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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 251)

Report: Rick Perry pushed to install Texas political donor on board of Ukraine gas company

Westlake Legal Group scYMRVR5_WOF9-6F_h5C3tr4r2Uf-g1sxIxI5VoLGgE Report: Rick Perry pushed to install Texas political donor on board of Ukraine gas company r/politics

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Trump Drops Plan To Host G-7 Summit At His Miami Resort

Westlake Legal Group ap_19238757585355_wide-17203db05b7d20aed1d9e192eef404099dc5cdad-s1100-c15 Trump Drops Plan To Host G-7 Summit At His Miami Resort

Trump abandoned his plan to host the next G-7 summit at his Doral, Miami, golf resort, on Saturday. Alex Sanz/AP hide caption

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Alex Sanz/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Drops Plan To Host G-7 Summit At His Miami Resort

Trump abandoned his plan to host the next G-7 summit at his Doral, Miami, golf resort, on Saturday.

Alex Sanz/AP

President Trump announced that he’s dropping his plan to host next year’s Group of Seven meeting of the leaders of the world’s biggest economies at his Miami-area golf club.

In a series of late-night tweets on Saturday, Trump blamed the reversal on what he described as “Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility,” following bipartisan claims that he’s exploiting his presidency for personal profit.

“I announced that I would be willing to do it at NO PROFIT or, if legally permissible, at ZERO COST to the USA. …” the president tweeted. “[B]ased on both Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility, we will no longer consider Trump National Doral, Miami, as the Host Site for the G-7 in 2020.”

He again touted his resort’s “grand” acreage, ample rooms and its proximity to the Miami International Airport as an ideal venue to host international leaders.

Trump said his administration “will begin the search for another site, including the possibility of Camp David, immediately.”

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney had announced on Thursday that Trump National Doral would be the site of the 2020 summit. The selection revived accusations about Trump’s ability to use his office for financial gain and claims that he’s violated the Constitution by collecting payments from foreign governments going to businesses he owns.

Since the early days of his presidency, Trump has faced multiple ongoing lawsuits alleging he is violating the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution, which prohibits a sitting president from accepting payments from foreign governments.

Noah Bookbinder, the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, one of the groups suing Trump over the emoluments issue, said Trump’s Saturday announcement was “a bow to reality, but does not change how astonishing it was that a president ever thought this was appropriate, or that it was something he could get away with.”

Democratic House leaders had planned a vote as early as this week to rebuke Trump over the decision. They also planned investigations into the selection process and suggested they would prevent government money from being spent at Trump properties. A number of Republicans in Congress had also voiced concerns with the Doral choice.

An hour before Trump canceled the Doral plan, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden issued a rebuke on Twitter.

“Hosting the G7 at Trump’s hotel? A president should never be able to use the office for personal gain,” the former vice president wrote.

During Thursday’s press briefing, Mulvaney dismissed the possibility of returning to Camp David to hold the gathering, describing it as “too small” and “too remote.”

“I understand the folks who participated in it hated it and thought it was a miserable place to have the G-7,” he said.

NPR’s Brett Neely contributed to this report.

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Jose Altuve’s walk-off home run sends Astros back to World Series

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Jose Altuve's walk-off home run sends Astros back to World Series

SportsPulse: The Houston Astros are returning to the World Series for the second time in three years after defeating the Yankees, but must go through a red-hot Nationals team if they want to hoist the trophy. USA TODAY

HOUSTON — With one swing of the bat, Jose Altuve sent the baseball screaming into the air Saturday, and a sellout crowd screaming into the night, winning the Houston Astros the American League pennant.

The game took some bizarre twists and turns Saturday evening, but they’re headed to the World Series.

Once again.

The Astros, who blew a 4-2 lead on DJ LeMahieu’s ninth-inning homer, came right back in the bottom of the 10th with Altuve’s blast over the fence in left-center for a 6-4 win in Game 6 of the American League Championship Series.

Roberto Osuna gave up the homer in the top of the ninth, which tied a game that the Astros had been leading since the first inning. 

The Yankees brought in Aroldis Chapman for the bottom of the frame. After a two-out walk for George Springer, Altuve clubbed an 84-mph slider for his second home run of the series – and fifth of the postseason.

Altuve was named ALCS MVP, going 8-for-23 with six runs in the series.

The Astros get a World Series date with the Washington Nationals where they will be trying to win their second title in three years – while the Nats vie for their first in franchise history

And, now, after all of the dizzying moves with the Astros and Yankees numbing the senses with their “bullpenning” for all of the world to see, we will be reverting back to ol’-fashioned baseball.

We will see future Hall of Famers, and former Cy Young and MVP winners in Max Scherzer, Justin Verlander and Zack Greinke.

It will be a matchup of the most expensive rotations in World Series history with $200-million-dollar pitchers in Scherzer and Greinke, and $100 million pitchers in Stephen Strasburg and Verlander, to go along with the soon-to-be the richest pitcher in baseball history in Gerrit Cole.

We’ll have a showcase of MVP candidates in third basemen Alex Bregman and Anthony Rendon.

