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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 256)

KT McFarland: Soleimani was the terror king – Dems and liberal media decry his death. Here’s why they’re wrong

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120158192001_6120156739001-vs KT McFarland: Soleimani was the terror king – Dems and liberal media decry his death. Here's why they're wrong K.T. McFarland fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article ae57d81b-3561-5f0e-a05a-fe843c0746a5

PROGRAMMING ALERT: Watch K.T. McFarland discuss this topic and more on Fox News Channel’s “The Story with Martha MacCallum” on January 6 at 7 pm ET.

The Democrats and their allies in the Trump-hating media have decided that killing the world’s King of Terror, Iranian commander Qassem Soleimani, was a bad thing. They’re wrong – for three very important reasons.

First, it shows the awesome power and precision of America’s military and intelligence capabilities. Killing someone with a drone in broad daylight while driving along a Baghdad street is not like killing someone in a missile barrage, a firefight or a bomb blast.

There are no warning signs, no sounds, nothing to see overhead or across the street. The drones hit their target with 100 percent accuracy.  One second Soleimani was there, the next second he was gone, with minimal collateral damage to anyone nearby.  Trump gave a sober warning to those who would harm Americans – we know where you are and we will eliminate you.

VAN HIPP: TRUMP’S PATH FORWARD WITH IRAN — SIX STEPS TO HELP THE US AND THE IRANIAN PEOPLE

Second, Soleimani’s demise has likely sent Iran’s leaders into disarray. He has been the mastermind behind Iran’s web of foreign terror campaigns for decades and is not easily replaced. The Ayatollah, Iran’s Supreme Leader, is in his mid-80s and in poor health, with no successor named.

Iran’s leaders were already operating under extreme duress before the Soleimani killing. Their economy is reeling from Trump’s sanctions, with 40 percent unemployment and upwards to 70 percent inflation.

Winter has arrived, gasoline and heating oil prices are rising out of control, and a good number of Iran’s 80 million people are struggling to survive.

Just a few weeks ago thousands of Iranians all across the country took to the streets to protest the regime. Iran’s leaders don’t just have to worry about Americans targeting them, they have to worry about their own people rising up against them.

Finally, the leaders of China, Russia and North Korea are taking note. Trump’s decision to launch a surgical strike to kill Soleimani, especially after the restraint he has shown Iran in the last year or so, sends a strong signal to our adversaries — don’t underestimate our president.

Trump is a counterpuncher and will always punch back harder. He will not pull his punches in an election year and the Democrats’ impeachment efforts haven’t constrained his ability to act decisively. — And don’t think you can wait him out, he’s likely to be reelected in 2020.

I was in China just before Thanksgiving on a bipartisan, Track Two mission to meet with senior Chinese government, foreign ministry and Communist Party leaders. Many believed what they were reading in the New York Times and Washington Post and seeing on CNN. They were convinced Trump has been weakened, would soon be removed from office, and had zero chance of being reelected. They implied they could just play for time until a China-friendly President took his place. There is no doubt a lot of rethinking in Beijing this week.

Trump’s decision to launch a surgical strike to kill Soleimani, especially after the restraint he has shown Iran in the last year or so, sends a strong signal to our adversaries — don’t underestimate our president.

What’s Iran’s next move?  Democrats and their media allies are convinced Trump has just started World War III. Iran will no doubt respond, but their options are not as unlimited as Trump’s domestic enemies have suggested.

Trump’s maximum pressure campaign has taken its toll on Iran’s economy. There is some evidence they have already drawn down the tens of billions in payouts they received from Obama’s nuclear deal, and have been forced to curtail funding for Soleimani’s foreign terrorist movements.  Wars are expensive and Iran would be hard-pressed to afford large scale military operations on top of their support for terrorist movements in the greater Middle East.

Iran has just put an $80 million bounty on Trump’s head. Interestingly, they asked for donations from their people to pay for it. It’s like they had to start a Go-Fund-Me page for terrorists.

For years Iran has threatened to shut down the Strait of Hormuz or interfere with oil tankers transiting the Persian Gulf, which could send world oil prices skyrocketing and oil-importing countries’ economies plummeting.  But America’s energy boom has changed the situation dramatically in just a few short years.  Trump’s emphasis on fracking technology has led to our oil and gas boom and turned us from an importer to exporter.

More from Opinion

Wreaking havoc on Middle East oil exports could actually end up doing Iran more harm than good because it could present them with difficulties in getting their own oil to the countries still doing business with them – especially China, India and Japan.  Furthermore, disruption of middle east oil exports could do the United States more good than harm, since we are now the world’s largest oil and natural gas exporter and still have additional capacity. American energy exports could fill some of the void left by Arab oil.

But we should not fool ourselves. Of course, Iran will retaliate. They will be forced to if for no other reason than a point of national pride.   Their most likely target is Americans in the middle east, especially where Iran has terrorist operations or proxy forces– Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, and Yemen for starters. It’s only prudent that the State Department warn all Americans in the region, including in Iraq. Iran’s proxies could also launch rocket attacks against Israel.

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What should Trump’s next move be?  Be quiet! Stay off Twitter. Cease trash-talking Iran, and stop taunting them.  Trump should let his actions speak for themselves. Trump has humiliated Iran, as well as rendering them economic and military damage. Let them get their frustrations off their chests. They will need to recover some measure of national pride before they can even contemplate seeking accommodation with the United States.

Meanwhile, increase the pressure on Iran’s economy. Tighten the sanctions, push them even further toward economic collapse.  At the same time make clear that we want a new and better relationship with Iran. Trump’s remarks after the attack were perfect. He laid out the case for killing Soleimani but didn’t gloat or brag.  He held out the hand of friendship to the Iranian people.

Trump has told Iran’s leaders he does not want war, nor will he press for regime change.  He has urged them to join us at the negotiating table and reach an agreement. He wants America to work with Iran to rebuild its economy, welcome them into the world community and once again be good friends.  It is up to the Iranian regime whether to accept Trump’s offer.

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If not, if the Iranian regime chooses war instead of peace, Trump should take his case directly to the Iranian people and encourage them to choose a new regime, and work covertly with the Iranian resistance groups. If there is regime change in Iran, it must not be Bush or Obama style – brought about by American military forces. It should be Reagan and Trump-style regime change: stressing their economies to the point where the people themselves rise up and demand it.

Finally, once this round of tensions subsides, either in a new relationship with the current Iranian regime or its successor government, the US should start redirecting its forces and resources from the Middle East to Asia. With American energy independence, we no longer need to be sucked into the ethno-sectarian psychodramas of Arab tribes which have been warring for millennia. Trump was elected to stop the forever wars of the Bush and Obama administrations. As Trump has said about Syria, but it applies also to the rest of the region, “Let someone else fight over this long bloodstained land.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120158192001_6120156739001-vs KT McFarland: Soleimani was the terror king – Dems and liberal media decry his death. Here's why they're wrong K.T. McFarland fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article ae57d81b-3561-5f0e-a05a-fe843c0746a5   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120158192001_6120156739001-vs KT McFarland: Soleimani was the terror king – Dems and liberal media decry his death. Here's why they're wrong K.T. McFarland fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article ae57d81b-3561-5f0e-a05a-fe843c0746a5

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Texas mom Heidi Broussard’s suspected kidnapper allegedly pretended baby was her own, prosecutors say

The  Texas woman arrested in connection with the death of 33-year-old mom Heidi Broussard and the kidnapping of her baby daughter allegedly pretended the little girl, who was born on Nov. 26, was her own, according to an unsealed affidavit.

