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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 254)

Pompeo tells McConnell he won’t run for Senate, despite overtures from GOP: source

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has told Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that he won’t run for Senate in 2020, a source close to McConnell told Fox News on Monday.

Pompeo has been urged by Republicans to consider a run for the open seat in Kansas to replace outgoing Republican Sen. Pat Roberts. Pompeo represented in Congress from 2011 to 2017 before Trump appointed him to lead the CIA and later the State Department.

In recent days, Pompeo himself has stoked speculation that he might run, including by making numerous visits to Kansas in 2019 and creating new personal Twitter and Instagram accounts. The Wall Street Journal noted that Pompeo posted a photo of his meeting with the Kansas Farm Bureau, which holds significant power in the state.

“Leader McConnell spoke with Secretary Pompeo this afternoon where he indicated he will not be running for Senate,” the source told Fox News. “Leader McConnell believes Secretary Pompeo is doing an incredible job as Secretary of State and is exactly where the country needs him to be right now.”

Pompeo, who was born in California and moved to Kansas in the 1990s, has time to change his mind, as the filing deadline for the Kansas primary race isn’t until June. He has more than $1 million in a campaign account from his time in the House that he could use.

The development comes as Pompeo has assumed a visible role in promoting President Trump’s Iran strategy, following Trump’s decision to order the killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

MCCONNELL TAKES AIM AT WARREN OVER SYMPATHETIC SOLEIMANI COMMENTS

Despite numerous overtures, Pompeo has repeatedly suggested he wants to stay in his current job.

“It’s my intention to stay and continue to serve as President Trump’s secretary of state,” Pompeo told Fox News in December, adding: “I’ve said that consistently. … I’ve watched my life take turns that one would never have expected. But it’s not something I want to do.”

Also in December, White House National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien told ABC News that Pompeo had also waved him off a possible run.

Westlake Legal Group AP19364009992229 Pompeo tells McConnell he won't run for Senate, despite overtures from GOP: source Gregg Re fox-news/politics/2020-senate-races fox news fnc/politics fnc ccc5796f-e763-57bc-ae9e-ce16278291ec article

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, center, Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, left, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley deliver a statement on Iraq and Syria, at President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago property, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

“I spoke with him about this two nights ago,” O’Brien said. “He said he’s not running for Senate. He said he’s staying as secretary of state.”

At the moment, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach leads the polls in the state’s GOP primary, but Pompeo would be expected to be the frontrunner should he enter the race to replace retiring GOP Sen. Pat Roberts.

Given Pompeo’s popularity in the Sunflower state – and Kobach’s past history of making controversial statements – Republican lawmakers have been rumored to be pushing the secretary of state to run for the seat. Kobach lost his bid in 2018 for Kansas governor.

“Let me put it this way: it’s certainly his decision,” Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., the National Republican Senatorial Committee chair, told radio host Hugh Hewitt last year. “I can conceive of no one who I’d rather work with in the United States Senate from the state of Kansas than Mike Pompeo.”

Even Pompeo’s current boss, President Trump, has weighed in on a potential Senate run for the secretary of state, saying that Pompeo would “win in a landslide” if he jumped into the race.

After Trump remarked Sunday that Iranian cultural sites were fair game for the U.S. military, Pompeo said the U.S. military may well strike more Iranian leaders if the Islamic Republic retaliates. But, he tip-toed around questions about Trump’s threats concerning the cultural sites, a military action that likely would be illegal under the laws of armed conflict and the U.N. charter.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Pompeo said only that any U.S. military strikes inside Iran would be legal.

“We’ll behave inside the system,” Pompeo said. “We always have and we always will.”

Fox News’ Rich Edson and Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119541673001_6119532209001-vs Pompeo tells McConnell he won't run for Senate, despite overtures from GOP: source Gregg Re fox-news/politics/2020-senate-races fox news fnc/politics fnc ccc5796f-e763-57bc-ae9e-ce16278291ec article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6119541673001_6119532209001-vs Pompeo tells McConnell he won't run for Senate, despite overtures from GOP: source Gregg Re fox-news/politics/2020-senate-races fox news fnc/politics fnc ccc5796f-e763-57bc-ae9e-ce16278291ec article

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Iran and Presidential War Powers, Explained

Westlake Legal Group merlin_166747266_afcc5eb8-984f-426a-98fa-d7d0340c657e-facebookJumbo Iran and Presidential War Powers, Explained War Powers Act (1973) War Crimes, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity War and Emergency Powers (US) United States Politics and Government United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Presidents and Presidency (US) Law and Legislation Iraq Iran Executive Orders and Memorandums Defense Department Defense and Military Forces Constitution (US)

WASHINGTON — Democratic leaders in Congress are moving to swiftly invoke the War Powers Resolution in an attempt to block President Trump from taking the United States into a war with Iran, even as Iran vows revenge for his killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani and Mr. Trump is threatening disproportionate strikes inside Iran if it does retaliate.

