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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 252)

Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: ‘She wasn’t just a pet’

A heartbroken Nevada woman claims her dog mysteriously died during a routine grooming appointment at PetSmart, believing that her pup was crushed to death under a grooming table.

A few days after Christmas, Vikki Seifert took her 2-year-old bulldog, Minni, to the pet-supply shop’s location at North 5th Street and 215 Beltway in Las Vegas, Fox 5 KVVU-TV reports.

AOC IN PETA DOGHOUSE AFTER ADOPTING PUREBRED FRENCH BULLDOG INSTEAD OF SETTING EXAMPLE WITH RESCUE PUP

But just 13 minutes after she dropped off Minni for a bath and nail trim at 6:30 p.m., Seifert says that the dog was dead.

Westlake Legal Group Vikki-Seifert-dog-2 Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: 'She wasn't just a pet' Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 18d8547e-6342-5ec0-b911-68528bc86e22

The heartbroken Las Vegas woman claims her dog, pictured, mysteriously died during a routine grooming appointment at PetSmart. (Vikki Seifert/KVVU)

The woman explained that her bulldog’s PetSmart appointments were usually quick, so she walked around the store in the meantime — but immediately knew something was wrong when she saw staffers run to the grooming area.

“I ran in there. When I went in, she was crushed under a grooming table,” Seifert told KVVU. “They said that they had listened for her heartbeat and she was gone.”

Westlake Legal Group Vikki-Seifert-kvvu Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: 'She wasn't just a pet' Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 18d8547e-6342-5ec0-b911-68528bc86e22

Vikki Seifert, pictured, believes that her pup was crushed to death by a grooming table at PetSmart. (KVVU)

Demanding answers, Seifert claims that the PetSmart employees could not provide a clear explanation for the accident.

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According to the North Las Vegas woman, the grooming table was unplugged — a possible reason why it couldn’t be raised off the animal.

“I don’t believe it was the weight of the table,” she alleged. “It was the fact that it was electric and it had crushed her to the point that the table was closed all the way on her. And then with it being unplugged, there was no way to raise it.”

Westlake Legal Group Vikki-Seifert-dog-3 Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: 'She wasn't just a pet' Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 18d8547e-6342-5ec0-b911-68528bc86e22

“A tragic accident occurred in our grooming salon, which led to the heartbreaking loss of Minni,” a rep for PetSmart said. (Vikki Seifert/KVVU)

When reached for comment, a PetSmart spokesperson described the incident as a “tragic accident” and confirmed that an investigation has since been launched.

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“A tragic accident occurred in our grooming salon, which led to the heartbreaking loss of Minni. There’s nothing more important than the safety of the pets in our care, and we immediately launched a comprehensive investigation into how this type of unprecedented event could have possibly happened,” a representative for the retailer told KVVU.

“We have been in constant contact with the pet parent since this occurred and will continue to do everything we can to help support her during this difficult time,” the spokesperson added.

Westlake Legal Group Vikki-Seifert-dog-1 Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: 'She wasn't just a pet' Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 18d8547e-6342-5ec0-b911-68528bc86e22

A photo of Minni as a puppy. (Vikki Seifert/KVVU)

Seifert, meanwhile, argues that that the details aren’t adding up.

“What were these two groomers doing? Why did no one notice where the dog was? Why was she under a table? How does a dog go in for a bath and get crushed in 13 minutes?” she wondered. “They told me my dog was dead by 6:43 p.m. I dropped her off at 6:30 p.m”

Westlake Legal Group Vikki-Seifert-dog-4 Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: 'She wasn't just a pet' Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 18d8547e-6342-5ec0-b911-68528bc86e22

Minni, seen here at Christmas, exploring presents under the tree. (Vikki Seifert/KVVU)

Seifert is now waiting on the results of Minni’s autopsy report. She also hopes to have the surveillance footage of the incident reviewed as she considers filing a lawsuit.

“People’s pets are their family members,”  Seifert said. “She wasn’t just a pet.”

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A spokesperson for Petsmart was not immediately available to offer further comment.

Westlake Legal Group Vikki-Seifert-dog-3 Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: 'She wasn't just a pet' Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 18d8547e-6342-5ec0-b911-68528bc86e22   Westlake Legal Group Vikki-Seifert-dog-3 Woman claims dog was crushed to death during PetSmart grooming appointment: 'She wasn't just a pet' Janine Puhak fox-news/lifestyle/pets fox-news/lifestyle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 18d8547e-6342-5ec0-b911-68528bc86e22

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U.S. Says It Won’t Discuss Withdrawing Troops from Iraq, as Iraq’s Leader Requested

Westlake Legal Group 10iraq-facebookJumbo-v2 U.S. Says It Won’t Discuss Withdrawing Troops from Iraq, as Iraq’s Leader Requested United States Suleimani, Qassim Politics and Government Mahdi, Adel Abdul Iran Drones (Pilotless Planes) Defense and Military Forces Baghdad (Iraq)

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq said on Friday that he had asked Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to send a delegation from the United States to prepare for the withdrawal of American troops from his country.

Iraqi lawmakers voted on Sunday to expel United States forces, after an American drone strike in Baghdad last week that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a top Iranian commander. The killing caused widespread outrage in Iraq, and its consequences continue to ripple through the Middle East.