The affidavit said that Magen Rose Fieramusca “presented Heidi Broussard’s newborn child as her own to her boyfriend,” as KEYE reported.

Investigators have alleged that Fieramusca had been plotting to take the Broussard’s newborn, Margot Carey, pretending to be pregnant at the same time as the victim.

FOX 7 Austin reported that Fieramusca’s Internet search history included: “reasons for Amber Alert,” “Amber alert issued Austin,” and “bodies found in Austin Texas.”

She also allegedly searched for “Heidi Broussard” 162 times.

Westlake Legal Group Magen-Fieramusca_AustinPD-HarrisCSO Texas mom Heidi Broussard's suspected kidnapper allegedly pretended baby was her own, prosecutors say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc article 9f97c0a7-405a-5873-9839-59e28d51739e

Magen Rose Fieramusca, right, was arrested in connection to the case of Heidi Broussard, a missing Texas mom and infant daughter. (Austin Police Department / Harris County Sheriff’s Office)

The women were described as close friends, as KXAN.com reported.

BODY FOUND LIKELY MISSING TEXAS MOM HEIDI BROUSSARD, POLICE SAY; NEWBORN FOUND ALIVE, SUSPECT ARRESTED

Broussard and Margot were reported missing Dec. 12 after dropping off her 6-year-old son at Cowan Elementary School in Austin. Police said Broussard and her baby returned home, where their belongings were found, before disappearing.

Broussard’s body was positively identified by the Harris County Institute of Forensic Science in late December, ruling her cause of death homicide by strangulation.

No murder charges have been filed.

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Fieramusca, who could face the death penalty if charged with murder, is being held in lieu of $600,000 bond on charges of kidnapping and tampering with a corpse.

Westlake Legal Group Magen-Fieramusca_AustinPD-HarrisCSO Texas mom Heidi Broussard's suspected kidnapper allegedly pretended baby was her own, prosecutors say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc article 9f97c0a7-405a-5873-9839-59e28d51739e   Westlake Legal Group Magen-Fieramusca_AustinPD-HarrisCSO Texas mom Heidi Broussard's suspected kidnapper allegedly pretended baby was her own, prosecutors say Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox news fnc/us fnc article 9f97c0a7-405a-5873-9839-59e28d51739e

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Carlos Ghosn’s Escape Preparations Spanned the Globe

Westlake Legal Group 06ghosn-4-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn’s Escape Preparations Spanned the Globe Turkey Securities and Commodities Violations Renault SA Nissan Motor Co Luggage and Packing Lebanon Japan Ghosn, Carlos airports

A team of operatives working to help Carlos Ghosn escape from Japan spent hundreds of thousands of dollars scoping out airports and other entry points in Indonesia, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand before his flight last week, a person with knowledge of the matter said.

The goal was to find security flaws that would allow Mr. Ghosn to evade the authorities, this person said. Ultimately, the planning team flew him from Japan to Turkey and then on to Lebanon. Mr. Ghosn has a home in Beirut and faces no extradition to Japan; he is also a citizen of France, where he has spent most of his adult life.

The preparation for his escape, remarkable in its scope, was conducted under a veil of secrecy: Even some of the project’s operatives did not know the client’s identity or when the escape would take place, said the person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the legal sensitivity of the issue.

Mr. Ghosn, the former head of the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi alliance, is facing charges of financial misconduct in Japan and was free on bail. He left his home in central Tokyo on Dec. 29, in an escape that the authorities are piecing together, fleeing what he called a “rigged Japanese justice system.”

Details of his trip are beginning to come to light. That afternoon, Mr. Ghosn walked about 900 yards to a hotel, where he met two men, according to NHK and Nikkei, which cited sources in the city prosecutor’s office and the Tokyo police.

The three then went to the Shinagawa railroad station, a major hub, and a little after 4:30 p.m. boarded a Shinkansen, or high-speed bullet train, for Osaka, about 340 miles southwest of the capital, the reports said.

It’s unclear if Mr. Ghosn, who is one of the most recognizable public figures in Japan, hid his appearance. Once in Osaka, the three men entered a hotel near Kansai International Airport about 8 p.m. A couple of hours later, the two men left the hotel with two large boxes; Mr. Ghosn was not in sight, the reports said. They boarded a corporate jet with the boxes, and flew to Istanbul.

News reports have said that Mr. Ghosn evaded airport security measures by hiding in a box that was loaded on the plane.

From Istanbul, Mr. Ghosn reportedly got on a smaller plane, and arrived in Beirut later Monday.

Lebanese officials have said he entered legally with a French passport and a Lebanese ID, so there was no reason to stop him at the border. But on Monday, France’s foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, suggested that might not have been the case.

“As far as we know, he did not use French documents,” he told BFM TV.

The French finance minister, Bruno Le Maire, appeared to harden the government’s stance on Mr. Ghosn, saying on Monday that the executive should face justice in a court of law.

“When one is a defendant, one does not escape justice,” he told France Inter radio. “And Carlos Ghosn is a defendant like any other.”

Mr. Le Maire added that the French government was ready to open an investigation into $11 million in questionable expenses at the headquarters of the alliance between Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi Motors while Mr. Ghosn headed the group. The expenses were identified in June during an internal audit carried out by Nissan and Renault, an alliance in which the French government holds a 15 percent stake.

Mr. Ghosn has long denied the allegations of financial wrongdoing and insisted he had been set up by Nissan executives who were worried that he would further merge the operations of the Japanese automaker and Renault of France.

Mr. Ghosn’s escape was an embarrassment for the Japanese authorities, who on Monday promised to tighten airport baggage inspections and the rules governing the release of criminal suspects on bail.

“Now, measures have been taken so that similar acts can’t be committed,” Masako Mori, Japan’s justice minister, said at a news conference. Though her ministry is not responsible for baggage inspection, she said, different agencies are working to tighten control.

Ms. Mori also said the government would accelerate an existing review of Japan’s bail policies, including whether to require defendants to wear tracking wrist or ankle bracelets. Mr. Ghosn offered to wear one when he sought bail, but the court granted it without that requirement.

She added that Mr. Ghosn’s bail had been canceled. In leaving Japan, he forfeited 1.5 billion yen in bail, or about $13.9 million.

Mr. Ghosn is expected to meet with reporters this week. On Monday, a host on the Fox Business Network, Maria Bartiromo, said that she had spoken to Mr. Ghosn over the weekend and that he said he would present evidence that the criminal counts against him were an effort by Nissan and Japanese officials to prevent a merger with Renault — a charge he has made before.

