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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 258)

‘The Majority’ of Iowa Caucus Results Will Be Released This Afternoon: Live Updates

Video

transcript

‘A Complete Mess’: Still No Results from Iowa Caucus

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.

“Anybody with an S to Z last name —” “L to R! L to R!” “Anybody want a sign?” “Bernie! Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” [whistle] “Seven, eight —” “Forty!” “Fifty-five, 56, 57, 58, 59 —” “There is no name on it.” “I need these guys right here. I need his name and his number.” “Could you verify your last name and address for me?” “O.K., I’m going to write Joe Biden for first preference. That’s your first preference, correct?” “We’re counting all of ours.” “Yeah, we’re just making sure everything’s signed.” “O.K., good.” “So we’re going to need each representative to sign off on here.” “So we don’t know all the results, but we know by the time it’s all said and done, Iowa, you have shocked the nation. By all indications, we are going on to New Hampshire victorious.” “And when those results are announced, I have a good feeling we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa.” “Thank you so much. So listen, it is too close to call. So I’m just going to tell you what I do know.” “You won!” “We don’t know exactly what it is yet, but we feel good about where we are.”

Westlake Legal Group 04primary-livebriefing-top2-videoSixteenByNine3000 ‘The Majority’ of Iowa Caucus Results Will Be Released This Afternoon: Live Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.CreditCredit…Mark Makela for The New York Times

  • The Iowa Democratic Party will begin releasing results from the caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time. The party blamed a “coding issue” in the app used to tabulate results.

  • A frustrated pack of Democratic presidential candidates sought to turn the mood of chaos to their own advantage Tuesday morning as they barreled toward the next nominating contest, in New Hampshire. And Michael R. Bloomberg, the multibillionaire former New York City mayor, is trying to capitalize by doubling his spending on television commercials.

  • Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., among others, have events in New Hampshire today.

  • Unexplained inconsistencies in results, heated conference calls and firm denials of hacking: Read more about how the Iowa caucuses melted down.

Here’s what you need to know:

The Iowa Democratic Party will begin to release results from Monday’s caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, its chairman, Troy Price, told the Democratic campaigns in a conference call.

Mr. Price told the campaigns that “the majority” of results the party had in hand would be made public later Tuesday, but he dodged questions from the campaigns about how much would be released and when final totals would become available.

“I don’t want to put a number on it but I can tell you it’s going to be more than 50 percent,” he said.

Officials on the call said the party was trying to verify results using paper records collected from each precinct and that it had dispatched staff members to collect them around the state.

The call quickly turned combative, as campaign representatives pressed the party officials about when results would be released and why it was taking so long.

“What do you have to back up these results?” one campaign representative asked.

“We have always said we have a paper trail in the process,” Mr. Price replied. “This is what we would have done on caucus night,” he added, of releasing verified results, as they have them.

Jeff Weaver, a senior aide to Mr. Sanders, praised the officials on the call and noted, “You do have a paper trail.” He warned rival campaigns against “discrediting the party,” a veiled reference to the Biden campaign, which had objected earlier in the call to the process.

“I do want to urge people in the interest of not discrediting the party, that folks who are just trying to delay the return of this because of their relative positioning in the results, last night, I think that’s a bit disingenuous,” Mr. Weaver said. “Those results should be rolled out as we get them.” But how long the process could take was not answered.

“Today, tomorrow, the next day, a week, a month?” said Jesse Harris, a senior adviser to Mr. Biden in Iowa, pressing the party. “We’re continuing to work through our process and just as soon as we can,” Mr. Price replied.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168332433_f6ea3ec3-e5ae-4e34-b44e-21fcd13f97e2-articleLarge ‘The Majority’ of Iowa Caucus Results Will Be Released This Afternoon: Live Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Mr. Bloomberg at a campaign event in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday.Credit…Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Mr. Bloomberg’s presidential campaign moved on Tuesday to exploit the chaotic outcome of the Iowa caucuses, authorizing his campaign team to double his spending on television commercials in every market where he is currently advertising and expand his campaign’s field staff to more than two thousand people, strategists involved in the conversations said.

The Bloomberg campaign has been trying to chart an unprecedented route to the Democratic nomination, skipping the first four contests in February but aggressively contesting the array of larger states that begin voting in March. From the outset, Mr. Bloomberg’s advisers believed the strategy would only have a chance of working if another moderate candidate — most likely former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — failed to emerge from February with a decisive upper hand in the race.

In an interview on Monday in Compton, Calif., Mr. Bloomberg was unusually blunt about his campaign spending strategy and his intent to seek advantages while his rivals toiled in the four early states, which have relatively few delegates needed to win the nomination.

“It’s much more efficient to go to the big states, to go to the swing states,” Mr. Bloomberg said. “The others chose to compete in the first four. And nobody makes them do it, they wanted to do it. I think part of it is because the conventional wisdom is ‘Oh you can’t possibly win without them.’”

Later, he added: “Those are old rules.”

Mr. Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor whose campaign is fueled by a multibillion-dollar personal fortune, conferred with advisers on Tuesday morning about the muddled results in Iowa. Encouraged by the murky outcome, Mr. Bloomberg authorized his campaign team to undertake the expansion in advertising and staff.

His campaign also released a new advertisement scheduled to be aired nationally Tuesday night, when President Trump is set to deliver his State of the Union address. The spot focuses on criticism of Mr. Trump, warning of a nation “divided by an angry, out-of-control president” and a White House “beset by lies, chaos and corruption.”

The advertisement tries to portray Mr. Bloomberg as the candidate who is best equipped to beat Mr. Trump in November.

The Iowa Democratic Party said Tuesday that there were delays in announcing the results from the precincts because the new app that it planned to use for its caucus results reported only partial data.

“As part of our investigation, we determined with certainty that the underlying data collected via the app was sound,” Mr. Price said. “While the app was recording data accurately, it was reporting out only partial data. We have determined that this was due to a coding issue in the reporting system. This issue was identified and fixed.”

Sean Bagniewski had seen the problems coming.

