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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 252)

Biden Defends Faulty Telling Of Military Heroism Story

Westlake Legal Group 5d68f2c63c00008b05486541 Biden Defends Faulty Telling Of Military Heroism Story

GREENVILLE, S.C. (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Thursday defended his faulty description of a tale of military heroism and his interactions with the service members who carried it out.

The “essence” of his recollection is correct, the former vice president told a South Carolina newspaper Thursday after a Washington Post story detailed how an emotional anecdote Biden told recently while campaigning in New Hampshire contained inaccuracies.

Biden’s telling appeared to conflate multiple events, yielding a single story of Vice President Biden pinning a Silver Star on a U.S. Navy captain in the Konar province of Afghanistan for his efforts trying to save another service member. In his latest telling of a story he’s varied over several years, according to the Post, Biden got most of the details wrong: There’s no military record of that specific ceremony, and Biden’s records as a senator show he traveled to Konar when he was Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman and before he was vice president.

Biden and his aides countered that the anecdote’s fundamental point — that as vice president he once formally recognized the valor of a heartbroken solider who didn’t want the recognition because his fellow solider ultimately lost his life — is true.

“The central point is it was absolutely accurate what I said,” Biden told The Post and Courier newspaper of Charleston, South Carolina, hours after the Post published its story. “He refused the medal. I put it on him, he said: ‘Don’t do that to me, sir. He died. He died.’”

Indeed, The Post account quoted Staff Sgt. Chad Workman recalling that he received a Bronze Star from Biden at Forward Operating Base Airborne in Wardak province, Afghanistan, on Jan. 11, 2011. Workman confirmed Biden’s account, adding that Biden treated him with empathy.

The accounts represent a growing conundrum for Democrats. Their 2020 front-runner is hinging his campaign on the propositions that President Donald Trump is a serial liar and a fundamental threat to the nation and that Biden, a 76-year-old veteran of U.S. politics and world affairs, offers his party the best hope of victory.

But Biden is also repeatedly subjected to media scrutiny, social media derision and quiet grumbling from his rivals over his penchant for verbal missteps, a cacophony that fosters questions about whether he is indeed the best Democrat to send into a general election campaign against Trump.

Biden rejected those questions, telling the Post and Courier they are “ridiculous.”

Veteran Democratic strategist David Axelrod said the episode speaks to two well-known attributes of Biden: his liability as undisciplined and his strength as one who empathizes with those in pain.

Axelrod doesn’t see it as particularly damaging, but notes such episodes, should they continue, could answer one of the central question facing Biden: Is he up to the intellectual rigors of being president?

“Where it becomes problematical is if It’s seen as evidence of some sort of decay,” said Axelrod, a former senior adviser to President Barack Obama. “That is obviously a danger. Anything that raises those concerns is problematic. I don’t think this is the one that could tip the scales.”

Biden’s supporters this week in South Carolina have been unfazed by any mounting criticism — particularly in comparison to Trump, who regularly misspeaks and has treated truth casually since he first launched his campaign in 2015.

“Look at Trump, a habitual, sinister liar,” said Dawn Deboskey, a 57-year-old from Anderson, South Carolina. “The vice president is absolutely on point, discussing every issue in a knowledgeable way. I have zero concerns.”

At the campaign town hall where Deboskey came to see Biden, the candidate opted for a humorous defense against those who question whether he’s still up for the job. On education, he opted against offering detailed numbers when talking through his usual riff on the need for more social workers.

Offer a number and turn out to be wrong, Biden said, “and the press will say Biden’s losing his mind. He can’t remember.”

Follow Barrow on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BillBarrowAP

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Legal Bid To Block Boris Johnson’s Parliament Suspension Fails

Westlake Legal Group 5d68df77250000340089a9fc Legal Bid To Block Boris Johnson’s Parliament Suspension Fails

A legal challenge aimed at stopping Boris Johnson’s suspension of parliament has been denied an interim interdict at the Court of Session in Edinburgh.

A cross-party group of members of parliament and peers filed a petition at Scotland’s highest civil court earlier this summer aiming to stop the prime minister being able to prorogue (suspend) parliament.

They called for an interim interdict on Thursday to halt prorogation until a final decision has been made on the case.