But Congress’s control over decisions about going to war has been eroding for generations, and administrations of both parties have established precedents that undercut the resolution as a meaningful check on presidential war-making authority.

Here is an explanation of the legal issues raised by the rapidly evolving crisis.

It is a law Congress enacted in 1973 — overriding President Richard M. Nixon’s veto — in an attempt to regain control over war decisions that had eroded during the Cold War.

Although the Constitution gives Congress the power to declare war, the United States military kept a large standing force deployed around the world as World War II gave way to the Cold War. Presidents, invoking their role as commander in chief, had directed those forces to launch or escalate wars, including in Korea and Vietnam.

One part says presidents may only introduce forces into hostilities after Congress has authorized using force or if the nation has been attacked. No subsequent president has respected that narrow list of when he may unilaterally dispatch forces into combat.

Another part requires presidents to consult with Congress before deploying troops into actual or imminent “hostilities.” Most presidents have obeyed this, but Mr. Trump did not before ordering the Suleimani strike.

Yet another part — important here — says if a president deploys combat troops without authorization, the deployment must end after 60 days unless lawmakers approve it in the interim. It also empowers Congress to direct the president to terminate the operation before that deadline.

They are trying to use the War Powers Resolution to block a war with Iran.

Senator Tim Kaine, Democrat of Virginia, has already proposed a joint resolution to do so, and Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Sunday that the House would act this week on a similar measure. The House version’s sponsor will be Representative Elissa Slotkin, Democrat of Michigan and a former C.I.A. and Pentagon analyst specializing in Shiite militias.

Mr. Kaine’s resolution declares that Mr. Trump has already introduced American armed forces into hostilities with Iran without congressional authorization and directs him to stop within 30 days of its enactment.

There are reasons to be doubtful.

Even if such a resolution passes both chambers, it seems inevitable that Mr. Trump would veto it. Overriding that veto would require a two-thirds majority in both chambers, which would require significant numbers of Republicans to break with him.

Last year, majorities in both chambers tried to use the War Powers Resolution to force Mr. Trump to end American support for Saudi Arabia’s intervention in Yemen’s civil war. But Mr. Trump vetoed it, and an override vote in the Senate failed 53 to 45, with only seven Republicans joining Democrats in challenging the president.

That is debatable.

Mr. Trump might claim a constitutional right to defy such a resolution even if it gets through Congress. Courts have been reluctant to adjudicate disputes between presidents and Congress over their war powers, raising the possibility of a standoff.

Attorney General William P. Barr has long espoused a maximalist interpretation of executive power, and once told President George Bush that he could launch the Persian Gulf war of 1991 without congressional permission and even if lawmakers voted against it. Many executive branch lawyers in Republican administrations have been hostile to the War Powers Resolution.

Many constitutional scholars view the law as a valid constraint on executive power, and Democratic administrations have not raised constitutional objections to it. But there is no controlling precedent to settle the matter, in part because no such confrontation has come to a head.

Perhaps the closest political precedent occurred in 1983. Congress enacted a bill declaring that a peacekeeping mission in Lebanon — after a firefight in Beirut, its capital, killed several Marines — had evolved into “hostilities” covered by the 60-day rule. At the same time, lawmakers granted authority for that mission to continue for 18 months.

President Ronald Reagan signed the law but said in a signing statement that his approval should not be interpreted as a concession that the War Powers Resolution could constrain his authority as commander in chief, though he stopped short of declaring it unconstitutional.

There might be a legal fight over this question, too — especially if any escalated conflict with Iran remained limited to airstrikes and cyberattacks rather than a ground invasion.

Presidents of both parties have argued that the War Powers Resolution did not apply to particular deployments for various reasons. In a 1993 dispute over a peacekeeping mission in Somalia, for example, the Clinton administration argued that the fighting was too intermittent for the law to cover the operation.

And during the 2011 NATO air war in Libya, the Obama administration — despite internal disagreement — argued that American participation could last more than 60 days without congressional authorization because the operation was too limited to count as the sort of “hostilities” the War Powers Resolution covers.

The national security adviser, Robert C. O’Brien, has claimed that Mr. Trump’s order to kill General Suleimani was “fully authorized” by the 2002 law in which Congress authorized the use of military force in Iraq, in addition to Mr. Trump’s constitutional authority to carry out acts of self-defense.

The implication appears to be that it is lawful to defend American troops in Iraq because they were deployed under the 2002 law — even if the threat comes from an Iranian. If Iran responds by attacking American forces in Iraq, the Trump legal team might similarly say the 2002 law covers an escalating response.

Mr. Kaine’s resolution, which states that the Suleimani killing had no congressional authorization, rejects the idea that the 2002 law covers the growing conflict with Iran.

