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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 258)

Donald Trump is much worse than Richard Nixon. He may even have committed treason.

Westlake Legal Group O66OiOUBjLPC1HLZ6JguRWaxDy4EpLIta5tcc7aNSpU Donald Trump is much worse than Richard Nixon. He may even have committed treason. r/politics

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Nearly two dozen paratroopers injured in Mississippi Airborne exercise: report

Nearly two dozen paratroopers were injured while conducting a training exercise in Mississippi on Wednesday night, according to a report.

The troops were jumping from a C-130 aircraft when the wind blew them away from their intended drop zone, Laurel, Miss.’s WDAM-TV reported.

Several of the 89 paratroopers landed in a group of pine trees. Some of the injured soldiers were taken to a hospital and others had to be rescued after their parachutes become tangled in the trees.

ARMY IDS FORT CAMPBELL SOLDIER KILLED IN WEAPONS TRAINING ACCIDENT

Westlake Legal Group paratroopers-1 Nearly two dozen paratroopers injured in Mississippi Airborne exercise: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/mississippi fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 9e7828fd-5a9e-5b96-86b6-fef45132f3fb

U.S. paratroopers conduct an airborne operation from a C-130 Hercules aircraft on Juliet Drop Zone near Pordenone, Italy, Sept. 24, 2014. (Dept. of Defense )

“At this time we’re tracking 22 injuries with 15 treated by medics in the field and seven transported to local hospitals,“ John Pennell, chief of media relations for U.S. Army Alaska, said, WDAM reported.

Staff Sgt. John Healy, with the 177th Armored Brigade at Camp Shelby, said none of the injuries were life-threatening.

The Mississippi National Guard released a statement just after midnight Thursday that read in part, “Airborne Operations all bear an inherent risk … We are grateful for overwhelming support that we have received from units here on Camp Shelby as well as local first responders. The entire community has come together to ensure that we are able to provide expert treatment to any Soldiers who were injured during the Airborne Operation.”

“Once all Soldiers have been accounted for, our goal is ultimately to continue training. Despite the challenges that we currently face, Soldiers always place the mission first.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

The operation was part of a 10-day training exercise.

Westlake Legal Group paratroopers Nearly two dozen paratroopers injured in Mississippi Airborne exercise: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/mississippi fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 9e7828fd-5a9e-5b96-86b6-fef45132f3fb   Westlake Legal Group paratroopers Nearly two dozen paratroopers injured in Mississippi Airborne exercise: report fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/mississippi fox-news/us/military/army fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 9e7828fd-5a9e-5b96-86b6-fef45132f3fb

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New England Patriots’ Julian Edelman recalls late-night awkward interaction with Bill Belichick

New England Patriots star Julian Edelman on Wednesday recalled the first conversation he ever had with head coach Bill Belichick and why it was a moment he will never forget for one very awkward reason.

Edelman, who joined the Patriots in 2009 as a seventh-round pick from Kent State, explained in a deleted scene from his Showtime series “100% Edelman” he has only talked to Belichick about eight times in his 10-year career. Early on, he was working a late night at the team facility when he saw Belichick on a treadmill in a dark weight room watching film and taking notes.

VONTAZE BURFICT’S ‘HEART IS BROKEN’ OVER SEASON-LONG SUSPENSION, RAIDERS’ DEREK CARR SAYS

“I hurry and scatter out of there so he doesn’t by any chance see me,” Edelman said. “That’s the last thing I would want at that time of my life and career because then I’d have to engage in a potential conversation and I don’t know if I had the stamina for that at that time.”

But soon afterward, came the truly uncomfortable encounter.

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Bill-Belichick6 New England Patriots' Julian Edelman recalls late-night awkward interaction with Bill Belichick Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 701276cd-04ff-5be1-93d6-233d7fdce678

Julian Edelman discusses his interaction with Bill Belichick. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

“I just so happen to walk by the hot tub and coach is in the hot tub. Obviously, I came in the room to go in the hot tub. But then we made eye contact and my natural instinct was to turn around like I was gonna leave,” he said.

SUPER BOWL CHAMPION PERCY HARVIN OPENS UP ABOUT ANXIETY ISSUES, HOW SMOKING WEED HELPED

“But then I saw that he saw that I was in there and then he got up and got out and real, real big party foul by coach. We’re supposed to have shorts on. Supposed to have shorts. But I guess at 11 o’clock, when you’re the GOAT of coaching you go wherever you want, free—free ball. So I had to hide my absolute face of terror after seeing what I saw and sit in the hot tub.”

Edelman said he did his thing in the hot tub and then tried to scamper out of there without being seen again by Belichick. The wide receiver said as he was leaving the building he ran into Belichick again.

As the two were walking toward the exit, Edelman said he tried to strike up a conversation.

“I was sitting there I was like in so much disbelief of everything that was happening, going on that night that I potentially wanted to try and make some small talk with him. And I don’t know where I got the confidence but I asked him, ‘Coach, it’s pretty amazing that you’re here this late.’

PATRIOTS’ BILL BELICHICK’S COMPLIMENTARY WORDS FOR REDSKINS OFFENSE HAS SOME FANS BEFUDDLED

“And, he looked back at me and without any hesitation, he goes, ‘It beats being a plumber. See you tomorrow’”

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

Edelman said he was befuddled by Belichick’s response and he may have “shedded [sic] a single tear.”

Westlake Legal Group NFL-Julian-Edelman2 New England Patriots' Julian Edelman recalls late-night awkward interaction with Bill Belichick Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 701276cd-04ff-5be1-93d6-233d7fdce678   Westlake Legal Group NFL-Julian-Edelman2 New England Patriots' Julian Edelman recalls late-night awkward interaction with Bill Belichick Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/new-england-patriots fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 701276cd-04ff-5be1-93d6-233d7fdce678

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Moderate Democrats Avoid Impeachment Backlash So Far

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. ― If moderate House Democrats are going to face a ferocious Republican backlash for supporting an impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump, it hasn’t started just yet.

