on state-run TV’s website.

IRANIAN MISSILE ATTACK ON US BASE IN IRAQ LEFT 34 SOLDIERS WITH CONCUSSIONS, PENTAGON SAYS

The footage showed passengers being helped to the street below by people on the ground.

Westlake Legal Group iranplane-cropped-318am Iranian airliner skids into street; all 150 passengers safe: report fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fnc/world fnc be023348-f113-5c12-aab5-71e9067623ef Associated Press article

An Iranian passenger plane sits on a road outside Mahshahr airport after skidding off the runway, in southwestern city of Mahshahr, Iran, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020.  (Mohammad Zarei/ISNA via AP)

Provincial airport director Mohammad Reza Rezanian said all of the passengers had been safely taken off the plane.It seems that tragedy was narrowly avoided, however, as images from the scene showed the plane had ground to a halt not far from a populated area.

PHOTOS TAKEN AT IRAQ BASE WHERE US TROOPS ARE STATIONED SHOW SCALE OF DAMAGE FOLLOWING IRANIAN AIRSTRIKES

The incident comes as Iran is still coping with the aftermath of the accidental downing of a Ukrainian airliner over Tehran. The plane was shot down by the Revolutionary Guard earlier this month amid heightened tensions with the United States, killing all 176 people aboard.

Iranian state television said the plane involved in Monday’s incident came in harder than usual and lost its landing gear as it hit the tarmac.No landing gear was evident in pictures of the plane after the accident, but it was not immediately clear if it failed to deploy or somehow collapsed as the jet hit runway at about 9:30 a.m. local time.

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The accident is under investigation, officials said. The flight from the Tehran-based airline originated in the Iranian capital.

Iranian reports identified the plane only as a McDonnell Douglas without being more specific, but Caspian has only the McDonnell Douglas MD-83s in its fleet.

Westlake Legal Group iranplane-cropped-318am Iranian airliner skids into street; all 150 passengers safe: report fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fnc/world fnc be023348-f113-5c12-aab5-71e9067623ef Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group iranplane-cropped-318am Iranian airliner skids into street; all 150 passengers safe: report fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fnc/world fnc be023348-f113-5c12-aab5-71e9067623ef Associated Press article

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Mary Anne Marsh: Trump impeachment not enough – Senate Republicans must hold him accountable

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125501109001_6125504797001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Trump impeachment not enough – Senate Republicans must hold him accountable Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/sports/mlb/houston-astros fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 760d2ffb-6c0a-5a3f-a2d2-0cc5d483e060

For centuries politics and sports have been treasured American pastimes. We obsessively follow campaigns waged by candidates and athletes chasing records as they try to win elections and championships.

Now, we are witnessing another common trait between politics and sports: cheating.

Baseball is considered the great American pastime and as American as apple pie. That’s why the recent revelation that the Houston Astros cheated by stealing signs to gain an unfair advantage to win the World Series is so stunning. Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred repeatedly stated that the scheme was “player-driven,” yet he didn’t punish one Astros player. That sends a clear message: cheating is acceptable.

JERRY FALWELL JR.: MY TRUMP ENDORSEMENT WAS CORRECT — HERE’S HOW HE RESTORED AMERICAN GREATNESS

Every contest “won” by those who cheat is forever marked with an asterisk. Baseball players who won batting titles and other honors as they transformed into the Incredible Hulk, only to admit later their use of performance-enhancing drugs, are so marked. And now an asterisk has been applied to Houston’s World Series win.

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We now see a similar pattern of cheating being laid out in the impeachment trial. The question is, will President Trump and others who participated be punished for their wrongdoing?

The pattern began in 2016 when Trump publicly asked Russia to interfere with our election to help him. His comment was in response to a question about a foreign government hacking an opponent’s emails. “I’d like to have them released,” Trump said. “No, it gives me no pause … if Russia or China or any other country has those emails, I mean, to be honest with you, I’d love to see them.” Soon WikiLeaks was releasing thousands of emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

The pattern continued three years later, with the call that led to his impeachment trial and the article charging him with abuse of power, when Trump sought Ukraine’s help in investigating his political rival Joe Biden. His claims of executive privilege that attempted to thwart the investigation of the call and related matters led to the second article charging him with obstructing Congress.