It wasn’t so much that the new app that the Iowa Democratic Party had planned to use to report its caucus results didn’t work. It was that people were struggling to even log in or download it in the first place. After all, there had never been any app-specific training for this many precinct chairs.

So last Thursday Mr. Bagniewski, the chairman of the Democratic Party in Polk County, Iowa’s most populous, decided to scrap the app entirely, instructing his precinct chairs to simply call in the caucus results as they had always done.

The only problem was, when the time came during Monday’s caucuses, those precinct chairs could not connect with party leaders via phone. Mr. Bagniewski instructed his executive director to take pictures of the results with her smartphone and drive over to the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters to deliver them in person. She was turned away without explanation, he said.

It was a surreal opening act for the 2020 campaign that included unexplained “inconsistencies” in results that were not released to the public, heated conference calls with campaigns that were hung up on by the state party, firm denials of any kind of hacking and a presidential primary left in a strange state of almost suspended animation.

“A systemwide disaster,” said Derek Eadon, a former Iowa Democratic Party chairman.

Amid the chaos and confusion, there were conflicting candidate speeches declaring various degrees of victory, as Mr. Sanders’s campaign released its own set of favorable partial results, and multiple campaigns hoped that the mess would not lessen the eventual impact of what they said appeared to be a disappointing first test for Mr. Biden.

DES MOINES — In a brief question-and-answer session with reporters aboard his charter plane before it took off for New Hampshire, Mr. Sanders denounced the Iowa Democratic Party for not being able to report caucus results as his campaign released internal numbers that showed him winning the state on all metrics.

“I think we should all be disappointed in the inability of the party to come up with timely results,” he said. “But we are not casting aspersions on the votes that are being counted.”

“This is not a good thing,” he added. “This is not a good night for democracy.”

At the same time, his campaign released its internal results, with 60 percent of precincts counted, that it said showed Mr. Sanders winning the first head count, with 29.08 percent, followed by Mr. Buttigieg with 21.63 percent, Ms. Warren with 19.51 percent, Ms. Klobuchar with 12.27 percent and Mr. Biden with 12.04 percent.

After realignment, his campaign said, Mr. Sanders had 29.4 percent, followed by Mr. Buttigieg at 24.87 percent, Ms. Warren at 20.65 percent, Mr. Biden at 12.92 percent and Ms. Klobuchar at 11.18 percent.

Still, Mr. Sanders stopped short of saying he had won, saying only that based on that information, “We’re in pretty good shape.”

“We’re not declaring victory,” he said.

Asked what his reaction was to Mr. Buttigieg declaring victory on Monday night, before any results were reported, Mr. Sanders was dismissive.

“I don’t know how anybody declares victory before you have official statement as to election results,” he said.

Mr. Sanders also said attempts by the Biden campaign to discredit the results were “unfair.”

KEENE, N.H. — Ms. Warren of Massachusetts called on the Iowa Democratic Party to “get it together,” saying the reporting errors that upended caucus results threatened to damage trust in the Democratic process.

Speaking to reporters after an event in Keene, her first in New Hampshire after landing at 4 a.m., Ms. Warren said reports that the Iowa Democratic Party planned to release half of the caucus results later this afternoon made little sense.

“I just don’t understand what that means to release half of the data,” she said. “So, I think they ought to get it together and release all of the data.”

Ms. Warren told the audience that the results showed a close race atop the Iowa field between her, Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg. Her campaign has sought to frame the caucus results — however unclear — as a bad night for Mr. Biden.

Asked if voters will be able to trust results, Ms. Warren replied, “I hope they’ll be able to.” At the same time, her campaign sent an email to supporters framing the results as a good night for them amid a tumultuous time for democracy.

“I know there are reasons to feel frustrated and discouraged,” it read. “Yesterday we had a bumpy democratic process. Tonight a lawless president will deliver his State of the Union. Tomorrow Republicans in the Senate will likely declare that their loyalty is to Donald Trump rather than our Constitution and the rule of law.”

As Democrats struggled to count the votes in the opening presidential nominating contest, the one person clearly rejoicing was the man they hope to evict from the White House.

“The Democrat Caucus is an unmitigated disaster,” President Trump wrote on Twitter on Tuesday morning as the Iowa results remained unknown. “Nothing works, just like they ran the Country. Remember the 5 Billion Dollar Obamacare Website, that should have cost 2% of that. The only person that can claim a very big victory in Iowa last night is ‘Trump.’”

But Mr. Trump, who won the Republican caucuses in Iowa handily, rejected suggestions that the breakdown in counting should cause the state to lose its status as the first stop in the presidential nomination process.

“It is not the fault of Iowa, it is the Do Nothing Democrats fault,” he wrote. “As long as I am President, Iowa will stay where it is. Important tradition!”

Read more here.

The app that the Iowa Democratic Party commissioned to tabulate and report results from the caucuses was not properly tested at a statewide scale, said people who were briefed on the app by the state party.

The party decided to use the app only after another proposal for reporting votes — which entailed having caucus participants call in their votes over the phone — was abandoned, on the advice of Democratic National Committee officials, according to David Jefferson, a board member of Verified Voting, a nonpartisan election integrity organization.

The app was built by Shadow Inc., a for-profit technology company that is also used by the Nevada Democratic Party, the next state to hold a caucus, as well as by multiple presidential campaigns.

The secrecy around the app this year came from the Iowa Democratic Party, which asked that even its name be withheld from the public. According to a person familiar with the app, its creators had repeatedly questioned the need to keep it secret, especially from the Iowa precincts where it would be used.

That person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he had agreed not to discuss details of the app, said that there were concerns that the app would malfunction in areas with poor connectivity, or because of high bandwidth use, such as when many people tried to use it at the same time.

NASHUA, N.H. — Fresh off an overnight flight from Des Moines, Mr. Buttigieg met the mayor of Nashua, Jim Donchess, for a coffee at the Riverwalk Café downtown.

“You did a great job last night on your speech,” Mr. Donchess said, as he greeted Mr. Buttigieg on a sidewalk outside of the coffee shop.

“Thanks,” Mr. Buttigieg said. “Felt good.”