At swing district town halls here and in the Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania, two first-term Democrats, Reps. Max Rose of New York and Susan Wild of Pennsylvania, saw their newfound support for an impeachment inquiry met mostly with applause. Both are the type of moderates that Republicans have sworn would pay a steep political price for backing impeachment. 

Their warm receptions show how rapidly the perceived politics of an impeachment inquiry are changing. Though Democrats long feared impeaching the president would gin up Trump’s fiercely conservative base voters and overshadow the party’s focus on health care and the economy, tightly crafted to appeal to swing voters. Instead, many Democratic operatives are increasingly seeing an impeachment inquiry as politically neutral. 

For instance, Priorities USA ― the largest Democratic super-PAC and a longtime advocate of the idea Democrats should remain focused on economic issues ― released polling this week aimed at showing “major warning signs for the GOP” on impeachment. The poll, conducted by Civis Analytics, found 45% of likely 2020 voters support impeachment, while 40% oppose it. (The poll is broadly in line with other recent public polling, though.) 

Westlake Legal Group 5d9572aa2200008c01dc8e91 Moderate Democrats Avoid Impeachment Backlash So Far

Andrew Kelly / Reuters Rep. Max Rose (D-N.Y.) meets the press following a town hall where he announced his support for an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. 

Rose, a military veteran and proud member of the centrist Blue Dog Coalition, unseated Republican Rep. Dan Donovan in November in a district that Trump won by nearly 10 percentage points in 2016. Until Wednesday evening, he had been one of just 11 House Democrats resisting coming out in favor of the impeachment inquiry. 

Speaking to over 100 constituents at the Jewish Community Center of Staten Island on Wednesday, however, Rose revealed that Trump administration officials’ obstructionist attitude toward investigations of alleged misconduct had pushed him over the edge.

“Instead of allaying our concerns, the president and his administration have poured gasoline on the fire. The American people have a right to know if their president used the power of his or her office to get a foreign power to interfere in our elections,” he said, eliciting applause from the audience.

On its face, Rose’s decision to embrace the impeachment inquiry in a district where Trump won by a larger margin than he did carries clear risk.

But Rose was facing Republican attacks for effectively supporting impeachment even before he had staked out a stance on the matter.

The Republican National Committee already began blasting him at the end of September as part of a $2 million ad campaign targeting Rose and other vulnerable House Democrats.

“Instead of working to create more jobs, Rose wants more hearings,” the narrator of the RNC ad says as images of more liberal Democrats, such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, appear on-screen. 

Nicole Malliotakis, the Republican New York Assemblywoman who has launched a bid to unseat Rose, nonetheless showcased how attacks against him could intensify now.

Rose, she tweeted, “tonight announced that he caved to Pelosi, AOC & socialist squad after saying he didn’t support impeachment.”

Speaking to reporters after the town hall, Rose, employing the sort of bravado native to his corner of New York, insisted that the attacks from Malliotakis and other Republicans did not frighten him.

“I am not concerned at all by [House Republicans’ campaign arm] or anyone that wants to try and challenge me because they already tried once, and we kicked their ass,” he boasted, referring to his 2018 victory. “And guess what: That’s exactly what is going to happen again. They have been absolute jokes. They will continue to be jokes. And I look forward to beating them by an incredible margin.”

 At the same time, Rose went out of his way during the town hall to distance himself from Ocasio-Cortez and other left-leaning Democrats whom Republicans have turned into a political cudgel against moderates like Rose. 

“On the one hand, we have Democrats who, before they have sworn the oath of office, want to impeach the president of the United States,” he said, making what appeared to be a veiled reference to comments by Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, a member of the group of progressive congresswomen known as “the Squad.” “On the other side, though, we have Republicans who swore the same oath that I did, but suddenly they become deaf, mute and blind whenever allegations against the president come up. That’s an even greater threat to our democracy.”

(Wild, similarly, used a voter’s question to note she had worked to be a “sounding board and educator” after Omar and Tlaib made comments some considered anti-Semitic.)

On the campus of Muhlenberg College, Wild faced questions about improving public education, “Medicare for All” and climate change before a voter asked why she was more focused on impeachment than on improving schools in the area. 

“It’s a mistake to think that those of us in Washington are spending all of our time on impeachment,” she told the crowd of roughly 250 people.

The audience at the event was mostly on the side of Wild, who won her seat in this manufacturing-heavy area by 10 percentage points in 2018. Questioners who pressed her on impeachment were met with boos, while a voter who suggested House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff jail uncooperative Trump officials received applause. Before the event, Wild told reporters that phone calls to her office were running 85% in favor of impeachment or an impeachment inquiry. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d9574152200005c01dc8f0a Moderate Democrats Avoid Impeachment Backlash So Far

Bill Clark via Getty Images Rep. Susan Wild talks with constituents following a town hall meeting at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. The crowd was largely supportive of her decision to back an impeachment inquiry.

Wild, who had opposed an impeachment inquiry until revelations about Trump pressuring Ukranian President Volodymyr Zelensky to reopen an investigation into Vice President Joe Biden’s son, said she felt “the administration left us no choice” but to back impeachment. And, she said, voters were behind them.

“I think the issue of the Ukraine phone call is sufficiently troubling. And we’ve seen what the polls have done this week,” she told reporters, later adding that she wanted to keep the inquiry focused narrowly on Ukraine and avoid re-litigating special counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russian interference in the 2016 election. “This was a single, discrete event that was very easy for people to understand.” 

Wild’s focus on polling is telling. Many Democrats have been privately surprised at how well the issue polls after months of surveys showing a majority of American voters opposed to any effort to remove Trump from office. But polling on a fast-developing issue is tricky, and impeachment could still turn sour for Democrats. Republicans boast that the issue will fire up their base, and Trump’s reelection campaign said it raised more than $15 million in the days after Democrats began more solid moves toward impeachment proceedings. 

Even with an impeachment inquiry looming, Rose and Wild were happy to highlight their work on other issues ― and their constituencies were happy to discuss them.