The House’s vote to impeach on these two articles puts an asterisk next to the president’s name. It will be there forever.

The House’s vote to impeach on these two articles puts an asterisk next to the president’s name. It will be there forever. Now, it is up to the Senate to determine if there will be punishment for these actions.

If senators condone Trump’s conduct, the betrayal of his oath of office, our elections and our national security, then they will be declaring that cheating is acceptable. If they refuse to hold Trump accountable they are telling the country that the president is above the law. Worse, they are giving him permission to cheat again in this year’s election. And if that helps him “win,” well, that’s fine too.

Senators who refuse to hold Trump accountable and protect our election are abdicating their responsibility and betraying their oath of office. If they don’t stand up to Trump in the face of a torrent of indisputable facts they aren’t standing up for the American people and our democracy.

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These same Republican senators, led by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have already signaled their lack of interest in securing elections, refusing to vote last year on measures passed by the House that would have protected our election systems from interference by foreign powers. Isn’t that an endorsement of cheating, in the 2020 presidential election and every other race too? Is that the message they want to send America? That “winning” by cheating is acceptable? Really?

For years, Russia has masqueraded as a superpower. But under Vladimir Putin, Russia is a third-rate country with a pitiful economy and military capabilities. Their only clout comes from undermining a real superpower, with the assistance of Americans in power. Cheating doesn’t make Russia a great power. In fact, it underscores just how weak it is because it demonstrates they are incapable of competing without cheating.

Of course, Russia also cheats in sports. For decades, Russians have used performance-enhancing drugs to “win” international competitions. Its athletes and “wins” are littered with asterisks, and it has been banned from this year’s Olympics.

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Is Russia the future for America? A country that cheats at politics and sports? Is that the American way?

At the end of this tragic chapter in American history, Donald Trump won’t be the only one with an asterisk next to his name. History will place asterisks next to the names of all who refuse to hold him accountable and rationalize that cheating in politics, at the highest level, is acceptable. That would indeed be a tragedy.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125501109001_6125504797001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Trump impeachment not enough – Senate Republicans must hold him accountable Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/sports/mlb/houston-astros fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 760d2ffb-6c0a-5a3f-a2d2-0cc5d483e060   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6125501109001_6125504797001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Trump impeachment not enough – Senate Republicans must hold him accountable Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/sports/mlb/houston-astros fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 760d2ffb-6c0a-5a3f-a2d2-0cc5d483e060

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Senate Dems use Bolton book revelations to bolster case for impeachment witnesses

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Senate Democrats on Sunday used a report on the draft of ex-national security adviser John Bolton’s new book to make their final pitch to “swing vote” Republicans who will decide on whether or not President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial will include witnesses.

Bolton, who along with Mick Mulvaney, the White House chief of staff, have been two witnesses coveted by Democrats who believe they both could provide first-hand evidence that Trump withheld U.S. aide from Ukraine for political gains and to damage Democrats and the Bidens.

WITNESS SWAP INVOLVING BIDEN AND BOLTON BEING CONSIDERED?

“The @NYTimes report suggests multiple top Trump Admin officials knew the facts and deliberately misled Congress and the American people,” Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., tweeted. The minority leader wrote that it is a “massive White House cover-up.”

“All we need is four Republican Senators to get the truth,” he tweeted late Sunday.

The three Republicans who may vote against the party line this week are Sens. Mitt Romney, Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins. Democrats are also eyeing Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn, who the Hill reported has been tight-lipped on where he stands on the matter.

The New York Times, which said it received an unpublished manuscript of Bolton’s book, reported that its contents claim that Trump indeed ordered the Ukrainian aid to be held up until Kiev agreed to investigate the Bidens and other Democrats. The paper reported the Bolton passed around the manuscripts to close associates over the past few weeks.

Sarah Tinsley, a senior adviser to Bolton, told Fox News he had submitted a hard copy draft of his manuscript to the NSC several weeks ago for “pre-publication review,” but insisted he had not shared it with anyone else. And, in a statement obtained by Fox News, Bolton attorney Charles Cooper lamented that the NSC review process had been “corrupted.” He also provided his letter to the White House concerning the manuscript.

Bolton, who according to a witness had called Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani a “hand grenade” and said a meeting about the White House’s pressure on Ukraine tantamount to a “drug deal,” has said he would be willing to testify if subpoenaed and has relevant information.