On Friday, Judge Lord Doherty dismissed the action ahead of a full hearing originally set for Sept. 6.

Judge Lord Doherty said: “I’m not satisfied that it has been demonstrated that there’s a need for an interim suspension or an interim interdict to be granted at this stage.

“A substantive hearing is set to place for Friday, September 6, before the first possible date parliament could be prorogued.”

The challenge was launched after the Queen approved Johnson’s request for parliament to be suspended for five weeks from Sept. 10.

The prime minister said Wednesday that parliament had to be prorogued so he could set out his government’s new legislative agenda in a Queen’s speech and bring to an end the recording-breaking session which has lasted more than two years.

But MPs and others opposed to Johnson’s Brexit strategy have said he is trying to limit their ability to stop the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Meanwhile, a court in Northern Ireland will also hear from lawyers representing anti-no-deal campaigners challenging the move and attempt to do the same at the High Court in London is also underway.

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Outlook For The Great Barrier Reef Is Now ‘Very Poor,’ Australian Government Says

SYDNEY ― The outlook for the iconic Great Barrier Reef was downgraded from “poor” to “very poor” on Friday as the bastion of coral struggles to survive ongoing threats from climate change, the Australian federal agency that oversees the reef said in shocking new findings.

The report, published every five years by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, is the first time the government has listed the long-term prospects of the reef so bleakly. The findings directly point to runaway climate change spurred by greenhouse gas emissions as the prime threat to the structure, noting that the time to protect the reef’s “long-term future is now.”

“Climate change is escalating and is the most significant threat to the region’s long-term outlook,” the authority said. “Significant global action to address climate change is critical to slowing deterioration of the reef’s ecosystem and heritage values and supporting recovery. … The significant and large-scale impacts from record-breaking sea surface temperatures have resulted in coral reef habitat transitioning from poor to very poor condition.”

The paper is the third released by the country, and the authority has been tracking the reef’s troubles since 2009. Aside from climate change, the report points to other issues facing the reef, including outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish and poor water quality linked to farming runoff.

But scientists have long argued that the greatest threat to the reef lies in our warming world.

The Great Barrier Reef has been struggling for years after a series of devastating, back-to-back bleaching events in 2016 and 2017 that left vast swaths of the reef damaged or dead. Scientists who visited the reef after those events likened them as an underwater apocalypse that left large stretches of the structure, the largest living thing on the planet, cooked to death.

Researchers issued some silver linings at the time, however, urging the world to take action to save the reef before it’s too late.

Friday’s findings prompted immediate concern from environmental groups who have long warned that federal action to address the decline of the reef hasn’t gone far enough.

“This is now the third Outlook Report. We’ve had 10 years of warnings, 10 years of rising greenhouse emissions and 10 years watching the Reef heading for a catastrophe,” Imogen Zethoven, director of strategy for the Australian Marine Conservation Society, a nonprofit conservation group, said in a statement. “We are seeing the results of government inaction on climate change. This latest report outlines the big threats from warming oceans and poor water quality. Nobody can say they were not warned.”

Westlake Legal Group 58eb63e416000021004d9a3b Outlook For The Great Barrier Reef Is Now ‘Very Poor,’ Australian Government Says

Credit: Greg Torda/ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies The Great Barrier Reef was hit by devastating, back-to-back bleaching events in 2016 and 2017 that left wide swaths of corals dead.

Sussan Ley, the country’s environment minister, responded to the report on Friday by touting the government’s initiatives to protect the reef. Australia has released a Reef 2050 Plan that focuses on efforts to save the Great Barrier over the next 30 years, but the proposal has been criticized for not going far enough to address climate change as the root cause of the reef’s woes.

“We have the best-managed reef ecosystem in the world,” Ley said in an editorial in The Sydney Morning Herald. “We have a massive job to do in protecting its future and we are getting on with that job. … I trust the scientists who tell me that climate change is the biggest single threat to the reef, just as I trust those who tell me of the things we can do, and are doing, to make the reef more resilient.”

Despite Ley’s assurances that the reef was “teeming with life” when she visited in recent weeks, the report Friday painted a bleak picture for the future of the reef should the government fail to enact its own policies, noting that without dramatic action, a part of Australia’s core identity could soon disappear.