Rose, whose town hall was devoted to transportation and commuter concerns, relished getting into the policy details on expanding bus and ferry routes. He touted his collaboration with Republican lawmakers on efforts to protect Staten Island commuters from toll hikes on the Verrazzano Bridge into Brooklyn. And he even welcomed the unlikely prospect of a federal, bipartisan infrastructure bill.

“Nothing, nothing at all ― impeachment or otherwise ― will distract … me from my work fighting for you,” he declared.

Even conservatives at Wild’s town hall weren’t focused on impeachment, instead asking what she was doing to help Trump combat China and about Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server while secretary of state. Several liberal questioners focused on climate change, and others focused on education. Wild said the high cost of prescription drugs was the “number one issue” in the district.

“I believe that I will get reelected on the basis of the work that I’ve done for the district and not on how this impeachment issue goes one way or another,” she told reporters.

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11 Financial Mistakes Lawyers Make

Let’s be honest. Law school didn’t teach us a lot about personal finance. We barely covered the law and many corporate lawyers would probably say the skills we learned related mostly to litigation. But then you’re thrust into a career, with a ton of student loan debt, and you realize you have a second job (whether you want to or not) managing your money. Let’s make sure we’re doing it right. Here are some of the top financial mistakes lawyers make:

1. Inadequate Savings Rate

Lawyers need to have a higher savings rate than the general population. You must save more than 5-10% to be successful.

Why? Because lawyers get a late start in the workplace. A typical college-grad expects to spend 43 years in the workforce. A typical lawyer might spend 35 years working.

Not only do lawyers start saving later in life, but before they can begin saving for retirement they must contend with significant student loan debt.

In other words, if you have student loan debt it will take some time before you reach net worth zero, which puts you even further behind. To catch up, you should be both reducing debt and saving for retirement.

For these reasons, lawyers need to be saving significantly more than 5-10% of their income. How much should be saving? The math is surprisingly simple. You need to save 25 times your desired annual income in retirement. Think you would be fine living off $100,000 a year? You need $2,500,000.

Keep in mind that your spending in retirement will almost certainly be substantially less than your current spending. You won’t be saving for retirement, nor will you be paying for most insurance products (e.g. life, disability, etc).

Also, your taxes are likely to be lower, particularly if you’re working in an expensive city like NYC or San Francisco. Retired people also have a lot of free time, so you won’t be spending money for prepared meals, cleaning services or someone to fold your laundry.

2. Over-Entertainment

Lawyers work long and often unpredictable hours and unwind late in the evenings with colleagues and friends. Hight stress jobs have a mentality of “work hard, play hard”. The result is that it’s easy to over-consume entertainment, alcohol and food.

The financial and physical cost of such over-consumption cost be high, but more importantly to you, it’s unnecessary. Unless you’re keeping track, most people will only have a fuzzy idea of the total amount they’re spending on entertainment each month.

If you’re trying to cut back, ask yourself how many times you need to go out each week? Do I need top-shelf alcohol for every drink? Do I need to be spending $80 at a restaurant 2 times a week plus have brunch with friends? What about movies/shows/sporting events? Do I need more entertainment or do I need more sleep? What about my cable bill? If you take some time to audit your entertainment expenses, it’s easy and painless to cut unnecessary expenses from your life.

I’m willing to bet you’re paying for things right now that you don’t use or enjoy.

3. Being Unaware of Firm Benefits

I’m always surprised when I discover a lawyer that isn’t aware of the firm’s entire benefits package. From large firms to small firs, nearly Every employer provides a bonanza of benefits for the taking.

If you’re in Biglaw, the firm will probably pay for meals after a certain hour or taking a car home .

If you’re at a small firm, you may have a high-deductible healthcare plan, which gives you access to the Health Savings Account. You might also be able to participate in taking transit deduction. All you need to do is take some time to understand you firm’s benefits.

Firms often also pay for things like bar membership, attorney registration fees and sometimes travel for conferences. They pay for professional development and continuing legal education. Firms subsidize your mobile phone bill. They even provide you with corporate discounts on your mobile plan (just enter your email and save 15%). Dust off the new hire packet and see what you’re missing.

4. Poor Tax Management

Financially successful lawyers manage their taxes and use tax-advantaged accounts. They use tax-advantaged accounts before investing in taxable accounts.

For many high-income lawyers, every dollar put into a tax-advantaged account saves around $0.40 in taxes. Because a lawyer’s marginal tax rate is always higher than his effective tax rate, by contributing to retirement accounts he can save his marginal tax rate today and pay his effective tax rate tomorrow in retirement. This tax arbitrage will add thousands of dollars to your savings.

What types of tax-advantaged accounts are available? Start with a 401K. Then learn about Backdoor IRAs. Once those are funded, max out your Stealth IRA (HSA). Then read a book about taxes. Once you have a basic tax understanding, you realize that it’s more important to change your tax behavior throughout the year than it is to focus on taxes on April 15th. Planning your tax strategy for next year will likely save you thousands of dollars.

Keep in mind that you don’t have to learn the entire tax code. All you need to understand is the tax code that’s relevant to you. Luckily, that’s a significantly smaller part of the overall tax code. If you learn only a couple of things a year, but the time you’re five years out of law school you’ll be a tax master.

5. Poor Debt Management

It’s no secret that many lawyers graduate law school with substantial debt.

Often, poor debt management begins during undergraduate years and compounds during law school. I’ve been there. Law school debt is funny money and it’s easier to spend it than when you incurred your first $1,000 of credit card debt.

For new lawyers, the debt manifests in student loan debt, credit card debt, vacation debt and sometimes mortgage debt. The cumulative interest paid on these debt becomes a major financial drag. The truth: your debt works harder than you. It’s working 24/7 and 365 days a year generating interest that you have to pay back. The sooner you destroy it, the better.

Earlier in your career, you’re likely to be overwhelmed by many competing demands, such that it’s easy to put things on auto-pilot (like your student loans).