It’s not the Yankees-Los Angeles Dodgers matchup  that Major League Baseball and Fox executives wanted, but, this will certainly do.

Gone will be the torturous bullpen games.

We’ll see legitimate marquee pitching matchups beginning Tuesday at Minute Maid Park with Scherzer and Cole in Game 1, Strasburg and Verlander in Game 2, and Greinke and Patrick Corbin.

“I think people would rather see that,’’ Cole said, “than TBA vs. TBA.’’

There were five pitching changes in the first three innings alone in Game 6, with 14 pitchers used overall. Nobody besides the families of Brad Peacock and Chad Green will ever remember the starting pitchers in this game.

It was ugly, but the Astros will take it, slaying the mighty Yankees

“Beauty,’’ Hinch said, “is in the eye of the beholder.’’

Pardon Hinch for now wanting to go back to the traditional style of winning, hardly finding the task of managing bullpen games enjoyable.

“It’s miserable. I love when JV or Gerrit goes out there and throws nine scoreless. Those are the fun ones,” Hinch said before Saturday’s game.

“It’s crazy. We’re in the Game 6 of the ALCS and we’re going to have upwards of double-digit number of pitchers pitching in a game of such magnitude.

“Welcome to 2019.’’

For the Yankees, it’s the first time since the 1910s that they’ve got a decade without reaching the World Series.

And for a franchise that has 27 World Series championships, it leaves the question whether this season was a failure.

“I hate that question,’’ Yankees manager Aaron Boone said. “I know as an organization, myself, our players, we’re chasing a championship and we’re doing everything we can. We want to be champions. So that’s the goal. That’s the focus.

“Putting a label, success, fail, all that, I don’t really have time for it, honestly.’’

Certainly, the Astros have pulled off one of the most amazing turnarounds in baseball history, losing 324 homers in 2011-2013, to now winning 100 or more games the last three seasons.

“I still remember when we lost a 100 games three years in a row,’’ All-Star second baseman Jose Altuve said. “It seems like we were in the very, very bottom. So the only hope I had was to keep working hard because everybody keeps telling me, “Yeah, we’re going to win a championship, we’re going to be a really good team. I wanted to be a part of that.’

“It was hard to believe but it happened. I think we learned a lot from losing.’’

The Astros even flaunted their depth in this clincher. They used seven different pitchers, six traditional relievers. Their first baseman, who entered the game with just one hit in 20 at-bats this series, was the offensive hero when Yuli Gurriel hit a three-run homer off Green in the first inning.

The defensive hero was Michael Brantley, who signed a free-agent contract last winter primarily for his bat, made one of the most remarkable postseason plays in franchise history. Aaron Hicks hit a blooper to no-man’s land, only for Brantley to dive, snag the ball with his outstretched glove, jump up, and then throw out Aaron Judge trying to scramble back to first base.

While the Astros move on, the Yankees will re-evaluate their strategy of putting their resources into their bullpen.

They passed on making trades for Verlander, Cole and Greinke over the past few years, with that trio landing with the Astros, and lost out to the in the free-agent bidding for Corbin.

But they paid the price. Their starters pitched the fewest innings by any team to reach the ALCS, with their starters lasting an average of just 4 ⅓ innings this postseason.

Maybe, they’ll go back to being the Yankees again, and write that $220 million-plus paycheck for Cole.

Who knows, maybe, they’ll even start emulating the Astros.

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Astros top Yankees 6-4 to win ALCS, advance to World Series

The Houston Astros are moving on to the World Series after eliminating the New York Yankees with a 6-4 victory Saturday night in Houston in Game 6 of the American League Championship Series.

Houston’s Jose Altuve won the game with a two-run home run in the bottom of the ninth inning after New York’s D.J. LaMahieu tied the game with a home run of his own in the top of the frame.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE MLB POSTSEASON COVERAGE

The Astros, who won the World Series in 2017, will play the Washington Nationals, who recently eliminated the St. Louis Cardinals to win the National League pennant.

Westlake Legal Group 96afccf7-AP19293160064305 Astros top Yankees 6-4 to win ALCS, advance to World Series fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-yankees fox-news/sports/mlb/houston-astros fox-news/sports/mlb-postseason fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc ee364269-5370-5ac5-a615-0fe4600ccf8c Dom Calicchio article

Houston Astros’ Jose Altuve, right, and starting pitcher Justin Verlander celebrate after winning Game 6 of baseball’s American League Championship Series against the New York Yankees Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019, in Houston. The Astros won 6-4 to win the series 4-2. (Associated Press)

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Game 6 was not without controversy. In the second inning, Yankees hitter Brett Gardner had two strikes called against him by home plate umpire Marvin Hudson that appeared questionable on replays. The Yankees had two runners on base at the time, with two outs and Houston leading 3-1.

In the seventh inning, Houston outfielder Michael Brantley made a diving catch in left field and turned it into a double play by catching New York’s Aaron Judge, who was too far off first base.