Trump on Monday attempted to refute the “The Room Where It Happened” manuscript’s reported claims and insisted that he never told Bolton that the aid was tied to the Biden investigation.

At the heart of the impeachment trial is Trump’s July 25, 2019 call with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky. Trump said the call was focused on corruption in Kiev and raised the Bidens as an example. Trump and Zelensky have both denied the Democrat claim that there was a quid pro quo. Trump called the entire impeachment process a political witch hunt.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, the 2020 Democratic hopeful, wrote on Twitter that the Senate “must hear from Bolton as a witness,” and posted a link to the Times’ story.

Fiona Hill, a former top White House expert on Russia, testified in November that Bolton shared her concern about what she saw as a push to get Ukraine to conduct the investigations.

She testified in front of the House Intelligence Committee and recalled Bolton expressing his own concerns about the push and told her to tell National Security Council lawyer John Eisenberg that he does not want to be a part of this “drug deal.”

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“He was saying that sarcastically, of course, I mean, just to be clear. Actually, he was angry, but he was also sarcastic. I mean — he wasn’t inferring that they were cooking up an actual drug deal in the War Room,” she said.

Fox News’ Gregg Re and Gillian Turner contributed to this report

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Bernie Sanders and His Internet Army

The defense from Bernie Sanders was straightforward: It wasn’t me.

He had been milling about on the Senate floor one day in the summer of 2017 when a colleague, Kamala Harris, stepped toward him. “Do we have a problem?” Ms. Harris asked, according to Democrats familiar with the exchange.

Some prominent Sanders supporters had been flaming Ms. Harris publicly as the preferred choice of the corporate Democratic establishment against which Mr. Sanders had long railed, a view amplified among Sanders-boosting accounts across social media. “Pre-emptive strike,” one person wrote on the popular SandersForPresident Reddit group, where Sanders fans were sharing details of Ms. Harris’s recent fund-raising swing in the Hamptons with former Hillary Clinton donors. “Start the conversation now, end it before 2020.”

Mr. Sanders assured Ms. Harris that there was no issue, the Democrats familiar with their conversation said. He insisted that he could not control how his followers communicated.

But two years later, as both senators pursued the party’s 2020 presidential nomination and Ms. Harris returned to the Hamptons to collect campaign checks, Mr. Sanders broadcast an observation of his own after Ms. Harris raised doubts about his “Medicare for all” plan. “I don’t go to the Hamptons to raise money from billionaires,” he tweeted last August, elevating a message that supporters had already been pushing. Thousands of retweets followed.

Since the start of Mr. Sanders’s first presidential campaign in 2016, his colossal online support base has been by turns a source of peerless strength and perpetual aggravation — envied and caricatured by rivals who covet such loyalty, feared by Democrats who have faced harassment from his followers, and alternately cherished and gently scolded by the candidate himself.

The zeal of Mr. Sanders’s fans has helped establish him as one of the 2020 front-runners a week before the Iowa caucuses. No other Democrat attracts supporters more dedicated to forcefully defending their candidate and lashing his foes, more willing to repeatedly donate their time and money to sustain his bid. Through the end of 2019, Mr. Sanders had raised nearly $100 million from over five million individual donations, without ever holding traditional fund-raisers, leading the primary field.

Yet as Mr. Sanders moves to position himself as a standard-bearer for a party he has criticized from the left for decades, the power of his internet army has also alarmed Democrats who are familiar with its underside, experienced in ways large and small.

Some progressive activists who declined to back Mr. Sanders have begun traveling with private security after incurring online harassment. Several well-known feminist writers said they had received death threats. A state party chairwoman changed her phone number. A Portland lawyer saw her business rating tumble on an online review site after tussling with Sanders supporters on Twitter.

Other notable targets have included Ady Barkan, a prominent liberal activist with A.L.S. — whom some Sanders-cheering accounts accused of lacking decision-making faculties due to his illness as he prepared to endorse Senator Elizabeth Warren — and Fred Guttenberg, the father of a shooting victim from the 2018 Parkland massacre, who had criticized Mr. Sanders’s statements about gun violence.

