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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 258)

The ‘Silicon Six’ spread propaganda. It’s time to regulate social media sites.

Westlake Legal Group -_J7NO2ftuwDs9z3viYSrtXip2EU5OuM8sKtldfJnnQ The ‘Silicon Six’ spread propaganda. It’s time to regulate social media sites. r/politics

I see this sentiment all the time and i just have to disagree, there is a 100y of successful regulation to point to, from Auto safety and emissions to Aerospace safety regulations, the EPA, the FDA, Labor regulations and on and on and on.

All you have to do is look at the situation we had before these regulatory bodies existed, before the EPA the air was soup and rivers were bursting into flames, before the FDA untested drugs and unsafe food were killing people daily…..The government isnt perfect, there have been notable regulatory failures in every structure over the last century, but its WAY BETTER, you really cant say its not.

Not going after you at all, im just saying- Think about what youre really saying..it really doesnt mesh up with reality imo.

You may have a different opinion, and im glad to hear it

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Mason Rudolph piñata seen at Cleveland Browns tailgate before game vs. Miami Dolphins

Westlake Legal Group Browns-fans Mason Rudolph piñata seen at Cleveland Browns tailgate before game vs. Miami Dolphins Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/myles-garrett fox-news/person/mason-rudolph fox news fnc/sports fnc article 5f5e73db-8c65-5934-ae2b-548986b2b037

It’s safe to say Cleveland Browns fans are frustrated at having lost star defensive end Myles Garrett for the remainder of the season because of a suspension for hitting Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph in the head with his own helmet during their matchup several days ago.

The Browns played their first game since the melee occurred in Week 11 at FirstEnergy Stadium and Cleveland fans wanted to make sure any anger they had going into the game against the Miami Dolphins was let out. They settled everything at the tailgate.

FRANK GORE PASSES BARRY SANDERS, HITS NO. 3 SPOT ON NFL’S ALL-TIME RUSHING LIST

The Cleveland Plain-Dealer captured video of Browns fans using a unique piñata to let loose on. Rudolph was made out to be the piñata.

A fan was then blindfolded and attempted to hit the piñata with a Steelers helmet. Dozens of fans watched as the fan swung the helmet around. The man holding the piñata was hit on the finger with the helmet at one point during the game.

WASHINGTON REDSKINS’ DWAYNE HASKINS TAKES SELFIE WITH FAN, MISSES FINAL SNAP

The fight between Garrett and Rudolph resulted in an indefinite suspension for the defensive end and a $50,000 fine for the quarterback. Garrett had accused Rudolph of using a racial slur to set him off but the NFL said they found “no such evidence” backing up the claim.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Steelers center Maurkice Pouncey had his suspension reduced from three games to two. Browns defensive lineman Larry Ogunjobi was suspended one game. He sat out Sunday against the Dolphins.

Westlake Legal Group Browns-fans Mason Rudolph piñata seen at Cleveland Browns tailgate before game vs. Miami Dolphins Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/myles-garrett fox-news/person/mason-rudolph fox news fnc/sports fnc article 5f5e73db-8c65-5934-ae2b-548986b2b037   Westlake Legal Group Browns-fans Mason Rudolph piñata seen at Cleveland Browns tailgate before game vs. Miami Dolphins Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/pittsburgh-steelers fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/myles-garrett fox-news/person/mason-rudolph fox news fnc/sports fnc article 5f5e73db-8c65-5934-ae2b-548986b2b037

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Climate Change Is Threatening Our Jobs — And Most Companies Are Doing Nothing

Hurricane Dorian was expected to hit Florida around Tuesday, Sept. 3. After a devastating season last year, residents feared the worst as they watched the Category 2 storm make its way towards them after inundating the Bahamas. As a precaution, one call center in Orlando closed for two days when the storm was expected to make landfall, giving its workers paid time off.

For one employee, Javier Torres, 25, that wasn’t enough time to prepare for the storm. So, he decided to take that Monday off as well to ensure he could properly stock up on supplies and move over to his father’s hurricane-ready house 30 minutes away. But when he returned to work that Friday ― after the storm grazed the state’s coastline, bypassing central Florida ― he found out his attendance record had taken a hit.

Torres had asked his supervisor ahead of time if he could use his personal leave to prepare for the hurricane. But because Monday fell on Labor Day, he was penalized due to a company policy discouraging workers from taking time off on a holiday. Torres felt he was being unfairly punished despite his company having taken some proactive steps to support employees ahead of the storm.

Thanks to climate change, storms are getting stronger, lasting longer, and becoming more frequent. And in hurricane-prone places like Florida, or wildfire-choked California, it means companies are grappling with how best to accommodate their employees. 

Few have developed clear policies for what workers can expect in the face of natural disasters, and for employees like Torres, this can leave them facing confusion, uncertainty and the possibility of lost wages, a blemished attendance record, or even termination. 