Westlake Legal Group f46c3343-AP19293094508914 Astros top Yankees 6-4 to win ALCS, advance to World Series fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-yankees fox-news/sports/mlb/houston-astros fox-news/sports/mlb-postseason fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc ee364269-5370-5ac5-a615-0fe4600ccf8c Dom Calicchio article

Houston Astros shortstop Carlos Correa celebrates after the end of the top of the sixth inning in Game 6 of baseball’s American League Championship Series against the New York Yankees, Oct. 19, 2019, in Houston. (Associated Press)

Houston had a chance to end the game in the top of the ninth, but New York’s LaMahieu smacked a two-run home run to tie the game.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group AP19293160064305 Astros top Yankees 6-4 to win ALCS, advance to World Series fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-yankees fox-news/sports/mlb/houston-astros fox-news/sports/mlb-postseason fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc ee364269-5370-5ac5-a615-0fe4600ccf8c Dom Calicchio article   Westlake Legal Group AP19293160064305 Astros top Yankees 6-4 to win ALCS, advance to World Series fox-news/sports/mlb/new-york-yankees fox-news/sports/mlb/houston-astros fox-news/sports/mlb-postseason fox-news/sports/mlb fox news fnc/sports fnc ee364269-5370-5ac5-a615-0fe4600ccf8c Dom Calicchio article

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In Bracing Terms, Trump Invokes War’s Human Toll to Defend His Policies

Westlake Legal Group 14dc-trumpwar-sub-facebookJumbo In Bracing Terms, Trump Invokes War’s Human Toll to Defend His Policies United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Syria Reed, Walter, National Military Medical Center Obama, Barack Iraq Dover Air Force Base (Del) Bush, George W Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — It is the most solemn of rituals for American presidents: comforting the soldiers wounded under his command or the families of those who have died. For generations, presidents have typically discussed those encounters in the most delicate of tones.

“The hardest thing I have to do, by far, much harder than the witch hunt, is signing letters to parents of soldiers that have been killed,” President Trump said at the White House this month.

But in arguing that there must be an end to “endless wars” in Afghanistan and more recently in Syria, Mr. Trump has given graphic accounts of distraught widows and disfigured soldiers in terms rarely, if ever, heard from a president before. In one recent instance, he said he had seen grieving family members “make sounds, scream and cry like you’ve never seen before.”

Mr. Trump has particularly focused on describing the ceremony of transferring the flag-draped coffins of American soldiers killed overseas from the military cargo planes that have brought their remains home to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

In his telling, it is a gut-wrenching ordeal, a scene of anguish from the families of the fallen that bolsters his determination to bring American soldiers home from overseas conflicts. The public shares that desire, according to one recent survey, which found that 46 percent of Americans believe that military intervention makes the country less safe, while just 27 percent believe the opposite.

All recent presidents have struggled with the cost of war, and how to speak publicly about it, and to many of his supporters, Mr. Trump is talking in authentic and admirably frank terms about a reality many Americans and Washington policymakers never confront.

But Mr. Trump’s comments also offend some veterans and military experts. They say that solemn words about fallen heroes ring hollow from a president who received a Vietnam draft deferment and who has managed a dangerously chaotic foreign policy.

Others wince at the bluntness of Mr. Trump’s accounts.

“I think it’s disrespectful,” said Andrew J. Bacevich, a retired Army colonel turned author and historian whose son was killed while serving in Iraq in 2007. “Those are infinitely private and painful moments. And to have anyone presume to comment on that, I think is beyond reprehensible.”

“He’s politicizing casualties,” he said.

Mr. Trump has paid two visits to Dover Air Force Base, according to a White House spokesman, but it is unclear whether he has actually witnessed such scenes himself, or is repeating accounts he has heard from the military officers he has encountered there.

At a recent rally in Minnesota, the president referred to a widow jumping “on top of the flowers,” adding “I’ve seen this.” But the coffins unloaded at Dover, known as transfer cases, are not adorned with flowers.

Visiting Dover is a “a very tough experience,” he said at the rally, describing grieving families awaiting the return of their deceased sons or daughters with remarkable poise.

On his first visit, the president said, he told an unnamed colonel that the relatives he had met appeared to be “doing great.” The colonel warned that would change: “No sir, they’re not going to do great. You’ll see.”

Then, Mr. Trump said, “this big incredible machine flies in, this tremendous cargo plane,” a door opens and lowers a ramp, down which several soldiers carry a coffin.

“And I see parents make sounds, that were just 20 minutes ago absolutely fine, make sounds, scream and cry like you’ve never seen before,” he said.

“Sometimes they’ll run to the coffin. They’ll break through military barriers,” he said on another occasion, and “run to the coffin and jump on top of the coffin. Crying mothers and wives. Crying desperately.”

Dan Caldwell, a senior adviser to Concerned Veterans for America, a conservative group that supports a noninterventionist American foreign policy, called Mr. Trump’s remarks “some of the most powerful and most eloquent remarks of his presidency.”

“I thought it was very important that he take some time to remind the American people of the human toll of these endless wars,” said Mr. Caldwell, a former Marine who served a tour of duty in Iraq. “Policymakers, especially here in Washington, D.C., need to understand that these wars have a real cost,” he added.