It is unclear. It depends both on the definition of “assassination” and on the strength of the secret intelligence that the Trump administration has said backs its claim that General Suleimani was plotting an “imminent” attack on American forces in Iraq.

As a legal matter, Executive Order 12333 bans government officials from engaging or conspiring in assassinations, but neither it nor any federal law defines the term.

The executive order traces back to a rule imposed by President Gerald R. Ford after accusations came to light in the 1970s that the C.I.A. had been involved in plots to kill foreign elected leaders with Communist sympathies. Later, as the United States grappled with Islamist terrorism, executive branch lawyers under both parties wrote secret memos developing the idea that targeted killings in self-defense are not assassinations.

The Obama administration also developed the idea that what counts as an “imminent” threat — which permits violent acts undertaken in self-defense — can be stretched for terrorists who are continuously planning attacks from the shadows, so that they can be struck during any fleeting opportunity even if they pose no literally imminent threat at that moment.

But no American court precedent exists adjudicating whether either theory is legitimate.

General Suleimani was a high-ranking official of a national government, not a leader of a nonstate terrorist group. But further complicating matters, last year Mr. Trump designated the branch of the Iranian military that General Suleimani led a foreign terrorist organization, the first time the United States deemed a state entity to meet that criteria.

Yes.

Mr. Trump has said on Twitter that if Iran strikes any Americans or American assets in retaliation for General Suleimani’s killing, he will order the military to attack sites that include some that are “important to Iran & the Iranian culture” and that the American strikes back will be “perhaps in a disproportionate manner.”

Part of the Hague Convention requires sparing, as far as possible, “buildings dedicated to religion, art, science” and “historical monuments” so long as they are not being used for a military purpose. The War Crimes Act makes it a felony under domestic law for an American to violate this ban, punishable by up to life in prison or execution if someone is also killed.

The law of war also requires distinguishing military targets from civilian people and property, which cannot be intentionally targeted. While some collateral damage is permissible as a side consequence of striking a legitimate target, it must be proportionate to the military objective.

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Brad Pitt jokes he has a ‘disaster of a personal life,’ calls himself ‘trash mag fodder’

As an A-list star, Brad Pitt is used to making headlines and getting his picture taken by the paparazzi.

The 56-year-old and his “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” co-star, Leonardo DiCaprio, recently spoke on Marc Maron’s “WTF” podcast, where the two actors briefly chatted about life in the limelight.

DiCaprio first recalled the moment he realized he had become a celebrity. “I just remember I was off on location doing movies right away [after making it] and then — you know, I was in my early 20s already — and I never bothered to look for a house, so stayed in my mom’s guest room into my early 20s, and then the [1997] movie [‘Titanic’] started to come out or the buzz of it or whatever, and I just remember four SUVs outside my house one day,” remembered DiCaprio.

BRAD PITT ADDRESSES DATING RUMORS: ‘NONE OF IT’S TRUE’

He continued: “And I went to, like, the liquor store to get a soda and there were the SUVs, and they just kept following me. Every day of my life. … I was like, ‘OK. This life will no longer be the same.'”

Westlake Legal Group pitt-dicaprio Brad Pitt jokes he has a 'disaster of a personal life,' calls himself 'trash mag fodder' Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 28978a40-6abd-52ce-9f5c-0ded5644257c

Brad Pitt, left, and Leonardo DiCaprio attend the photo call for “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” at the Four Seasons Hotel on Thursday, July 11, 2019, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)

The 45-year-old went on to note that nowadays, he doesn’t get followed around as much, “Thank God,” DiCaprio said. “Usually, there’s like this time when you have a movie coming out or you’re starting to do promotion where they’re sort of on you a lot more. But, you know, I’ve been able to escape a lot more, which is great. And walk around outside and things like that.”

Pitt — who won the best supporting actor in a motion picture accolade at the Golden Globes on Sunday — then admitted he was “a little disgruntled” to hear DiCaprio’s remark.

BRAD PITT CALLS JENNIFER ANISTON ‘A GOOD FRIEND’ AT GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS

When asked if he has people waiting for him, Pitt said: “Aw, man. Aw, man. I’m just, like, trash mag fodder,” he teased before jokingly suggesting it’s “because of my disaster of a personal life probably, most likely.”

“You have a very exciting personal life,” DiCaprio chimed in. “… Like Lil Kim said, ‘The paparazzi’s gonna get you one way or another.’ It’s been my motto. I figure there’s nothing you can do about it.”

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1197740221 Brad Pitt jokes he has a 'disaster of a personal life,' calls himself 'trash mag fodder' Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 28978a40-6abd-52ce-9f5c-0ded5644257c

Brad Pitt attends the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 05, 2020 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Asked if the men have ever worn disguises to elude the paparazzi, DiCaprio shared that “it’s all a failure.” However, Pitt noted on the podcast that he does, in fact, have a few ways to escape the cameras.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I’ve got some good getaways that I will not reveal here because they’re still in play,” he stated.