But things may slowly be changing. In 2017, the New York City-headquartered technology company Fog Creek Software — now called Glitch — announced a new “climate leave” policy. Anil Dash, Glitch’s CEO, realized the company needed it when remote employees fleeing the wildfires in California that year asked if they could have time off to deal with the disasters. 

The new policy provided five days of paid leave specifically for dealing with the impacts of a natural disaster. He would have given his employees the time off anyway, Dash wrote in a Medium article announcing the change, but writing it down provided them with certainty and peace of mind. 

This year, some of Glitch’s employees have leaned on the policy again when wildfires swept across Northern California. “We have a number of people in California right now and they feel reassured that amidst the terrifying aspect of having to evacuate there’s at least that reassurance,” said Dash. “Your job will be there.”

But most companies are reactive when it comes to natural disasters, figuring out what to do when the extreme weather is on its way or has already passed ― rather than establishing protocol well ahead of any event happening. This can mean a lot of uncertainty for employees, like Torres and his fellow call center workers. 

Westlake Legal Group 5dd6ad171f00005211def168 Climate Change Is Threatening Our Jobs — And Most Companies Are Doing Nothing

ADAM DELGIUDICE via Getty Images Businesses were forced to close in Florida ahead of Hurricane Dorian making its way towards the state after stalling over the Bahamas.

Torres has worked in three different centers and all operate in similar ways, he says: There is a company hotline that employees subscribe to that lets them know whether to come into work or not. 

The hotline is an opt-in program that provides employees with company updates, allowing managers to connect quickly with all employees in the face of an impending storm. But updates typically only come a few days in advance, says Torres, giving little time for people to prepare. 

In Torres’ opinion, these companies are waiting as long as possible to decide when to close the office, potentially prioritizing productivity at the expense of preparation. 

“It’s really frustrating, actually,” Torres said. “I think it’s inconsiderate to have us working until the last minute possible. It makes hurricane prep harder than it should be.” 

Despite the attention Glitch received when it announced its policy, few companies have adopted similar climate leave policies. Rich Fuerstenberg, a consultant at the international HR consulting firm Mercer, says there’s been no interest among the various companies he works with to adopt such a policy.  

“We have mentioned it to a number of employers and none have expressed interest,” Fuerstenberg wrote in an email to HuffPost. Most employers are much more concerned with what they see as more immediate needs such as paid parental leave and managing disabilities than they are with climate change leave. 

But while most employers may not be accounting for it, people are already paying for climate change. In each of the last five years, the United States has been hit with 10 or more billion-dollar weather and climate disasters — including hurricanes, wildfires and inland floods — causing more than $500 billion of damage across the country in just the last five years.

The Camp fire last year, for instance, which killed 85 people and displaced around 50,000 others, was the world’s costliest natural disaster in 2018, causing a total of $16.5 billion in losses. Hurricane Sandy in 2012 ― the fourth biggest storm in U.S. history ― cost New Jersey $70.2 billion in economic damages. Meanwhile, the record-breaking flooding across the Midwest this spring is expected to cost more than $3 billion in damages, as farmers bear the brunt with lost crops and little insurance coverage to help. 

According to a jobs report released in September 2017, businesses across the Southeastern United States lost 33,000 jobs that month alone, largely due to Hurricanes Harvey and Irma that year. Some 1.5 million people were unable to work as a result of the storms, according to the government — the highest number in 20 years.

Westlake Legal Group 5dd6b1962500009616d2dcd3 Climate Change Is Threatening Our Jobs — And Most Companies Are Doing Nothing

ASSOCIATED PRESS//SETH WENIG Signs asking for a “buy out” hang in front of a home damaged by Hurricaine Sandy on Staten Island, New York.

There are a number of ways a company can deal with natural disasters beyond a formal climate leave policy, said Fuerstenberg. In recent years, many companies have paid employees for time lost without an official policy or allowed people to use vacation time or other accrued paid time off to deal with disasters. 

Some companies also have “disruption” policies that will pay employees for time lost because of business closure, said Carol Sladek, a consultant at the HR consulting firm Aon Health Solutions.

For example, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts includes a similar provision for its 38,000 unionized employees during “flood, hurricane, or other catastrophic events,” providing up to five days of pay for shifts missed “due to business closure.” (The Walt Disney Company did not respond to a request for comment.)  

Mercer has also seen more and more companies of all kinds and sizes adopting “holistic paid time off” policies, said Fuerstenberg, where employers provide a certain number of days off without categorizing them as “paid” or “sick” leave. Others have adopted unlimited paid time off policies that would allow employees the flexibility of dealing with a natural disaster without having to juggle multiple paid leave policies. 

Overall, it seems companies have no consistent approach to dealing with disasters. Mitch Steiger, legislative advocate for the California Labor Federation, said he’s never even heard about climate leave and natural disaster leave policies. 