In a Thursday evening phone call, which Mr. Abdul Mahdi’s office said Mr. Pompeo had initiated, the Iraqi prime minister said he had objected to dual violations of his country’s sovereignty — referring to both the American attack and the retaliatory missile strikes by Iran on bases in Iraq.

“Iraq is keen on keeping the best of relations with its neighbors and its friends in the international community,” the prime minister’s office said in the statement.

Iraq’s priority is to “fight terrorism,” according to the statement, including violence from the Islamic State, the militant group that tore through the region before being routed with support from Iranian-backed militias and a coalition of Western forces last year.

United States forces have been stationed in Iraq, and to a lesser degree in Syria, as part of that operation. There are currently around 5,200 American troops in Iraq.

The vote to eject the American forces was nonbinding and nearly half of the members of the Iraqi Parliament — primarily those representing ethnic Kurdish and Sunni Muslim minorities — did not vote. But there was no doubt of Mr. Abdul Mahdi’s support for the measure, because he quickly drafted a bill calling for the troops’ withdrawal.

In his statement on Friday, the Iraqi prime minister said that American forces entering the country and drones flying over Iraq did so “without a permission from the Iraqi government.”

Mr. Pompeo’s office confirmed that the two had spoken, and in a statement, the American secretary of state said that he “reiterated the United States’ condemnation of the Iranian regime’s Jan. 7 launch of ballistic missiles into two sites in Iraq that host Iraqi, American, and coalition forces working together to defeat ISIS.”

An initial readout of the call from the State Department did not mention the request for a delegation to discuss troop withdrawal.

Edward Wong and Falih Hassan contributed reporting.

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Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21

A Vermont state senator looking to make a point about cellphone use is calling for people under the age of 21 to face $1,000 fines and jail time if they are caught using the devices.

Sen. John Rodgers, a Democrat, has introduced a bill to the state legislature that would ban cellphones for anybody under the legal drinking age.

“In light of the dangerous and life-threatening consequences of cellphone use by young people, it is clear that persons under 21 years of age are not developmentally mature enough to safely possess them,” the bill says.

Westlake Legal Group mobile-phone-iStock Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21 Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/us fnc article 5f281dde-1d2f-5dcc-9ab3-0b3585a655a1

A Vermont state senator has introduced a bill that would ban cell phones for anyone under the age of 21. (iStock)

CELLPHONE-RELATED INJURIES ON THE RISE, STUDY SAYS

“The Internet and social media, accessed primarily through cell phones, are used to radicalize and recruit terrorists, fascists, and other extremists,” it continues, according to the Times Argus newspaper. “Cell phones have often been used by mass shooters of younger ages for research on previous shootings.”

The bill says such a ban would be justified because the “General Assembly has concluded that persons under 21 years of age are not mature enough to possess firearms, smoke cigarettes or consume alcohol,” according to WPTZ.

Anyone who breaks the cellphone ban, if passed, would face up to a year in prison and/or a $1,000 fine.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

But Rodgers suggested that he is merely trying to make a point about cellphone use and doesn’t expect the measure to pass.

“I have no delusions that it’s going to pass,” he told the Times Argus. “I wouldn’t probably vote for it myself.”

Westlake Legal Group mobile-phone-iStock Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21 Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/us fnc article 5f281dde-1d2f-5dcc-9ab3-0b3585a655a1   Westlake Legal Group mobile-phone-iStock Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21 Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/us fnc article 5f281dde-1d2f-5dcc-9ab3-0b3585a655a1

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Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21

A Vermont state senator looking to make a point about cellphone use is calling for people under the age of 21 to face $1,000 fines and jail time if they are caught using the devices.

Sen. John Rodgers, a Democrat, has introduced a bill to the state legislature that would ban cellphones for anybody under the legal drinking age.

“In light of the dangerous and life-threatening consequences of cellphone use by young people, it is clear that persons under 21 years of age are not developmentally mature enough to safely possess them,” the bill says.

Westlake Legal Group mobile-phone-iStock Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21 Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/us fnc article 5f281dde-1d2f-5dcc-9ab3-0b3585a655a1

A Vermont state senator has introduced a bill that would ban cell phones for anyone under the age of 21. (iStock)

CELLPHONE-RELATED INJURIES ON THE RISE, STUDY SAYS

“The Internet and social media, accessed primarily through cell phones, are used to radicalize and recruit terrorists, fascists, and other extremists,” it continues, according to the Times Argus newspaper. “Cell phones have often been used by mass shooters of younger ages for research on previous shootings.”

The bill says such a ban would be justified because the “General Assembly has concluded that persons under 21 years of age are not mature enough to possess firearms, smoke cigarettes or consume alcohol,” according to WPTZ.

Anyone who breaks the cellphone ban, if passed, would face up to a year in prison and/or a $1,000 fine.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

But Rodgers suggested that he is merely trying to make a point about cellphone use and doesn’t expect the measure to pass.

“I have no delusions that it’s going to pass,” he told the Times Argus. “I wouldn’t probably vote for it myself.”