Big mistake.

If you’re planning on paying off your student loans (i.e. not pursuing student loan forgiveness through a plan like PSLF or IBR/REPAYE), refinancing your students loans is a no brainer. You’ll save tens of thousands of dollars.

Holding a $150,000 debt at 6.8% a year generates a staggering $10,200 in yearly interest. Cutting that rate to 3.4% will save you $5,100 a year. That’s a hard return to beat for a few hours of work.

I’ve negotiated cashback bonuses with the student loan refinancing companies, so that you can get a bonus and pay off your student loans even quicker.

6. Investing Too Aggressively or Too Conservatively

In 2008, hedge fund manager Ted Seides made a $1 million bet with Warren Buffett on whether the S&P index fund would beat a portfolio of hedge funds over the next ten years.

How’s the bet going?

Buffett crushed him.

Warren Buffett has consistently advised making monthly investments in a low-cost index fund. On page 20 of his 2013 letter to Berkshrire shareholders, he writes:

My advice to the trustee could not be more simple: Put 10% of the cash in short-term government bonds and 90% in a very low-cost S&P 500 index fund. (I suggest Vanguard’s.) I believe the trust’s long-term results from this policy will be superior to those attained by most investors – whether pension funds, institutions or individuals – who employ high-fee managers.

Because lawyers start careers later in life, there can be pressure to be overly aggressive with investments. This is foolhardy.

The greatest portfolio returns are achieved by matching the market returns through a low-cost index fund. It’s a counterintuitive proposal that the best return is to be as close as possible to average but it’s a proposal that has borne out time and time again.

As Vanguard founder Jack Bogle said, we are collectively the entire market anyway. Splitting the returns between you and the “helpers” just leads to lower returns for you.

This may be hard to accept. Lawyers might think that they are smarter than the general population, so it’s reasonable to think they can beat the market. But, financial professionals themselves cannot beat the market (as evidenced by Warren Buffett’s $1M bet). It’s too risky, too complicated and too much trouble to try and select winning investments. Take a billionaire’s advice. He probably knows what he’s talking about.

Plus, while you’re building wealth, the most important number is your savings rate anyway. Too many people are focused on chasing returns when they barely have any assets anyway.

7. Not Knowing How to Get Rich

It turns out that living below your means is the only way to build wealth. Building wealth has two variables: income and expenses.

Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery. – Wilkins Micawber from David Copperfield.

Most Biglaw associates have a fixed income. Make sure you qualify for the annual bonus, but otherwise, your salary is set and so there is not much you can do to increase income. However, you have great control over your expenses. Focus on increasing your savings rate. Related: See my sample 1st Year Biglaw Associate Budget.

8. Not Having a Written Financial Plan

An Investment Policy Statement (IPS) is a statement that defines general investment goals and objectives. It describes the strategies that used to meet these objectives and contains specific information on subjects such as asset allocation, tax rates and financial goals. Having an IPS provides the foundation for all future investment decisions made by an investor and serves as a guidepost for your financial goals.

Your IPS need not be complicated or lengthy. An IPS can easily be 2-3 pages. If you do not have a written policy, day-to-day events will influence your financial decisions. This leads to chasing short-term performance that will impact your long-term goals.

Your IPS will be a short document answering basic questions like:

  • Where are your financial assets located?
  • How much is in tax-advantaged accounts versus taxable accounts?
  • How much will you be contributing to these accounts?
  • What are your short-term and long-term financial goals?
  • What asset classes will you use to meet these goals?
  • What is your effective tax rate?
  • What type of insurance policies do you have and what type of coverage do they provide?

9. Expensive Investments

The price you pay for investment advice has a significant impact on your overall wealth.

Many mutual funds charge an expense ratio for investing in their fund. If your fund has an expense ratio of 1%, then that means that for every $10,000 you have invested, the fund will take $100 each year to cover its expenses (regardless of whether the fund makes or loses money during the year).

Rather than debiting this money from your account, the expense ratio is baked into the fund’s annual returns. If your fund returns 4% over the year, the real return was 5% minus the 1% expense ratio.

As you can see, a 1% expense ratio may not sound like much but can be quite expensive. In the above example, a 1% expense ratio represented 20% of your total gains for the year paid over to the fund manager!

10. Assuming You’ll Have More Money in the Future

Lawyer salaries are weird. Biglaw associates are promoted each calendar year automatically and receive a corresponding salary increase. There are no opportunities to negotiate the raises, yet you know in advance your salary for the next year.

It makes it easy to assume that you’ll always be making more money in the future, which allows you to artificially inflate your lifestyle now. It also makes it easy to put off saving.

Yet at the same time many Biglaw associates do not know if they will be employed at a firm within five years. Many lawyers leave during their 3rd or 4th year (my assumption is that the large salary increase from a third to fourth year associate is an attempt by firms to retain associates during those years).

The reality is that outside of law firms there are no guaranties for large salary increases each year. Therefore, it seems much better to assume your salary is fixed and simply bank the raises. This helps you grow into your lifestyle slowly.

After all, making even $100,000 straight out of school is a huge windfall. If you set your salary at the latest biglaw salary scale, you will be able to save a substantial sum of money as your salary increases.

11. Buying a House/Apartment

Many Biglaw associates live in high cost of living locations. Therefore, they may be less likely to buy an apartment or home than a doctor living in Kansas. Still, many associates focus on purchasing real estate early in their career. The prevailing notion that “you’re throwing your money away on rent” is prevalent. But it doesn’t always work out well.

It may be easy to make a profit on the sale of a home, but lose money overall. This is because the cost of owning a home is high and often not included in the calculation when someone casually mentions that they “bought a condo for $600,000 and sold it four years later for $700,000”.

Plus, investments tend to go up as well. The person who bought a condo for $300,000 twenty years ago and sold it for $1,200,000 sounds like a genius but probably would have done better in the stock market with index funds.