“Obviously, it’s something that does need to exist,” Steiger said. In recent years, he has heard “horror stories” about workers who lived in an evacuation zone and had to flee the fires, but were still expected to go in to work because their place of work was outside the burn area. 

At the state and federal level, there are a few legal protections for workers who lose work because of natural disasters, primarily in the form of unemployment insurance and federal disaster unemployment assistance, says Maurice Emsellem, an unemployment aid expert at the National Employment Law Project, a legal advocacy group that focuses on fair employment laws.  

But this aid is often distributed unequally, leaving out vulnerable populations. For example, while the average U.S. citizen recovering from a disaster receives $26, tribal citizens receive only $3 per person, according to High Country News. There’s also little to stop employers from penalizing employees for not showing up as a result of a disaster, Emsellem said. 

Denise Diaz, executive director of the advocacy organization Central Florida Jobs with Justice, said while few companies in central Florida have formal natural disaster policies, she’s noticed a cultural shift in the region since Hurricane Irma pummeled the state two years ago. 

Ahead of Hurricane Dorian this year, more businesses adjusted schedules or closed early to give their employees adequate time to gather supplies and prepare for an impending storm. This is better for the companies, too. Experts in emergency management have found giving employees time before a disaster to prepare enables them to be better equipped to return to work once the threat passes, said Diaz.

Diaz said she thinks the issue of company planning for natural disasters could be an important one for Florida in the coming years. This year, it felt like there was a new hurricane threat every other week in the state, she said. Formal hurricane policies and plans could help both employers and employees be more resilient while dealing with this new climate normal.

Westlake Legal Group 5dd6b0221f00005712def16c Climate Change Is Threatening Our Jobs — And Most Companies Are Doing Nothing

ASSOCIATED PRESS//RINGO H.W. CHIU Farmers keep working as a wildfire on a hill burns in the background in Camarillo, California.

Even if these policies were adopted on a broad scale, however, they still wouldn’t help every worker whose livelihood is threatened by natural disasters. 

Day laborers like housekeepers and agricultural workers, as well as undocumented workers, would not be covered if they lose days of work during and in the aftermath of a disaster, said Christy Lubin, executive director of Graton Day Labor Center, a nonprofit that supports day laborers in Northern California. These workers are already economically vulnerable because many work seasonal or even daily contract jobs that don’t provide benefits or economic security. Their immigration status may also make them ineligible for unemployment benefits and hesitant to seek disaster relief.

Gig economy workers and contract employees would likely not be covered either, said Diaz. This can mean a loss of crucial income for some of the already most economically vulnerable workers, said Lubin, who are often immigrants and people of color. 

A lack of federal protections and reliance on daily wages also puts many of these workers in the position of risking their lives and health to work in dangerous conditions. During last year’s wildfire season, farmworkers in California, many of them undocumented migrants, were still working outside without face masks, breathing in the toxic smoke as the Woolsey fire raged nearby. 

And this fall, housekeepers, gardeners and other domestic workers showed up to work in one of the most affluent neighborhoods of Los Angeles, only to find their employers had fled the nearby Getty fire and failed to tell them.

It will require more than revised HR policies to protect these workers, who are often protected by few federal standards. Even workers like Torres may still feel unable to stand up to their employers to demand clearer policies in the face of danger. But Glitch’s Dash is hopeful that even if companies aren’t talking about it publicly, most want to take care of their workers on the worst days of their lives. “I think most employers want to do the right thing,” he said.

CORRECTION: the piece was amended to correct the name of Aon Health Solutions, which the previous version referred to as Aon Hewitt.

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Carolina Panthers’ Cam Newton to serve underprivileged kids Thanksgiving meals

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Cam-Newton Carolina Panthers' Cam Newton to serve underprivileged kids Thanksgiving meals Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/carolina-panthers fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/cam-newton fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/sports fnc article 26308b15-410d-5f5b-a089-51302faaa4ca

Carolina Panthers star Cam Newton is helping more than 1,000 underprivileged kids get fed for Thanksgiving on Monday.

Newton is hosting his eighth annual “Cam’s Thanksgiving Jam” with help from his family members and 80 volunteers from Harris Teeter and JPMorgan Chase, the Charlotte Observer reported Friday. He will be hosting the event through his foundation and is expected to serve 1,300 children.

CINCINNATI BENGALS FAN SAYS HE’LL LIVE ON HIS ROOF UNTIL TEAM WINS A GAME

“Throwback Thursday to Cam’s Thanksgiving Jam through the years! Looking forward to our BIGGEST Thanksgiving Jam yet.  It’s coming next week with the help of our partners,” Newton tweeted last week.

ANTONIO BROWN REUNION WITH NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS APPEARS UNLIKELY

The children who are in the Second Harvest Food Bank of Metrolina’s Kids Café program will be receiving the Thanksgiving Meals, according to the Observer.