Mr. Trump has also spoken increasingly often about his somber encounters with the wounded at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center outside Washington, which the White House spokesman said he had visited eight times.

He recently recalled meeting a soldier whose nose had been reconstructed from “a thousand fragments,” and recounted his awkward conversation.

“I said, ‘So where were you hurt?’” Mr. Trump asked the soldier, whom he did not name. “He said, ‘My face, sir, was almost obliterated.’”

“I said, ‘You have a better face than I do,’” Mr. Trump disclosed to nervous laughter in the room, before praising the skill of the man’s surgeons.

Scott Corsaut, a Marine veteran and interim president of America’s Gold Star Families, a support group for the families of people killed during active duty, said he sympathized with the emotional nature of Mr. Trump’s interactions.

“It’s got to be tough as a president, whether it’s President Trump or President Obama, to greet the families. I just really feel that as a human being that’s got to be a tough job,” he said.

Others see little introspection on Mr. Trump’s part.

“Having a draft dodger come and lecture us about what service to the country means or hard it is to lose troops in combat is hypocrisy at its worst,” said Representative Seth Moulton of Massachusetts, a former Marine who served four tours in Iraq. “It’s disgusting. Fake piety is worse than none at all,” added Mr. Moulton, who was briefly a Democratic candidate for president. “He’s saying what he believes is politically popular.”

Peter D. Feaver, a scholar of civil-military relations at Duke University who served on the National Security Council under President George W. Bush, said that Mr. Trump may be haunted by his exemption from Vietnam service after a diagnosis of bone spurs that some evidence suggests was unfounded.

“Some presidents struggle with whether they have the moral authority to cause other people to risk their lives,” Mr. Feaver said.

Mr. Trump’s past two predecessors, Mr. Bush and Barack Obama, each regularly visited Walter Reed to meet with service members wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mr. Bush was a pilot in the Air National Guard during the Vietnam War, but Mr. Obama, like his successor, did not serve in the military.

But Mr. Bush never visited Dover, despite the thousands of troops killed under his watch, although he met privately with the families of hundreds of lost soldiers in other locations. His White House, determined to maintain support for the Iraq war, resisted pressure to allow cameras to film the return of bodies there.

In late 2009, as he weighed whether to send more troops into Afghanistan, Mr. Obama paid an unannounced midnight visit to Dover to greet a plane returning several Americans who had been killed there. The White House allowed a photographer to capture the scene, prompting conservatives to accuse Mr. Obama of exploiting a sacred ritual.

Mr. Trump has also allowed cameras to photograph him at Dover, but families must also agree to any coverage by the news media.

“The burden that both our troops and our families bear in any wartime situation is going to bear on how I see these conflicts,” Mr. Obama said the next day. “It is something that I think about each and every day.

When Mr. Trump posted a video to his Twitter account defending his first call for a total withdrawal from Syria in December, he suggested that such a disentanglement from a foreign war would comfort those who had died fighting in them.

“I’ll tell you, they’re up there looking down on us,” Mr. Trump said, adding that “there is nobody happier” about his withdrawal plan. “That’s the way they want it,” he continued, pointing his finger toward the sky.

Mr. Bacevich shares Mr. Trump’s skepticism of foreign military action, but he said the president is a flawed and ineffective antiwar messenger, noting that he has overseen Pentagon budget increases and appointed hawkish aides like John R. Bolton, who has since left as national security adviser.

Mr. Trump “doesn’t know how to end endless wars,” he said. “He doesn’t know how to deal with the situations he’s inherited. You can’t just say, ‘Well, we quit.’”

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After Criticism, Trump to Select New Location for G7

Westlake Legal Group 19dc-doral-facebookJumbo After Criticism, Trump to Select New Location for G7 United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump National Doral Miami (Doral, Fla) Miami (Fla) Group of Seven Family Business Conflicts of Interest

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Saturday that he would no longer hold next year’s Group of 7 meeting at his luxury golf club near Miami, a swift reversal after two days of intense criticism over awarding his family company a major diplomatic event.

“I thought I was doing something very good for our country by using Trump National Doral, in Miami, for hosting the G-7 leaders,” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter, before again promoting the resort’s amenities. “But, as usual, the hostile media & Democrat partners went CRAZY!”

Mr. Trump added: “Therefore, based on both Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility, we will no longer consider Trump National Doral, Miami, as the Host Site for the G-7 in 2020.”

The decision to host the Group of 7 at Mr. Trump’s club was first announced by Mick Mulvaney, the president’s acting chief of staff, during a news briefing on Thursday at the White House, but Mr. Trump had hinted that the resort would be a possibility for months. Democrats immediately portrayed the plan as a blatant act of self-dealing corruption, and ethics lawyers said payments from the visiting delegations could violate the emoluments clause of the Constitution, which forbids the president from accepting gifts and funding from foreign governments.

The White House stressed that Mr. Trump would not stand to profit personally from the event — Mr. Mulvaney said it could be held “at cost,” meaning that Mr. Trump would not make money — but the Doral would still have received a large amount of free publicity simply by hosting the summit.