As the two men walked down the sidewalk, Mr. Buttigieg told the Nashua mayor that it was “frustrating” to not have good results, but said “you can’t deny” that he had had a strong night.

Mr. Donchess, a four-term mayor, announced his endorsement of Mr. Buttigieg this morning, though said he had been considering it for some time and was not influenced by the reports of a strong finish in Iowa.

Mr. Buttigieg lingered in the coffee shop for about 10 minutes, sitting down with three voters to talk about local issues. He ignored questions from reporters about whether his speech last night in Iowa, seemingly declaring victory absent any official results, was premature.

Voters here — both those who said they were undecided and those who said they would vote for Mr. Buttigieg — offered a collective shrug at the former mayor’s decision to declare victory in the absence of any official results.

Asked if it was appropriate for Mr. Buttigieg to have suggested he had won, Ben Gayman, an undecided voter from Manchester, did not hesitate.

“Of course,” he said. “They all did.”

A lot of reasons contributed to Monday night’s events, chiefly a breakdown of the process by which caucus leaders were supposed to report results to the Iowa Democratic Party.

But one factor was baked into that process from almost the moment the caucuses ended four years ago.

Historically, the party had focused on highlighting only one caucus result: the number of delegates each candidate had earned for the state convention. The winner of the Iowa caucuses was the person who earned the most state delegates, which translate into national delegates, which determine the nomination. This year, however, the state party chose to release four results from the caucuses.

That’s because in 2016, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton edged out Mr. Sanders in the state delegate count by a quarter of a percentage point, earning roughly 700 to Mr. Sanders’s 697. That meant 23 national delegates for Mrs. Clinton and 21 for Mr. Sanders — an inconsequential difference between the two rivals.

Mr. Sanders’s 2016 campaign fought for an audit in Iowa — comparing the reported results with the papers on which caucus leaders had recorded voters’ preferences — and accused the state Democratic Party of a lack of transparency.

Largely because of Mr. Sanders’s objections, the party decided to release additional numbers in 2020 that it had always logged but never made public: the number of supporters each candidate had in the first round of voting and the number he or she had in the second round, after nonviable candidates were eliminated and caucusgoers realigned.

The idea was that all this data would provide a fuller picture of each candidate’s strength. But it also made reporting the results more complicated. Read more here.

In a joint statement released Tuesday morning, Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst of Iowa and the state’s governor, Kim Reynolds, defended the Iowa caucuses, saying they were confident the results would ultimately be tallied.

“Iowa’s unique role encourages a grass-roots nominating process that empowers everyday Americans, not Washington insiders or powerful billionaires,” they said. “The face-to-face retail politics nature of Iowa’s caucus system also encourages dialogue between candidates and voters that makes our presidential candidates accountable for the positions they take and the records they hold.”

They also defended the state’s position at the start of the nominating calendar.

“Iowa’s large population of independent voters and its practice of careful deliberation contributes greatly to the national presidential primary and makes it the ideal state to kick off the nominating process,” they said. “Iowans and all Americans should know we have complete confidence that every last vote will be counted and every last voice will be heard.”

Reporting was contributed by Maggie Astor, Peter Baker, Alexander Burns, Nick Corasaniti, Sydney Ember, Reid J. Epstein, Sheera Frenkel, Shane Goldmacher, Christine Hauser, Astead W. Herndon, Nicole Perlroth, Jonathan Martin, Jennifer Medina and Matt Stevens.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

3 Big Questions After The Iowa Results Meltdown

Westlake Legal Group ap_20035152249783-cc6c7f0a317da1f01dcb9662ccb2e15a5de1eb11-s1100-c15 3 Big Questions After The Iowa Results Meltdown

People wait for results at a caucus night campaign rally for former Vice President Joe Biden on Monday in Des Moines, Iowa. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Westlake Legal Group  3 Big Questions After The Iowa Results Meltdown

People wait for results at a caucus night campaign rally for former Vice President Joe Biden on Monday in Des Moines, Iowa.

John Locher/AP

Yes, it really happened. After millions of dollars spent by the candidates, Iowa’s caucuses were a bust. A delay in results has stalled the Democratic presidential race.

Now, the country is (so far) left with no winner from the contest that was supposed to kick off the Democratic presidential contest and help determine which candidate will take on President Trump this fall.

The Iowa Democratic Party tried out an app that was supposed to deliver fast results, but it failed. Luckily, the party had instituted paper backups. The state party says it expects some results at some point Tuesday, but the delay has real consequences and raises some major questions:

What might this mean for the Democratic presidential campaign?

First of all, the winner is not yet known and, above all, this debacle robbed whomever that is of a chance to have their moment in the sun.

The campaigns worked so hard in this state because it has been predictive of who has become the Democratic nominee — the last four and seven of last nine have gone on to be the party’s standard-bearer over the past 40 years.

Iowa, being first, also serves to winnow the field and help elevate front-runners. That’s especially important in a year like this with a record number of candidates running. Whoever actually won was stripped of the potential momentum they were banking on to catapult them into New Hampshire and beyond.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg declared measures of victory Monday night. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts is saying she finished in the top three with Sanders and Buttigieg — and her campaign is pointedly saying that former Vice President Joe Biden finished a “distant fourth.”

At this point, it is all spin. But imagine, for example, if on caucus night, it was known in prime time that Sanders and Buttigieg were the top two. And imagine what that would mean for Biden’s candidacy — and fundraising. Eventually, the result will be known, though, and what will that mean for Biden’s hopes next week in New Hampshire?

Sen. Amy Klobuchar used the lack of results as a reason to continue on to New Hampshire. What would have happened if she finished fifth with that result known on caucus night? Now, the moderates in the race may continue to split the vote for longer than they would have liked.

What the delayed result did was stall the race — after a year of time, money and effort expended.

What does this mean for Iowa’s first-in-the-nation status?

It may very well be Bye-owa. Traditions are hard to change, but this mess is going to likely mean a fresh push for removing Iowa from being first.

The caucuses have already come under fire for being too complicated, too inaccessible and too white.