Some of the children’s family members may also get meals at the event and all the participants get to receive a second full Thanksgiving meal, according to the Cam Newton Foundation.

Newton is a huge presence in the Charlotte community, serving as the leader of a celebrity kickball tournament, a 7-on-7 youth football tournament and a healthy day of service among other events.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The Panthers quarterback has had a tough year on the field. He was placed on the season-ending injured reserve earlier this month with a foot injury. He played in two games this season, finishing with 572 passing yards and zero touchdowns.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Cam-Newton Carolina Panthers' Cam Newton to serve underprivileged kids Thanksgiving meals Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/carolina-panthers fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/cam-newton fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/sports fnc article 26308b15-410d-5f5b-a089-51302faaa4ca   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Cam-Newton Carolina Panthers' Cam Newton to serve underprivileged kids Thanksgiving meals Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/carolina-panthers fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/person/cam-newton fox-news/good-news fox news fnc/sports fnc article 26308b15-410d-5f5b-a089-51302faaa4ca

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Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is the ace up president’s sleeve

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6107810383001_6107814598001-vs Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is the ace up president’s sleeve New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 202c9c4f-4c13-5f77-8b32-0f66d9182898

Here’s my slam-dunk choice for quote of the year: “I want a trial.”

The president of the United States said that Friday morning, and his title alone would be reason enough to make it the most significant thing said in 2019. But there’s much more to it because Donald Trump’s demand highlights the historically unique set of circumstances he and the nation face in 2020.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

As of now, the new year will feature an impeachment trial in the Senate followed by the presidential election. If Trump survives Democrats’ effort to remove him, he would be the first impeached president to face voters again.

Andrew Johnson, impeached in 1868, was later denied his party’s nomination for a second term. Bill Clinton won his second term before he was impeached.

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While there’s some skepticism that Trump really wants to put everything on the line over allegations involving his dealings with Ukraine, I’m convinced he’s ­serious.

I’m also convinced he’s crazy like a fox. Given the flimsy allegations and the unfair, one-party nature of the House process, beating impeachment in the Senate seems close to a sure thing. And doing so would dramatically boost Trump’s chances of getting four more years.

Indeed, it’s probable that as impeachment goes, so goes the election.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING MICHAEL GOODWIN’S COLUMN IN THE NEW YORK POST

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY MICHAEL GOODWIN

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6107810383001_6107814598001-vs Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is the ace up president’s sleeve New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 202c9c4f-4c13-5f77-8b32-0f66d9182898   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6107810383001_6107814598001-vs Michael Goodwin: Trump impeachment trial is the ace up president’s sleeve New York Post Michael Goodwin fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fnc/opinion fnc article 202c9c4f-4c13-5f77-8b32-0f66d9182898

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Buttigieg proposes long-term care benefits for older Americans, protecting Social Security ‘forever’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6105392405001_6105400527001-vs Buttigieg proposes long-term care benefits for older Americans, protecting Social Security 'forever' fox-news/politics/executive/social-security fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andres del Aguila 5f12bed2-b393-5243-ae7a-80940ec4165e

Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg on Monday rolled out a plan to “promote dignity and security in retirement” through additional regular payments to older Americans, along with imposing a payroll tax on the wealthiest Americans to “protect Social Security forever.”

The South Bend, Ind., mayor said his father had been admitted to a hospital last winter for an undisclosed illness, and died this past January. He said a social worker told him the best option for long-term care would be to deplete their assets in order to qualify for Medicaid.

The Democrat said he asked himself, “Is that how this works in America?”

On Monday, his campaign announced plans to establish Long-Term Care America, a program providing people 65 and older with a benefit of $90 per day. “Over 11 million will receive benefits from the program throughout their lifetime,” according to the proposal.

Buttigieg, a self-described progressive who has resisted calls from the far left to embrace “Medicare-for-all,” also vowed to preserve Medicare Advantage – a private health-care plan – for those favoring it.

“There’s no dignity in retirement without being able to choose the health-care plan that’s right for you,” Buttigieg said.

The candidate said he would “revitalize the private long-term care insurance market” by bolstering support for caregivers — which would involve raising the minimum wage to a $15 an hour, expanding training programs, ensuring the possibility for career advancement and allowing home-care workers to unionize.

Many Americans have acted as at-home caregivers for their loved ones at their own expense. Buttigieg aimed to reduce that burden by providing “12 weeks of paid family leave, providing credit toward Social Security for family and other unpaid caregivers, and improving support by funding and training long-term care navigators and creating community-based service hubs,” according to the plan. Under the proposal, Buttigieg will require the Social Security administration to recognize at-home, unpaid caregiving as work, thus providing a credit toward benefits.