Westlake Legal Group mobile-phone-iStock Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21 Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/us fnc article 5f281dde-1d2f-5dcc-9ab3-0b3585a655a1   Westlake Legal Group mobile-phone-iStock Vermont Democrat lawmaker introduces bill to ban cellphones for people under 21 Greg Norman fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/vermont fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox news fnc/us fnc article 5f281dde-1d2f-5dcc-9ab3-0b3585a655a1

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Rep. Brian Mast blasts Dems, media ‘taking Iran’s side’: Soleimani died ‘exactly the way’ he should have

Westlake Legal Group BRIAN Rep. Brian Mast blasts Dems, media 'taking Iran's side': Soleimani died 'exactly the way' he should have Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 22b3188b-df45-58b5-8796-077481fc6034

Veteran Rep. Brian Mast, R-Fla., said Friday that he couldn’t be “more amazed” by those “taking Iran’s side” after the rogue regime fired missiles at an airbase in Iraq which hosted American troops.

The strike, which left no American casualties, is believed to have been tied to the downing of a Ukrainian passenger jet carrying 176 people. All passengers on board were killed.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends” with hosts Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt and Brian Kilmeade, Mast said that he felt compelled to deliver his speech on the House floor on Thursday – discussing the War Powers Resolution passed later that evening – because lawmakers “need to be comfortable with the fact that we are justified to remove [terrorists] from the battlefield.”

“And, this is a common theme from the left, these American apologists that like to go out there and say that because America did something this resulted in some other country going out there and taking some unnecessary actions, some ill-fated action,” said Mast. “And, it’s not the Americans’ fault. It’s the fault of those that went out there and took those actions themselves.”

UKRAINIAN AIRPLANE SHOT DOWN BY MISTAKE BY IRANIAN ANTI-AIRCRAFT MISSILE, PENTAGON OFFICIALS BELIEVE

2020 presidential candidate, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg wrote on Twitter Thursday that “innocent civilians are now dead because they were caught in the middle of an unnecessary and unwanted military tit for tat.”

“It wasn’t unnecessary, that’s for sure,” Mast replied.

“We take very seriously our fallen,” he noted. “And, what this is, is a response to all of those that have been killed.”

“And, part of the way that we remember those that have been killed is we don’t forget who killed them. And, we make sure that there is a reckoning. And, it’s unfortunate that there are so many that forget about that,” Mast added.

In an airstrike last week, the United States killed Iranian General Qassem Soleimani near the Baghdad International Airport. The U.S. took out Soleimani because it says he is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of U.S. forces and was in the process of plotting the deaths of many more.

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The House Foreign Affairs Committee member said that Soleimani “should be looked at no differently than al-Baghdadi or Cigar Gari or bin Laden or any other terrorist that we have removed from this world” and that the world is better for “not having him in this place.”

“His life’s work was to kill and maim our U.S. service members,” Mast told the “Friends” hosts. Soleimani “ended up in a number of pieces on the side of a road next to the Baghdad airport. And, that’s exactly the way it should have ended for him.”

Westlake Legal Group BRIAN Rep. Brian Mast blasts Dems, media 'taking Iran's side': Soleimani died 'exactly the way' he should have Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 22b3188b-df45-58b5-8796-077481fc6034   Westlake Legal Group BRIAN Rep. Brian Mast blasts Dems, media 'taking Iran's side': Soleimani died 'exactly the way' he should have Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror/counter-terrorism fox-news/us/terror fox-news/us/military fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/politics/house-of-representatives/democrats fox-news/politics/elections/house-of-representatives fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 22b3188b-df45-58b5-8796-077481fc6034

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WWE Superstar Mandy Rose reflects on her journey to wrestling: ‘It’s kind of crazy’

It takes a lot to be a WWE Superstar.

Constant traveling, exercising and literal fighting can wear on someone, but Mandy Rose — whose real name is Amanda Rose Saccomanno — loves her life and is still going strong.

In addition to wrestling, the 29-year-old Westchester, N.Y., native has dove headfirst into several other passion projects. She starred in the fifth season of the reality show “Total Divas,” hosts a donut-centric web series with fellow Superstar Sonya Deville and has now developed a skincare line, Amarose.

WWE STARS CHARLOTTE FLAIR AND ANDRADE ARE ENGAGED

Mandy spoke with Fox News about what drew her to wrestling, her time on television and the best places that work has taken her to.

Fox News: How did you become a WWE Superstar?

Mandy Rose: I was studying speech-language pathology at Iona College and I got my bachelor’s degree there. And then I was approached from a friend, actually, that was like, ‘You know, you should get into bodybuilding and fitness competitions.’ And I didn’t really know anything about that industry, but it kind of intrigued me a little bit. So I was like, ‘I’ll give it a shot.’ You know, I always was fit and loved to work out and play sports, but I didn’t really know, you know, anything about fitness competition. So I was training to do a show in Boston with WBFF [World, Beauty, Fitness & Fashion] and I did the show, I really didn’t know what I was doing, but I placed first, which is really cool. And from then on, I went on to WBFF Worlds and I became the 2014 Bikini World Champion, which then led me to WWE. So, it’s kind of crazy.

Westlake Legal Group Daria-Berenato-2-Courtesy-WWE-1 WWE Superstar Mandy Rose reflects on her journey to wrestling: 'It's kind of crazy' Nate Day fox-news/organization/wwe fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 8906b72b-ed0e-534e-a720-2e48988d7396

Mandy Rose, left, and Sonya Deville enter the “SmackDown” ring. (Courtesy WWE)

Fox News: Where did the name “Mandy Rose” come from?