“Politics is a contact sport,” said Bakari Sellers, a former South Carolina State legislator who supported Ms. Harris in the Democratic primary. “But you have to be very cognizant when you say anything critical of Bernie online. You might have to put your phone down. There’s going to be a blowback, and it could be sexist, racist and vile.”

In recent days, he said, one man sent a profanity-filled private message on Instagram, calling Mr. Sellers, who is black, an “Uncle Tom” and wishing him brain cancer.

When Mr. Sanders’s supporters swarm someone online, they often find multiple access points to that person’s life, compiling what can amount to investigative dossiers. They will attack all public social media accounts, posting personal insults that might flow in by the hundreds. Some of the missives are direct threats of violence, which can be reported to Twitter or Facebook and taken down.

More commonly, there is a barrage of jabs and threats sometimes framed as jokes. If the target is a woman, and it often is, these insults can veer toward her physical appearance.

For some perceived Sanders critics, there has been mail sent to home addresses — or the home addresses of relatives. The contents were unremarkable: news articles about the political perils of centrism. The message seemed clear: We know where you live.

— Bernie Sanders, in a 2019 letter to supporters

Interviews with current and former staff members and major online supporters make clear that top advisers — and often, Mr. Sanders himself — are acutely aware of the bile spread in his name.

In February 2019, shortly after announcing his second presidential run, Mr. Sanders emailed a letter to surrogates. “I want to be clear,” he said, “that I condemn bullying and harassment of any kind and in any space.”

That he felt compelled to append this note to his national reintroduction was perhaps as telling as its contents.

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Mr. Sanders at a campaign rally in Queens in October. Credit…Christopher Lee for The New York Times

The Sanders campaign declined to discuss its 2020 digital operation and the extent to which it monitored social media discussions.

A spokesman, Mike Casca, flagged Mr. Sanders’s call for civility from last February. The campaign also released a statement from a spokeswoman, Sarah Ford, emphasizing the candidate’s previous remarks. “As the senator has said loudly and clearly,” she said, “there is no room in the political revolution for abuse and harassment online.”

Sanders aides routinely decide against commenting publicly about an online spat, reasoning that to do so would only elevate the conflict. The candidate’s defenders are quick to reject any suggestion that Mr. Sanders is responsible for the most egregious conduct of his followers, who are disproportionately young and overrepresented online, when the vast majority proceed with greater care.

His allies also argue that online combat is not unique to the Sanders side, with some high-profile women who support the senator saying they have been attacked, too.

“The same folks who want to complain that Sanders supporters are more vicious than anybody else never come out to chastise the supporters of other candidates,” said Nina Turner, a former Ohio state senator and Mr. Sanders’s national campaign co-chair.

But many political veterans outside the Sanders operation fault the campaign’s handling of the vitriol.

Jess Morales Rocketto, a progressive strategist who worked on campaigns for Barack Obama and Mrs. Clinton, said Mr. Sanders had empowered aides and surrogates who “have a tendency to aggressively amplify things that a campaign would normally shut down amongst supporters.”

“There are always people who say things that are problematic. It’s not that that is unique to Bernie’s campaign,” she said. “What’s unique is it is a consistent problem in the universe of Bernie Sanders.”

— RoseAnn DeMoro, a Sanders supporter and former leader of National Nurses United

With more than 10 million followers on Twitter, Mr. Sanders has a larger audience on the platform than Ms. Warren, Pete Buttigieg, Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Amy Klobuchar combined. A sizable number could be automated bots or fictitious accounts. Federal prosecutors have detailed coordinated efforts by Russian nationals to interfere in the 2016 election, with an emphasis on two candidates — Donald J. Trump and Mr. Sanders — whom the Russians hoped to bolster while denigrating their opponents.

In a party gripped with anxiety about unifying to defeat Mr. Trump, the venom among Sanders backers and their counterparts supporting other candidates is of serious concern to Democrats.

Peggy Huppert, an Iowa activist who consulted for the 2016 Sanders campaign, said she had decided to support Mr. Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., in 2020 “in large part because of the way he conducts himself.” She praised Mr. Sanders’s letter to supporters after his announcement but said that this message had plainly failed to resonate.

“Obama set the tone for his campaign: ‘You are positive, you are respectful, you are civil,’” Ms. Huppert said. “I guess Bernie hasn’t.”