“Without additional local, national and global action on the greatest threats, the overall outlook for the Great Barrier Reef’s ecosystem will remain very poor, with continuing consequences for its heritage values,” the report states. “The window of opportunity to improve the Reef’s long-term future is now.”

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David Koch’s Heirs Will Enjoy the Biggest Tax Loophole Nobody Talks About

Westlake Legal Group vdxWugJjuCVvD08ZFn0YxAX9hh9gqk1S-wQnKBwYgBU David Koch’s Heirs Will Enjoy the Biggest Tax Loophole Nobody Talks About r/politics

Royalty/Handouts/Free Ride, all terms the Republicans like to throw around, while voting for and being backed by inheritors like Trump and the Bushes and Kochs.

They’re royal bloodlines but instead of ruling over one group of serfs, they have a distribution across geography, each having a share of the output of workers, while also having a share in all the services the workers need to pay for to survive, with all trickling up to these inheritors who didn’t even remotely earn it and haven’t passed any sort of intelligence filter. It’s the same thing as the world thought it moved away from, just masked ever so slightly.

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Catherine Zeta-Jones Finds Out About Son’s Skydive In The Funniest Way

Westlake Legal Group 5d68e6053c00003300485d13 Catherine Zeta-Jones Finds Out About Son’s Skydive In The Funniest Way

And the “Chicago” star posted a series of weary face emojis after reportedly finding out about the 19-year-old’s daredevil escapade via Instagram.

“Don’t tell mom,” Douglas captioned the clip he shared online earlier this week.

The Welsh actor also commented with this Instagram story:

Now, it’s unclear whether Zeta-Jones truly didn’t know about her son’s skydive before seeing the clip. But Michael Douglas, her husband and Dylan’s dad, made light of it by commenting: “No I wasn’t the Cameraman! 😂📸.”

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China Expels a Wall Street Journal Reporter in Sign of Tougher Line

Westlake Legal Group 30wsj-1-facebookJumbo China Expels a Wall Street Journal Reporter in Sign of Tougher Line Wall Street Journal Politics and Government Newspapers Chun Han Wong China Chai, Ming Australia

BEIJING — China has effectively expelled a reporter working for The Wall Street Journal after he wrote an article about the cousin of the country’s top leader, Xi Jinping, in the latest sign of a government clampdown on media freedoms.

The Chinese authorities declined to renew the press credentials of Chun Han Wong, a reporter in Beijing for The Journal, a spokesman from Dow Jones, the parent company of the newspaper, said in an emailed statement on Friday.

Mr. Wong, a Singaporean national, had reported on Chinese politics from Beijing for The Journal since 2014.

Mr. Wong’s expulsion comes amid a widening crackdown on journalists, both foreign and domestic. The government has threatened others with expulsion or made reporters wait for months, and sometimes years, before their visas were approved.

China’s Foreign Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Mr. Wong was the co-writer of an article in July about Ming Chai, a 61-year-old Australian citizen who is also Mr. Xi’s cousin. The article, which quoted unnamed Australian officials, said that the authorities were scrutinizing Mr. Chai’s activities as part of a broad money-laundering and organized crime investigation.

China’s Foreign Ministry at the time called the accusations groundless. The Journal article follow similar coverage by Australian news outlets. Others, including The New York Times, also covered the investigation.

Mr. Wong’s expulsion was reported earlier by The Washington Post.

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Pete Buttigieg Was Rising. Then Came South Bend’s Policing Crisis.

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — On a Tuesday in March, just after Pete Buttigieg began to catch fire with Democrats nationally, he flew home for his final State of the City address.

Mr. Buttigieg, the two-term mayor, drew more than 40 rounds of applause as he described the “comeback decade” in South Bend, pointing to new businesses and apartments downtown and the demolition of hundreds of blighted houses.

He had far less to say about his city’s police department: He devoted nearly as much time to it as he did to South Bend’s “smart sewers.”

But out of the spotlight, public safety was about to get worse. Reports of violent crime increased nearly 18 percent during the first seven months of 2019 compared to the same period in 2018. The number of people being shot has also risen markedly this year, after dropping last year. The city’s violent crime rate is double the average for American cities its size.