Mandy Rose: My real name is Amanda Rose Saccomanno, so a lot of people don’t know that, but Rose is kind of special in my family as my grandma’s name is Rosemary, my mom’s name is Mary Rose, I’m Amanda Rose, my niece is Demi Rose. So it kind of just keeps going in the family. But I was put on ‘Total Divas’ right when I got signed, so before I kind of stepped foot in the ring, I was on ‘Total Divas’ and I went by the name of Mandy, so […] we didn’t really want to change my name after that. It was like everyone knew me as Mandy and even from ‘Tough Enough,’ so we went with Mandy Rose.

‘SMACKDOWN’ SUPERSTAR SONYA DEVILLE REFLECTS ON LONG JOURNEY TO BECOMING A ‘BADA–‘ IN THE WWE

Fox News: What makes “Total Divas” so special?

Mandy Rose: It’s really cool because it’s such a blessing to be on ‘Total Divas’ because it’s a totally different demographic, as well, and a lot of the audience is a lot of people that may not watch wrestling and may not be aware with WWE, but then all of a sudden they get so intrigued by it, especially women all around the world, you know, traveling, and you see behind the scenes and you see some stuff that you’ll never see […] on WWE TV. So it’s really cool to get that vibe. And right now it’s a great time to be a woman in sports entertainment. So it’s really cool, especially to see these women like, you know, kicking a– on TV, but seeing all the work that […] comes with it and all the stuff that we have to, you know, all the drama and everything behind the scenes. So it’s a lot of fun.

Fox News: What makes it a good time to be a woman in sports entertainment?

Mandy Rose: I mean, just everything! You see these women, you know, we’re just all breaking down barriers. I mean, it’s what people want to see, too. You know, especially in sports, entertainment and WWE. And people want to see the women, you know, kick butt. And it’s just a great time. So I’m really blessed. And for me, it’s only the beginning of my career and I’m excited for what’s to come. And it only makes me more motivated and be more driven to want to get to the top, want to get to the very top, just like the women’s main event of this year at WrestleMania.

Fox News: Who are your female icons outside of wrestling?

Mandy Rose: I would say, Serena Williams, I’ve always looked up to [her]. She’s just bad– and I mean, she just speaks volumes, obviously. And I mean, there’s just a lot of women out there that, you know, even like JLo […] she just, you know, looks better and better with age. And she’s just a huge influence to young girls that want to be out there in whatever industry it is. Music, entertainment, movies. So it’s just a great time.

KEVIN SPACEY ACCUSER ARI BEHN ‘WAS AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUT FAMILY,’ SAYS NORWAY’S KING HARALD V

Fox News: What is your new show, “Damandyz Donutz,” about?

Mandy Rose: So my tag-team partner, Sonya Deville and I, we decided to go around the world everywhere, we go for TV and try the best glazed donuts. And now it’s kind of turning into this food channel, as well, because we love food and we’re big foodies and we’re both, every time we go places, we’re like, ‘Oh let’s find the nicest restaurant and go check out, you know, what their cuisine is.’ And we wanted to build our YouTube channel, so we’re like, what’s the better way to get a little more creative and try to engage our fans into seeing something that they don’t see all the time. So we do little videos and we’re in the car, of us eating donuts or at restaurants. And it really took a hit. Now we have our own website, we have our own clothing line with it, and eventually, we want to have a brick-and-mortar one day.

“…I was approached from a friend, actually, that was like, ‘You know, you should get into bodybuilding and fitness competitions.’ And I didn’t really know anything about that industry, but it kind of intrigued me a little bit.”

— Mandy Rose

Fox News: What is your “Fit With Mandy” app?

Mandy Rose: It’s an app that I created about a year ago. It’s basically a 12-week at-home program designed for all different skill levels. Males, females of any age. It requires […] little-to-no equipment. And it’s a lot of high-intensity interval training. And it’s a lot of stuff that I do when I’m on the road when we are in these little towns and cities that we can’t find a good gym or good equipment. So it’s just something that you can even do in your hotel room. So it speaks volumes for me because it’s something where I’m so passionate for it and I’m obviously so into taking care of my health and fitness. And we have to keep up with that, of course, in WWE. So it’s something that’s convenient, easy and accessible for everyone.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1046194560 WWE Superstar Mandy Rose reflects on her journey to wrestling: 'It's kind of crazy' Nate Day fox-news/organization/wwe fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 8906b72b-ed0e-534e-a720-2e48988d7396

Left to right:Paige, Mandy Rose and Sonya DeVille during 2018 New York Comic Con. Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images (Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

Fox News: What was the inspiration for your skincare line, Amarose?

Mandy Rose: So obviously, it’s another thing to keep up with, not only your health and beauty. I’m always in front of the camera, always traveling and getting out of airports and skincare is very important to me. So a little less than a year ago, Jazz Mathur and I partnered together with creating a skincare line called Amarose. So it’s very exciting, it’ll be launching soon in February and we’ve got a bunch of different products, and we really took the time in developing the best products and also suitable for everyone. But for me especially, too, I’ve tried out the products for at least five months and I’ve been seeing amazing results, and it’s something that I want to make sure I love. And, you know, if I’m gonna be showcasing it to other people; and it’s really exciting. And of course, the name Amarose, “rose” is there.

‘LAST MAN STANDING’ STAR TIM ALLEN: ‘WE JUST DON’T MAKE FUN OF STUFF… EXCEPT LIBERALS’

Fox News: What are some of your favorite places work has taken you to?