Ms. Mori defended the country’s justice system as fair and open, with plenty of opportunities for Mr. Ghosn to defend himself.

“We acknowledge that there are various criticisms of Japan’s criminal justice procedures, but every country has a different criminal justice system,” she said. “It isn’t appropriate to simply focus on one part of the system when comparing it to other countries.”

Mr. Ghosn was accompanied out of Japan by Michael Taylor, an American security consultant and a former Green Beret, The New York Times reported on Friday, citing a person familiar with the matter.

Mr. Taylor, a well-known private-security contractor, has extensive contacts in Lebanon dating to the 1980s, when he was deployed to Beirut as part of a team of United States Special Forces that worked alongside Lebanese soldiers. He speaks Arabic, and Lebanese intermediaries connected him with Mr. Ghosn, according to a person familiar with the matter.

The Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing an anonymous source, that Mr. Ghosn had been smuggled through the Kansai airport in a type of box often used for concert equipment. It said that the terminal for private jets at that airport was essentially empty, and that oversize luggage could not fit in the airport’s scanners.

A customs official at the airport, Akira Taniguchi, said that screening of luggage was done in two stages. In the first, a private security company using X-ray and other equipment checks whether there are items that are not allowed on board, likes guns or knives.

In the second stage, customs officials check whether the bags contain items that are not permitted to be brought into or taken out of Japan, like drugs and some foods. They use X-ray machines, metal detectors, drug detectors and dogs for that step.

Asked if Mr. Ghosn had managed to elude these measures, Mr. Taniguchi said, “We cannot comment on this.”

Makiko Inoue and Hisako Ueno reported from Tokyo, and David Yaffe-
Bellany from New York. Liz Alderman contributed reporting from Paris.

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U.S. Informs Iraqi Government About Repositioning Of Coalition Forces

Westlake Legal Group rts2wqps-aeeab9936e76cb89070ca02eda36516533f3a1c0-s1100-c15 U.S. Informs Iraqi Government About Repositioning Of Coalition Forces

U.S. Army soldiers from 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Task Force-Iraq, man a defensive position at Forward Operating Base Union III in Baghdad, Iraq, on December 31, 2019. Task Force-Iraq Public Affairs/via Reuters hide caption

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Task Force-Iraq Public Affairs/via Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  U.S. Informs Iraqi Government About Repositioning Of Coalition Forces

U.S. Army soldiers from 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Task Force-Iraq, man a defensive position at Forward Operating Base Union III in Baghdad, Iraq, on December 31, 2019.

Task Force-Iraq Public Affairs/via Reuters

The U.S. military has informed the Iraqi government that it is repositioning forces in line with a request from the Iraqi parliament and prime minister.

A letter from Brig. Gen. William Seely to the director of the Iraqi joint operations task force informed the Iraqi government that the U.S. would be “repositioning forces over the coming days and weeks to prepare for onward movement.”

A U.S. military official in Baghdad told NPR the operation involves what he described as a “limited repositioning of troops mostly from the Baghdad area to places that are likely to be safer.”

He said it involved several hundred troops, mostly coalition and NATO forces being moved from the main military base in Baghdad’s green zone as a result of the suspension of training missions.

The official said this is a limited operation and, despite the wording of the letter, not the first phase of a withdrawal.

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Soleimani’s killing ignites Russia-vs.-Iran schism in Syria

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120143386001_6120146016001-vs Soleimani's killing ignites Russia-vs.-Iran schism in Syria Hollie McKay fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc article 94458ea6-e01a-5dc6-8260-eef72cc7d825

The death of Iranian commander Qassem Soleimani, at the orders of President Trump last week, not only has cast a murky shadow on the future of Iraq’s leadership, but also has sent schisms through Syria’s leadership, multiple sources tell Fox News.

“Many Syrians wish the U.S. would have killed Soleimani years ago. Perhaps this would not have led to major shifts on the ground, but it is certain that the number of those killed, wounded or displaced would have been fewer,” said Rahim Hamid, a Virginia-based Iranian Arab analyst. “But, many Syrians have felt that they got their revenge.”

In the twisted patchwork of conflicts that the Middle East has been, Syria’s policy throughout its long-running civil war has been manipulated largely by the military prowess of Moscow and Tehran. Namely, Soleimani was deemed a chief engineer in aligning with the regime of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad and exercising Iran’s military might under the guise of fighting terrorism. Under the slain commander’s governance, Syria received a plethora of weapons, training, and ground support from the top echelon of Iran’s military.

“Soleimani’s project in Syria was to drive away American forces. He was in no hurry because he was busy building the foundations to enhance the Iranian political, military, security, economic and militia influence in Syria and he achieved a lot in this field,” noted Bassam Barabandi, a former Syrian diplomat and founder of the Middle East-focused activism organization, People Demand Change. “Bashar al-Assad is closer to the Iranian influence and the Iranian axis than the Russians within the Syrian regime. But, the Assad regime is split, as never before, into two very distinct wings between pro-Iran and pro-Russia.”

SOLEIMANI SLAYING: U.S. SEIZES OPPORTUNE MOMENT, BUT RAMIFICATIONS MAY BE COSTLY

The Iranian wing has been led by Assad, who received his advice and instructions directly from Soleimani, Barabandi underscored. Moreover, Iran has had its own sphere of influence and followers inside the Syrian military.

Over the weekend, Syrian government forces and Iranian associates were documented to have fired several shells at the Conoco gas field in the Deir Ezzor area of eastern Syria, which U.S troops still in the embattled country have been tasked with protecting. Aside from the apparent act of retaliation, sources said that the surprise attack on Soleimani last week has prompted deeper divisions within the Syrian government itself.

While some analysts have speculated that Soleimani’s death will empower Russia in the region, they’ve largely observed a stronger Assad-led tilt toward Tehran over Moscow.

From the lens of one source closely connected to U.S.-Syria policy, Assad – who typically has been less vocal about his conflicts with Israel than many others in the region – has used the incident to ratchet up anti-Israel sentiment, in addition to sending an envoy to Tehran to express condolences.

SYRIAN OPPOSITION LEADER WARNS IRANIAN ACTIVITY INSIDE SYRIA HAS REACHED UNPRECEDENTED DANGEROUS LEVEL

“It is well known that Russia wants to end the war, but knows that Assad’s image can’t be revived,” the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said. “So, his bet is to go to Iran over Russia.”

It remained to be seen exactly what approach Soleimani’s successor, Esmail Ghaani, will take in the region. Historically, analysts have pegged him as being focused on Iranian influence in the east – Afghanistan and Pakistan – while Soleimani set his targets on the western area of Iraq and Syria.

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“Trump says that he killed Soleimani to prevent the war, not to ignite it,” Hamid noted. “Syrians have been screaming for many years that Iran’s deterrence is what brings peace to the region, not appeasing it or coping with its agenda.”