An event with the size and scope of the Group of 7, which the White House had planned for next June, would have brought a cash windfall to the Doral and the surrounding area in South Florida, which has high vacancy rates at that time of year. White House officials, at Mr. Trump’s suggestion, decided the Doral was the “best physical location” in the United States for the meeting, Mr. Mulvaney said.

The United States has held the Group of 7 in Houston, Puerto Rico, Denver and Sea Island, Ga., as well as Camp David since the gatherings began in France in 1975. On Saturday, Mr. Trump said that other locations, including Camp David, would be considered, two days after Mr. Mulvaney said all of the attendees to the 2012 summit, hosted by President Barack Obama, believed it was a “miserable” venue.

But for the right one, the economic boost can be significant: A study by the University of Toronto in 2010 estimated that the summit, held that year as the Group of 8 in Huntsville, Ontario, would bring the area $300 million in benefits.

The Doral has struggled financially since the Trump family bought the resort out of bankruptcy in 2012, reportedly paying $150 million for the property. More than $100 million in loans to help finance the project came from Deutsche Bank.

Democrats in the House and Senate quickly introduced legislation intended to block the use of the Doral, a bill they called “Trump’s Heist Undermines the G7,” or the Thug Act. The measure would have blocked the use of federal funds for the Group of 7 if the event were held at the Doral.

“Mr. Trump is unashamed of his corruption,” said Representative Lois Frankel, Democrat of Florida, said in a statement Friday. “He is abusing the office of the presidency and violating law by directing millions of dollars of American and foreign money to his family enterprises by holding an important meeting of world leaders at his Doral resort.”

Senator Richard Blumenthal, Democrat of Connecticut, who has helped lead the effort by Democrats in Congress to challenge federal and foreign spending at Trump resorts, said the president’s reversal was a sign that he himself saw that his standing in Washington was weakening.

“He backed down because of cracks in support from his own party, plain and simple,” Mr. Blumenthal said. “The threat that his shattering Republican support on this issue and Syria potentially impacting the solid wall on impeachment — that all is threatening him more deeply than he ever expected.”

House and Senate Democrats, Mr. Blumenthal added, will continue to press ahead with a lawsuit pending in federal court that claims spending at Mr. Trump’s resorts by foreign government officials violates the Constitution.

“His backing down doesn’t excuse his continued corrupt acceptance of foreign payments and benefits in violation of the Constitution,” he said.

Lawyers who have served in both Republican and Democratic administrations objected to the move, including several who emphasized that even though Mr. Trump, as president, is exempt from a federal conflict of interest statute, his role in the matter was improper.

“It stinks,” said Charles Fried, a Harvard law professor who served as solicitor general under President Ronald Reagan. “It is so completely blatant.”

Some Republicans in Congress also questioned Mr. Trump’s move.

“In the law, there’s a canon that says, avoid the appearance of impropriety,” Representative Francis Rooney, Republican of Florida, told reporters on Friday, adding, “I think that would be better if he would not use his hotel for this kind of stuff.”

Former White House officials expressed shock that Mr. Trump would consider hosting an event that would enrich his family, and suggested that the choice would also pose immediate ethical concerns for the world leaders invited to the summit.

“The appearance of impropriety and self-enrichment will likely be troubling to at least some G7 leaders,” said Daniel M. Price, who helped organize the summits for President George W. Bush. “If I were still the U.S. sherpa and the president was invited to attend a summit at a business resort owned by the foreign leader host, my first question would be to White House counsel about whether ethics rules would permit the president to attend.”

The president’s reversal adds another twist to a process that appeared to flout longstanding State Department guidelines for vetting diplomatic event venues — Mr. Mulvaney said the idea for the Doral was thought up in the White House dining room. Still, Mr. Mulvaney said aides created a short list of about a dozen sites, and narrowed it down to three possibilities in Hawaii and Utah.

Local officials in those states said they were never notified that the White House had been scouting for venues for a major event. A spokeswoman for David Ige, the Democratic governor of Hawaii, said officials determined that the White House had been looking for locations only after the fact.

“No specific facility was considered,” said Cindy McMillan, Mr. Ige’s communications director. “The White House was confirming capabilities and looking at hotels that fit the security and meeting space requirements.”

And Juan Carlos Bermudez, the mayor of Doral, Fla., said Saturday night that no one from the White House called to tell him that the president had changed his mind.

“I would have liked to have been notified. But they didn’t,” he said, adding that he learned of the reversal from a news report.

Mr. Bermudez, who had also not been apprised of Mr. Trump’s original decision to host the Group of 7 at the Doral, expressed disappointment that the city would no longer be able to showcase itself to the world.

“He has to do what he has to do. We respect that. We would love to have hosted it in Doral,” he said. “It is the administration’s decision. Not ours. It is beyond our purview.”

The city was just starting to formally plan for the event, he added, with meetings with federal government officials set for next week.

“Somebody else will have to deal with that,” he said.