Westlake Legal Group brad-pitt-ad-astra-tokyo-getty Brad Pitt jokes he has a 'disaster of a personal life,' calls himself 'trash mag fodder' Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 28978a40-6abd-52ce-9f5c-0ded5644257c   Westlake Legal Group brad-pitt-ad-astra-tokyo-getty Brad Pitt jokes he has a 'disaster of a personal life,' calls himself 'trash mag fodder' Mariah Haas fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 28978a40-6abd-52ce-9f5c-0ded5644257c

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What’s Next In Tech? We Dodged Robots At CES To Find Out

Westlake Legal Group rts2xbuy-91f304c857b5c11ae6f0b5cc067e6cfc822efceb-s1100-c15 What's Next In Tech? We Dodged Robots At CES To Find Out

Lovot companion robots by Groove X wander at CES, the consumer electronics show, in Las Vegas. Steve Marcus/Reuters hide caption

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Steve Marcus/Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  What's Next In Tech? We Dodged Robots At CES To Find Out

Lovot companion robots by Groove X wander at CES, the consumer electronics show, in Las Vegas.

Steve Marcus/Reuters

Flying cars, big-screen TVs that rotate vertically to better show your mobile videos, a trash can that changes its own bag: Welcome to CES.

About 200,000 people will descend on Las Vegas this week to check it all out at annual technology extravaganza of the consumer electronics show.

Among the robots they will encounter is the Charmin RollBot. That’s roll as in, a roll of toilet paper, which is what the small-wheel robot carries on top of itself.

“So you’re on the commode, you look over, oh no, somebody didn’t change the roll. Hello? Nobody home,” explained Gregg Weaver, who works in research and development at Charmin-maker Procter & Gamble.

That’s when you take out your smartphone and summon the RollBot via Bluetooth. It “delivers a fresh roll of Charmin, saves the day,” Weaver says.

That might sound a bit dramatic, but this single-task robot could save you a few uncomfortable steps to retrieve a spare roll.

Westlake Legal Group ap_20005833904190-41b029a58ec564c89945d96262950b3ea643c2e3-s1100-c15 What's Next In Tech? We Dodged Robots At CES To Find Out

The Bluetooth-enabled Charmin RollBot is on display at CES in Las Vegas. The robot is just a concept — it isn’t available to buy — but it would deliver a roll of toilet paper in the user’s home. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Westlake Legal Group  What's Next In Tech? We Dodged Robots At CES To Find Out

The Bluetooth-enabled Charmin RollBot is on display at CES in Las Vegas. The robot is just a concept — it isn’t available to buy — but it would deliver a roll of toilet paper in the user’s home.

John Locher/AP

You can’t buy P&G’s robot — or a lot of the stuff on display here.

But that’s what much of CES is about: glimpsing the future of technology. Things like touchscreens and voice assistants showed up here years before they became mainstream.

The show is a dizzying display of tech in every form imaginable, spread over almost 3 million square feet of exhibition space.

Visitors must dodge rolling robots and people stumbling around, their eyes covered by virtual reality headsets.

A lot of the buzz at this year’s show is about 5G — the next generation of much faster cellular networks. It promises to be up to 100 times faster than current networks, said Kevin Westcott, a vice chairman at consulting firm Deloitte.

5G is still in the early stages, but that’s not dampening the excitement.

“It doesn’t mean a huge amount today, because can I download a movie faster or do I get my traffic updates faster? That’s not going to change my life,” Westcott said. “What’s going to change it is when people start envisioning new applications that use absolutely real time data.”

Thanks to 5G, self-driving cars will be able to communicate with each other — and to the roads they are driving on.

Among the companies at CES working on this is Valerann, a British-Israeli startup that puts sensors in roads.

The sensors detect traffic and weather, and can light up to direct cars around a vehicle pulled over onto the shoulder.

Shahar Bahiri, a co-founder of Valerann, says the company is already using 5G connections in some places, because it’s the fastest way to share data.

“When you know that you have this stopped vehicle, when you know that you have black ice on the road,” he said, “your life is easier using data.”

But CES is not all robots and futuristic cars. Health is also a big theme here, and many of the startups at this year’s show are making apps and devices that bring the tools of the doctor’s office to your smartphone.

At another booth, a company called Binah uses an iPad’s camera to read a person’s vital signs by scanning her face.

It looks for a tiny movement in the skin under the eye each time the heart beats.

“There’s a change in the reflection of the light on your skin,” said Mona Popilian, Binah’s director of marketing.

“And we say OK, now there’s been a heartbeat, and then there’s another and another. And so we have the heart rate. And based on this, we continue to calculate the rest of the measurements,” she said.

That includes oxygen levels, respiration rate and mental stress. Binah plans to add blood pressure measurements this year.