Policing problems in South Bend came to national attention on June 16, when a white sergeant fatally shot a 54-year-old black resident, Eric Logan. The officer’s body camera was not turned on, which was widely seen as a sign of lax standards in the department. Mr. Buttigieg found himself flying home again, regularly, to face the fury of some black citizens and the frustrations of many others.

It is the great paradox of Mr. Buttigieg’s presidential candidacy: His record on public safety and policing, once largely a footnote in his political biography, has overshadowed his economic record in South Bend, which he had spent years developing as a calling card for higher office.

“When he came in, the goal was to help turn the city around. That had nothing to do with the police department,” said Kareemah Fowler, until recently the South Bend city clerk.

Mr. Buttigieg’s image as a young, results-oriented executive continues to make him popular with many upper-income white liberals. They have delivered an overflowing war chest to his campaign: He had the best recent fund-raising quarter of any Democrat in the race, pulling in $24.8 million.

But criticism of Mr. Buttigieg’s oversight of the police has damaged his viability as a Democratic presidential candidate, given the huge influence of black voters in choosing the party’s nominee. He has slipped in the polls in recent months, from double-digit poll numbers in Iowa and New Hampshire in the spring to the single digits more recently. In a recent Fox News poll, he earned less than 1 percent support from black Democratic primary voters.

Mr. Buttigieg continues to draw large crowds, and a strong performance in the next debate or the army of field staff he has hired in early primary states could improve his standing in the race. And he has tried to highlight other issues, campaigning on the urgency of the climate crisis, a proposal to revive rural economies and for mental health and addiction services.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00buttigieg2-articleLarge Pete Buttigieg Was Rising. Then Came South Bend’s Policing Crisis. South Bend (Ind) Race and Ethnicity Presidential Election of 2020 Police Brutality, Misconduct and Shootings Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Mr. Buttigieg walked with protesters who were marching outside of the South Bend Police Department headquarters in June.CreditMark Felix for The New York Times

In a campaign swing through New Hampshire last weekend, however, voters readily expressed concern about how the police issues reflected on Mr. Buttigieg’s qualifications.

“If he couldn’t corral a 100-member police department, how will he corral the Defense and State Departments,’’ said Len Gleich, 72, who heard the mayor in Hanover, N.H.

A Dartmouth student, Eowyn Pak, 20, said she was a Buttigieg supporter but was disappointed he did not speak to how he’d unite the country given the racial divisions in his hometown. “If one took a gander at the audience in that room today, it would become apparent that Buttigieg lacks minority following and support,’’ she said, referring to the virtually all-white crowd at his event.

In a recent interview, Mr. Buttigieg said his handling of South Bend’s policing controversies are “certainly something I have to speak to” on the campaign trail. But he rejected the idea that he neglected issues of crime and policing until a crisis arose. He said that among the major priorities of his first term — “the things that are on the whiteboard when we have our strategy meetings’’ — an effort to reduce gun violence was in the top three.

“If nothing else, hopefully it will come across that among the candidates I’ll be one of those who has engaged these issues and the challenge that they represent,” Mr. Buttigieg said. “This is not a specialty or back-burner issue for me. It’s been so central for our community and the people I serve.”

Since the shooting two months ago, Mr. Buttigieg has pursued damage control on two fronts: an earnest willingness to embrace his critics, and a characteristically technocratic search for a policy response.

He has laid out a “Douglass Plan” to address historic wrongs against African Americans, including “a fundamentally racist criminal justice system.”

He attended protest marches and town halls at home, where the anger of some minority residents lashed against him like a breakwater.

While welcoming new police recruits the week after the shooting — all six of them white — Mr. Buttigieg lectured that their uniform came with a burden.

“In our past and present, we have seen innumerable moments in which racial injustice came at the hands of those trusted with being instruments of justice,” the mayor said.

But eloquently describing a history of injustice and showing empathy for its victims have yet to improve trust in the police, according to black critics and supporters of the mayor in South Bend, a city of about 100,000 in northern Indiana.

When pressed at the first Democratic debate in June about why just 6 percent of South Bend’s police officers were black, in a city where 26 percent of the residents are black, Mr. Buttigieg confessed, “Because I couldn’t get it done.”CreditSara Burnett/Associated Press

When pressed at the first Democratic debate in June about why just 6 percent of South Bend police officers were black, in a city where 26 percent of the residents are black, Mr. Buttigieg confessed, “Because I couldn’t get it done.”