COUNCILMAN FROM BUTTIGIEG’S HOMETOWN ENDORSES BIDEN

In addition, Buttigieg aimed to secure the solvency of Social Security by imposing a payroll tax on individuals earning above $250,000 a year. He also vowed to “protect Social Security forever” by working with Congress to periodically increase taxes on the nation’s top earners, adding that benefits would increase over time to ensure seniors don’t fall beneath the poverty line.

Buttigieg also called for a public-option 401 (k) “with low fees and smart investment options so that all workers have the opportunity to supplement their Social Security benefits if they choose with employer contributions,” adding that it will “expand retirement savings among the 62 million workers locked out of tax-preferred retirement savings, and enable the typical worker to retire with over $500,000.”

Buttigieg said he’s “determined to usher in a new era for older Americans that upholds the unshakable promise that every American should be able to maintain a decent standard of living when they retire.”

Older adults are projected to outnumber children for the first time in United States history by 2035, according to a 2018 report by the U.S. Census Bureau. In addition, the nonpartisan, nonprofit Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has predicted Social Security will become insolvent by 2035.

Buttigieg’s plan mirrored legislation put forth by other Democrats vying for the presidential nomination.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., introduced the Social Security Expansion Act in February with support from Sens. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Cory Booker, D-N.J.

Their proposal, however, aimed higher, pledging to extend the solvency of Social Security through 2071 by also lifting the earnings cap, subjecting those raking in over $250,000 a year to the Social Security payroll tax.

A chief economist at Moody’s Analytics reviewed Buttigieg’s proposal. Dr. Mark Zandi said the plan would secure the solvency of Social Security through 2051, adding that it will reduce the federal deficit by $1.2 trillion over 10 years.

“The reforms you have proposed will put the Social Security system on sounder financial ground, extending its solvency by more than 30 years into the middle of this century,” Zandi wrote to the presidential candidate. “More reforms will eventually be needed, but your reforms address the system’s financial problem, which will be a relief to a financially precious low and middle-income Americans.”

President Trump has not issued a plan to specifically address the impending insolvent system but said during the 2016 campaign that a thriving economy will secure Social Security by boosting the money paid into it.

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“The key to preserving Social Security and other programs that benefit AARP members is to have an economy that is robust and growing,” Trump said in a statement to the AARP in June 2016. “For too long Americans have had a great deal of uncertainty in their lives, and the reforms I will bring to D.C. will remove that uncertainty and will restore confidence in the American economy.”

Trump has fulfilled his promise of providing a tax cut, signing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in 2017, which Democrats have criticized for benefiting corporations and the richest Americans at the expense of the rest of the country.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6105392405001_6105400527001-vs Buttigieg proposes long-term care benefits for older Americans, protecting Social Security 'forever' fox-news/politics/executive/social-security fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andres del Aguila 5f12bed2-b393-5243-ae7a-80940ec4165e   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6105392405001_6105400527001-vs Buttigieg proposes long-term care benefits for older Americans, protecting Social Security 'forever' fox-news/politics/executive/social-security fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-primaries fox-news/politics/elections/presidential fox-news/politics/elections/campaigning fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/pete-buttigieg fox news fnc/politics fnc article Andres del Aguila 5f12bed2-b393-5243-ae7a-80940ec4165e

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Russia’s 2016 Election Meddling Was A ‘Well-Choreographed Military Operation,’ Former FBI Counterintelligence Expert Says

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President Obama May Not Be Up For Election, But His Legacy Is

Westlake Legal Group ap_19096512526087-a8e4e1d7df2507c95022d3f9c5881ba223daaad8-s1100-c15 President Obama May Not Be Up For Election, But His Legacy Is

Former President Barack Obama has been taking a more vocal role in the 2020 presidential primary recently. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  President Obama May Not Be Up For Election, But His Legacy Is

Former President Barack Obama has been taking a more vocal role in the 2020 presidential primary recently.

Michael Sohn/AP

When Barack Obama stood in Chicago’s Grant Park facing throngs of people in 2008 and declared that “change has come to America,” Arielle Monroe was a freshman in college.

Obama was her generation’s rock star, who swept away the nation’s last remaining racial barrier in politics and inspired a multi-racial, multi-generational coalition to support him.

“All different kinds of people related to this man, how we all believed in him,” she said. “There was this whole message of hope – right? – in that it’ll all get better for people who have grown up maybe not feeling that that’s a possibility.”

Now, with less than three months before Democratic voters begin to cast ballots to select their nominee, Monroe is one of many voters who hasn’t yet found a candidate to inspire her in that same way.

“I’m not excited right now, but I hope to be soon,” she said.

More than a decade after his election, which represented one of the most hopeful moments in American politics, a debate is breaking out among Democrats over Obama’s legacy and the direction the party should go in at a moment in which the historic divides Obama sought to bridge seem more vast than ever.