And this is not the first time there have been complications — with both parties. As it is, the state Democratic Party was going to make matters more confusing with three separate results.

Quirky and quaint may have given way to clunky and antiquated, especially in the 21st century with voters coming of age who look at this system and think it makes no sense.

There have been other efforts to change the calendar in the past and entrenched interests have stopped it. But before 2024, after what happened Monday night, the Democratic Party is going to have to have a real conversation and debate about how to reinvent this process.

What does this mean for faith in the vote?

Democracy is messy. And states want to go to faster, more modern ways of voting. But, if 2016 foreign interference efforts weren’t enough, the Iowa delay is a real warning shot against moving too soon, too fast.

At least Iowa instituted a paper backup system this year. Imagine the level of disaster this would have been had it not.

Several places in the country are looking to use smartphones for voting with no paper backup. Every state and municipality has to be rethinking those plans today.

What’s more, the Iowa Democratic Party has not been transparent about the maker of the app. And, you know what a lack of transparency breeds? Conspiracy theories. That started happening immediately Monday night (egged on by the Trump campaign).

“A Republic if we can keep it,” the founders warned.

All that holds democracies together is the trust in elections. If that’s lost, good luck keeping the Republic.

Another lesson for November’s general election — Americans have to realize that vote counting takes awhile. News networks do a great job modeling and projecting elections. But those aren’t final votes, and when a result is close, it’s going to take awhile.

Remember those California congressional districts in 2018. Remember that Hillary Clinton’s popular vote lead ballooned into the millions after midnight and the election of President Trump in 2016.

But in an age juxtaposed by the public’s distrust and its simultaneous social media need for speed, can Americans find the will power to slow down, be judicious, wait and be patient? It seems unlikely.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iowa Caucus: Live Results and Updates

Video

transcript

‘A Complete Mess’: Still No Results from Iowa Caucus

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.

“Anybody with an S to Z last name —” “L to R! L to R!” “Anybody want a sign?” “Bernie! Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” [whistle] “Seven, eight —” “Forty!” “Fifty-five, 56, 57, 58, 59 —” “There is no name on it.” “I need these guys right here. I need his name and his number.” “Could you verify your last name and address for me?” “O.K., I’m going to write Joe Biden for first preference. That’s your first preference, correct?” “We’re counting all of ours.” “Yeah, we’re just making sure everything’s signed.” “O.K., good.” “So we’re going to need each representative to sign off on here.” “So we don’t know all the results, but we know by the time it’s all said and done, Iowa, you have shocked the nation. By all indications, we are going on to New Hampshire victorious.” “And when those results are announced, I have a good feeling we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa.” “Thank you so much. So listen, it is too close to call. So I’m just going to tell you what I do know.” “You won!” “We don’t know exactly what it is yet, but we feel good about where we are.”

Westlake Legal Group 04primary-livebriefing-top2-videoSixteenByNine3000 Iowa Caucus: Live Results and Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Democratic candidates tried to spin the chaotic situation at the Iowa caucuses, and campaigned in New Hampshire as they awaited the results.CreditCredit…Mark Makela for The New York Times

  • The Iowa Democratic Party will begin releasing results from the caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time. The party blamed a “coding issue” in the app used to tabulate results.

  • A frustrated pack of Democratic presidential candidates sought to turn the mood of chaos to their own advantage Tuesday morning as they barreled toward the next nominating contest, in New Hampshire. And Michael R. Bloomberg, the multibillionaire former New York City mayor, is trying to capitalize by doubling his spending on television commercials.

  • Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, and Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., among others, have events in New Hampshire today.

  • Unexplained inconsistencies in results, heated conference calls and firm denials of hacking: Read more about how the Iowa caucuses melted down.

Here’s what you need to know:

The Iowa Democratic Party will begin to release results from Monday’s caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, its chairman, Troy Price, told the Democratic campaigns in a conference call.

Mr. Price told the campaigns that “the majority” of results the party had in hand would be made public later Tuesday, but he dodged questions from the campaigns about how much would be released and when final totals would become available.

“I don’t want to put a number on it but I can tell you it’s going to be more than 50 percent,” he said.

Officials on the call said the party was trying to verify results using paper records collected from each precinct and that it had dispatched staff members to collect them around the state.

The call quickly turned combative, as campaign representatives pressed the party officials about when results would be released and why it was taking so long.

“What do you have to back up these results?” one campaign representative asked.

“We have always said we have a paper trail in the process,” Mr. Price replied. “This is what we would have done on caucus night,” he added, of releasing verified results, as they have them.

Jeff Weaver, a senior aide to Mr. Sanders, praised the officials on the call and noted, “You do have a paper trail.” He warned rival campaigns against “discrediting the party,” a veiled reference to the Biden campaign, which had objected earlier in the call to the process.

“I do want to urge people in the interest of not discrediting the party, that folks who are just trying to delay the return of this because of their relative positioning in the results, last night, I think that’s a bit disingenuous,” Mr. Weaver said. “Those results should be rolled out as we get them.” But how long the process could take was not answered.

“Today, tomorrow, the next day, a week, a month?” said Jesse Harris, a senior adviser to Mr. Biden in Iowa, pressing the party. “We’re continuing to work through our process and just as soon as we can,” Mr. Price replied.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_168332433_f6ea3ec3-e5ae-4e34-b44e-21fcd13f97e2-articleLarge Iowa Caucus: Live Results and Updates Warren, Elizabeth Presidential Election of 2020 Manchester (NH) Iowa Democratic Party Buttigieg, Pete (1982- )

Mr. Bloomberg at a campaign event in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday.Credit…Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Michael R. Bloomberg’s presidential campaign moved on Tuesday to exploit the chaotic outcome of the Iowa caucuses, authorizing his campaign team to double his spending on television commercials in every market where he is currently advertising and expand his campaign’s field staff to more than two thousand people, strategists involved in the conversations said.