Iran has vowed to exact revenge on the United States for Soleimani’s slaying, prompting a flurry of pushback from Trump on Twitter and a bevy of questions as to what would happen next. The Quds Force leader’s death came at a time when the regime and its allies have been closing in on the last Syrian rebel stronghold of Idlib. Almost 300,000 people, according to the United Nations, have escaped the bastion in less than a month amid pro-government attacks – but with few places to run.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120143386001_6120146016001-vs Soleimani's killing ignites Russia-vs.-Iran schism in Syria Hollie McKay fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc article 94458ea6-e01a-5dc6-8260-eef72cc7d825   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120143386001_6120146016001-vs Soleimani's killing ignites Russia-vs.-Iran schism in Syria Hollie McKay fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/world fnc article 94458ea6-e01a-5dc6-8260-eef72cc7d825

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U.S. Military Letter Stating Potential Iraq Withdrawal ‘Was A Mistake,’ General Says

Westlake Legal Group 5e1395352500003b1998ff37 U.S. Military Letter Stating Potential Iraq Withdrawal ‘Was A Mistake,’ General Says

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper disputed a U.S. military letter announcing that troops would be repositioned within Iraq in advance of a potential pullout. Esper claimed he didn’t know where the letter came from and that it was “inconsistent with where we are right now.”

There has been “no decision whatsoever to leave Iraq,” Esper told reporters on Monday, responding to a letter suggesting plans to draw down troop presence in the country.

The letter “was a mistake,” Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley told reporters.

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U.S. military officials leading a joint task force told Iraqi government officials Monday that they are preparing to pull troops from Iraq, following the country’s parliament vote on Sunday to eject foreign troops from the country.

“In due deference to the sovereignty of the Republic of Iraq, and as requested by the Iraqi Parliament and the Prime Minister, [we are] repositioning forces over the course of the coming days and weeks to prepare for onward movement,” Marine Brigadier General William H. Seely III wrote in a letter

On Sunday, Iraq’s parliament passed a resolution calling on Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi to revoke Iraq’s invitation to host U.S. troops, which have helped the country retake control over territory lost to the Islamic State in 2014. The U.S. currently has about 5,000 troops in Iraq. 

“The government commits to revoke its request for assistance from the international coalition fighting Islamic State due to the end of military operations in Iraq and the achievement of victory,” the resolution read.

The nonbinding resolution had overwhelming support from Shiite lawmakers, although Sunni and Kurdish members of parliament boycotted the special session.

The vote was a response to the U.S. assassination last week of Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a top-ranking Iranian military commander who was responsible for Tehran’s proxies in Iraq and throughout the Middle East. The U.S. military targeted Soleimani with airstrikes on Baghdad’s airport, a move Shiite politicians in Iraq said violated Iraqi sovereignty.

The vote did not legally require the withdrawal of troops because the parliamentary vote would have had to trigger a meeting by the country’s Cabinet, which cannot meet because there is currently only an acting prime minister and acting Cabinet.

But U.S. military officials likely expect a more official order soon.

“We respect your sovereign decision to order our departure,” Seely wrote in the letter Monday.

The withdrawal would not necessarily mean the complete end of the U.S. military presence in Iraq, just the withdrawal of the joint task force that’s specifically committed to fighting ISIS.

A spokesperson for the joint task force did not immediately respond to a request for more clarification on the announcement.

After Sunday’s vote, Trump threatened “sanctions like they’ve never seen before” against Iraq if the country forced the U.S. to withdraw its troops.

This article has been updated with more details on the parliament vote and Defense Department response to the letter.

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World Recoils As Trump Threatens Iranian Cultural Sites

President Donald Trump doubled down on threats to Iranian cultural sites on Sunday, warning that he considered them fair targets as tensions escalate following the Trump-ordered assassination of Tehran’s top military general Qassem Soleimani last week.

“They’re allowed to kill our people. They’re allowed to torture and maim our people. They’re allowed to use roadside bombs and blow up our people. And we’re not allowed to touch their cultural sites,” Trump said aboard Air Force One as he returned to Washington from a two-week vacation at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. “It doesn’t work that way.”

He made similar comments on Twitter on Saturday, when he announced that 52 Iranian sites could be targeted, “some at a very high level & important to Iran & the Iranian culture.”

Targeting cultural sites is illegal under the 1954 Hague Convention and the 1972 World Heritage Convention, which both the U.S. and Iran have ratified. And as Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif noted in a tweet of his own, the destruction of cultural landmarks is reminiscent of ISIS fighters, who destroyed countless ancient Christian and Muslim holy sites as they took over Syria and Iraq.

On Monday, White House adviser Kellyanne Conway attempted to bolster the legality of Trump’s threat by implying that some of Iran’s military sites have cultural importance. “I think that Iran has many military, strategic military sites that you may cite are also cultural sites,” she told reporters.

It’s unlikely that argument will win over U.S. allies and international nonprofits, however, who have recoiled at Trump’s repeated threats.

Iran houses 24 UNESCO World Heritage sites, the designation given to irreplaceable natural and cultural monuments around the world. UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay called for their protection Monday, hailing the sites as “vectors of peace and dialogue between peoples, which the international community has a duty to protect and preserve for future generations.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e138e0f24000041245a513e World Recoils As Trump Threatens Iranian Cultural Sites

Smartshots International via Getty Images A portion of the ceiling of the Masjed-e Jameh mosque, a UNESCO World Heritage site in Isfahan, Iran.

A spokesperson for U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson downplayed the likelihood of such an attack, noting it would likely violate international law and could constitute a war crime.

“There are international conventions in place that prevent the destruction of cultural heritage,” the spokesperson affirmed.

On Twitter, architect and activist Sergio Beltrán-García shared a thread about some of Iran’s ancient cultural sites, which he hailed as a “perfect harmony of materials, engineering, symbolism and function.”

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art also denounced Trump’s threats, calling them “abhorrent to the collective values of our society” in a statement on Monday.

“Our world knows precisely what is gained from protecting cultural sites, and, tragically, what is lost when destruction and chaos prevail,” the museum said.

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Iran’s UN ambassador tells US to leave, silent on dictatorship claims

The Iranian ambassador to the United Nations told Fox News that he has one message for President Trump: The U.S. should get out of Iraq.

As the Trump administration plans to send 5,000 more U.S. troops to the region, Ambassador Majid Takht Ravanchi said that wasn’t a good idea.

“The U.S. should leave the region,” the ambassador said. “It belongs to the people in the region, and I think the sooner the better.”

Fox News spoke to the ambassador as he left for work and hurried to his diplomatic sedan.

“I have to get to the office,” he said as he rushed to this car. “We are talking to the U.N., that’s it.”

US BRACES FOR IRAN’S NEXT MOVE AS REGIME VOWS REVENGE FOR SOLEIMANI STRIKE

He would not answer when we told him, “The U.S. says that you are an evil dictatorship.”

With that, an aide to the ambassador closed the rear door of the car where the ambassador was sitting.

Iran is trying to muster diplomatic support in the wake of the U.S. airstrike that killed Gen. Qassem Soleimani. A war of words has erupted between President Trump and the regime in Tehran, with Iran threatening to retaliate against U.S. military targets.