Mandy Rose: I have traveled a lot of different places, but I have to say South Africa was really cool, like Cape Town and Johannesburg. We, unfortunately, were really only there for a few hours. We […] either go to the gym, sightsee, either/or, we don’t have time for both. Then we go to our shows and then […] go to the next city. So it’s kind of hard, but recently, my new favorite has been Dublin, which was a lot of fun. It actually was the last stop we were at, so we were able to kind of go out and we had some Irish coffees and it was just, the streets were just, it was really cool. It was a really cool experience.

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Fox News: Do you have any travel tips?

Mandy Rose: Well now, I feel like because I travel so much, it just becomes a routine for me. It’s like, when I get home, I unpack everything out of my suitcase, wash everything and pretty much everything goes right back in to make it easier, my suitcase never really closes. It’s just if you’re on the road so much, it’s just easier that way. But little tips, it’s just making sure you’re prepared, like, you know, with your essentials. For me, it’s my skincare, for me, it’s my, you know, my protein on the road and making sure I have the right nutrition and food for my diet. That’s about it. And just making sure you’re also just in the moment, as well, because we’re always so busy that this time can go by fast, too. So it’s, like, always just being in the moment and being present.

Westlake Legal Group 9fdef744-mandy-rose-WWE WWE Superstar Mandy Rose reflects on her journey to wrestling: 'It's kind of crazy' Nate Day fox-news/organization/wwe fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 8906b72b-ed0e-534e-a720-2e48988d7396   Westlake Legal Group 9fdef744-mandy-rose-WWE WWE Superstar Mandy Rose reflects on her journey to wrestling: 'It's kind of crazy' Nate Day fox-news/organization/wwe fox-news/entertainment/features/exclusive fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 8906b72b-ed0e-534e-a720-2e48988d7396

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Elizabeth Warren Opens a New Front in Disability Policy

Westlake Legal Group 09warren-disability-facebookJumbo Elizabeth Warren Opens a New Front in Disability Policy Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Disabilities

Christine Motokane could get long-term care to help her with daily tasks like cooking. Matthew Cortland could marry his longtime partner. Christin Lucas could stop worrying that her son’s school might put him back in the isolated classrooms that made him suicidal.

This is some of what is at stake in a newly prominent debate over disability policy.

For months, Democratic presidential candidates have built on one another in this arena, culminating last week with a plan from Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts whose scope shocked many advocates.

That plan and the way Ms. Warren developed it, with a working group of about a dozen people with disabilities, reflect a sea change. More presidential candidates than ever before are acknowledging how many issues, from criminal justice to student debt, affect people with disabilities, who make up a quarter of the country’s adult population. And more people with disabilities are shaping the policies that could affect them.

“Candidates are actually listening to disabled people,” said Rebecca Cokley, director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress Action Fund, who was part of Ms. Warren’s working group and has advised several other candidates on their plans. “This is how policy should be made. It matters who’s at the table.”

Ms. Warren is not the only candidate to take a new approach. Several activists praised Julián Castro, the former housing secretary who ended his campaign and endorsed Ms. Warren this month, for his attention to disability policy. Former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., has an extensive plan.

And Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota released a proposal on Friday — developed with disability rights groups, her campaign said — that would, among other things, expand home- and community-based services, make technologies like speech-generating devices more accessible, increase Social Security disability payments and strengthen anti-discrimination laws.

But the disability community has responded more enthusiastically to Ms. Warren’s plan than to any other so far.

“It is the most comprehensive thing I have seen in my 20 years of looking at these things,” said Jason Dorwart, a theater professor at Oberlin College who is quadriplegic.

The plan is sprawling, touching on health care, education, employment, Social Security, technology, housing, incarceration, police brutality and environmental justice.

It overlaps with other candidates’ plans: For instance, Ms. Warren, Mr. Buttigieg, Ms. Klobuchar, Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont all want to fully fund the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which is meant to guarantee free public education for children with disabilities. They also all want to end the sub-minimum wage, which allows some workers with disabilities to be paid cents an hour based on the argument that it will make employers more likely to hire them.

But in other areas, her plan goes further.

While several candidates want to change rules that keep recipients of Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income in poverty, Ms. Warren’s proposal is particularly detailed, including on eligibility and income limits. Advocates also noted sections on helping deaf children learn language skills and on the threats people with disabilities face in police encounters and natural disasters, as well as the plan’s attention to how disability and race are intertwined.

“Typically, if you look at who people focus on when it comes to disability in politics, it’s a disabled white man or white woman,” said Vilissa Thompson, a social worker who founded Ramp Your Voice and was part of Ms. Warren’s working group.

In an interview this week, Ms. Warren said she had asked her staff to create the group after hearing from people with disabilities at her campaign events.

“The personal stories caused us to rethink parts of current federal policy that badly need to be rewritten,” she said. “In every way possible, the disability community helped us expand our understanding of both what needed to be done and what we could do.”

More than anything, people with disabilities marveled at the wide range of proposals in a single document — a breadth Ms. Warren alluded to in a Twitter question-and-answer session when she declared, “All policy issues are disability policy issues.”

Ms. Warren “sees that things like the plastic straw ban or the California wildfires all have disability rights components,” said Jasmine E. Harris, a professor of law at the University of California, Davis. “Disability is a lens by which we can view how certain issues disproportionately impact people with disabilities. That is the disability scholar’s dream, to hear that.”