At a recent gathering of Democrats in Wyandotte County, Kansas, Melissa Bynum, said she wants to hear candidates paint a big picture vision for the future. But she worried that some candidates weren’t recognizing Obama’s legacy.

“Well, I think that they need to make sure that they are acknowledging all of the good that he was able to accomplish in his eight years in the White House,” she said.

She specifically mentioned health care, which has been one of the most animating issues of the Democratic presidential primary.

The debate over the direction in which the party should go spilled into public view during the November presidential debate, hosted by MSNBC and The Washington Post.

Early in the evening, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was asked about Obama’s recent remarks about the electorate, made at a Washington gathering of the Democracy Alliance.

“This is still a country that is less revolutionary than it is interested in improvement,” Obama said during his November 15 remarks, according to audio of his remarks that was captured off microphone. “They like seeing things improved. But the average American doesn’t think that we have to completely tear down the system and remake it. And I think it’s important for us not to lose sight of that.”

Democratic strategist Joel Payne said Obama’s comments were both an “implicit defense of the Obama years, as well as “a bit of the warning to the party to not lurch to far, in this instance to the left.”

They were also an apparent beginning of a more public role in the 2020 primary for Obama, who until recently had largely kept a low profile.

Sanders, who has campaigned on calls for a political revolution, was asked whether Obama was incorrect.

“No, he’s right,” Sanders said. “We don’t have to tear down the system, but we do have to do what the American people want.”

Then, he segued into a defense of the Medicare for All single payer proposal he’s championed as a replacement to the Affordable Care Act.

During last week’s debate, Democrats also tussled over who would be the best candidate to reinvigorate the multiracial, multigenerational cohort of voters that Obama brought to the polls in 2008.

California Sen. Kamala Harris repeatedly, explicitly argued that she is the candidate “who has the ability to go toe-to-toe with Donald Trump and someone who has the ability to rebuild the Obama coalition and bring the party and the nation together.”

Former Vice President Joe Biden said that he was “part of that Obama coalition,” adding that he came “out of a black community, in terms of my support.”

And South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg said he wants to build a coalition that includes not just left-leaning voters, but moderates and “future former Republicans,” adding that “everybody is welcome in this movement that we’re building.”

But days before the debate, Paul Avila doubted that lightning could strike twice.

“Well I’m not sure it’s possible. That happened over a decade ago,” he said when asked if any candidate in the race could rebuild the Obama coalition. “Things have changed a lot over the past 10 years. I don’t see anybody yet that could be another Barack Obama.”

Avila is still undecided in the 2020 race but says he’s leaning toward supporting Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren or Sanders because they’re “much more progressive, willing to take more chances in order to win.” He also likes Buttigieg, who he described as “sharp as a tack.”

But he was less bullish on Biden, who he says “is a little past his prime, and he also has some baggage that he’s carrying around” from his Senate career.

When asked about Obama, Avila said that he was a “good president, but there were some things about his presidency that left a lot to be desired.”

Florentino Camacho, who attended the Wyandotte County Democrats breakfast, and lives in Kansas City Mo. said that Obama was one of the best presidents of his lifetime, and praised him for being a president who fought for all Americans, something he said President Trump isn’t doing.

But, he worried that Democrats could be unprepared for the playbook Republicans will throw at them in the general election.

“I think they’re doing good, but they have to start fighting as bad and as dirty as the Republicans,” he said.

Gary Bradley-Lopez, 21, supported Hillary Clinton in 2016 and said that none of the current candidates is “bringing the kind of fire” that Clinton did that year, or that Obama did in the two prior elections.

He says his biggest priority in a candidate is that they be a woman or a person of color — he isn’t interested in electing another white man. And he says that though he’s “culturally” excited for candidates like Harris, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, he still doesn’t know who he’ll support.

“I’m not sure if there’s a candidate that right. Like, Oh, I can’t wait to go knock on doors for them or I can’t wait for them to be president,.” he said. “I’m not sure that candidate is even in the race yet.”

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This Thanksgiving Stuffing Bread Is Unlike Anything You’ve Had Before

I grew up eating the traditional stovetop stuffing. You know, the kind in the bag where you add some onions and celery, and call it a day. It wasn’t until my late teens that I realized stuffing could actually be made from scratch. Then I later went to culinary school and started making my own homemade version and thought it was pretty damn good.

But then, a few years ago, my wife’s best friend came over and delivered us literally the most perfect stuffing I had ever had. It was all the things a stuffing should be ― crispy on the outside, soft and moist on the inside and packed full of flavor. But there was a twist ― it was in the shape of a loaf. I was intrigued and immediately had a million questions.

First off, it’s made with only six ingredients. How could a dish with only six ingredients have so much flavor? The answer is chicken stock. The success or failure of this dish lies in the quality of broth you use. You’ll want to make your own or invest in a stock that you know tastes great. The bread absorbs all of the seasonings of the broth and becomes the main flavor of the dish, so go big or go home. A stick of butter doesn’t hurt the flavor, either.