The Bloomberg campaign has been trying to chart an unprecedented route to the Democratic nomination, skipping the first four contests in February but aggressively contesting the array of larger states that begin voting in March. From the outset, Mr. Bloomberg’s advisers believed the strategy would only have a chance of working if another moderate candidate — most likely former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. — failed to emerge from February with a decisive upper hand in the race.

In an interview on Monday in Compton, Calif., Mr. Bloomberg was unusually blunt about his campaign spending strategy and his intent to seek advantages while his rivals toiled in the four early states, which have relatively few delegates needed to win the nomination.

“It’s much more efficient to go to the big states, to go to the swing states,” Mr. Bloomberg said. “The others chose to compete in the first four. And nobody makes them do it, they wanted to do it. I think part of it is because the conventional wisdom is ‘Oh you can’t possibly win without them.’”

Later, he added: “Those are old rules.”

Mr. Bloomberg, the former New York City mayor whose campaign is fueled by a multibillion-dollar personal fortune, conferred with advisers on Tuesday morning about the muddled results in Iowa. Encouraged by the murky outcome, Mr. Bloomberg authorized his campaign team to undertake the expansion in advertising and staff.

His campaign also released a new advertisement scheduled to be aired nationally Tuesday night, when President Trump is set to deliver his State of the Union address. The spot focuses on criticism of Mr. Trump, warning of a nation “divided by an angry, out-of-control president” and a White House “beset by lies, chaos and corruption.”

The advertisement tries to portray Mr. Bloomberg as the candidate who is best equipped to beat Mr. Trump in November.

The Iowa Democratic Party said Tuesday that there were delays in announcing the results from the precincts because the new app that it planned to use for its caucus results reported only partial data.

“As part of our investigation, we determined with certainty that the underlying data collected via the app was sound,” Mr. Price said. “While the app was recording data accurately, it was reporting out only partial data. We have determined that this was due to a coding issue in the reporting system. This issue was identified and fixed.”

Sean Bagniewski had seen the problems coming.

It wasn’t so much that the new app that the Iowa Democratic Party had planned to use to report its caucus results didn’t work. It was that people were struggling to even log in or download it in the first place. After all, there had never been any app-specific training for this many precinct chairs.

So last Thursday Mr. Bagniewski, the chairman of the Democratic Party in Polk County, Iowa’s most populous, decided to scrap the app entirely, instructing his precinct chairs to simply call in the caucus results as they had always done.

The only problem was, when the time came during Monday’s caucuses, those precinct chairs could not connect with party leaders via phone. Mr. Bagniewski instructed his executive director to take pictures of the results with her smartphone and drive over to the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters to deliver them in person. She was turned away without explanation, he said.

It was a surreal opening act for the 2020 campaign that included unexplained “inconsistencies” in results that were not released to the public, heated conference calls with campaigns that were hung up on by the state party, firm denials of any kind of hacking and a presidential primary left in a strange state of almost suspended animation.

“A systemwide disaster,” said Derek Eadon, a former Iowa Democratic Party chairman.

Amid the chaos and confusion, there were conflicting candidate speeches declaring various degrees of victory, as Mr. Sanders’s campaign released its own set of favorable partial results, and multiple campaigns hoped that the mess would not lessen the eventual impact of what they said appeared to be a disappointing first test for Mr. Biden.

KEENE, N.H. — Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts called on the Iowa Democratic Party to “get it together,” saying the reporting errors that upended caucus results threatened to damage trust in the Democratic process.

Speaking to reporters after an event in Keene, her first in New Hampshire after landing at 4 a.m., Ms. Warren said reports that the Iowa Democratic Party planned to release half of the caucus results later this afternoon made little sense.

“I just don’t understand what that means to release half of the data,” she said. “So, I think they ought to get it together and release all of the data.”

Ms. Warren told the audience that the results showed a close race atop the Iowa field between her, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind. Her campaign has sought to frame the caucus results — however unclear — as a bad night for former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

Asked if voters will be able to trust results, Ms. Warren replied, “I hope they’ll be able to.” At the same time, her campaign sent an email to supporters framing the results as a good night for them amid a tumultuous time for democracy.

“I know there are reasons to feel frustrated and discouraged,” it read. “Yesterday we had a bumpy democratic process. Tonight a lawless president will deliver his State of the Union. Tomorrow Republicans in the Senate will likely declare that their loyalty is to Donald Trump rather than our Constitution and the rule of law.”

The Iowa Democratic Party changed its rules for this year to accommodate concerns that the caucus process was not transparent. But instead of making things clearer, the new process only muddled matters, leaving a procession of candidates to hustle onstage Monday night before any official outcome could alter the mood.

Mr. Sanders predicted that he would “be doing very, very well” whenever Iowa’s tale was told. Ms. Warren vowed that her campaign was “built for the long haul.” Ms. Klobuchar claimed to “punching above our weight.”

“We’re going to walk out of here with our share of delegates,” Mr. Biden told supporters, as rival campaigns suggested that their data showed the long-assumed front-runner underperforming. “We feel good about where we are.”

But Mr. Buttigieg was almost certainly boldest, inching toward an outright declaration of victory: “By all indications,” he said, “we are going on to New Hampshire victorious.”

At the time, none of those indications were public.

More on the make-or-break night in Iowa that could break the caucuses.

As Democrats struggled to count the votes in the opening presidential nominating contest, the one person clearly rejoicing was the man they hope to evict from the White House.

“The Democrat Caucus is an unmitigated disaster,” President Trump wrote on Twitter on Tuesday morning as the Iowa results remained unknown. “Nothing works, just like they ran the Country. Remember the 5 Billion Dollar Obamacare Website, that should have cost 2% of that. The only person that can claim a very big victory in Iowa last night is ‘Trump.’”

But Mr. Trump, who won the Republican caucuses in Iowa handily, rejected suggestions that the breakdown in counting should cause the state to lose its status as the first stop in the presidential nomination process.

“It is not the fault of Iowa, it is the Do Nothing Democrats fault,” he wrote. “As long as I am President, Iowa will stay where it is. Important tradition!”

Read more here.

The app that the Iowa Democratic Party commissioned to tabulate and report results from the caucuses was not properly tested at a statewide scale, said people who were briefed on the app by the state party.