In recent days, Sanders supporters have filled the social media feeds of Ms. Warren and her allies with snakes — emojis, GIFs, doctored photographs — following the candidates’ quarrel over whether Mr. Sanders had told Ms. Warren privately in 2018 that a woman could not win the presidency. And last week, Mrs. Clinton resurfaced to revisit old wounds, telling The Hollywood Reporter that Mr. Sanders was to blame for permitting and “very much supporting” a toxic campaign culture.

For many of Mr. Sanders’s admirers, the interview only reinforced a conviction that traditional Democratic forces wish him political harm.

So why, they ask, should he be expected to stifle his most potent megaphone?

“You can’t control these folks,” RoseAnn DeMoro, a vocal Sanders supporter and former leader of National Nurses United, said of his online base. “I should say, ‘us folks.’”

There was a running joke inside the Clinton campaign’s 2016 Brooklyn headquarters: The cruelest surprise her digital team could pull on staff members was to retweet their personal account from the candidate’s handle, putting them on the radar of Mr. Sanders’s followers.

Mrs. Clinton’s aides mostly marveled at the scope and intensity of an ostensible long shot’s online base.

Mr. Sanders’s supporters, now often identified on Twitter by the rose emoji of the Democratic Socialists of America, loosely coordinated in private channels on Slack, a messaging service designed for the workplace, and congregated on Reddit, posting memes, news and jokes. (Today, there are 384,000 members in the SandersForPresident group on Reddit. The central group for Mr. Biden has about 3,100.)

— Michael Ceraso, a 2016 Sanders aide

Top Sanders aides initially worked to assemble traditional campaign infrastructure with staff on the ground in early nominating states like Iowa and New Hampshire. But much of the rest of the map was effectively the province of volunteers, who were responsible for helping to translate online enthusiasm into in-person support.

To Mr. Sanders, who had long bet his career on the power of mass movements, the online momentum did not necessarily register as unusual, even if he did not understand all the nuts and bolts.

Zack Exley, a senior adviser in 2016, said someone once asked Mr. Sanders how he had managed to draw so many people to his events.

“What do you mean?” the candidate replied, according to Mr. Exley. That was just how movements worked.

“If you’re in that position,” Mr. Exley said, “I don’t think you’re actually curious about how they got there.”

Others suggested that Mr. Sanders was highly attuned to what was happening online. His campaign aides tracked popular hashtags and, at times, encountered caustic posts. The candidate was particularly cognizant of, and grateful for, his online supporters’ capacity for small-dollar fund-raising.

“It would stun me that he wouldn’t know what was going on, positive or negative, online,” said Michael Ceraso, a Sanders aide in 2016 who worked for Mr. Buttigieg’s presidential campaign for part of last year.

While Mr. Sanders has said he does not have Twitter or any other apps on his phone, he is aware of the power of his online platform. “Given the fact that I have more social media followers than maybe all of my opponents combined, I guess we’re doing something right on that,” he told The New York Times editorial board. “What I have recognized is the importance of it.”

Ro Khanna, a California congressman who is now Mr. Sanders’s national campaign co-chair, said that the same internet that helped usher in the presidencies of Mr. Trump and Mr. Obama had made Mr. Sanders an unlikely juggernaut.

“If it weren’t for social media, if it weren’t for the use of email, Bernie Sanders would never have been a major contender,” he said. “It’s a glimpse, I think, into what the future of what campaigns may be.”

— a message received by Maya Contreras, co-founder of a feminist think tank who has been critical of Mr. Sanders

That is precisely what some Democrats fear. As the 2016 primary grew increasingly fractious, Mr. Sanders’s campaign found a drawback to such fervor: the online bullying among some supporters.

Sady Doyle, a progressive feminist author and Sanders critic who has been the subject of his followers’ ire, recalled one message she received from a stranger: “If you ever have a child, I’m going to dash it on the walls of Troy.” She said her husband asked her not to attend protests alone while pregnant.

Maya Contreras, a graduate student and co-founder of a feminist think tank who has criticized Mr. Sanders on Twitter, recalled a deluge in the lead-up to the 2016 election. “I got messages saying ‘go back to where you came from’ — which is Denver, Colorado, where I was born,” she said.

“Someone tweeted and said ‘You better watch where you’re going or something’s going to happen to you,’” Ms. Contreras added. “I also got ‘die bitch.’”