People with disabilities described a range of ways that plans like Ms. Warren’s could change their lives.

Ms. Motokane, 27, who has autism, said she had sought Medicaid coverage for an aide to help her with things like cooking, budgeting and transportation. But her salary as a school paraprofessional in rural Washington State puts her above the income limit for that coverage — a limit Ms. Warren wants to raise.

Mr. Dorwart, 43, faced a similar situation in graduate school: He worked part-time over two months, but both paychecks arrived in one month, exceeding the income limit and costing him his Social Security Disability Insurance. That meant he had to pay out of pocket for the aide who enabled him to get out of bed and into his wheelchair, which in turn meant he had to take out more student loans and rely on GoFundMe campaigns to get by.

Another rule Ms. Warren wants to change limits the assets S.S.I. recipients can have, so that marrying someone with, say, $5,000 in a retirement account means losing benefits. Because of that, Mr. Cortland, a lawyer and policy analyst who was part of the working group, cannot afford to marry his partner of 12 years.

“Long term, there are very few parts of this plan that wouldn’t improve my life,” said Jack MC Staier, who has multiple disabilities, including hypermobility (which causes his joints to dislocate), Raynaud’s syndrome, migraines and depression.

Financial security is one of the biggest potential benefits, said Mr. Staier, 21, recalling that during his first year of college, he could only afford to spend $10 a day on food, and his weight dropped dangerously. Now, he can’t afford braces that would ease his chronic pain, and worries he won’t be hired if he discloses his disabilities to potential employers.

In interviews with a dozen activists and people with disabilities this week, only one criticism of Ms. Warren’s plan was raised: its lack of an explicit commitment to inclusive education, in which children with disabilities are taught in regular classrooms with accommodations, not in separate special-education rooms. Several studies have shown that children do better academically and socially under inclusive education.

Ms. Warren, who has often spoken about her experience as a special-education teacher, is committed to inclusive education, her campaign said, adding that several elements of her plan — including more funding for paraprofessionals, who can help students with disabilities in regular classrooms — would promote it. But her plan sets no targets or timeline for that.

By contrast, Mr. Buttigieg’s plan says that by the end of the 2025 school year, 85 percent of students with “intellectual and multiple disabilities” should be spending 80 percent or more of the school day in a regular classroom.

Ms. Lucas, of Bay Village, Ohio, said that when her son Bobby, who has Down syndrome, was put in a separate classroom in second grade, he became so depressed that he said he would kill himself. Bobby is now in fifth grade and in a regular classroom, and Ms. Lucas said that he was doing well — but that she was constantly afraid a new administrator could remove him.

“Just because that segregated room exists, it’s a constant threat for him,” she said.

Cal Montgomery, 52, an activist in Chicago who has autism and uses a wheelchair, also brought up inclusive education. “If all you see is that the disabled kids are somewhere else,” he said, “then it’s much easier to accept institutionalization as a natural thing when you’re an adult.”

He added, though, that he was leaning toward voting for Ms. Warren, and that she had “clearly listened” to people with disabilities — a sentiment echoed by several members of the working group, who said they had rarely seen a candidate collaborate that way.

“There’s a saying in the disability community, ‘Nothing about us without us,’” Mr. Cortland said. “Some other candidates have talked about the disability community as being something ‘other,’ and not really talked about us in ways that reflect the fact that we’re 25 percent of the population of the United States.”

Many of the candidates’ proposals would require congressional approval, which could be a challenge if a Democrat is elected president but Republicans control either chamber. For instance, one current piece of legislation, the Disability Integration Act, has 34 co-sponsors, but only two are Republicans. And the Trump administration is trying to move in the opposite direction by subjecting S.S.I. and S.S.D.I. recipients to more frequent reviews of whether they still have severe enough disabilities.

Even so, Mr. Montgomery said proposals like Ms. Warren’s — as well as Mr. Buttigieg’s, Mr. Castro’s and Mr. Sanders’s — had given people with disabilities something they had long lacked: clarity on how candidates would help or hurt them.

“All we have to judge is what they put out in public,” he said. “I appreciate that those individuals have given us a really robust vision of what they see for us in the future, because that enables us to make informed decisions about voting in a way we’ve never been able to before.”

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New Mexico boy, 1, becomes state’s first pediatric flu death of season

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095666100001_6095663710001-vs New Mexico boy, 1, becomes state’s first pediatric flu death of season Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/health/wellness fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox news fnc/health fnc da6ddb9d-91f0-524b-983a-08ff703a3b5f article

A 1-year-old boy in New Mexico has become the state’s first pediatric flu death of the 2019-2020 season.

The boy, who was not identified, was from Roosevelt County, officials with the New Mexico Department of Health announced this week. No other details were provided and it’s not currently clear if the boy had received the flu shot. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends vaccination for any child 6 months of age or older.

FLU  HAS SICKENED THE MOST PEOPLE IN THIS STATE 

“(The) seasonal flu vaccine covers multiple strains, including the ones currently circulating, and it is not too late to get vaccinated,” Health Secretary Kathy Kunkel said in a statement, according to the Albuquerque Journal. “The flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and your family from influenza and, given the fact that this season hasn’t peaked yet, we strongly encourage you to get vaccinated if you haven’t already.”