Even without the Group of 7 at Trump Doral in Florida, the president has made visits to one of his resorts, golf clubs or hotels a total of 308 days since he was sworn in — about a third of his tenure as president.

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Winners and losers from Week 8 in college football led by Wisconsin, Oregon

There are worse things than losing to Illinois. You could lose to Kansas, for example. 

This isn’t to say anything positive about No. 6 Wisconsin’s 24-23 upset at Illinois, which maims the Badgers’ hopes of reaching the College Football Playoff, puts a dent in the perception of the Big Ten and removes every ounce of excitement surrounding that matchup with No. 4 Ohio State to end October.

That the Badgers are going to plunge in the next Amway Coaches Poll, issued on Sunday, is a justified reaction to what just occurred: they lost to Illinois. Wisconsin was a 30.5-point favorite. Illinois hadn’t beaten a ranked Big Ten team since 2007, a 28-game stretch that stood as the second-longest such streak in the Bowl Subdivision. (Behind Kansas, of course.)

Westlake Legal Group  Winners and losers from Week 8 in college football led by Wisconsin, Oregon

Since opening the season with a win at home against Akron, which remains winless, Illinois had dropped games at Memorial Stadium to Eastern Michigan, Nebraska and Michigan. Meanwhile, Wisconsin had pitched four shutouts in the year’s first six games, the first time the program had done so since 1930, and had allowed just 29 points, the fewest by any team through six games since Florida State gave up 29 points in 1993.

The Badgers hadn’t trailed all season — and didn’t trail Illinois until kicker James McCourt made a 39-yard field goal as time expired. (From the perspective of timing, if the game-winning attempt came with zeroes on the clock, did Wisconsin technically lead for the entire game? If so, the Badgers still haven’t trailed through seven games despite holding a loss.)

DESERVED LOSS:No. 6 Wisconsin didn’t play well and Illinois beat them

SCARY SCENE:Oklahoma’s Sooner Schooner crashes on field 

BAD MOVE:Clemson player ejected after throwing punch at Louisville player

The loss has the secondary effect of hurting the reputation of the Big Ten, which before this weekend could tout overall depth — there were six Big Ten teams in this week’s Amway Coaches Poll — along with three teams still in contention for the national semifinals, with the Badgers joined by the Buckeyes and Penn State. Not that it would matter in the end: Ohio State won’t be held out of the playoff because Wisconsin lost to Illinois.

As of Saturday afternoon, the Badgers’ only path demands not one but two wins against Ohio State, one in October and the other for the conference championship in early December, along with the predictable sort of chaos that ensues across the Power Five during the year’s second half. It sounds doable, sort of, except that the team that lost to Illinois would have no chance against the Buckeyes.

Here are the rest of Saturday’s winners and losers in college football:

Winners

Oregon

The 35-31 win at No. 23 Washington keeps the No. 12 Ducks very much alive in the playoff hunt: Oregon is now 6-1 overall and 4-0 in Pac-12 play, with the one loss coming on a neutral site against No. 11 Auburn. While he struggled against pressure, Oregon quarterback Justin Herbert completed 24 passes for 280 yards and four touchdowns, giving him 21 touchdowns against one interception on the season, and showed why he’s viewed as one of top NFL prospects in the country.

STILL ALIVE:Oregon in playoff mix after road defeat of Washington

Virginia

Bronco Mendenhall and the Cavaliers bounced back against Duke and made a case for returning to the Top 25. After dropping consecutive games to Notre Dame and Miami (Fla.), Virginia led 17-0 at halftime and 41-7 at the end of the third quarter in a 48-14 win. It helps to force turnovers: Duke turned it over five times while Virginia had five scoring drives of 40 or fewer yards. It still counts.

Virginia Tech

The Cavaliers’ Commonwealth Cup rival pulled of a 43-41 win against North Carolina in six overtimes, the longest game since the FBS enacted new overtime rules designed to shorten games that go into extra frames. Beginning this season, teams will begin attempting two-point conversions beginning in the fifth overtime. Exciting! Virginia Tech won on backup quarterback Quincy Patterson’s short scoring run in the sixth to move to a surprisingly positive 5-2 after losing early to Boston College and Duke. Painfully, UNC is 3-4 with the four losses coming by a combined 12 points: 24-18 to Wake Forest, 34-31 to Appalachian State, 21-20 to Clemson and 43-41 to the Hokies.

Baylor

Matt Rhule is moving to the front of the line for some end-of-year coaching accolades. Even after losing senior linebacker Clay Johnston, the heart of an improved defense and an All-America candidate, Baylor pulled off a 45-27 win at Oklahoma State to move to 7-0 heading into winnable games against West Virginia and TCU. After winning just one game in his 2017 debut, Rhule has the Bears in contention for a New Year’s Six bowl.

Iowa State

Since losing by a nose to Baylor on Sept. 28, Iowa State has rolled off three convincing Big 12 wins in a row against TCU, West Virginia and, on Saturday, Texas Tech. In doing so, the Cyclones have painted themselves as perhaps the second-best team in the conference, trailing only Oklahoma. The three-game streak, capped by Saturday’s 34-24 win at the Red Raiders, also helps to erase the sour taste of narrow losses to the Bears and rival Iowa.