It’s useful not just for individuals. Popilian says Binah’s app can be used by doctors to remotely examine patients. A big Japanese insurance company is using it to monitor drivers’ stress levels.

Popilian invites me to try out the app, so I step in front of the iPad and she starts the scan.

It takes a few seconds to deliver my results. My heart rate and oxygen levels are normal — but, after dodging robots and surrounded by flashing screens, unsurprisingly, I am mildly stressed.

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Trump Says He’ll Target Iran’s Cultural Sites. That’s Illegal

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-495330417_wide-63d18f37d703228b273646f48cd69744e80c4ff1-s1100-c15 Trump Says He'll Target Iran's Cultural Sites. That's Illegal

The Unesco-listed cultural site Naqsh-eJanan Square in Isfahan, Iran, in 2014, known for its immense mosques, picturesque bridges and ancient bazaar. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Says He'll Target Iran's Cultural Sites. That's Illegal

The Unesco-listed cultural site Naqsh-eJanan Square in Isfahan, Iran, in 2014, known for its immense mosques, picturesque bridges and ancient bazaar.

John Moore/Getty Images

Iran’s cultural heritage is suddenly a topic of urgent global interest, after President Trump threatened to strike such sites if the country retaliates for the United States’ killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani last week.

In a series of tweets Saturday evening, Trump wrote that “if Iran strikes any Americans, or American assets,” the U.S. has targeted 52 Iranian sites — “some at a very high level & important to Iran & the Iranian culture, and those targets, and Iran itself, WILL BE HIT VERY FAST AND VERY HARD.”

Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, tweeted that targeting Iranian cultural sites would be a war crime.

On Monday, Defense Secretary Mark Esper indicated U.S. forces wouldn’t carry out Trump’s threat, saying, “We will follow the laws of armed conflict.”

On Sunday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had appeared to walk back Trump’s statements on ABC’s This Week. “We’ll behave lawfully, we’ll behave inside the system, we always have and we always will,” he said on Sunday morning.

Nonetheless, Trump doubled down on his threat. “They’re allowed to kill our people. They’re allowed to torture and maim our people. They’re allowed to use roadside bombs and blow up our people,” he told reporters on Sunday evening. “And we’re not allowed to touch their cultural sites? It doesn’t work that way.”

The targeting of cultural properties by the U.S. is indeed not allowed. The U.S. is a signatory to the 1954 Hague Convention, which requires “refraining from any act of hostility” directed against cultural property.

The convention covers “movable or immovable property of great importance to the cultural heritage of every people, such as monuments of architecture, art or history, whether religious or secular; archaeological sites; groups of buildings which, as a whole, are of historical or artistic interest; works of art; manuscripts, books and other objects of artistic, historical or archaeological interest; as well as scientific collections and important collections of books or archives or of reproductions of the property defined above,” as well as buildings and centers whose main purpose is to house such items.

It also bars using cultural sites “for purposes which are likely to expose it to destruction or damage in the event of armed conflict.” That means signatory nations can’t use such sites to house soldiers or weapons with the goal of shielding them from attack.

The convention permits immunity in “exceptional cases of unavoidable military necessity.”

U.S. military policy agrees. The Department of Defense’s Law of War manual mentions cultural property 625 times, repeatedly citing the Hague Convention. It also addresses the subject of military necessity: “Acts of hostility may be directed against cultural property, its immediate surroundings, or appliances in use for its protection when military necessity imperatively requires such acts.”

Accordingly, the U.S. military educates its soldiers about their responsibilities not to target or destroy cultural property, and to help in its preservation, says Nancy Wilkie, president of the U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield. The organization is dedicated to the prevention of destruction and theft of cultural heritage.

The Pentagon has even distributed playing cards with photos of cultural sites in Afghanistan and elsewhere to remind troops to safeguard heritage sites and artifacts.

“Cultural sites and cultural objects that can provide sort of a baseline for recovering from strife, whether it’s civil war or war against an external agent,'” says Wilkie, an archaeologist and the former president of the Archaeological Institute of America. “And so one way to demoralize the population is to destroy its cultural heritage.”

As World War II was underway in 1943, then-Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower issued an order to his commanders, demanding the protection of historical monuments:

“Today we are fighting in a country which has contributed a great deal to our cultural inheritance, a country rich in monuments which by their creation helped and now in their old age illustrate the growth of the civilization which is ours. We are bound to respect those monuments so far as war allows.

“If we have to choose between destroying a famous building and sacrificing our own men, then our men’s lives count infinitely more and the building must go. But the choice is not always so clear-cut as that. In many cases the monuments can be spared without any detriment to operational needs. Nothing can stand against the argument of military necessity. That is an accepted principle. But the phrase “military necessity” is sometimes used where it would be more truthful to speak of military convenience or even of personal convenience. I do not want it to cloak slackness or indifference.”