In person, serious violence has been avoided, it seems, though there have been occasional low-grade clashes. A May 2016 fight over delegates in Nevada included reports of thrown chairs, which some Sanders supporters dispute, and threats against the state party chairwoman, Roberta Lange, who changed her phone number after receiving a torrent of menacing messages about her, her grandchild and other relatives.

Former Senator Barbara Boxer of California, a Clinton supporter who had been at the Nevada convention, said she worried for her safety after being booed offstage.

“After the incident, Bernie and I talked on the phone, and he said, ‘I can’t believe that, my supporters would never do that,’” Ms. Boxer recalled. “I said, ‘Well, you ought to get to the bottom of it, Bernie.’”

She said Mr. Sanders responded, “Those cannot be my people.”

By early 2016, the behavior of Mr. Sanders’s online supporters, short-handed in the media as “Bernie Bros,” had become a stubborn trope, diagnosed as a political problem at the highest levels of the senator’s campaign, even as aides largely blamed Mrs. Clinton’s operation for overblowing it.

At times in public, Mr. Sanders tried to disclaim unseemly conduct. “We don’t want that crap,” he said in February 2016.

But he and his senior team also nursed a sharp sense of grievance. Jeff Weaver, a top Sanders strategist, played down the gravity of the Nevada unrest, telling CNN afterward that “no one had a right to feel threatened.”

“What happens,” he said, “is that when you rig the process and you get an angry crowd, you know, they’re not used to that.”

When the story broke this month detailing the private conversation between Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren about female electability, Sanders surrogates received a message from the campaign, advising them against going out of their way to engage with it publicly.

But later that day, Mr. Sanders’s campaign manager, Faiz Shakir, told CNN that whoever had pushed the Warren story was lying. Shaun King, a civil rights activist and prominent Sanders supporter with more than one million Twitter followers, said he saw an opportunity.

Among other widely circulated tweets, Mr. King wrote that he had spoken to Warren campaign staff members who reported that she “routinely embellishes stories.” He alleged that the Warren campaign and its allies “leaked this attack against Bernie to the press for political gain.”

Eventually, Ms. Turner, the campaign co-chair, got in touch. “She called me and said, ‘Shaun, just let up on it,’” he said. He did, to an extent. But by then, much of the Sanders-aligned internet was about to begin tweeting snakes at Ms. Warren and her supporters en masse.

In that instance and more than a handful of others over the past year, the campaign has publicly distanced itself from the rancor. Mr. Sanders’s wife, Jane, called for unity as the Warren squabble persisted. Mr. Sanders weighed in when some followers scorched Mr. Barkan, the activist with A.L.S., after his endorsement of Ms. Warren. “Bernie and all of his staff and surrogates were incredibly gracious and kind when I made the difficult decision to endorse one of my heroes over the other,” Mr. Barkan said in a statement.

The campaign recognizes the possible political downsides in any extreme behavior, but aides are perhaps most wary of the “bro” portion of the “Bernie Bro” descriptor, as Mr. Sanders prepares to make his case to a diverse Democratic electorate later in the primary calendar. Ms. Ford, the Sanders spokeswoman, said opponents were perpetuating “a false myth to discount the diversity of our supporters.”

While Mr. Sanders’s poll numbers with nonwhite voters are stronger than many rivals’, female and nonwhite Sanders critics say they continue to face disproportionate harassment from ostensibly progressive forces. “People talk about white dudes getting radicalized on the right,” said Imani Gandy, a senior legal analyst for Rewire.News behind a popular Twitter account, @AngryBlackLady. “I feel like white dudes in Brooklyn are being radicalized too.”

Candice Aiston, a lawyer who supported Ms. Harris before she left the primary, sparred with Sanders supporters last year and found herself targeted beyond Twitter: Some condemned her in Google reviews of her law practice and reported her to the Oregon state bar association, which dismissed the complaints.

(“She’s O.K. at her job, but her right wing ideology screams too loud,” one online review read. “Would not recommend.”)

For the campaign, the balance is delicate — tut-tutting at times without diluting the force of online support. Mr. Khanna, the congressman and campaign co-chair, called Mr. Sanders “the one person on our side who can counter what Trump’s formidable presence is going to be online.”