Also, consider the outcome if you had bought a condo in NYC in 2006 right before the Great Recession. A lot of lawyers lost a ton of money during that time. If you’re considering purchasing a home, make sure to run your numbers through The New York Times Rent vs Buy Calculator.

What do you think? Have you made any of these mistakes? I know I’ve made several. Let us know what you think in the comments.

Westlake Legal Group joshua_holt_authorphoto 11 Financial Mistakes Lawyers Make Investing

Joshua Holt A practicing private equity M&A lawyer and the creator of Biglaw Investor, Josh couldn’t find a place where lawyers were talking about money, so he created it himself. He spends 10 minutes a month on Personal Capital keeping track of his money and his latest deal involved purchasing office space on the EquityMultiple real estate crowdfunding platform.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Punish students for Nazi salutes? It’s not always easy — or a good idea, experts say

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Punish students for Nazi salutes? It's not always easy — or a good idea, experts say

The stepsister of Anne Frank met privately Thursday with Southern California high school students who were photographed gleefully giving Nazi salutes around a swastika formed by drinking cups during a party. (Mar 7) AP

GARDEN GROVE, Calif. – A little more than a month ago, videos surfaced showing high school students here giving the straight-arm Nazi salute while singing a German military song.

District leaders say they have already moved on.

“This is a very isolated incident,” said Lan Quoc Nguyen, the school board president in Garden Grove about the off-campus event involving Pacifica High School athletes. 

But should they have – and were their actions correct?

As acts of hate become more prevalent across the country, school officials are wrestling with how to respond. Sometimes they sanction participants. Sometimes they don’t. If they do discipline the students, rarely is it public. One problem, school officials around the country say, is that many of the incidents showing up on social media took place off-campus. 

The Garden Grove Unified School District chose to discipline the students in question, but it also sought to use the incident as a teaching moment for the whole campus. Students launched a “kindness campaign” focusing on mutual respect and compassion. School administrators met with leaders from The Anti-Defamation League, are adopting a “No Place for Hate” program and visited a Holocaust museum, said district spokeswoman Abby Broyles.

Teaching kids about the Holocaust: States require education about it as anti-Semitism, hate crimes surge

“I think we’re learning and healing from it,” said Jessica On, a Pacifica senior who is student body president. “It blindsided a lot of us.”

Videotaped images of Nazi emulation aren’t soon going to vanish, either in this multi-ethnic bedroom community in California’s Orange County or other schools around the country. The question is what to do about it.

Taking disciplinary action sends a direct message about whether hate will be tolerated, but at the same time raises questions of freedom of speech.

Another approach is to use such moments as teaching opportunities, a chance to show the pain caused by white nationalists

“Punishment doesn’t work,” said Maureen Costello, director of the Teaching Tolerance Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama, a civil rights group that tracks hate groups. “They feel they are martyrs to the cause. It will just make them more disaffected.”

Michele Gold, board chair of the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, is even more direct: “You teach them. You educate them. Punishment doesn’t do anything.”  

But there’s one issue on which all agree: White nationalist incidents must be dealt with directly. As the number of years since the Holocaust has grown, younger people have become less informed about its horrors and the hate-filled beliefs of Nazis, polls show – and can be more easily seduced by denial rhetoric online.

“Expressions of antisemitism and racism have a chilling and intimidating effect on a school environment even more than a workplace environment,” said Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino. Ignoring such acts “would have the effect of limiting school participation where (students of color or Jewish students) are perceived not only as not wanted, but also at risk.”

Free speech or hate speech?

The latest outrage over students’ emulating Nazis stems from the posting of a video snippet in August showing Pacifica students flashing the Nazi salute as at least one sings the German military song “Erika.” 

Garden Grove officials said the incident occurred in an off-campus banquet room before a larger school event in November. Administrators said they learned of it four months later, but details were initially sketchy.

The district said it would not disclose details about discipline, citing student privacy laws. California’s educational code lets superintendents or principals suspend students for threatening or carrying out an act of “hate violence,” although it’s unclear whether the district applied that standard to this case. 

The incident is part of a disturbing trend of rising white nationalism. The Southern Poverty Law Center found in its latest report that the number of neo-Nazi and other white supremacist chapters rose to 148 in 2018, up from 100 in 2017.

At the high school level, white supremacism often spreads from social media.

“We believe there are individuals who have a mission to create these kinds of situations and it’s intentional,” said Kenneth Inouye, president of the Orange County Human Relations Council, a nonprofit that develops violence prevention and other programs for schools and businesses. “But at the same time, we think a lot of young people think it’s acceptable. And, of course, it’s not.”

Inouye, however, acknowledges the speed at which some comments are mainstreaming. Behavior that used to be unacceptable five years ago is common to see on TV news, he said. It’s true across the country. 

Four students at SAIL High School in Tallahassee, Florida, were suspended in December for laying down to form a human swastika in a field on campus. The incident had been brought to the attention of Leon County Schools officials by a concerned parent at the school.

Ferreting out culprits isn’t always easy. Lori Mueller, superintendent of the Baraboo School District in Wisconsin, faced a similar situation when a photo surfaced late last year appearing to show about 60 male students giving the Nazi salute on the steps of the Sauk County Courthouse.

She said she fears the students didn’t have an understanding of what they were doing – that they meant no harm, but they created harm by their action. 

The photo was taken off-campus on a weekend. As a result, she said, the district was cautioned to respect the students’ First Amendment freedom of speech right. Administrators didn’t punish them. 

Other administrators face the same dilemmas as they consider possible punishment. 

In Noblesville, Indiana, a video surfaced of a high school student yelling profanities and hurling racial slurs while wrapped in a Nazi flag in January 2018. The school district called the incident “ugly,” and an official noted students can be disciplined for illegal conduct that occurs on or off school grounds. But a police lieutenant said he wasn’t aware of any laws having been broken. 

Whether it’s flags, salutes or other acts that show support for Nazis, all can be deemed free speech.