The Hague Convention was developed after the war brought the destruction of important cultural sites such as the monastery at Monte Cassino, founded in 529 and bombed by the Allies in 1944.

The Department of Defense’s Law of War manual quotes from Eisenhower’s order and repeats some of its language in its current policy.

To aid the U.S. military in its obligations not to destroy important cultural heritage sites, the U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield has previously provided “no-strike lists” of such sites in countries including Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya.

The organization has not been able to compile such a list for Iran because it’s been difficult for scholars to work there. “Iran is huge,” Wilkie says, estimating that such a list would include 5,000-10,000 sites.

UNESCO has 22 cultural sites in Iran on its World Heritage List, from the ancient ruins of Persepolis to the historic bazaar complex in Tabriz.

Wilkie hopes that the U.S. military will stand by its policy to protect cultural sites, despite Trump’s threats. Such places are important to local people as sites of honor or worship, she says, while others have worldwide significance.

“Culture is what we have,” she says. “It reminds us of our past, and it unites us in our desire to preserve our sensibilities and sensitivities to cultural differences, and yet — to the fact that we’re all human and we all share human values.”

NPR’s Jackie Northam contributed to this story.

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Gutfeld on Ricky Gervais and the Golden Globes

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120184573001_6120181716001-vs Gutfeld on Ricky Gervais and the Golden Globes Greg Gutfeld fox-news/person/ricky-gervais fox-news/opinion fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/opinion fnc article af736425-4bba-5fab-9094-d8f115d3fd03

Television has a way of uniting Americans in a way nothing else can.

The “staged” moon landing. The 1980 Winter Olympics. And, the 2020 Golden Globes, where Ricky Gervais gave a bloody nose to the greatest villain.

There, he said everything you’ve ever wanted to say to that self-obsessed pile of pulsating flesh known as Hollywood.

WHITNEY CUMMINGS DEFENDS RICKY GERVAIS FOLLOWING COMEDIAN’S GOLDEN GLOBES OPENING MONOLOGUE

“Apple rolled into the TV game with a morning show … a superb drama about the importance of dignity and doing the right thing, made by a company that runs sweatshops in China,” Gervais said. “You say you’re woke, but the companies you work for … Apple, Amazon, Disney — if ISIS started a streaming service, you’d call your agent, wouldn’t you? So if you do win an award tonight, do not use it as a platform to make a political speech.”

Hello, 911? I’d like to report a massacre at the Beverly Hilton.

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You know Hollywood’s therapists just hiked up their prices.

Gervais also mocked their desperate desire for wokeness, explaining why he left out the “in memorium” segment, which honors performers who died in the past year. That was so clever few in the crowd got it.

Then there was this punch in the face. “In this room are some of the most important TV and film executives in the world,” Gervais said. “He’s coming for you.”

How dare you bring up our industry’s rapists, at this fine event? Some of them might be here!

“No one cares about movies anymore. No one goes to cinema. No one really watches network TV. Everyone’s watching Netflix,” Gervais added. “You could binge-watch the entire first season of ‘After Life’ instead of watching this show. That’s a show about a man who wants to kill himself because his wife dies of cancer, and it’s still more fun than this. Spoiler alert: Season Two is on the way, so in the end, he obviously didn’t kill himself, just like Jeffrey Epstein.”

Nice.

All in all, it was a dream come true for anyone tired of Hollywood telling you how dumb and racist America is, even as they continue to take all that money from us dumb racist Americans.

Remember, Gervais ain’t no righty. He’s an old-school liberal who believes in freedom of expression, but also freedom from the hypocrisy of the intolerant woke.

You think the woke crowd will actually wake up?

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Nope. They’re too vain, too insecure, and self-unaware to see the truth, even if it came raining down from the beery mouth of a pudgy Brit.

Hats off to Ricky, who didn’t really tell a joke. He just exposed the biggest one of all: Hollywood

Adapted from Greg Gutfeld’s monologue on “The Five” on Jan. 6, 2020.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120184573001_6120181716001-vs Gutfeld on Ricky Gervais and the Golden Globes Greg Gutfeld fox-news/person/ricky-gervais fox-news/opinion fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/opinion fnc article af736425-4bba-5fab-9094-d8f115d3fd03   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120184573001_6120181716001-vs Gutfeld on Ricky Gervais and the Golden Globes Greg Gutfeld fox-news/person/ricky-gervais fox-news/opinion fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/opinion fnc article af736425-4bba-5fab-9094-d8f115d3fd03

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Christian Bale in talks to join Chris Hemsworth in Marvel’s ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’: report

It appears Christian Bale may be joining the Marvel Cinematic Universe, according to new reports.

The “Dark Knight” trilogy star is said to be crossing over from DC Films and is in discussions to join Marvel Studios’ “Thor: Love and Thunder,” per Collider and confirmed by The Hollywood Reporter on Monday.