This view is shared among some online supporters who have turned Sanders fandom into something approaching a full-time job. Rodney Latstetter, a 62-year-old retiree in Illinois who posted repeatedly in 2017 about Ms. Harris’s Hamptons fund-raising, said he and a partner spent about seven hours a day running dozens of pro-Sanders social media groups. His Twitter page boosts Mr. Sanders and raises doubts about his rivals to more than 17,000 followers.

“Some of my followers — there are a few of them that have a little bit of an issue with their mouth or something like that,” Mr. Latstetter said, adding that he was unsure if he would support any of the other Democratic candidates if they won the nomination. “I also have my moments, too, where I have my limits, and I come out fighting.”

Such digital combat has seeped perceptibly into popular culture. The singer John Legend, endorsing Ms. Warren in a tweet this month, added a note of caution for Sanders supporters: “Try not to drive people away with your nastiness. I will happily vote for him if he wins the primary. Chill.”

This did not necessarily land with its intended audience.

“Some of you millionaires need to realize that many of us actually *need* Bernie Sanders to win the Presidency,” one account replied. “We can’t just ‘chill.’”

Nick Corasaniti contributed reporting.

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China extends Lunar New Year holiday to contain coronavirus as death toll rises

China on Monday expanded sweeping efforts to contain a viral disease by extending the Lunar New Year holiday to keep the public at home and avoid spreading infection as the death toll rose to 80.

Hong Kong announced it would bar entry to visitors from the mainland province at the center of the outbreak following a warning the virus’s ability to spread was increasing. Travel agencies were ordered to cancel group tours nationwide, adding to the rising economic cost.

Increasingly drastic anti-disease efforts began with the Jan. 22 suspension of plane, train and bus links to Wuhan, a city of 11 million people in central China where the virus was first detected last month. That lockdown has expanded to a total of 17 cities with more than 50 million people in the most far-reaching disease-control measures ever imposed.

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA PUSH US TALLY TO 5

Westlake Legal Group AP20027164673303 China extends Lunar New Year holiday to contain coronavirus as death toll rises fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fnc/world fnc d51babff-1ec8-5a37-abfe-3717d67fa6b0 Associated Press article

Commuters wearing protective face masks walk on a sidewalk Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, in the Shinjuku district of Tokyo. China has extended its Lunar New Year holiday three more days to discourage people from traveling as it tries to contain the spread of a viral illness that has caused dozens of deaths. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

The end of the Lunar New Year holiday, China’s busiest travel season, was pushed back to Sunday from Thursday to “reduce mass gatherings” and “block the spread of the epidemic,” a Cabinet statement said.

Tens of millions of people were due to crowd into planes, trains, and buses to return to work after visiting their hometowns or tourist sites for the holiday. Schools will postpone reopening until further notice, the Cabinet said.

Also Monday, China’s No. 2 leader, Premier Li Keqiang, visited Wuhan to “guide epidemic prevention work,” the Cabinet website said. Photos on the site showed Li, in a blue smock and green face mask, meeting hospital employees.

The U.S. Consulate in Wuhan said it was arranging to evacuate its diplomats and some American citizens on Tuesday. The French government said it would fly its citizens in Wuhan to France and quarantine them there. Japan was preparing to fly its nationals out of Wuhan.

French automaker PSA Peugeot Citroen, which has a factory in Wuhan, said it was moving foreign employees and their families by bus to be quarantined in another city.

The disruption to business and consumer spending threaten to depress Chinese economic growth that Beijing is struggling to shore up after it sank to a multi-decade low of 6.1% last year. That could spread shockwaves to Asian economies that rely on China as a source of tourists and export markets.

Chinese regulators called on banks and insurers in a statement Monday to support to people and companies affected by the outbreak.

The biggest impact will be on travel, hotels, and restaurants but Chinese retail spending, factory output, and investment also might suffer if the outbreak and quarantines last, forecasters say.

Westlake Legal Group AP20022434749667-1-1 China extends Lunar New Year holiday to contain coronavirus as death toll rises fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fnc/world fnc d51babff-1ec8-5a37-abfe-3717d67fa6b0 Associated Press article

Passengers wear masks to prevent an outbreak of a new coronavirus in a subway station, in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. The first case of coronavirus in Macao was confirmed on Wednesday, according to state broadcaster CCTV. The infected person, a 52-year-old woman, was a traveller from Wuhan. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

The outbreak is a “notable downside risk” to growth, though it “could potentially be a high impact but short-lived event,” said Tommy Wu and Priyanka Kishore of Oxford Economics in a report.