The party decided to use the app only after another proposal for reporting votes — which entailed having caucus participants call in their votes over the phone — was abandoned, on the advice of Democratic National Committee officials, according to David Jefferson, a board member of Verified Voting, a nonpartisan election integrity organization.

The app was built by Shadow Inc., a for-profit technology company that is also used by the Nevada Democratic Party, the next state to hold a caucus, as well as by multiple presidential campaigns.

The secrecy around the app this year came from the Iowa Democratic Party, which asked that even its name be withheld from the public. According to a person familiar with the app, its creators had repeatedly questioned the need to keep it secret, especially from the Iowa precincts where it would be used.

That person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he had agreed not to discuss details of the app, said that there were concerns that the app would malfunction in areas with poor connectivity, or because of high bandwidth use, such as when many people tried to use it at the same time.

Read more here.

NASHUA, N.H. — Fresh off an overnight flight from Des Moines, Mr. Buttigieg met the mayor of Nashua, Jim Donchess, for a coffee at the Riverwalk Café downtown.

“You did a great job last night on your speech,” Mr. Donchess said, as he greeted Mr. Buttigieg on a sidewalk outside of the coffee shop.

“Thanks,” Mr. Buttigieg said. “Felt good.”

As the two men walked down the sidewalk, Mr. Buttigieg told the Nashua mayor that it was “frustrating” to not have good results, but said “you can’t deny” that he had had a strong night.

Mr. Donchess, a four-term mayor, announced his endorsement of Mr. Buttigieg this morning, though said he had been considering it for some time and was not influenced by the reports of a strong finish in Iowa.

Mr. Buttigieg lingered in the coffee shop for about 10 minutes, sitting down with three voters to talk about local issues. He ignored questions from reporters about whether his speech last night in Iowa, seemingly declaring victory absent any official results, was premature.

Voters here — both those who said they were undecided and those who said they would vote for Mr. Buttigieg — offered a collective shrug at the former mayor’s decision to declare victory in the absence of any official results.

Asked if it was appropriate for Mr. Buttigieg to have suggested he had won, Ben Gayman, an undecided voter from Manchester, did not hesitate.

“Of course,” he said. “They all did.”

A lot of reasons contributed to Monday night’s events, chiefly a breakdown of the process by which caucus leaders were supposed to report results to the Iowa Democratic Party.

But one factor was baked into that process from almost the moment the caucuses ended four years ago.

Historically, the party had focused on highlighting only one caucus result: the number of delegates each candidate had earned for the state convention. The winner of the Iowa caucuses was the person who earned the most state delegates, which translate into national delegates, which determine the nomination. This year, however, the state party chose to release four results from the caucuses.

That’s because in 2016, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton edged out Mr. Sanders in the state delegate count by a quarter of a percentage point, earning roughly 700 to Mr. Sanders’s 697. That meant 23 national delegates for Mrs. Clinton and 21 for Mr. Sanders — an inconsequential difference between the two rivals.

Mr. Sanders’s 2016 campaign fought for an audit in Iowa — comparing the reported results with the papers on which caucus leaders had recorded voters’ preferences — and accused the state Democratic Party of a lack of transparency.

Largely because of Mr. Sanders’s objections, the party decided to release additional numbers in 2020 that it had always logged but never made public: the number of supporters each candidate had in the first round of voting and the number he or she had in the second round, after nonviable candidates were eliminated and caucusgoers realigned.

The idea was that all this data would provide a fuller picture of each candidate’s strength. But it also made reporting the results more complicated. Read more here.

In a joint statement released Tuesday morning, Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst of Iowa and the state’s governor, Kim Reynolds, defended the Iowa caucuses, saying they were confident the results would ultimately be tallied.

“Iowa’s unique role encourages a grass-roots nominating process that empowers everyday Americans, not Washington insiders or powerful billionaires,” they said. “The face-to-face retail politics nature of Iowa’s caucus system also encourages dialogue between candidates and voters that makes our presidential candidates accountable for the positions they take and the records they hold.”

They also defended the state’s position at the start of the nominating calendar.

“Iowa’s large population of independent voters and its practice of careful deliberation contributes greatly to the national presidential primary and makes it the ideal state to kick off the nominating process,” they said. “Iowans and all Americans should know we have complete confidence that every last vote will be counted and every last voice will be heard.”

Reporting was contributed by Maggie Astor, Peter Baker, Alexander Burns, Nick Corasaniti, Sydney Ember, Reid J. Epstein, Sheera Frenkel, Shane Goldmacher, Christine Hauser, Astead W. Herndon, Nicole Perlroth, Jonathan Martin, Jennifer Medina and Matt Stevens.

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‘No Longer A Friend’: Ukrainians Are Losing Faith In The U.S.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1197678597-52f86cdb19cae3bf576e6b581732d29f1227c0ad-s1100-c15 'No Longer A Friend': Ukrainians Are Losing Faith In The U.S.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (left) and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy arrive for a joint news conference in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Jan. 31. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  'No Longer A Friend': Ukrainians Are Losing Faith In The U.S.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (left) and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy arrive for a joint news conference in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Jan. 31.

Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

Nataliya Gumenyuk grew up in a small town outside of Kyiv during the first hungry years after Ukraine gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. Like many Ukrainians of her generation, she was raised on Hollywood movies — but also the American credo of positive social change.

Today Gumenyuk, 36, is a prominent Ukrainian journalist, who co-founded Hromadske, a noncommercial, nongovernmental public broadcaster, during street protests that rocked Kyiv six years ago.

Gumenyuk, who traveled to the U.S. to cover the last three presidential elections, says America has lost its sheen since Ukraine unwittingly became the focus of President Trump’s impeachment process in Washington.

“There was the idea of a moral example, which is definitely no longer there,” Gumenyuk says.

Revelations that President Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden are at the heart of the impeachment trial in the Senate. Trump’s decision to freeze military aid to Ukraine over the summer, as well his administration’s back-channel efforts to contact Zelenskiy, have shaken many Ukrainians’ belief in the U.S. as a steadfast ally and role model.