While details surrounding Bale’s character are currently under wraps, franchise star Chris Hemsworth will reprise his role as the God of Thunder, Tessa Thompson will continue her role from “Ragnarok” as Valkyrie and Natalie Portman is set to make her return to the franchise — after 2013’s “Thor: The Dark World” — as Jane Foster, reported THR.

CHRISTIAN BALE BASHES DICK CHENEY IN GOLDEN GLOBES SPEECH AFTER PRAISING FORMER VP JUST WEEKS AGO

Westlake Legal Group 4a00b4c9-AP19321109277129 Christian Bale in talks to join Chris Hemsworth in Marvel’s ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’: report Julius Young fox-news/topic/marvel fox-news/person/christian-bale fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 383e599b-1800-5bb8-96a8-e40d4b98a9a6

This image released by 20th Century Fox shows Christian Bale, right, and Matt Damon in a scene from the film, “Ford v. Ferrari.” (Merrick Morton/20th Century Fox via AP)

The film will reportedly be helmed by “Thor: Ragnarok” director Taika Waititi.

CHRISTIAN BALE COMPARES DICK CHENEY TO SATAN

For Bale, the four-time Academy Award-winner was largely seen as one of the go-to stars for DC’s superhero films, having played Bruce Wayne and Batman in Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight” trilogy, which met its end in 2012 with “The Dark Knight Rises.”

According to THR, Bale also toyed with the idea of joining the “Star Wars” universe in “Solo: A Star Wars Story.”

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Marvel Studios had no comment when reached by Fox News. A rep for Bale did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

“Thor: Love and Thunder” is slated to open in theaters on Nov. 5, 2021.

Westlake Legal Group christian-bale-critics-choice-ap Christian Bale in talks to join Chris Hemsworth in Marvel’s ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’: report Julius Young fox-news/topic/marvel fox-news/person/christian-bale fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 383e599b-1800-5bb8-96a8-e40d4b98a9a6   Westlake Legal Group christian-bale-critics-choice-ap Christian Bale in talks to join Chris Hemsworth in Marvel’s ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’: report Julius Young fox-news/topic/marvel fox-news/person/christian-bale fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 383e599b-1800-5bb8-96a8-e40d4b98a9a6

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LA Rams fire veteran defensive coordinator Wade Phillips

Westlake Legal Group Wade-Phillips LA Rams fire veteran defensive coordinator Wade Phillips fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9362a9e7-0a94-5823-bf0c-de7e2ac83fef

Veteran defensive coordinator Wade Phillips has been fired by the Los Angeles Rams after three winning seasons.

Phillips announced Monday on Twitter that the Rams are not renewing his contract, and the team later confirmed it. The 72-year-old former head coach of a record six NFL teams says he wants to stay in coaching.

The Rams finished 9-7 this season, missing the playoffs for the first time in Phillips’ three-year partnership with Sean McVay. Although Phillips’ distinctive 3-4 defense led by Aaron Donald again finished near the top of the NFL in many advanced metrics this season, McVay has decided to shake up his coaching staff for a third consecutive offseason.

McVay offered no reasoning for his decision in a brief statement issued through the team.

“Coach Wade has been a veteran voice in heading our defense for the past three seasons,” McVay said. “His wealth of experience, sound advice, and helpful demeanor has been invaluable to our coaches and players, and also has set an example for me as a head coach and a leader of men.”

The Rams also fired veteran running backs coach Skip Peete, who had been with the franchise since before McVay and Phillips arrived.

Phillips and the offense-minded McVay joined the Rams together in 2017, with the veteran coordinator serving as an experienced counterpoint and adviser to the youngest head coach in modern NFL history. McVay, then 30 years old, asked Phillips to join him in Los Angeles before he even got the job.

The duo engineered a stunning one-season turnaround of the Rams, who had endured 13 consecutive non-winning seasons and a 12-year playoff drought. While McVay put immediately together a prolific offense, Phillips ran a defense that eventually backstopped the Rams to 33 regular-season victories, two NFC West titles and four playoff games in three seasons.

The Rams won the NFC championship last season, and Phillips’ defense held New England to 13 points in the lowest-scoring Super Bowl ever. But McVay’s offense scored only three points against the Patriots, and its fall from the league’s elite continued this season.

Phillips’ defense remained largely solid this season, as it had been for his entire tenure in Los Angeles. With Donald backed by a talent-studded group including pass-rusher Dante Fowler, leading tackler Cory Littleton, Eric Weddle, Clay Matthews and midseason acquisition Jalen Ramsey, the Rams finished near the middle of the league this season in points and yards allowed while ranking higher in advanced metrics, including defense-adjusted value over average (DVOA).

But the Rams defense’s bad games were glaring debacles that inflated the statistics of an otherwise above-average unit. Los Angeles gave up a combined 144 points in losses to Tampa Bay, Baltimore and Dallas while the Rams missed the playoffs by one game.