Westlake Legal Group AP20005532108574 Iran's UN ambassador tells US to leave, silent on dictatorship claims fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc Eric Shawn article 2af21c17-9558-5206-8b82-377234d867b0

Coffins of Gen. Qassem Soleimani and others who were killed in Iraq by a U.S. drone strike, are carried on a truck surrounded by mourners during a funeral procession, in the city of Mashhad, Iran, Sunday, Jan. 5, 2020. Soleimani’s death Friday in Iraq further heightens tensions between Tehran and Washington after months of trading attacks and threats that put the wider Middle East on edge. (Mohammad Hossein Thaghi/Tasnim News Agency via AP)

In a letter addressed to the U.N. secretary-general last week, Ambassador Ravanchi called on the U.N. Security Council to condemn the death of Soleimani.

Meanwhile, the United States Mission to the U.N. issued a statement Monday that called out both Russia and China for preventing a council statement condemning the attack against the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad on Dec. 31st.

In it, the U.S. thanked the 27 members of the U.N. that spoke out against the attack on the embassy.

“They clearly recognize the importance of a host country’s obligations under the 1961 Vienna Convention to protect diplomatic and consular premises.”

The U.S. mission also took aim at the Security Council’s inaction because of the two veto-wielding members, Russia and China.

“Not allowing the United Nations Security Council to issue the most basic of statements underscoring the inviolability of diplomatic and consular premises once again calls the Council’s credibility into question,” the mission said. “Such expressions of support should not be controversial or warrant courage. As we have demonstrated, we will not tolerate attacks on U.S. personnel and facilities and will respond decisively to protect our interests, citizens, and allies.”

IRAN COULD GAIN ACCESS TO NUCLEAR BOMB IN A FEW MONTHS, SECURITY EXPERTS ESTIMATE

A Security Council diplomat told Fox News that the Russians and Chinese, “didn’t allow the statement to proceed on Saturday morning.”

At the U.N., Monday morning’s Security Council meeting centered on Syria, but diplomats were mindful of the Iranian developments.

Outside the U.N. Security Council, Soleimani’s death was a topic in the hallways. He is blamed for countless deaths of civilians in Syria, the deaths of 603 American troops in Iraq from Iranian made IED’s planted by Tehran’s proxies and masterminding Tehran’s terror operations for decades.

Westlake Legal Group AP20003737389427 Iran's UN ambassador tells US to leave, silent on dictatorship claims fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc Eric Shawn article 2af21c17-9558-5206-8b82-377234d867b0

President Donald Trump walks off after delivering remarks on Iran, at his Mar-a-Lago property, Friday, Jan. 3, 2020, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

“My prime minister called for de-escalation,” said Deputy British Ambassador Jonathan Allen. “[Prime Minister Boris Johnson] also said we would not be mourning for Qassem Soleimani.”

Both Russia and China criticized the airstrike on Soleimani, as well as the protestors’ previous attack on the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

IRAN DEMANDS UN CONDEMN US KILLING OF SOLEIMANI, SAYS IT ‘RESERVES RIGHT TO SELF-DEFENSE

“China opposes the use of force in international relations. It’s obvious that the unilateral risk-taking, military actions of the United States violated basic norms of international relations and led to the gravitation of the tension and for China. We urge the United States not to abuse any further use of force,” said Chinese U.N. Ambassador Zhang Jun.

Russia’s ambassador said the country wanted to focus on de-escalation efforts.

“We now have to talk about territorial integrity, what sovereignty of Iraq [is] about, about the need to de-escalate” said Russian ambassador Vassily Nebenzia, “and to prevent developments going down the drain in the direction of a major conflict.”

Westlake Legal Group AP20004587945436 Iran's UN ambassador tells US to leave, silent on dictatorship claims fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc Eric Shawn article 2af21c17-9558-5206-8b82-377234d867b0

A U.S. Army soldier checks his rifle before heading out Saturday, Jan. 4, 2020 at Fort Bragg, N.C., as troops from the 82nd Airborne are deployed to the Middle East as reinforcements in the volatile aftermath of the killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani. (AP Photo/Chris Seward)

Another diplomat told Fox News that, presently, there were no calls for a Security Council meeting on the situation in Iran.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif is expected to arrive in New York on Thursday to take part in a Security Council debate on upholding the U.N. Charter. Zarif was already slated to come before the recent uptick in tensions.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told reporters geopolitical tensions are “at their highest level this century.”

“And this turbulence is escalating. … Everywhere we see many people frustrated and angry,” Guterres said. “We see increased social unrest and growing extremism, nationalism and radicalization, with a dangerous advance of terrorism in several areas of the world, notably in Africa. This situation cannot go on.”

Ben Evansky contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120158141001_6120154641001-vs Iran's UN ambassador tells US to leave, silent on dictatorship claims fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc Eric Shawn article 2af21c17-9558-5206-8b82-377234d867b0   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120158141001_6120154641001-vs Iran's UN ambassador tells US to leave, silent on dictatorship claims fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/united-nations fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world/conflicts fox news fnc/world fnc Eric Shawn article 2af21c17-9558-5206-8b82-377234d867b0

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How 7-Eleven Struck Back Against an Owner Who Took a Day Off

Westlake Legal Group 06seveneleven-1-facebookJumbo How 7-Eleven Struck Back Against an Owner Who Took a Day Off Population Part-Time Employment Matsumoto, Mitoshi Labor and Jobs Japan Franchises Convenience Stores 7-eleven

HIGASHI-OSAKA, Japan — The rice balls are gone. So are the juice bottles, which Mitoshi Matsumoto priced to sell early. Most of his store’s shelves stand empty, but he has kept some cigarette cartons and bottles of alcohol in the hope that his long-running battle with the 7-Eleven convenience store chain will end in his favor.

The company that controls the 7-Eleven chain, Seven & I Holdings, terminated Mr. Matsumoto’s franchise last week after he decided to close his store on New Year’s Day, and it has stopped supplying him.

It was the latest battle between Mr. Matsumoto and one of Japan’s best-known companies over harsh working conditions in the Japanese convenience store industry, which demands that stores stay open seven days a week, 24 hours a day, for all 365 days in a year.

Mr. Matsumoto remains in business, but just barely. The screen on the A.T.M. flashes, “Not in operation.” His two full-time employees are ready to jump to new jobs once he finally closes, and his seven part-time employees no longer show up.

Still, he plans to stay open as long as he can.

“I want to stay in business for the sake of myself and other owners throughout the country,” said Mr. Matsumoto, 57, who says he plans to continue his fight in a local court.

A spokesman for Seven & I, Katsuhiko Shimizu, said the company terminated Mr. Matsumoto’s contract last Tuesday. He denied that the termination was tied to Mr. Matsumoto’s plan to close for a day, and instead cited numerous customer complaints about the store and Mr. Matsumoto’s disparaging remarks about the company on social media.