“Under basic First Amendment principles, a Nazi salute would generally be protected,” said Dave Snyder, executive director of the First Amendment Coalition, a nonprofit group dedicated to freedom of speech. But not necessarily on campus. “The important variable is whether it is at school at a school function,” Snyder said. And even then, it “depends on how you define ‘school function.’ ” 

Teaching to address ‘ignorance’

Rather than focus on punishment, some districts instead have chosen to see the incidents as a teachable moment.

They have tried to beef up teaching around the rise of the Nazi movement and of the Holocaust, in some cases with field trips or encounters with Holocaust survivors. The lessons have been driven by a sense that while millennials and Generation Z certainly know about Adolf Hitler, they may be largely unaware of the scope of his party’s beliefs.

Nazism included not only the genocide of Europe’s Jews, Slavic people and Roma, also known as Gypsies. Nazi hatred has extended also to people of color, LGBTQ individuals, people with disabilities and Jehovah’s Witnesses.

A 2018 survey of 1,350 American adults found that 22% of millennials either hadn’t heard of the Holocaust or weren’t sure they had heard of it, double the percentage among all U.S. adults. Nearly half of millennials – only 4 percentage points more than the general population – couldn’t name a single concentration camp, according to the survey by Shoen Consulting on behalf of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany. 

In Newport Beach, another Orange County city, photographs surfaced in March showing a group of young people believed to be students or graduates of Newport Harbor High School rendering the Nazi salute around drinking cups arranged in the form of a swastika.

A “schoolwide response rally” was ordered that included a presentation by a Holocaust survivor, a grandmother of one of the students, a rabbi and student speakers. The district created a Human Relations Task Force to educate students, parents and teachers to fight hate.

The Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust reached out to the school district as word of the incident spread.

Whether it’s the Nazi salute or the swastika, many of the students “really have no idea what the symbols represent, the true meaning behind it,” said CEO Beth Kean. “A lot of it, we believe, comes from this place of ignorance.”

She said students who come to the museum, such as those from Newport Harbor, are moved when they see concentration camp artifacts and hear from a survivor. It is a “very emotional visit,” she said.

“When we brought in the kids from Newport Harbor … they started crying seeing these objects,” she said.

As for the growth in the acts themselves around the country, she said she isn’t surprised.

“Each incident is another grim reminder of the times we find ourselves in,” Kean said.

Pacifica High School, site of the latest Orange County video incident, is situated near the Vietnamese-American community known as Little Saigon. The student body was 36% white, 31% Latino and 25% Asian in the 2017-2018 school year. About 1.4% of the students are black. 

Students said they viewed the video showing the Nazi salutes as a prank gone awry, but they acknowledged it needs to be taken seriously.

“It’s not a joke,” said Justine Terry, 15, a junior, because of the pain it brings.

It also brought disgrace to Pacifica. “I felt like they had to ruin it for the school,” she said.

Peter Truong, a dad waiting in the pick-up line earlier this school year, said he discussed the incident with his kids, a 17-year-old daughter and a 14-year-old son who attend Pacifica. Truong, 57, of Garden Grove, cautioned them to stay away from troublemakers.

“I just told them: ‘Try not to get involved with it –— stay away from those kinds of things,’ ” he said. 

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2019/10/03/nazi-salute-holocaust-first-amendment-white-supremacy-swastika-anti-semitic/2126489001/

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Attention Foreign Leaders Planning to Visit the White House: A Stoic Expression Is Key to Survival

WASHINGTON — An awkward handshake is really the least of their worries.

As President Trump continues to rage against impeachment — and the Democrats and whistle-blower he holds responsible for bringing it about — visiting world leaders are encountering a different kind of diplomatic mission.

It includes a welcome ceremony, a meeting with Mr. Trump and an invitation to sit stone-faced for an indeterminate amount of time on live television as the president accuses people of treason, lies and corruption. And sometimes the session is reprised a little later in a formal news conference.

That was what happened on Wednesday when President Sauli Niinisto of Finland became the latest foreign leader to strike a straight-lipped contrast to Mr. Trump as Mr. Trump defended himself and attacked his adversaries. Not once but twice.

As reporters crowded into the Oval Office, Mr. Trump sat beside his guest and accused Democratic lawmakers, including Representative Adam B. Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, of treason. Mr. Trump also suggested that the congressman was not fit to carry the secretary of state’s “‘blank’ strap,” as Mr. Niinisto looked on.

“He should resign from office in disgrace,” Mr. Trump said of Mr. Schiff, “and frankly they should look at him for treason.”

Adding to the awkward scene, a Finnish reporter seemed to pick up on the president’s anger, and asked Mr. Trump what he could learn from Finland, which has been rated the happiest country in the world.

“Finland is a happy country,” Mr. Trump said in response as he slapped Mr. Niinisto’s knee. “Finland is a happy country. He’s a happy leader, too.”

Mr. Niinisto nodded and seemingly moved to swat Mr. Trump’s hand away.

But the American president wasn’t done. And at a news conference later Wednesday, Mr. Niinisto was all but forced to again express some stolid Nordic enthusiasm.

“Mr. President, you have here a great democracy,” Mr. Niinisto told Mr. Trump in the East Room. “Keep it going on.”

Skipping the usual protocol with a visiting foreign leader is nothing new for Mr. Trump.

He has launched into meandering asides, including falsely claiming his father was born in Germany as Jens Stoltenberg, the NATO secretary general, looked on in April. In 2017, he seemed to forget to shake hands with Angela Merkel, the German chancellor.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 02dc-memo-02-articleLarge Attention Foreign Leaders Planning to Visit the White House: A Stoic Expression Is Key to Survival Zelensky, Volodymyr United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Sauli Niinisto, Morrison, Scott (1968- ) impeachment

President Trump last year with President Muhammadu Buhari of Nigeria.CreditTom Brenner/The New York Times

And, in front of Muhammadu Buhari, the president of Nigeria, Mr. Trump took questions concerning reports that he had called several African nations “shithole countries.”