During Mr. Buttigieg’s first term as mayor, from 2012 through 2015, reports of total violent crime were relatively stable, although the number of homicides rose after he took office.

In his second term, though, reports of violent crimes rose sharply, according to F.B.I. and South Bend records. The increase was almost entirely from aggravated assaults, one of four offenses that comprise the F.B.I.’s main violent crime category. Mr. Buttigieg’s aides said the increase was because of changes in how violent crime data was classified and reported, which they said have significantly overstated crime trends.

In 2016, the South Bend police changed their definition of aggravated assault at the urging of the F.B.I. to include a wider number of crimes, said Mark Bode, the city’s communications director. Reported aggravated assaults more than doubled that year. The F.B.I.’s national crime report for 2016 noted that because of the changes, the city’s crime data was not comparable to previous years.

James Alan Fox, a criminologist at Northeastern University, cautioned that the data reporting changes made it difficult to render a judgment about violent crime overall during Mr. Buttigieg’s time in office. And aggravated assaults are a less reliable category for depicting trends, he said.

Still, even accounting for the changes implemented in 2016, the city’s violent crime rate has been rising lately, according to city data.

“I’ve not seen any acknowledgment from the mayor that our violent crime has increased substantially” over the past year or so, said Ricky Klee, a former City Council candidate who has written blog posts critical of the mayor.

“He’s made statements that have been vague, inaccurate or misleading,” Mr. Klee said.

Mr. Buttigieg, in the interview, denied those criticisms. “We adopted every best practice we know about in order to drive down violent crime,’’ he said. “What I wish I could do is do something about guns. In the state of Indiana, that’s obviously challenging.’’

Mr. Buttigieg said he believed violent crime and murder rates in South Bend were comparable to cities with similar poverty rates and other characteristics. He also said an increase could be explained by residents trusting the police and reporting more crimes.

The mayor argued that homicide rates were a more appropriate yardstick than overall violent crime, because virtually all murders are reported, whereas other crime data include statistical “noise’’ that he said makes it impossible to scrutinize trends or to compare to national averages.

“The thing we pay most attention to and the thing I worry most about is the murder rate,’’ he said.

Since Mr. Buttigieg took office in January 2012, there were 100 homicides through the end of 2018 — an increase of about 30 percent from the seven years before he became mayor. That does not include 10 homicides in the first seven months of this year, a number that has already topped last year’s total of 9, which was the lowest since 2013.

Protestors in South Bend, Ind., after a white sergeant fatally shot a 54-year-old black resident named Eric Logan.CreditMark Felix for The New York Times

On another front, minority police hiring, South Bend under Mr. Buttigieg took a step in reverse.

There are now just 15 black officers in the police department, down from 29 in 2012, according to city data and local news reports. The city has recruited just two new black officers since April 2017, compared to 20 white officers. City data released to The New York Times show some black applicants were rejected after a pre-polygraph interview and a written test.

Although there is a national shortage of police candidates, critics said South Bend’s problems have been exacerbated by the mayor, who made a series of decisions on personnel and police discipline that sowed mistrust and failed to stabilize the department.

In Mr. Buttigieg’s first months in office, he demoted the city’s first black police chief, Darryl Boykins, which the mayor acknowledged damaged relations between the police and minorities for years.

Mr. Buttigieg said he demoted the chief after learning that the F.B.I. was investigating the police department for taping officers’ phone calls. Rumors flew that white officers had been recorded making racial slurs.

The tapes have never been released, because the officers who were recorded sued to keep them private, and the case remains tied up in court.

Mr. Buttigieg replaced Mr. Boykins with a white police chief, Ron Teachman, who he recruited from a department in Massachusetts.

Like the mayor, Mr. Teachman had a reputation as a technocrat, interested in technology and academic approaches to crime solving.

But the hiring of an outside chief proved unpopular with some in the department.

“Morale went down with all officers,” said Davin Hackett, an officer who quit the department in 2017. Mr. Hackett was one of three black officers who filed lawsuits in 2016 and 2017 charging racial discrimination under Chief Teachman and his successor, Scott Ruszkowski, who is also white.

“A lot of minority officers left,” Mr. Hackett said in an interview.