Mr. Matsumoto’s fight with 7-Eleven has made him famous in Japan, a country that has long struggled with a strenuous and sometimes deadly work culture.

Government figures show overwork was blamed for 246 claims related to hospitalization or death in 2018. The retail industry was one of the biggest sources, officials show. Another 568 workers took their own lives over job-related exhaustion. The phenomenon is so common that Japan has coined a term for it, “karoshi.”

Overwork has become an even bigger issue as the Japanese population ages and shrinks. Though the country’s economic growth has been weak for years, the labor market has tightened considerably as more workers slip into retirement and fewer young workers take their place. While Japan is rethinking its tough immigration laws, the rules still generally keep people from moving to the country to fill in the gap.

Those strains are particularly evident in the convenience store industry. Japan’s chains have greatly expanded in recent years in an effort to capture market share at one another’s expense.

While the expenses for the chains were minimal, the expansion took a toll on the franchisees who operate the vast majority of Japan’s more than 55,000 convenience stores. Unable to find dependable workers, many owners increasingly worked themselves.

“Under the current situation, the company can have it both ways,” said Naoki Tsuchiya, a professor at Musashi University in Tokyo and an expert on labor issues in the industry, who called Mr. Matsumoto “a significant figure” in the nationwide discussion over convenience stores. “They don’t have to take risks, but the owners have to take them.”

Mr. Matsumoto first drew attention a year ago. Under pressure to find workers and unable to take a day off himself, he decided to close his store before midnight. When 7-Eleven threatened his business, he contacted local reporters.

“In the last seven years, I managed to take only three trips with my wife,” he said over the weekend. “Even back then, I was preoccupied with store operations, worrying about sudden cancellation by part-time workers. I had to hold a mobile phone while I soaked in a spa.”

The clash drew renewed attention last month when Mr. Matsumoto declared his intention to close his store on New Year’s Day, Japan’s most important holiday. Days later, 7-Eleven threatened to close his store.

When Mr. Matsumoto reopened on Jan. 2, the threat appeared to have been carried out. The company’s vast and super-efficient logistics system had stopped sending fresh supplies. The sales terminal where employees ring up goods is still online, but little else appears to be connected to the 7-Eleven apparatus that runs nearly 40 percent of Japan’s convenience stores.

Mr. Matsumoto says he still has business. Supportive customers have shown up to shop among his remaining inventory, which includes snacks, instant noodles, stationery items, detergents and cosmetics.

One of them, Hiroshi Nakayama, a 45-year-old electrical equipment wholesaler, had long watched the fight between Mr. Matsumoto and 7-Eleven and went to the store after his son’s soccer game to check in. The whole fight could have been avoided, he said.

“There must have been other solutions to fix the bad relationship with the company,” said Mr. Nakayama, who turned up on Saturday after Mr. Matsumoto, running on a skeleton staff, had closed for the night. “They could have discussed it more. It’s both sides’ fault.”

Mr. Matsumoto said another store owner, from the city of Kyoto, had come to visit to express support, but he declined to provide a name.

Despite his troubles with the company, Mr. Matsumoto said he hoped a legal fight would restore his franchise. He said that 7-Eleven had offered to pay for his remaining inventory — owners are responsible for buying their own products from the company at wholesale prices — but that he had refused. He wants Japan’s convenience store industry to change instead.

“If I win the case, I hope more will follow and raise their voices,” he said. “If I lose, many will get depressed and more afraid of 7-Eleven.”

That is why, he said, he plans to fight to the bitter end.

“It doesn’t matter if I win or lose,” Mr. Matsumoto said. “I just want to disclose everything in my case. I believe the justice will be given.”

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A Sea of Mourners in Iran, and New Threats From Both Sides: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

transcript

Crowds Gather at Suleimani’s Funeral

Throngs of people chanting “Death to America” crowded the streets of Tehran on Monday as Iran mourned Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, whose funeral was held in the capital.

He thinks he killed one of us. He hasn’t gone — look how many more Suleimani we have.

Westlake Legal Group 06Iran-briefing1-promo-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600-v3 A Sea of Mourners in Iran, and New Threats From Both Sides: Live Updates United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Iran Esmail Ghaani Defense and Military Forces

Throngs of people chanting “Death to America” crowded the streets of Tehran on Monday as Iran mourned Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, whose funeral was held in the capital.CreditCredit…Office of Iran’s Supreme Leader, via Reuters

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei wept and offered prayers over the coffin of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani at the funeral in Tehran on Monday, as throngs of people filled the city’s streets to mourn.

General Suleimani was killed by the United States on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike. American officials said the general had ordered assaults on Americans in Iraq and Syria and was planning a wave of imminent attacks.

Ayatollah Khamenei had a close relationship with the general, who was widely considered to be the second most powerful man in Iran.

The military commander was hailed as a martyr, and his successor swore revenge during the funeral ceremony, while chants of “Death to America” rang out from the crowds in the capital.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166747320_5c2b277e-7978-4b1e-8564-2e231030f246-articleLarge A Sea of Mourners in Iran, and New Threats From Both Sides: Live Updates United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Targeted Killings Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Iran Esmail Ghaani Defense and Military Forces

State-run news outlets reported that millions had gathered in Tehran.Credit…Arash Khamooshi for The New York Times

“God the almighty has promised to get his revenge, and God is the main avenger,” said Esmail Ghaani, the Iranian general who will succeed General Suleimani as head of the Quds Force, the foreign expeditionary arm of the elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. “Certainly actions will be taken,” he added.

General Suleimani’s killing has prompted fears of escalating retaliatory actions between Iran and the United States, and of a broader regional conflict. After the attack, Iran said it would no longer abide by a 2015 agreement to suspend uranium production.

Zeinab Suleimani, General Suleimani’s daughter, said in a eulogy that the United States and Israel faced a “dark day.”

“You crazy Trump, the symbol of ignorance, the slave of Zionists, don’t think that the killing of my father will finish everything,” she said.

The general’s funeral was attended by a broad swath of Iranians, including reformers who oppose the government of President Hassan Rouhani but who perceived the killing as an attack on all of Iran.

“I felt like he was our safety umbrella spread above Iran,” said Amir Ali, 22, a university student, of General Suleimani. “I felt safe knowing he was out there.”

The Iraqi government has begun to consider new parameters for the American military in Iraq after lawmakers voted 170-0 on Sunday in favor of expelling United States troops from their country.

The troops will be limited to “training and advising” Iraqi forces, but will not be allowed to move off their bases or to fly in Iraqi airspace while plans are being made for their departure, said Brig. Gen. Abdul Karim Khalaf, the military spokesman for Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi.

The vote on Sunday was not final and many lawmakers did not attend the session. But Mr. Mahdi drafted the language and submitted the bill to Parliament, leaving little doubt about his support for the expulsion.

Mr. Mahdi met with Matthew Tueller, the American ambassador to Iraq, on Monday, and “stressed the need for joint action to implement the withdrawal,” according to a statement and photo released by Mr. Mahdi’s office. He also emphasized Iraq’s efforts to prevent the current tensions between Iran and the United States from sliding into “open war.”