Last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was the first high-ranking administration official to visit Ukraine since the impeachment scandal broke last fall. There hasn’t been a U.S. ambassador in Kyiv since May, when Trump abruptly recalled Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. And Kurt Volker, who was the top U.S. diplomat tasked with negotiating an end to Ukraine’s six-year conflict with Russia, resigned in September before giving testimony in the impeachment inquiry.

Before leaving for Europe last month, Pompeo called into question whether Americans care about Ukraine.

“Maybe there was the idea that with this visit, Pompeo could say: ‘Look, I care about Ukraine and have come to Ukraine’ so it could be used in the impeachment trial,” says Gumenyuk.

Zelenskiy wants to secure a White House visit and a replacement for Volker. That would signal to the Kremlin that the U.S. still supports the Ukrainian government in its bid to end the low-level war with Russian-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine. But Pompeo offered neither a date for a meeting with Trump nor a new envoy to Ukraine.

Ivan Yakovina, a political commentator in Kyiv, says Ukraine’s political class has become disillusioned with the United States.

“Previously it was Ukraine that was unpredictable. Now, we have no idea what’s going to happen in the United States next week,” Yakovina says. “A lot of people are disappointed. America used to be a beacon of freedom, liberty and anti-corruption efforts. Now a lot of Ukrainians feel like, ‘yeah, we are by ourselves.'”

After his talks with Zelenskiy last Friday, Pompeo held a meeting with representatives of Ukrainian civil society, including Olena Tregub, head of the Independent Defence Anti-Corruption Committee, a nongovernmental watchdog group.

Tregub says the meeting lasted more than an hour and focused on the challenges the Zelenskiy government faces in fighting corruption and improving Ukraine’s investment climate. Ukraine ranks 126th in Transparency International‘s 2019 Corruption Perception Index, between Bolivia and Laos.

While Tregub welcomed the opportunity to speak with Pompeo, she says the U.S. can do more to support civil society beyond providing financial assistance.

“This is not a safe environment for anti-corruption campaigners,” she says. “The U.S. should continuously show that it supports agents of change. One visit is just a start but definitely not enough.”

Gumenyuk, whose TV channel depends on funding from foreign governments, says Ukraine’s reliance on U.S. assistance makes it awkward to criticize the Trump administration for its transactional approach to foreign policy.

“America is not an adversary — but maybe no longer a friend,” Gumenyuk says. “You’d want to have the U.S. be a more trustworthy partner.”

But not everyone in Kyiv takes such a bleak view of U.S.-Ukrainian relations.

Ivan Pohrebniyak, an IT entrepreneur, doubts whether Pompeo was speaking for the Trump administration when he questioned Americans’ interest in Ukraine.

“Is this the general opinion of the entire government of the U.S.? I don’t think so,” says Pohrebniyak, 36. “How much did previous presidents care about Ukraine?”

Pohrebniyak, who travels frequently to the U.S. for work, says Trump appeals to him as a businessman who gets things done.

He says he is keeping an open mind about whether Trump deserves to be impeached and still believes the rule of law will prevail in the U.S. — unlike in Ukraine.

With the Senate all but certain to acquit Trump on Wednesday, political analyst Yakovina is less sanguine.

“As long as Donald Trump is president of the United States, nobody can be sure of anything,” Yakovina says. “I’m afraid that after his acquittal in the Senate, Trump will start pressuring Ukraine even more. Now he won’t have anything to fear.”

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How Coronavirus is Affecting the U.S. Oil Industry

Westlake Legal Group 04oil-facebookJumbo-v3 How Coronavirus is Affecting the U.S. Oil Industry United States Economy Texas Prices (Fares, Fees and Rates) Oil (Petroleum) and Gasoline Layoffs and Job Reductions International Trade and World Market Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) China

HOUSTON — At a time when they are already cutting jobs and weighed down by debt, American oil producers are bracing for the latest shock to hit world energy markets: the economic effects of the coronavirus outbreak on China and beyond.

Oil and natural gas producers have been suffering from low commodity prices for the past year and now expect a sharp drop in global prices for their products. As a result, they are preparing to slash investments in exploration and production. The price of West Texas intermediate crude, a key benchmark, fell below $50 on Monday, a 20 percent decline in less than a month, before recovering slightly on Tuesday.

China buys only about 200,000 barrels a day of oil and refined transportation fuels from the United States, out of 8.5 million barrels of total daily American exports. But oil is a global commodity, and benchmark prices are set on world markets, not domestically. Lower prices mean lower profits.

“It’s a blow,” said Steven Pruett, chief executive of Elevation Resources, a Texas oil company, “especially when you add this to the fact that we’re getting almost nothing for our natural gas, and oil prices are sliding from $55 a barrel to $50. Credit availability is already tight, and it’s going to get that much tighter.”

Those concerns reflect the growing influence that China exerts on international energy markets.

Just a few weeks after the outbreak of the virus, daily Chinese oil demand is already down 20 percent because of dwindling air travel, road transportation and manufacturing. Since China consumes 13 of every 100 barrels of oil the world produces, every oil company is being hit to some extent.

More than 50 million people are affected by a travel lockdown in Hubei Province, the center of the outbreak, slowing gasoline consumption, while international airlines are rapidly scaling back flights, leaving a glut of jet fuel and diesel on global markets at a time when petroleum supplies were already abundant and prices depressed.

For producers in places like Iraq and Saudi Arabia, that kind of price drop can mean a 10 percent loss in profits. But in the United States, where the break-even price for the average oil well drilled in shale fields is far higher at roughly $45 a barrel, some producers could lose as much as 60 percent of their profits, according to Michael Lynch, president of Strategic Energy and Economic Research.

“The big question is whether the Saudis will put oil in storage and wait to ride this out; and if not, everyone is going to see less money coming in,” said Mr. Lynch, who has advised OPEC in the past. “For the big guys like Exxon Mobil and Chevron, it’s not a big deal. But for the small guys, they are going to be hurting, and you could see the number of bankruptcies rise sharply in the next few weeks.”