Mr. Hackett claimed in his lawsuit that he was twice denied promotions in favor of less qualified whites. His case was dismissed by summary judgment in July. One of the other officers’ cases was also dismissed summarily, and the third officer reached a settlement with the city.

Early in Chief Teachman’s tenure in 2013, the Indiana State Police were called in to investigate a complaint that the chief failed to assist a fellow officer in breaking up a fight outside the Martin Luther King Jr. Center.

The chief had remained inside the center when told of the fight and was untruthful to the lead state investigator, according to Patrick Cottrell, who at the time was president of South Bend’s Board of Public Safety, an oversight body for the police.

Chief Scott Ruszkowski, a South Bend native with many years on the force, was named chief after the previous chief left to work in private industry.CreditRobert Franklin/South Bend Tribune, via Associated Press

In response, Mr. Buttigieg said the episode “had more to do with interpersonal politics than public safety.”

Discipline within the department increased substantially under Chief Teachman, the mayor said. From 2014 to 2017, reported use of force incidents dropped by 35 percent, according to city data.

“I think in the long run that will serve us well,’’ the mayor said.

In any event, after two years Chief Teachman left to work in private industry.

His successor, Chief Ruszkowski, was a South Bend native with many years on the force. “He was popular in the minority community and among the police force,” said Ms. Fowler, the city clerk, who is black. “What the mayor did was he granted their wishes.”

At a City Council meeting after the Eric Logan shooting, Mr. Buttigieg listed multiple efforts by his administration to improve trust between the police and residents. They included rerouting patrols to keep officers in the same neighborhoods consistently, allowing residents to file online complaints about the police and spending $1.5 million on body cameras.

Minority residents and officials, including supporters of the mayor and chief, said the current anger had far deeper roots than just the Logan shooting, which occurred when an officer responded to a report of a person breaking into cars downtown.

“A lot of people are angry and hurt, but the issues didn’t just start under Mayor Pete,” said Sharon McBride, a black member of the City Council, known as the Common Council. Mr. Buttigieg “talked about fixing the heart before you can branch out to the rest of the body,” she recalled about his policy priorities. Today, “the downtown is great,” she said. “But did we do enough in the minority community? Absolutely not.”

Mr. Buttigieg, right, and Chief Ruszkowski answered questions during a town hall in June.CreditMark Felix for The New York Times

In 2012, three white officers entered the home of Deshawn Franklin, a black teenager asleep in his bed, and subdued him with punches and a stun gun. It turned out to be a case of mistaken identity. A jury found the officers guilty of violating the Franklin family’s civil rights. But it awarded them just $18, which activists called a slap in the face.

Two of the same officers later pressured a convenience store clerk with a mental disability into swallowing cinnamon until he became sick. Officers posted a video of the episode on YouTube. The city settled a lawsuit for $8,000 and temporarily suspended the officers.

In response to these and other complaints of excessive force, the mayor and police chief introduced bias training for officers.

But for some minority activists and members of the City Council, the measures were insufficient; they called for a more aggressive civilian watchdog to receive and investigate complaints of police misconduct.

Mr. Buttigieg resisted. He argued that the existing Board of Public Safety, whose members the mayor appoints, already served an oversight role. But that board did not conduct its own investigations.

“We pushed and we organized and said this needs to happen,” said Regina Williams-Preston, a member of the City Council who supported a new board. She called Mr. Buttigieg’s refusal to endorse the idea “a betrayal of the community.”

Mr. Buttigieg said that he embraces civilian review of police and is open to activists’ calls for more robust oversight.

“The bottom line is the concept of civilian review makes sense,” he said. “I think we have it up to a point. I think it’s reasonable to say that we can do more.”

Oliver Davis, a city council member who is often critical of the mayor, acknowledged the success of many of Mr. Buttigieg’s economic initiatives, such as demolishing or repairing 1,000 blighted houses in 1,000 days and rerouting downtown streets to increase pedestrian traffic and lure businesses.

But he said Mr. Buttigieg’s inability to solve the challenges of public safety overshadow those achievements.

“If you build up the downtown and fix all the potholes but your police officers are killing people, your people are not around to enjoy it,” he said.

“That is the key issue with Mayor Pete.”