Mr. Mahdi also made clear that Iraq wanted good relations with “all countries” but that Iraq wanted those relationships to be based on “mutual respect, and preserving its security, stability and national sovereignty.”

The drone strike that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani on Friday also killed Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the deputy head of the Popular Mobilization Forces, a coalition of Iranian-backed militias in Iraq.

The attack was viewed by many in Iraq as a violation of the nation’s sovereignty, and the Foreign Ministry said on Sunday that it had summoned the American ambassador. Iran reacted to Sunday’s vote with congratulatory messages.

But the Iraqi Parliament was divided over the demands from angry citizens to expel American troops. Nearly half of its members, primarily Kurds and Sunnis, did not attend Sunday’s session and did not vote. In his speech to lawmakers, Mr. Mahdi laid out two possibilities: to either quickly end the presence of foreign forces in Iraq, or to set a timeline for their expulsion.

The measure approved by Parliament did not include a timeline, and only instructed the government to end the presence of foreign forces in Iraq. Officials said no decision had been made about whether any American troops would be able to stay, or under what conditions.

By Monday, there was still no timetable for the troops’ departure and no specifics about whether all American forces would be asked to leave or only some. And while Mr. Mahdi’s rhetoric was tough in his speech to the Iraqi Parliament on Sunday, by late in the evening, after speaking with President Emmanuel Macron of France by phone, his language was more modulated.

In a post on Twitter describing their phone call, Mr. Mahdi suggested that he was leaving the door open to something less than a complete departure.

He said he had agreed with Mr. Macron to “continue to discuss this delicate issue.”

He added that they talked about “the withdrawal of the foreign forces from Iraq in a way that would not damage the battle against ISIS and would preserve the sovereignty of Iraq and keep its relationships with the countries of the international coalition” that is fighting the Islamic State in Iraq.

Those goals would be difficult to achieve without some continued presence by the United States, because other countries’ troops are unlikely to stay in the absence of American military support.

In an address to the Iraqi Parliament on Sunday, Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq said that he was supposed to meet with General Suleimani on the morning he was killed.

“It was expected that he was carrying a message for me from the Iranian side responding to the Saudi message that we had sent to the Iranian side to reach agreements and breakthroughs important for the situation in Iraq and the region,” Mr. Mahdi said.

The content of the messages was not immediately clear, but Mr. Mahdi’s comments suggested that the drone strike ordered by Mr. Trump may have interrupted a diplomatic back channel aimed at averting conflict between Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Saudi officials did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

President Trump on Sunday doubled down on his threats to attack Iranian cultural sites and warned of a “major retaliation” if the Iranian government planned tit-for-tat attacks in the aftermath of the killing of a senior military commander.

Mr. Trump defended the drone strike that killed General Suleimani.

Earlier on Sunday, Mr. Trump said in a tweet that the United States had selected 52 Iranian sites, some “at a very high level & important to Iran & the Iranian culture” to attack in the event of Iranian retaliation.

That prompted the Iranian foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, to say that “targeting cultural sites is a war crime.”

But on Sunday evening, aboard Air Force One on his way back from his holiday trip to Florida, Mr. Trump did not back down.

“They’re allowed to kill our people,” he said to reporters. “They’re allowed to torture and maim our people. They’re allowed to use roadside bombs and blow up our people. And we’re not allowed to touch their cultural site? It doesn’t work that way.”

President Hassan Rouhani of Iran said in a tweet on Monday that “those who refer to the number 52 should also remember the number 290,” in a reference to the number of people killed when an Iranian passenger plane was shot down by an American warship in the Persian Gulf in 1988.

“Never threaten the Iranian nation,” Mr. Rouhani said.

Audrey Azoulay, the director-general of Unesco, met with the Iranian ambassador to the organization on Monday to discuss the current situation, and issued a statement pointing to international agreements that condemn acts of destruction of cultural heritage.

“Ms. Azoulay stressed the universality of cultural and natural heritage as vectors of peace and dialogue between peoples, which the international community has a duty to protect and preserve for future generations,” Unesco said in the statement.

Two top Senate Democrats urged President Trump early Monday to declassify the document that the administration sent to Congress formally giving notice of the airstrike that killed Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani. It is unusual for an administration to classify the entirety of such a notification, and Democrats upbraided the document as insufficient. The notification to Congress is required by law.

In a joint statement, Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader; and Senator Robert Menendez of New Jersey, the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee, said it was “critical that national security matters of such import be shared with the American people in a timely manner.”

“An entirely classified notification is simply not appropriate in a democratic society, and there appears to be no legitimate justification for classifying this notification,” they said.

The House is expected to vote later this week on a resolution invoking the War Powers Act that would curtail the president’s ability to authorize a strike against Iran without Congress’s approval. The Senate could vote on similar legislation as soon as mid-January.

Saudi Arabia is scrambling to ease tensions in the Middle East amid fears that Iran could retaliate for the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani with strikes against Riyadh and other American allies in the region.

Saudi Arabia’s powerful crown prince and de facto ruler, Mohammed bin Salman, is sending his younger brother, Deputy Defense Minister Khalid bin Salman, to Washington in the coming days to urge restraint, the Saudi news media has reported.

“We are very keen that the situation in the region doesn’t escalate any further,” the Saudi foreign minister, Prince Faisal bin Farhan, told reporters in Riyadh on Monday. “It’s certainly a very dangerous moment, and we have to be conscious of the risks and dangers, not just to the region but to wider global security, and therefore we hope that all actors take all the steps necessary to prevent any further escalation and any provocation.”

While the Saudi leadership considers Iran its staunchest regional enemy, a drone and missile attack on Saudi oil processing plants in September that the United States accused Iran of orchestrating exposed the kingdom’s vulnerability — and raised questions about President Trump’s willingness to defend it.

The United States Embassy in Riyadh this week warned Americans in the kingdom of “the heightened risk of missile and drone attacks,” adding that Americans working near military bases and oil facilities were “at heightened risk of attack.”

The Iranian government said it would no longer abide by a commitment it made under a 2015 nuclear deal that limited its enrichment of uranium.

The decision to lift all restrictions on the production of nuclear fuel spelled the effective end of the nuclear deal, experts said, though Iran left open the possibility that it would return to the limits if sanctions were lifted.

“It’s finished. If there’s no limitation on production, then there is no deal,” said David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security, a nonprofit in Washington.

The announcement came after the Iranian Supreme National Security Council held an emergency meeting on Sunday after General Suleimani’s assassination.

“The Islamic Republic of Iran will end its final limitations in the nuclear deal, meaning the limitation in the number of centrifuges,” the government said in a statement. “Therefore Iran’s nuclear program will have no limitations in production including enrichment capacity and percentage and number of enriched uranium and research and expansion.”

The announcement followed several steps by Iran to move away from the terms of the agreement, nearly two years after Mr. Trump withdrew the United States. The other parties to the deal included Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China.