The other trick to this stuffing is that it’s cooked in a water bath, also known as a bain-marie. The pan is nestled inside a larger pan of hot water in the oven, insulating the bread and keeping the oven moist, therefore keeping your stuffing moist. It also helps to cook it evenly, so the outer edge of your stuffing won’t bake faster than the center.

If you’re in the market for a new stuffing this year, look no further than this stuffing loaf. It tastes even better the next stay for breakfast slathered with butter.

Westlake Legal Group 5dd2debf210000406834d4cf This Thanksgiving Stuffing Bread Is Unlike Anything You’ve Had Before

Jeremy Paige

stuffing loaf

Thanksgiving Stuffing Bread

Ingredients

  • 1 (1-pound) white bread loaf, cut into 1-inch chunks and left out to dry overnight

  • 1 (4-ounce) stick salted butter

  • 1 small yellow onion, minced

  • 2 stalks celery, minced

  • 2 cups good quality chicken stock

  • 1 large egg, beaten

  • Kosher salt, to taste

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Spray a 9×5 loaf pan with nonstick spray.

2. Heat butter in large skillet over medium heat.

3. Add onion and celery. Sauté until onion is translucent, about 7 to 10 minutes.

4. Transfer to a large bowl and mix with stale bread, chicken stock and egg. Season with salt.

5. Firmly press mixture into loaf pan and cover with aluminum foil.

6. Place loaf pan in large casserole dish. Pour hot water in bottom of casserole dish until it reaches about 1 1/2inches up the side of the loaf pan.

7. Place in oven and bake for 45 minutes.

8. Remove cover and bake additional 15 minutes.

9. Let cool for 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack. Then slice and serve.

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Corruption Inquiry Spreads to U.A.W. Lakeside Resort

Westlake Legal Group 24resort1-facebookJumbo Corruption Inquiry Spreads to U.A.W. Lakeside Resort Williams, Dennis (1953- ) United Automobile Workers Suits and Litigation (Civil) Reuther, Walter Philip Organized Labor Michigan Jones, Gary (1956- ) Corruption (Institutional) Bribery and Kickbacks Automobiles

ONAWAY, Mich. — The United Auto Workers union is based in Detroit, but its spiritual home lies 250 miles to the north, in a dense and remote forest on the shores of Black Lake.

Here, 40 miles from the nearest Starbucks, the U.A.W. owns a spartan retreat known to few people outside the auto industry, though it opened nearly 50 years ago. Covering 1,000 acres, the gated compound includes cabins, lodges, a banquet hall and a recreation center with an Olympic-size swimming pool. An eternal flame marks the hilltop resting place of the ashes of Walter Reuther, who built the U.A.W. into one of the most powerful unions in the country in the 1950s and 1960s.

This tranquil scene was disrupted in August when the F.B.I. raided the compound, seizing documents and records. The raid was the latest chapter in a yearslong Justice Department investigation into corruption at the union that has thrown the U.A.W. into turmoil and embroiled two of Detroit’s Big Three automakers — Fiat Chrysler and General Motors.

The resort was one of a half-dozen locations government agents searched. The raids signaled that investigators were not done with their work, despite having charged or won convictions of a dozen union officials and three Fiat Chrysler executives.

Last week, the U.A.W. president, Gary Jones, resigned as the union’s executive board was preparing to remove him for the submission of false expense reports and using union money for personal gain. The U.A.W. said Mr. Jones had concealed the use of more than $1 million in union funds for luxury travel, extravagant dinners and purchases of high-price cigars, golf clubs and apparel for himself, his family and his lieutenants.

What drew federal agents to Black Lake is not clear. But union members and labor experts have criticized the U.A.W.’s unusual decision to build a luxury lakeside cabin at the resort for the exclusive use of Mr. Jones’s predecessor as president, Dennis Williams. Federal agents searched the cabin and separately raided a home owned by Mr. Williams in Corona, Calif. The union is reviewing other financial transactions for possible wrongdoing, and now plans to sell the cabin and the land that it sits on in a secluded corner of the retreat, said Brian Rothenberg, a U.A.W. spokesman.

The decision to sell the cabin was part of a set of reforms instituted by the acting president, Rory Gamble, after he took the helm from Mr. Jones. “Restoring the full faith and trust of our membership and protecting their interests is the top priority,” Mr. Rothenberg said.

The U.A.W. provided more modest, rustic cabins within the retreat complex for other previous retired presidents, and the union is considering ending that practice, too.

Union members and supporters say it is particularly disappointing that the resort — formally called the Walter P. and May Reuther Family Education Center — has been pulled into the investigation. The union uses it as a place for members to study the past and plan for the future in training seminars and conferences.