The death follows at least 52 other pneumonia and flu-related deaths since October, officials said, according to the outlet.

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The news comes after reports emerged this week that a 10-year-old Texas boy died after contracting the flu. Jaxon Campbell, a student at Austin Elementary School in Coppell, was remembered for his positive and can-do attitude by his teammates and friends in the community.

A spokesperson for the state Department of Health did not immediately return Fox News’ request for additional comment on Friday.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095666100001_6095663710001-vs New Mexico boy, 1, becomes state’s first pediatric flu death of season Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/health/wellness fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox news fnc/health fnc da6ddb9d-91f0-524b-983a-08ff703a3b5f article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095666100001_6095663710001-vs New Mexico boy, 1, becomes state’s first pediatric flu death of season Madeline Farber fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/new-mexico fox-news/health/wellness fox-news/health/respiratory-health/cold-and-flu fox news fnc/health fnc da6ddb9d-91f0-524b-983a-08ff703a3b5f article

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BBC Underpaid Female TV Host, Tribunal Rules

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The television host who took the BBC to court over unequal pay has won her case, in the first high-profile court case to be brought since the fallout over pay at the broadcaster more than two years ago.

Samira Ahmed, who was paid 440 pounds (about $565) per episode when she started hosting a program called “Newswatch,” argued before an employment tribunal that she should have been paid as much as Jeremy Vine, the host of another program, “Points of View,” who received £3,000 (about $3,850) an episode.

Both programs are about 15 minutes long and involve airing and discussing the comments of viewers. Ms. Ahmed’s program focuses on their thoughts on the news coverage. The program hosted by Mr. Vine deals with feedback on entertainment programs.

She was seeking almost £700,000 in backdated pay.

The BBC argued that Mr. Vine’s program required different skills because he was expected to be a friend to the audience in a way that Ms. Ahmed’s job does not, and so deserved to be paid more for the work he did.

The BBC has been grappling with complaints over salaries since at least 2017, when it first published the pay bands of its highest paid stars. The BBC is a public service broadcaster financed mostly by a television license fee paid by most households in the country and, as a result, often comes under criticism for the way it spends this money.

It published the salaries of its highest paid hosts in 2017 after the government made it a requirement of its governing charter, prompting an outcry over the lack of diversity in its highest ranks. This led to hundreds of pay complaints. The BBC’s former China editor, Carrie Gracie, quit in protest over not being paid as much as her male peers.

There are about 120 women considering collective action against the broadcaster over equal pay.

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Live Updates: Ukraine Gets ‘Important Data’ From U.S. on Iran Plane Crash

Here are the latest developments:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166903488_e844af27-9aaf-4ebc-9a46-9f378fa493e8-articleLarge Live Updates: Ukraine Gets ‘Important Data’ From U.S. on Iran Plane Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States Ukraine International Airlines Tehran (Iran) Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Boeing Company Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

A vigil in Toronto on Friday for the victims of the Ukrainian plane crash. More than 60 of those who died were Canadians.Credit…Warren Toda/EPA, via Shutterstock

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine spoke with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday morning Washington time after he requested that the United States and other Western countries release the evidence that a Ukrainian passenger jet that crashed shortly after takeoff in Iran had been shot down.

Mr. Zelensky said in a post on Facebook early Friday that the possibility that a missile had downed the Ukraine International Airlines plane on Wednesday, killing all 176 aboard, “cannot be ruled out but is not currently confirmed.”

Hours later, Mr. Zelensky’s spokeswoman said the president had met with U.S. Embassy officials in Kyiv and received “important data that will be studied by our specialists” and later in the day he spoke with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

American and allied officials said on Thursday that they had intelligence that surface-to-air missiles fired by Iranian military forces shot down the Boeing 737 minutes after it took off from Tehran, headed for Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital.

The jet crashed hours after Iran fired ballistic missiles at American targets in Iraq in retaliation for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of a powerful branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, and was bracing for a possible American response.

Mr. Zelensky has pledged to get to the bottom of what happened, cutting short a trip to Oman immediately after the crash and dispatching a team of 45 Ukrainian experts to Tehran.

On Friday, Mr. Zelensky made it clear that Western governments, allies in his country’s conflict with Russia, had not initially shared the evidence that led them to believe that the Ukrainian jet had been shot down by Iran.

“The version that a missile hit the airplane cannot be ruled out, but currently cannot be confirmed,” Mr. Zelensky wrote in the post, before his call with Mr. Pompeo.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada and Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain both said Iran had probably shot down the plane by accident. President Trump said he suspected that the downing of the plane had been the result of “a mistake on the other side.”

An American official told The New York Times that the United States had a high level of confidence that a Russian-made Iranian air defense system had fired two surface-to-air missiles at the plane.

The crash of the Ukrainian jet has presented Mr. Zelensky, a 41-year-old comedian who swept to a stunning victory in the presidential election last spring, with the most urgent crisis of his short tenure.

“Our goal is to ascertain the undeniable truth,” Mr. Zelensky said in his statement on Friday. “We believe this is the responsibility of the whole international community before the families of the dead and the memory of the victims of the catastrophe.”

The Ukrainian prosecutor general’s office issued a public request for help from Canada, seeking information from intelligence agencies about a possible missile strike.