None except the United States have left the agreement, which was a key foreign policy achievement of former President Barack Obama. Since that renunciation, the Trump administration has imposed severe sanctions aimed at crippling Iran’s economy.

The nuclear agreement ended some economic sanctions on Iran in return for its verifiable pledge to use nuclear power peacefully.

Iran’s statement on Sunday did not include details about its enrichment ambitions. And the country did not say that it was expelling the inspectors who monitor its nuclear program.

President Trump seemed to respond to the announcement on Monday with an all-caps post on Twitter:

A senior adviser to President Trump on Monday said that the president held open the possibility of renegotiating a nuclear deal with Iran.

“He said he’s open to meet if Iran wants to start behaving like a normal country,” Kellyanne Conway, Mr. Trump’s White House counselor, told reporters.

The European parties to the deal, including Britain, France and Germany, as well as China and Russia, also signatories to the deal, had struggled to preserve the agreement as tensions between the United States and Iran worsened.

Geng Shuang, a spokesman for the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said at a daily news briefing that there was still hope for the nuclear deal. He noted that Tehran had said it would continue to cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency, which monitors Iranian activities under the agreement, and that it could return to the pact under the right conditions.

“We believe that although Iran has been compelled to reduce adherence owing to external factors, it has also demonstrated restraint,” Mr. Geng said.

In a joint statement on Sunday night, Britain, France and Germany called on Iran to refrain from violence and to return to “full compliance with its commitments” under the 2015 nuclear agreement, which Tehran has seemed to all but have abandoned.

The statement followed Iran’s announcement that day that it would no longer abide by the limits to uranium enrichment set out in the deal, a move that seemed to finally kill off the agreement after months during which Tehran had carefully breached less significant limits.

President Trump withdrew the United States from the nuclear deal in 2018.

The European statement seemed somewhat forlorn, since its efforts to preserve the deal have been weak, hamstrung in part by a desire to maintain good relations with Washington. The statement did not support the drone strike on the Iranian general but did acknowledge American concerns, saying that, “we have condemned the recent attacks’’ on coalition forces in Iraq and “are gravely concerned by the negative role played by Iran in the region.’’

The statement called for “de-escalation” of tensions from all parties and reaffirmed the Europeans’ determination “to continuing the fight against Islamic State, which remains a priority.’’ And it called on Iraq “to continue to supply the necessary support to the coalition’’ — in other words, to not expel American and NATO troops.

The secretary general of NATO, Jens Stoltenberg, called an emergency meeting of the alliance’s advisers on Monday afternoon. During a news conference following the meeting Mr. Stoltenberg said NATO would be suspending training operations on the ground in Iraq.

“At our meeting today, Allies expressed their strong support for the fight against ISIS and for the NATO mission in Iraq,” he said. “In everything that we do, the safety of our personnel is paramount. As such, we have temporarily suspended our training on the ground.”

Josep Borrell Fontelles, the European Union foreign policy chief, posted on Twitter that while the bloc regretted Iran’s announcement on the deal, it would wait for independent verification from the international nuclear monitoring group to determine what actions would be taken.

Peter Stano, his spokesman, said during a news briefing in Brussels said that de-escalation was the goal.

“It’s in our interest as Europeans to maintain this agreement,” Mr. Stano said.

On Monday, Heiko Maas, the German foreign minister, said that the Europeans would talk to Iran and planned to come up with a coordinated response.

“This could be the first step toward the end of this agreement, which would be a great loss,” Mr. Maas told a German radio station. “And so we will weigh things up very, very responsibly.”

Russian officials have been sharply critical of the targeted killing in Iraq but have not otherwise intimated how the Kremlin might respond, or whether Moscow, which has longstanding ties with Tehran, might play a mediating role.

President Vladimir V. Putin invited Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany to visit Moscow on Saturday to discuss the strike, among other issues, the Kremlin announced.

Oil prices surged and stock markets in Asia fell on Monday morning, as the impact of General Suleimani’s death ricocheted around the world.

The price of Brent oil, the international benchmark, jumped above $70 in futures trading as markets digested a steady flow of news over the weekend. It fell back below that level, to $69.92 a barrel, when markets opened in Europe, though the price was still about 5 percent higher than before the killing last week.

The sudden escalation in tensions in a region that supplies much of the world’s petroleum has roiled oil markets. The West Texas Intermediate, the American oil benchmark, rose 1.9 percent to $64.22 a barrel in futures trading.

Analysts at Capital Economics have warned that the price of oil could spike to $150 a barrel if the bellicose rhetoric between the two countries turned into action.

“The price of oil would soar in the event of full-blown military conflict in the Middle East,” said Alexander Kozul-Wright, a commodities economist at Capital Economics.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain, fresh from winning a mandate to take Britain out of the European Union, faces a particularly vexing challenge in dealing with the escalation between the United States and Iran.

In the first foreign policy crisis of the post-Brexit era, London is caught between its traditional alliance with Washington — one that Mr. Johnson wants to deepen further with a trade agreement — and the new relationship with Europe.

In his first statement on President Trump’s decision to strike the general, Mr. Johnson took pains to emphasize the threat posed by the Iranian military leader and said, “We will not lament his death.” But Mr. Johnson also called on all sides to avoid aggravating the situation, echoing the language used by the French and German governments.

Mr. Johnson suggested he wanted to play a mediating role and noted that he had spoken to Mr. Trump, as well as to President Emmanuel Macron of France and to Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany. The European governments have been more circumspect in their reactions to the American strike, with the Germans criticizing Mr. Trump’s threat to impose sanctions on Iraq if Baghdad were to expel American troops from bases in the country.

Mr. Johnson was said to be upset that Mr. Trump had not notified him of the strike in advance, but he can ill afford a falling out with the president, given Britain’s need to initiate trade talks with Washington

The United States Embassy in Israel said in a security alert on Monday that tension in the Middle East could result in rocket attacks or other dangerous situations for Americans who are abroad.

“Out of an abundance of caution, the Embassy strongly encourages U.S. citizens to remain vigilant and take appropriate steps to increase their security awareness, as security incidents, including rocket fire, often take place without warning,” the embassy said.

The embassy said people should keep a low profile, be aware of their surroundings and monitor local media, among other suggestions.

António Guterres, the secretary general of the United Nations, said in a statement on Monday that “Geopolitical tensions are at their highest level this century.”

“Even nuclear non-proliferation can no longer be taken for granted,” he said. “This cauldron of tensions is leading more and more countries to take unpredicted decisions with unpredictable consequences and a profound risk of miscalculation.”

He said he was urging world leaders to stop the escalation.

Reporting was contributed by Alissa J. Rubin, Ben Hubbard, Russell Goldman, Alexandra Stevenson, Farnaz Fassihi, Christopher Buckley, Megan Specia, Steven Erlanger, Melissa Eddy, Mark Landler, Thomas Gibbons-Neff, Eric Schmitt, Vivian Yee, David D. Kirkpatrick, Catie Edmondson, Andrew Kramer, Edward Wong and Eileen Sullivan.

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