“I want to thank them for the opportunity to be a part of their success the last 3 years,” Phillips wrote. “Most of all I want to thank the players who I loved working with. I still want to coach and feel I can contribute.”

The Rams even hired Phillips’ son, Wes, as their tight ends coach this season. McVay and Wes Phillips worked together as assistants in Washington, which led to McVay’s partnership with Wade Phillips.

Phillips has coached in the NFL since 1976, working for 11 franchises. The son of famed coach Bum Phillips has been a head coach for more teams than anyone in league history, presiding over Denver, Buffalo, Dallas, New Orleans, Atlanta and the Houston Texans.

He coordinated the defense with which the Broncos won the Super Bowl four years ago, earning Phillips’ first championship ring. When he wasn’t retained in Denver one season later following Gary Kubiak’s departure as head coach, Phillips teamed up with McVay.

The Rams’ defense consistently outplayed McVay’s offense this season, but its bad games were stinkers. Last month, the defense also allowed San Francisco to convert on two third-and-16 plays on the final drive leading to the 49ers’ winning points in the loss that eliminated the Rams from the postseason race.

McVay’s success has led to heavy staff turnover for Los Angeles, but the previous upheaval had been about assistants leaving for bigger jobs. The Rams lost Matt LaFleur and Greg Olson after they went 11-5 and won the division in McVay’s debut season in 2017, and the Rams lost Zac Taylor a year ago after their Super Bowl run.

The candidates to be Phillips’ replacement are likely to include Aubrey Pleasant, the Rams’ young cornerbacks coach. Pleasant spent four seasons coaching alongside McVay in Washington before they joined the Rams together in 2017.

Peete had just completed his 22nd consecutive season as an NFL running backs coach. He joined the Rams on Jeff Fisher’s final staff and stayed on when McVay took over.

Peete has been Todd Gurley’s position coach for the franchise running back’s entire career. Gurley is coming off a terrible season by his lofty standards, ranking 21st in the NFL with a career-low 857 yards rushing along with just 207 yards receiving.

“When I came to the Rams in 2017, our running backs had a unanimous vote of confidence for Skip Peete to lead our running back corps,” McVay said. “Since then, he has helped our running backs to make great strides in the last three years, and his more than 20 years of coaching experience was imperative in our offensive growth.”

Westlake Legal Group Wade-Phillips LA Rams fire veteran defensive coordinator Wade Phillips fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9362a9e7-0a94-5823-bf0c-de7e2ac83fef   Westlake Legal Group Wade-Phillips LA Rams fire veteran defensive coordinator Wade Phillips fox-news/sports/nfl/los-angeles-rams fox-news/sports/nfl fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 9362a9e7-0a94-5823-bf0c-de7e2ac83fef

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Man facing child-sex charges who escaped to Mexico is caught, extradited to California

A fugitive wanted for more than a decade on child sex charges was recently arrested in Mexico and extradited to California to face trial, FBI officials said Monday.

Jose Cruz Naranjo Silva, 77, was arrested in 2006 on charges of lewd or lascivious acts with a child under the age of 14, the FBI said in a press release.

Westlake Legal Group Silva Man facing child-sex charges who escaped to Mexico is caught, extradited to California fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d1ae8b91-3c44-5a13-9c73-8322697bdc0a Bradford Betz article

Jose Cruz Naranjo remains in custody at the Sacramento County Jail. (Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office)

Silva was charged by the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office on July 20, 2006, but fled the U.S. while on bail, according to the FBI.

In May 2008, the FBI obtained a federal warrant for unlawful flight to avoid prosecution at the request of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department.

Silva evaded authorities until the Mexican government found him in Guadalajara last year. Mexican authorities detained Silva on Aug. 19, 2019, pending extradition to the United States.

FBI agents escorted Silva from Mexico to Sacramento on Friday. He was then remanded to the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department for transport to the Sacramento County Jail, according to the agency.

VIRGINIA DAD PUMMELS MAN IN BEDROOM ALLEGEDLY MOLESTING YOUNG KIDS, POLICE SAY

Multiple law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, Interpol in Mexico City and the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, worked together to enable Silva’s capture and extradition.

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Silva remains in custody and is ineligible for bail, according to the Sacramento Bee. He is scheduled to appear in court on Tuesday. It wasn’t immediately clear whether Silva had an attorney who could speak on his behalf.

Westlake Legal Group Silva Man facing child-sex charges who escaped to Mexico is caught, extradited to California fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d1ae8b91-3c44-5a13-9c73-8322697bdc0a Bradford Betz article   Westlake Legal Group Silva Man facing child-sex charges who escaped to Mexico is caught, extradited to California fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime/sex-crimes fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc d1ae8b91-3c44-5a13-9c73-8322697bdc0a Bradford Betz article

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ICE Detention Center Captain Was on a Neo-Nazi Website and Wanted to Start a White Nationalist Group

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