“Black Lake serves a critical purpose for the union,” said Harley Shaiken, a labor relations professor at the University of California, Berkeley, who has attended and taught seminars at the retreat since the 1970s. “It’s historically important for the union. It’s meant to get people together to debate critical issues. It’s a place of thinking and engaging.”

When the retreat opened in 1970, it was heralded for its timbered beams and spare Scandinavian design.

Today, rather than a showplace for the U.A.W., Black Lake is a part of the union’s financial difficulties. The union spends several million dollars a year to operate it — money that is classified as a loan to the subsidiary that operates Black Lake. In 2018, the accumulated debt amounted to more than $60 million.

Anyone can book a stay there. During a recent overnight stay, I found it dated. Guest rooms feature few of the amenities found in modern hotels, like Wi-Fi and cable TV. Some hallways were marked by musty odors. But a golf course the U.A.W. built just outside the retreat in 2000, at a cost of $6.7 million, is considered one of the best in Michigan.

At the main gate, I was told only union-made vehicles were allowed on the grounds. I had to park my Volkswagen in a lot outside the perimeter. Some Chevrolets and Fords were parked there, too, because vehicles made in Mexico are not welcome, either.

Credit…Neal E. Boudette/The New York Times Credit…Neal E. Boudette/The New York Times

That week Black Lake was hosting about 150 workers for a weeklong seminar on the history of organized labor and the U.A.W. Any member is welcome to attend such courses. The union covers the cost and offsets the wages workers would have earned that week. Participants said they spent much of the day in lectures — instructors take attendance. One afternoon is set aside for recreation.

When I visited, the large gymnasium with two full-size basketball courts and the pool were empty most of the day. Six pool tables remained untouched in a darkened room.

These days, senior union officials often hold meetings in places like Orlando, Fla., Washington, D.C., and May, N.J. Before becoming the U.A.W. president in 2018, Mr. Jones ran a regional office in Hazelwood, Mo., and held annual conferences in Palm Springs, Calif. Court filings by federal prosecutors and an internal union complaint against Mr. Jones claim that he and other union officials booked luxury villas for four weeks or more, even though the Palm Springs conferences lasted less than a week.

In raids at Mr. Jones’s home and elsewhere, agents seized thousands of dollars in cash, hundreds of bottles of high-price liquor, hundreds of golf shirts, multiple sets of golf clubs and large quantities of cigars that had been billed to union accounts, according to court filings. One dinner described by prosecutors ran up a bill of $6,599.87 that included $1,760 for four bottles of Louis Roederer Cristal Champagne.

A lawyer for Mr. Jones, J. Bruce Maffeo, said the suggestion that the conference expenses had been concealed “is without any basis in fact.” Spending for the conferences in Palm Springs was “laid out in sufficient detail to the U.A.W. accounting department over a period of years.”

A close associate of Mr. Jones who helped organize the conferences in Palm Springs and has been charged by federal prosecutors, Vance Pearson, resigned from the U.A.W. on Sunday. The union had been taking steps to remove him from his post as a regional director.

Back at the union’s Black Lake resort, the stone and glass cabin for Mr. Williams, the former president, is in a fenced-off area more than a mile from the main complex. But it is accessible from the lake. Wading in to its shoreline, I found the home with picture windows facing the lake. According to the county planning office, the 1,885-square-foot residence has cherry cabinets, granite countertops, three-and-a-half baths and a stone patio.

Mr. Reuther hoped the union would train future generations of leaders in the contemplative setting far from the toil of assembly lines. At one time, it had a day care center — Mr. Reuther imagined workers’ families joining them on their retreats.

He also hoped it would be a place where the U.A.W. could use its power to solve societal problems. The first event held at Black Lake was a conference on the environment that the union organized with the United Nations in the summer of 1970.

Such was the U.A.W.’s reach that it could attract foreign government officials to Northern Michigan. But Mr. Reuther didn’t attend the event. He died in a plane crash while traveling to Black Lake a few months earlier.

Shortly after the resort opened, the union waged a bitter strike against G.M., and it eventually prevailed, coming away with significant wage increases. The strike was tough on the union, which depleted its strike fund and went into debt, even mortgaging Black Lake to the Teamsters for a time.

By the 1980s, the Big Three auto companies and the union were in a slow decline. Today, the U.A.W.’s membership has fallen to about 400,000, from as many as 1.5 million when Mr. Reuther ran it. But it still remains a potent force, recently winning higher wages and bonuses for G.M. workers after a 40-day strike.

Around the time G.M. and Chrysler were in bankruptcy in 2009, the U.A.W. tried sell the resort, which was viewed as a luxury when thousands of workers were losing their jobs. But the union couldn’t find a buyer.

That’s good news, said JoAn Matney, a retired autoworker from Toledo. “It’s empowering and fun to go there,” she said. “I definitely think they should keep it.”

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