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Anti-Trump host Donny Deutsch loses MSNBC show: reports

After just 13 episodes, MSNBC has pulled the plug on “Saturday Night Politics,” a show hosted by Donny Deutsch, a staunch critic of President Trump.

The show never caught on with viewers, finishing far behind Fox News’ “Watters World” with Jesse Watters, according to The Hill.

It’s far from the first cancellation for Deutsch, whose CNBC show, “The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch,” was scrapped in 2008. His other shows were trashed in 2010, 2013 and 2015, according to TV Newser.

MSNBC’S LAWRENCE O’DONNELL APOLOGIZES FOR UNVERIFIED TRUMP-RUSSIA REPORT: ‘WE ARE RETRACTING THE STORY’

Westlake Legal Group RTX1O3UX Anti-Trump host Donny Deutsch loses MSNBC show: reports fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/tv fox news fnc/media fnc Dom Calicchio article ad482f9a-84f9-5d01-ad88-3fa3d0cadbf3

Donny Deutsch speaks during the Television Critics Association Cable Summer Press Tour in Beverly Hills, Calif., Aug. 12, 2015. (Reuters)

Applying some positive spin in his Thursday tweet announcing he had lost his latest gig, Deutsch noted for fans that his MSNBC show was the liberal network’s “highest rated Saturday night program EVER!”

Deutsch added that he will continue to appear on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” hosted by another Trump critic, former U.S. Rep. Joe Scarborough.

Back in May, Deutsch appeared on “Morning Joe” and asserted that Trump was capable of deliberately sparking a civil war in the U.S.

“I’m not speaking hyperbole,” Deutsch said at the time.

In July, Deutsch blasted “wealthy white people” for continuing to back Trump.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In June, the president ripped Deutsch on Twitter as “a total Loser,” saying Deutsch’s show was “a disaster,” and that Deutsch and CNN’s Erin Burnett “used to BEG me” to appear on “The Apprentice,” when Trump starred on that program.

MSNBC will replace Deutsch’s show with reruns of “All In with Chris Hayes,” according to The Hill.

Westlake Legal Group RTX1O3UX Anti-Trump host Donny Deutsch loses MSNBC show: reports fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/tv fox news fnc/media fnc Dom Calicchio article ad482f9a-84f9-5d01-ad88-3fa3d0cadbf3   Westlake Legal Group RTX1O3UX Anti-Trump host Donny Deutsch loses MSNBC show: reports fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/entertainment/tv fox news fnc/media fnc Dom Calicchio article ad482f9a-84f9-5d01-ad88-3fa3d0cadbf3

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China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

Westlake Legal Group mizrahi-d-loren-f79716bb3b073d39140baccd2421660cb8a4a871-s1100-c15 China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

Designer Isaac Mizrahi (left) embraces Robert D’Loren, CEO of Xcel Brands, which once manufactured 70% of its clothes in China. Today that’s down to about 20%. The company now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

Designer Isaac Mizrahi (left) embraces Robert D’Loren, CEO of Xcel Brands, which once manufactured 70% of its clothes in China. Today that’s down to about 20%. The company now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka.

Brendan McDermid/Reuters

A lot of American companies that make or buy products in China are starting to rethink that, as a new round of tariffs takes effect this weekend. But Robert D’Loren doesn’t have to worry. As CEO of the Xcel Brands clothing company, he began moving production out of China some time ago.

“You never want to have all your eggs in one basket,” D’Loren said. “China was easy. In retrospect, probably if you had 90% of your production in China, that wasn’t good risk-management planning.”

D’Loren, who sells clothing under the Isaac Mizrahi and Halston labels, among others, once manufactured 70% of his company’s clothes in China. Today that’s down to about 20% — a byproduct of D’Loren’s effort to find faster, more flexible suppliers that can jump on fashion trends and turn out clothes in as little as six weeks.

“Sometimes there are things that by design and by luck … you do that serve you well,” D’Loren said.

Xcel now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka, and it’s exploring production in Central and South America. But building that flexible network wasn’t easy. Clothes from the new factories didn’t fit right at first, or the fabric wasn’t what D’Loren expected.

“It took us five deliveries to get it right,” he said. “Everything that could go wrong did go wrong.”

Many companies are now going through a similar process of trial and error, as they look for ways to avoid the president’s tariffs.