They pointed to the example of the 2003 SARS outbreak when economic activity plunged but recovered relatively quickly. The impact should be “less severe” than SARS because of faster official reaction and “increased transparency,” they said.

Abroad, economies including Hong Kong, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore and the Philippines with big tourism industries that rely on Chinese travelers “seem most at risk,” said Wu and Kishore.

CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK SPURS PARIS TO CANCEL LUNAR NEW YEAR PARADE, IMPACTS CELEBRATIONS WORLDWIDE

The National Health Commission said 2,744 cases were confirmed by midnight Sunday. There were 24 new deaths on Sunday, all in Hubei province, where Wuhan is located.

The youngest patient is a 9-month-old girl in Beijing. China also reported five cases in Hong Kong and two in Macao.

South Korea confirmed its fourth case Monday. Scattered cases also have been confirmed in Thailand, Taiwan, Japan, the U.S., Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Nepal, France, Canada, and Australia.

The U.S. has confirmed cases in Washington state, Chicago, southern California, and Arizona.

China’s health minister, Ma Xiaowei, said the country was entering a “crucial stage” as “it seems like the ability of the virus to spread is getting stronger.”

President Xi Jinping has called the outbreak a grave situation and said the government was stepping restrictions on travel and public gatherings while rushing medical staff and supplies to Wuhan.

The epidemic has revived memories of the 2002-03 SARS outbreak that originated in China and killed nearly 800 people.

Westlake Legal Group AP20027247313069 China extends Lunar New Year holiday to contain coronavirus as death toll rises fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fnc/world fnc d51babff-1ec8-5a37-abfe-3717d67fa6b0 Associated Press article

A poster warning about coronavirus is seen as passengers wear masks in a departure lobby at Incheon International Airport in Incheon, South Korea, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020. China on Monday expanded sweeping efforts to contain a viral disease by extending the Lunar New Year holiday to keep the public at home and avoid spreading infection. The sign reads ” A new coronavirus occurs in Wuhan City, China.” (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Then, Chinese authorities were criticized for reacting slowly and failing to disclose information. The government has responded more aggressively to the latest outbreak.

The National Health Commission said anyone traveling from Wuhan is required to register with community health stations and quarantine themselves at home for 14 days — the virus’ maximum incubation period.

Hong Kong announced it would bar entry to travelers from Hubei, starting Monday. Hong Kong residents returning from the area will be allowed to the territory but were told to quarantine themselves at home.

Two of Hong Kong’s most popular tourist attractions, Hong Kong Disneyland and Ocean Park, closed.

CORONAVIRUS: 56 DEAD AND 1,975 INFECTED AS CANADA REPORTS 1ST CASE

Also Sunday, Wuhan banned most vehicle use, including private cars, in downtown areas. The city will assign 6,000 taxis to neighborhoods to help people get around if they need to.

Wuhan is building two hospitals, one with 1,500 beds and another with 1,000, for the growing number of patients. The first is scheduled to be finished next week.

The National Health Commission said it is sending extra medical teams to Wuhan. The Chinese military dispatched 450 medical staff, some with experience in past outbreaks including SARS and Ebola.

The virus is from the coronavirus family that includes the common cold but also more severe illnesses like SARS and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. The new virus causes cold- and flu-like symptoms, including cough and fever, and in more severe cases, shortness of breath and pneumonia.

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The virus is thought to have spread to people from wild animals sold at a market in Wuhan. On Sunday, authorities banned trade in wild animals and called on the public to refrain from eating meat from them.

Westlake Legal Group AP20027164673303 China extends Lunar New Year holiday to contain coronavirus as death toll rises fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fnc/world fnc d51babff-1ec8-5a37-abfe-3717d67fa6b0 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group AP20027164673303 China extends Lunar New Year holiday to contain coronavirus as death toll rises fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/health/infectious-disease/coronavirus fox-news/health fnc/world fnc d51babff-1ec8-5a37-abfe-3717d67fa6b0 Associated Press article

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