“We didn’t discuss it because the president knows me,” Mr. Trump told reporters during his news conference with Mr. Buhari in April 2018, “and he knows where I’m coming from, and I appreciate that.”

Faced with the same question, the Nigerian president demurred, saying “the best thing for me is to keep quiet.”

Since the beginning of Mr. Trump’s presidency, at least some world leaders and their aides have made it a point to anticipate unexpected moments like these and plan ahead, according to a former official in the Washington diplomatic community who spoke on the condition of anonymity to not describe private planning.

The president’s approach has bent the norms of a protocol system put in place by Mr. Trump’s modern predecessors, according to Peter Selfridge, who served as the United States chief of protocol during the Obama administration.

“Obviously,” Mr. Selfridge said, “this president uses the press conference a little differently.”

President Barack Obama would regularly give his diplomatic guests warnings that a press availability might contain off-topic questions, according to a former Obama administration official who spoke on the condition of anonymity. But Mr. Obama would also appear visibly annoyed when asked questions not related to the purpose of the visit, especially if he was abroad.

When asked if Mr. Trump gave his visitors a similar heads-up, Stephanie Grisham, the White House press secretary, indicated that there was no need.

“I think foreign leaders are well aware that the U.S. press corps often has no desire to cover the foreign diplomacy taking place during these visits,” Ms. Grisham wrote in an email.

Indeed, Mr. Trump’s behavior often overshadows whatever diplomacy is taking place. White House officials told journalists before Mr. Niinisto’s visit that it would focus on economic cooperation and mutual security concerns between the two countries, which is a familiar refrain before any such visit.

But in the past two weeks, impeachment and the allegations against Mr. Trump and his relations with Ukraine have overshadowed diplomatic concerns.

That was more than just subtext to Mr. Trump’s meeting last week in New York with Volodymyr Zelensky, the Ukrainian president. Mr. Zelensky, who in a transcript of his phone call with Mr. Trump in July adeptly flattered the president, could barely mask his discomfort when the two met with reporters afterward.

“It’s a great pleasure to me to be here,” Mr. Zelensky said, “and it’s better to be on TV than by phone, I think.”

Mr. Trump with Prime Minister Scott Morrison of Australia last month at the White House.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

And two weeks ago, Scott Morrison, the prime minister of Australia, had little time to prepare when his state visit came just as the furor over the president and Ukraine began to unfold.

After Mr. Morrison’s welcome ceremony, Mr. Trump pulled him into the Oval Office and began deriding the whistle-blower’s complaint that details him repeatedly pressing the Ukrainian president to talk with aides interested in an investigation of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

Defending his behavior on the call, he turned to Mr. Morrison for support.

“I’ve had conversations with many leaders,” Mr. Trump said. “They’re always appropriate. I think Scott can tell you that.”

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Today on Fox News, Oct. 3, 2019

STAY TUNED:

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: “Bill Hemmer Breaks the ‘Fourth Wall'” – Fox News’ Bill Hemmer, co-anchor of “America’s Newsroom” joins the podcast to discuss what it’s like covering the biggest news in politics and the current impeachment inquiry against President Trump.

Also on the Rundown: The Trump Administration announced it will be ending the “catch and release” policy at the border as part of its immigration reform effort. Ken Cuccinelli,  acting director of the Citizenship and Immigration Services, explains what this means for immigrants who now try to cross the U.S. border illegally. Plus, commentary by Jimmy Failla, head writer for “Kennedy” on Fox Business.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Rich Lowry, editor of the National Review; Dana Perino, host of “The Daily Briefing”; Chris Wallace, host of “Fox News Sunday”; economist Steve Moore.

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Moderate Democrats Avoid Impeachment Backlash So Far

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. ― If moderate House Democrats are going to face a ferocious Republican backlash for supporting an impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump, it hasn’t started just yet.

At swing district town halls here and in the Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania, two first-term Democrats, Reps. Max Rose of New York and Susan Wild of Pennsylvania, saw their newfound support for an impeachment inquiry met mostly with applause. Both are the type of moderates that Republicans have sworn would pay a steep political price for backing impeachment. 

Their warm receptions show how rapidly the perceived politics of an impeachment inquiry are changing. Though Democrats long feared impeaching the president would gin up Trump’s fiercely conservative base voters and overshadow the party’s focus on health care and the economy, tightly crafted to appeal to swing voters. Instead, many Democratic operatives are increasingly seeing an impeachment inquiry as politically neutral. 

For instance, Priorities USA ― the largest Democratic super-PAC and a longtime advocate of the idea Democrats should remain focused on economic issues ― released polling this week aimed at showing “major warning signs for the GOP” on impeachment. The poll, conducted by Civis Analytics, found 45% of likely 2020 voters support impeachment, while 40% oppose it. (The poll is broadly in line with other recent public polling, though.) 

Westlake Legal Group 5d9572aa2200008c01dc8e91 Moderate Democrats Avoid Impeachment Backlash So Far

Andrew Kelly / Reuters Rep. Max Rose (D-N.Y.) meets the press following a town hall where he announced his support for an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. 

Rose, a military veteran and proud member of the centrist Blue Dog Coalition, unseated Republican Rep. Dan Donovan in November in a district that Trump won by nearly 10 percentage points in 2016. Until Wednesday evening, he had been one of just 11 House Democrats resisting coming out in favor of the impeachment inquiry. 

Speaking to over 100 constituents at the Jewish Community Center of Staten Island on Wednesday, however, Rose revealed that Trump administration officials’ obstructionist attitude toward investigations of alleged misconduct had pushed him over the edge.

“Instead of allaying our concerns, the president and his administration have poured gasoline on the fire. The American people have a right to know if their president used the power of his or her office to get a foreign power to interfere in our elections,” he said, eliciting applause from the audience.

On its face, Rose’s decision to embrace the impeachment inquiry in a district where Trump won by a larger margin than he did carries clear risk.

But Rose was facing Republican attacks for effectively supporting impeachment even before he had staked out a stance on the matter.