“The truth is that the trade war is a little bit of a wake-up call for many companies,” said Gerry Mattios, a Singapore-based vice president with Bain & Company consultants.

He says rising labor costs in China were already causing some companies to look elsewhere for suppliers, and the Trump tariffs have accelerated that. But other countries will need a lot of investment to match the expert manufacturing base and robust shipping network that China has built over the past two decades.

A survey by the American Chamber of Commerce in China says most companies that do relocate look to Southeast Asia. Vietnam’s exports to the U.S. jumped 33% in the first six months of this year, compared with the same period last year.

Mexico is another popular destination for companies shifting away from China. Roberto Durazo works for a company called Ivemsa that helps manufacturers set up shop in Mexico. He held three conference calls with potential clients in a single day this week. But for now, he says, most companies are keeping their options open.

“Not many of them are pulling the trigger,” Durazo said. “My feeling is that many of them are gathering information and, if the trade war continues for a long time, just making the decision of coming into Mexico.”

Mexico offers the advantage of much shorter delivery times to the United States. But it was only three months ago that President Trump was threatening tariffs on goods made there. Trump ultimately dropped that threat.

Trump has urged companies worried about tariffs to move production back to the United States. But only about 6% of the companies operating in China are considering that, according to the American Chamber survey.

Harry Moser, who runs the Reshoring Initiative, estimates that about 25% of those companies would find manufacturing in the U.S. competitive if they took tariffs, transportation and all other costs into account.

“Probably they made the right decision going to China when the wages [there] were so low,” Moser said. “Probably they should have reevaluated it five years ago. But now that they feel they have to bring a lot of work out of China, now is the perfect time to reevaluate the U.S. as an alternative.”

As the trade war drags on, more companies may rethink their presence in China. But for now, most are staying put. That includes Crown Crafts, a Louisiana-based company that makes baby blankets and other products in China. CEO Randall Chestnut told investors this summer that he looked into shifting production to a half-dozen different countries. But ultimately he decided it was cheaper to stay in China and simply pay Trump’s tariffs.

“So we think that we’re going to have to bite the bullet and, you know, pass it on,” Chestnut said during a quarterly earnings call.

According to the American Chamber survey, 60% of the U.S. companies now operating in China have no plans to relocate.

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Minor league baseball pitcher ‘destroyed’ after losing family in triple homicide

Westlake Legal Group blake-bivens-Shutterstock Minor league baseball pitcher 'destroyed' after losing family in triple homicide fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc Brie Stimson article 1d4e2390-7bbc-555f-8a57-668c41eb3b11

A minor league baseball pitcher on Thursday said his “heart was turned to ash,” after police said his wife, 14-month-old son and mother-in-law were found murdered at a family home in Virginia.

Blake Bivens, who plays for the Montgomery Biscuits of the Southern League, posted several pictures of his family on Instagram and wrote a loving tribute to them.

BLAKE BIVENS’ FAMILY TRAGEDY BRINGS SADNESS TO BASEBALL WORLD

“My life as I knew it is destroyed,” he wrote. “The pain my family and I feel is unbearable and cannot be put into words. I shake and tremble at the thought of our future without them.”

He said his wife Emily was the “best wife and mother this world has ever seen” and wrote he “can’t breathe” without his son.

“I finally understood what love was when you were born and I would have done anything for you,” he wrote. “You have changed my life forever, you are my reason why. I long to hold the both of you again in heaven.”

He added that his mother-in-law Joan loved her family “more than anyone I’ve ever seen.”

“You raised the most wonderful girl in the world. I’m so glad y’all are still together,” he wrote.

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Bivens’ brother-in-law, Matthew Thomas Bernard, 18, was arrested and charged with three counts of first-degree murder Tuesday after a chase with police.

Officials have not released a motive in the killings.

Westlake Legal Group blake-bivens-Shutterstock Minor league baseball pitcher 'destroyed' after losing family in triple homicide fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc Brie Stimson article 1d4e2390-7bbc-555f-8a57-668c41eb3b11   Westlake Legal Group blake-bivens-Shutterstock Minor league baseball pitcher 'destroyed' after losing family in triple homicide fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox-news/sports fox news fnc/sports fnc Brie Stimson article 1d4e2390-7bbc-555f-8a57-668c41eb3b11

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