Iran has maintained that there was no evidence that the plane was struck by a missile and doubled down on that assertion on Friday, despite western officials pointing to intelligence suggesting the passenger jet was accidentally hit by a missile.

Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization chief, Ali Abedzadeh, speaking during a Friday news conference, urged caution and said that nothing could be determined until the data from the black boxes was analyzed and said statements made by other nations were politically motivated.

But, he added, what could be said was that the plane had not been hit by a missile and was likely on fire before it crashed. He also urged nations with intelligence on the crash, namely the United States and Canada, to share that information with Iran.

“We cannot just give you speculation,” Mr. Abedzadeh said in footage televised and translated on Iranian state television. “So far what I can tell you is that the plane has not been hit by a missile, and we have to look for the cause of the fire.”

Hassan Rezaeifar, the head of the Iranian investigation team, said during the same news conference that it could take more than a month to process the data recovered from the flight recorders and that the investigation could take up to two years. He also noted that Ukraine, France, Canada, and Russia have all said they are willing to assist Iran with the data extraction, and Tehran will send the black box to one of these countries if it fails to retrieve the data.

Normally, Iran has the capacity to download black box data, but Mr. Rezaeifar said that since the devices had been damaged, it would be difficult to extract information.

“We need special software and hardware which are available in our country, but if we fail to extract the data due to the damages of the black box, we will get help from other countries,” he said.

The black box will begin to be evaluated on Friday, Iran’s state-run IRNA news agency reported, “to assess and check whether it is possible to reconstruct and analyze the information inside the country.” State television aired footage that it said showed the two black boxes that were recovered from the crash site.

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Westlake Legal Group xxivid-iran-plane-2-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Live Updates: Ukraine Gets ‘Important Data’ From U.S. on Iran Plane Crash Zelensky, Volodymyr United States Ukraine International Airlines Tehran (Iran) Iran Defense and Military Forces Canada Boeing Company Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

The New York Times has obtained and verified video showing the moment a Ukrainian airliner was hit in Iran.CreditCredit…Screenshot from video

Footage verified by The New York Times appears to show a missile fired from Iranian territory hitting a plane near Tehran’s airport, the area where a Ukrainian jet crashed on Wednesday.

As investigators work to determine an official cause of the accident, the video offered new clues about the crash, which came hours after a violent confrontation between Iran and the United States.

A small explosion occurred when what appears to be a missile hit the plane above Parand, a city near the airport, but the plane did not explode, the video showed. The jet continued flying for several minutes and turned back toward the airport, The Times has determined.

The plane, which by then had stopped transmitting its signal, flew toward the airport ablaze before it exploded and crashed quickly, other videos verified by The Times showed.

Visual and audio clues in the footage also matched flight path information and satellite imagery of the area near where the plane crashed.

The aftermath of the plane crash in Iran has the potential to open a fresh rift between Ukraine and its most important Western allies.

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine has already turned into an unwilling player in United States domestic politics as a result of the Trump administration’s pressure campaign seeking assistance in the 2020 presidential race. Now, he is stuck in the middle of an even more volatile American crisis: the conflict with Iran.

On the one hand, Mr. Zelensky needs Iranian cooperation to deliver the full-fledged investigation of the disaster that he has pledged to his public. On the other, Mr. Zelensky needs the data collected by Western intelligence — not to mention his continued reliance on Western support in Ukraine’s conflict with Russia.

“He could end up in a situation of being caught between two fires,” said Oleksandr Danylyuk, Mr. Zelensky’s former national security adviser, who resigned in September. “It’s a very complicated situation.”

Mr. Zelensky was caught flat-footed on Thursday when American officials went public with intelligence findings about the crash, and it was clear that the United States and its Western allies had not briefed Kyiv.

On Friday, American and Ukrainian officials raced to dispel any appearance of a rift. But Anatoliy Hrytsenko, a former Ukrainian defense minister, said that any recalcitrance from Western countries would create suspicions in Ukraine that they were using the tragedy as a cudgel in their conflict with Iran.

“Western leaders must give us these intelligence findings,” Mr. Hrytsenko said. “If we assume the worst and they don’t do this, then a big question mark arises: Is this really about determining the cause of a plane crash or is this now geopolitics?”

France’s aviation investigation authority said on Friday that it had been invited by Iran to take part in the investigation into the crash of an Ukrainian plane near Tehran this week.

A spokesman for the authority, known by its French acronym B.E.A., or Bureau d’Enquêtes et d’Analyses, said France was getting involved because the jetliner’s engine had been designed by CFM, a joint venture between GE Aviation, an American company, and Safran Aircraft Engines, a French one.

“No further assistance has been requested at this point in time,” the spokesman said, adding that Iranian aviation authorities were the lead investigator in the case.

Jean-Yves Le Drian, France’s foreign minister, did not say on Friday whether the country had proof that the jetliner had been shot down by Iranian missiles, but said that France was “available” to help with the investigation.

“Before the speculation, we must establish the truth in conditions of utmost transparency,” Mr. Le Drian told RTL, a French radio station. France, one of the signatories of the Iranian nuclear deal, is now trying to salvage it by acting as a go-between for Iran and the United States.

Anton Troianovski, Megan Specia, Aurelien Breeden, Melissa Eddy, Christiaan Triebert, Malachy Browne, Sarah Kerr and Ainara Tiefenthäler contributed reporting.

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