The Republican National Committee already began blasting him at the end of September as part of a $2 million ad campaign targeting Rose and other vulnerable House Democrats.

“Instead of working to create more jobs, Rose wants more hearings,” the narrator of the RNC ad says as images of more liberal Democrats, such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, appear on-screen. 

Nicole Malliotakis, the Republican New York Assemblywoman who has launched a bid to unseat Rose, nonetheless showcased how attacks against him could intensify now.

Rose, she tweeted, “tonight announced that he caved to Pelosi, AOC & socialist squad after saying he didn’t support impeachment.”

Speaking to reporters after the town hall, Rose, employing the sort of bravado native to his corner of New York, insisted that the attacks from Malliotakis and other Republicans did not frighten him.

“I am not concerned at all by [House Republicans’ campaign arm] or anyone that wants to try and challenge me because they already tried once, and we kicked their ass,” he boasted, referring to his 2018 victory. “And guess what: That’s exactly what is going to happen again. They have been absolute jokes. They will continue to be jokes. And I look forward to beating them by an incredible margin.”

 At the same time, Rose went out of his way during the town hall to distance himself from Ocasio-Cortez and other left-leaning Democrats whom Republicans have turned into a political cudgel against moderates like Rose. 

“On the one hand, we have Democrats who, before they have sworn the oath of office, want to impeach the president of the United States,” he said, making what appeared to be a veiled reference to comments by Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, a member of the group of progressive congresswomen known as “the Squad.” “On the other side, though, we have Republicans who swore the same oath that I did, but suddenly they become deaf, mute and blind whenever allegations against the president come up. That’s an even greater threat to our democracy.”

(Wild, similarly, used a voter’s question to note she had worked to be a “sounding board and educator” after Omar and Tlaib made comments some considered anti-Semitic.)

On the campus of Muhlenberg College, Wild faced questions about improving public education, “Medicare for All” and climate change before a voter asked why she was more focused on impeachment than on improving schools in the area. 

“It’s a mistake to think that those of us in Washington are spending all of our time on impeachment,” she told the crowd of roughly 250 people.

The audience at the event was mostly on the side of Wild, who won her seat in this manufacturing-heavy area by 10 percentage points in 2018. Questioners who pressed her on impeachment were met with boos, while a voter who suggested House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff jail uncooperative Trump officials received applause. Before the event, Wild told reporters that phone calls to her office were running 85% in favor of impeachment or an impeachment inquiry. 

Westlake Legal Group 5d9574152200005c01dc8f0a Moderate Democrats Avoid Impeachment Backlash So Far

Bill Clark via Getty Images Rep. Susan Wild talks with constituents following a town hall meeting at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. The crowd was largely supportive of her decision to back an impeachment inquiry.

Wild, who had opposed an impeachment inquiry until revelations about Trump pressuring Ukranian President Volodymyr Zelensky to reopen an investigation into Vice President Joe Biden’s son, said she felt “the administration left us no choice” but to back impeachment. And, she said, voters were behind them.

“I think the issue of the Ukraine phone call is sufficiently troubling. And we’ve seen what the polls have done this week,” she told reporters, later adding that she wanted to keep the inquiry focused narrowly on Ukraine and avoid re-litigating special counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russian interference in the 2016 election. “This was a single, discrete event that was very easy for people to understand.” 

Wild’s focus on polling is telling. Many Democrats have been privately surprised at how well the issue polls after months of surveys showing a majority of American voters opposed to any effort to remove Trump from office. But polling on a fast-developing issue is tricky, and impeachment could still turn sour for Democrats. Republicans boast that the issue will fire up their base, and Trump’s reelection campaign said it raised more than $15 million in the days after Democrats began more solid moves toward impeachment proceedings. 

Even with an impeachment inquiry looming, Rose and Wild were happy to highlight their work on other issues ― and their constituencies were happy to discuss them.

Rose, whose town hall was devoted to transportation and commuter concerns, relished getting into the policy details on expanding bus and ferry routes. He touted his collaboration with Republican lawmakers on efforts to protect Staten Island commuters from toll hikes on the Verrazzano Bridge into Brooklyn. And he even welcomed the unlikely prospect of a federal, bipartisan infrastructure bill.

“Nothing, nothing at all ― impeachment or otherwise ― will distract … me from my work fighting for you,” he declared.

Even conservatives at Wild’s town hall weren’t focused on impeachment, instead asking what she was doing to help Trump combat China and about Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server while secretary of state. Several liberal questioners focused on climate change, and others focused on education. Wild said the high cost of prescription drugs was the “number one issue” in the district.

“I believe that I will get reelected on the basis of the work that I’ve done for the district and not on how this impeachment issue goes one way or another,” she told reporters.

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Trump’s video taken off Twitter after band Nickelback complains

Westlake Legal Group iFjhbkDEc1quCzPu6_y1CPBGRcf4T9pOXwyYEMyVejQ Trump's video taken off Twitter after band Nickelback complains r/politics

Twitter has repeatedly complained that they can not enforce their own rules since it would mean banning a LOT of politicians. This would mean more problems from them, they would take part in the political process…. since ALL OF THEM are right wing. So, they can only enact the most clear cases, copyright being pretty much the only one… When POTUS spews violent rhetoric, Twitter can’t do ANYTHING. This allows his supporters also to use language and spread content that violates twitter rules.

One side in this fight, fights dirty. Same is with Youtube: they have had to implement almost totalitarian, blind rule that demonetizes pretty much all content that for ex revisionist also share. To block holocaust denialism being spread by their own algorithms, they also demonetize channels that speak about the actual history.

So. stop pointing the finger solely on social media companies. They are often totally helpless. Note: i do not say they are perfect, far from it. Just that not EVERYTHING is completely their fault, it is us, the users that are the biggest problem. Pretty much all of the social media sites have rules that can stop this but they can’t do it. They have to invent rules that are “fair and balanced” and treats both sides the same. One side just lies constantly and that causes a lot of collateral damage.

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