Penn State

Michigan didn’t play poorly at all, especially with a ball-control offense that was successful in achieving its primary purpose: keeping Penn State’s offense on the sideline. In that respect, running 82 plays was a major win for Michigan, even if those plays averaged about a pretty pedestrian 5.1 yards per snap. Without knowing the result, you’d look at the box score and see the Wolverines with 130 more yards of offense and possession for almost 38 minutes (along with one turnover to Penn State’s none) and assume Jim Harbaugh’s team won, if narrowly.

Instead, the Nittany Lions packed four touchdown drives into just 54 plays and about 22 minutes of possession. It’s easy to imagine the offense scoring 40-plus with more time. Quarterback Sean Clifford threw for three touchdowns, two to terrific wide receiver KJ Hamler, while the running game drew one big play from back Ricky Slade. In all, the defense allowed a season-high 21 points but delivered another win that will boost the Nittany Lions’ postseason stock.

MAKING STOP:No. 7 Penn State beats Michigan with goal line stand

Losers

Miami (Fla.)

Here’s a fun one: Miami lost 28-21 in overtime to Georgia Tech, which earlier this season lost to The Citadel and hadn’t come within 16 points of each of its first three opponents in ACC play. The Yellow Jackets aren’t very good, you see, even if the team’s struggles were expected under first-year coach Geoff Collins. The Hurricanes’ new coach, Manny Diaz, now heads into the home stretch at 3-4 with five games left. Of that group, four come on the road: Pittsburgh, Florida State, Florida International and Duke.

“This is a rebuild,” Diaz said after the loss, which is laughable. The Hurricanes won 10 games just two years ago and were 49-29 across the previous six seasons — not great, but not rebuild-worthy numbers — while the program had inked top-25 recruiting classes in three of the past four years. To call this a rebuild is a desperate and transparent attempt at spinning a season that has spiraled out of control.

Toledo

Meanwhile, in the MAC … Toledo has careened off the tracks in back-to-back losses to Bowling Green and Ball State, quickly transforming the Rockets from conference favorite to one of the more mystifying teams in the FBS. The loss to Bowling Green came as a heavy favorite. Saturday’s loss at Ball State might’ve been worse: Toledo gave up 374 yards rushing on 7.5 yards per carry, allowed 12.1 yards per pass attempt and had just 309 yards of offense in a 52-14 loss.

Missouri

Missouri lost 21-14 to Vanderbilt, which one week ago lost 34-10 at home to UNLV. College football is not supposed to make sense — and it rarely does — but this is particularly strange, given that Missouri had made a quiet case for the Top 25 while the Commodores were supposedly circling the drain under embattled coach Derek Mason

Army

Blessed with soft schedule and fresh off 21 wins across the past two seasons, Army was cited in the preseason as a team capable of climbing from unranked into the Top 25. Instead, the Black Knights are now a disappointing 3-4 after a 28-21 loss to Georgia State. The three wins: Rice (0-7), Texas-San Antonio (3-4) and Morgan State (1-6 in the Football Championship Subdivision). On the other hand, each of the four teams to beat Army have five wins.

Texas

The Longhorns didn’t lose to Kansas, though there’s something generally negative about allowing 569 yards of offense and needing to escape via a last-second field goal to pull out a 50-48 win. I mean, the Jayhawks averaged 6.6 yards per carry. (And boldly went for and converted the two-point conversion to take a 48-47 lead with little over a minute left.) The defense is an obvious issue for Texas, which has given up at least 30 points in each of the past four games and five of the past six. 

Florida State

The takeaway isn’t that Wake Forest beat Florida State — it’s that Wake beat the Seminoles and nobody’s surprised. It’s a statement about the direction of each program, with Wake angling to become the second ranked team in the ACC and FSU again staring at the possibility of missing the postseason. The Demon Deacons’ 22-20 win made me wonder: Scoring 22 points is weird, right? Well, 24 teams, counting Wake, have won by scoring 22 points in a game since 2004. But the Demon Deacons are the only one of that group to get to 22 points the old-fashioned way: with one touchdown and five field goals. 

Westlake Legal Group  Winners and losers from Week 8 in college football led by Wisconsin, Oregon

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Pelosi, other US lawmakers arrive in Jordan for meetings on Syria

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096162715001_6096160158001-vs Pelosi, other US lawmakers arrive in Jordan for meetings on Syria fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox news fnc/world fnc Dom Calicchio cdd962e5-541e-5301-af08-bfe0fb64d628 article

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and a bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers announced late Saturday U.S. time that they had arrived in Jordan for meetings with King Abdullah II and other officials regarding the situation in Syria.

“Our bipartisan delegation is visiting Jordan at a critical time for the security and stability of the region,” Pelosi said in a statement.  “With the deepening crisis in Syria after Turkey’s incursion, our delegation has engaged in vital discussions about the impact to regional stability, increased flow of refugees, and the dangerous opening that has been provided to ISIS, Iran and Russia.”

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The scheduled talks in Jordan come as both Turkey and the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) claim the other side is violating terms of a 120-hour cease-fire brokered by the U.S. and Turkey on Thursday.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096162715001_6096160158001-vs Pelosi, other US lawmakers arrive in Jordan for meetings on Syria fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox news fnc/world fnc Dom Calicchio cdd962e5-541e-5301-af08-bfe0fb64d628 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6096162715001_6096160158001-vs Pelosi, other US lawmakers arrive in Jordan for meetings on Syria fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox news fnc/world fnc Dom Calicchio cdd962e5-541e-5301-af08-bfe0fb64d628 article

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Megathread: Trump drops plan to host G-7 at Doral

Westlake Legal Group p3LeiM48jenBIuVsqq8MGxPQUkzAzuWF89nU4oBLPyE Megathread: Trump drops plan to host G-7 at Doral r/politics

Accused of using the presidency to enrich himself, Trump announced a rare backtrack on Twitter on Saturday night stating “based on both Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility, we will no longer consider Trump National Doral, Miami, as the Host Site for the G-7 in 2020.” He says his administration “will begin the search for another site, including the possibility of Camp David, immediately.”


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Donald Trump pulls his Doral property from consideration for G-7 after bipartisan blowback

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Donald Trump pulls his Doral property from consideration for G-7 after bipartisan blowback

President Trump said Syria has “got a lot of sand” while talking about Turkey’s invasion of the country. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump announced late Saturday that he will not use his Doral golf resort in Miami for the G-7 summit next year, reversing course after the decision drew swift condemnation from Democratic and Republican lawmakers.

“Based on both Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility, we will no longer consider Trump National Doral, Miami, as the Host Site for the G-7 in 2020,” Trump posted on Twitter shortly before 10 p.m. ET Saturday. “We will begin the search for another site, including the possibility of Camp David, immediately.” 

In announcing the Doral pick just days earlier, White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney described the resort as “the best place” to host the leaders of the world’s most industrialized economies. Mulvaney tried to head off criticism about the propriety of using one of the president’s properties, saying it was well suited for the summit.

Republicans expressed relief Saturday. 

Former White House press Secretary Ari Fleischer simply tweeted: “Good call.”

Bradley Moss, a national security lawyer, tweeted:

“Wow, the pressure from within the Republican caucus must have been immense for him to so quickly back off.”

Several analysts said the sudden reversal reflects Trump’s concerns about holding Republican support as impeachment heats up.

Tony Schwartz, who ghost wrote Trump’s “The Art of the Deal,” tweeted.

“Trump never admits being wrong on anything. Now, after fierce criticism for clear self-dealing, he says he won’t hold G-7 at his own hotel after all. One more sign that he is feeling threatened and running scared.”

Matt Mackowiak, a veteran GOP consultant, said the reason for the backtrack was clear: “Loss of Republican support and he never does anything at cost.”

Mulvaney had initially dismissed Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland. President Barack Obama held the meeting there in 2012. 

Where the White House could look next: The other finalists for G-7 were two sites in Utah and one in Hawaii, Mulvaney said Thursday. Mulvaney said the White House advance team surveyed 10 locations, in California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Michigan, North Carolina, Tennessee and Utah.

Doral: White House: Next G-7 meeting will take place at Trump’s Doral facility in Florida

Democrats swiftly denounced the Doral pick as nothing more than self-dealing that involves the nation’s foreign policy. They pointed out Trump is making the move as his campaign hammers away on the notion that Democratoc rival Joe Biden’s son Hunter profited from his father’s role as vice president during the Obama administration. 

“This is corruption, plain and simple,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., one of the Democratic presidential candidates, tweeted at the time. 

Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said he would investigate what he called the “most brazen” example of how the president violates the emoluments clause of the U.S. Constitution. Trump faces several lawsuits questioning whether foreign leaders staying at his properties is a violation of the clause. 

“He is exploiting his office and making official U.S. government decisions for his personal financial gain,” Nadler said at the time.

Democrats weren’t alone in balking at the move. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, told reporters it was not appropriate to use taxpayer dollars at a Trump resort. 

“You have to go out and try to defend him. Well, I don’t know if I can do that!” Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, told the Washington Post. “I have no doubt that Doral is a really good place – I’ve been there, I know. But it is politically insensitive. They should have known what the kickback is going to be on this, that politically he’s doing it for his own benefit.”

The G-7 will take place June 10-12, 2020, less than five months before the U.S. presidential election in which Trump seeks a second term.

The G-7 is a high-profile, annual gathering of leaders from the world’s largest industrialized economies: the United States, Italy, Japan, France, the United Kingdom, Canada and Germany. The most recent took place in August in the resort town of Biarritz, France. 

Mulvaney initially appeared to dismiss Camp David out of hand.

“I understand the folks who participated in it hated it and thought it was a miserable place to have the G-7,” he said. “It was way too small. It was way too remote. My understanding is this media didn’t like it because you had to drive an hour on a bus to get there either way.”

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