Forty-two oil and gas companies filed for bankruptcy protection in North America last year; since oil prices plummeted in 2015, there have been 208 bankruptcy filings by producers, involving roughly $122 billion in aggregate debt, according to the Haynes and Boone law firm.

Oil prices have fallen despite the loss of up to one million barrels a day of Libyan exports because of political turmoil there. A hastily convened meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and Russia, a possible prelude to a production cut, helped to stem the price slide, perhaps only temporarily.

American oil companies had already tightened their budgets last year, with roughly 14,000 of 750,000 employees in the United States losing their jobs. Over the last week, Exxon Mobil, ConocoPhillips and Chevron reported disappointing earnings because of low oil and gas prices and narrow profit margins.

A prolonged price collapse between 2014 and 2017 forced American oil and gas companies to lay off over 160,000 workers, and roughly 100,000 in Texas alone.

S&P Global Platts, the energy analytics firm, said the virus could shave global oil demand by as much as 4 percent, or 4.1 million barrels a day, in February. For the full year, the firm projects an average daily fall in global demand of 290,000 to one million barrels.

“There’s still too much uncertainty on the virus spread and its consequences on the economy,” said Claudio Galimberti, head of demand and refining analytics at S&P Global Platts.

Analysts point to the SARS epidemic of 2002-3 for clues. Asian jet fuel demand fell by 1 percent in 2003 from the year before, after climbing an average of 7 percent per year during the prior five years, according to Citigroup Global Markets research. Demand snapped back powerfully in 2004, and otherwise the impact on global oil markets was short-lived and modest.

But China has become a much more important engine to the world economy over the last 17 years, and medical researchers cannot be sure that the new virus will fade during warmer weather like the flu.

But while lower oil prices hurt producers, they benefit American drivers. The average national price of regular gasoline has dropped 12 cents per gallon over the last month, according to the AAA motor club. That is a break particularly for lower-income motorists, who tend to drive older vehicles that are less fuel-efficient and spend a higher percentage of their income on energy.

Refiners can buy and store cheaper fuels for the summer, when demand will be higher. Producers are not so lucky.

The Chinese virus is spreading as oil producers are preparing their 2020 exploration and production budgets, which they will announce over the next two months. When the year began, oil prices had stabilized between $60 and $65 a barrel after cuts in OPEC production targets. But with prices now roughly $10 lower, executives predict that the industry will have to adjust.

“People are going to have to drop rigs and scale back production growth,” said Scott D. Sheffield, chief executive of Pioneer Natural Resources, a major Texas shale oil producer. “The question is, how fast can the Chinese stop the virus from spreading and start picking up oil demand.”

Mr. Sheffield predicted that if oil prices did not go up soon, domestic shale oil production, recently expected to increase by 500,000 to 700,000 barrels a day this year, instead would be flat.

Other countries will come under pressure, too. Most of the 10 million barrels a day that China imports come from Russia, Africa and Iran and other Persian Gulf nations, and producers in those regions have already been forced to sharply discount their shipments.

“You have to be concerned when you see demand is going down and economies are faltering,” said J. Nelson Wood, chief executive of Wood Energy, an Illinois-based oil company with wells in four states. “And of course that has a direct impact on price.”

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Sons of Confederate Veterans’ appeal over Christmas parade denial heard in Louisiana

Westlake Legal Group flag_orange20county Sons of Confederate Veterans' appeal over Christmas parade denial heard in Louisiana fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/special/occasions/christmas fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 06357e8e-fef0-56c5-9132-26ad3811ca82

A federal appeals court was set to hear arguments Tuesday over a Louisiana city’s decision to bar the Sons of Confederate Veterans from marching in a 2015 Christmas parade.

Court records show the Louisiana Division of the group was denied permission to march in a parade in the city of Natchitoches that year amid concerns that many would be offended by the group carrying a Confederate flag.

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Tuesday’s arguments before the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal concern the resulting lawsuit filed by the Confederate-honoring group. It alleged that city officials and the nonprofit that hosts the parade violated its constitutional rights to freedom of speech and due process of law.

Last year, U.S. District Judge Dee Drell dismissed the lawsuit. Among his reasons were that the denial of the permit was done by the nonprofit — the Historic District Business Association — not a government agency. Drell noted in his opinion that city officials were worried about protests and that Mayor Lee Posey had expressed concerns in a letter to the HDBA that the group’s display of the Confederate flag would offend some and could result in “disruption or interference with the parade.”

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But, Drell said, it was the private, nonprofit agency’s decision to deny the permit — not the city’s.

The denial of the permit came months after the slayings of nine black worshippers at a South Carolina church by white supremacist Dylann Roof. Pictures on social media of Roof posing with Confederate battle flags led to renewed opposition to public displays of Confederate iconography and successful efforts in some locales, including New Orleans, to remove memorials to Confederate leaders from public display.

Westlake Legal Group flag_orange20county Sons of Confederate Veterans' appeal over Christmas parade denial heard in Louisiana fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/special/occasions/christmas fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 06357e8e-fef0-56c5-9132-26ad3811ca82   Westlake Legal Group flag_orange20county Sons of Confederate Veterans' appeal over Christmas parade denial heard in Louisiana fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/louisiana fox-news/special/occasions/christmas fnc/us fnc Associated Press article 06357e8e-fef0-56c5-9132-26ad3811ca82

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I’m Rebecca Morin, politics reporter for USA TODAY, covering all things related to the 2020 presidential election. I’ve spent the last week in Iowa for the caucuses. AMA!

Westlake Legal Group cKFe-9a79CQhvYEzPVnzm63liniyUkKCrL0HCcE12T4 I’m Rebecca Morin, politics reporter for USA TODAY, covering all things related to the 2020 presidential election. I’ve spent the last week in Iowa for the caucuses. AMA! r/politics

Hey y’all. I’m Rebecca Morin, politics reporter for USA TODAY, and have been covering the 2020 presidential election over the past year. I previously was part of USA TODAY’s politics now team. Before working at USA TODAY, I was a breaking news reporter for Politico. I’m originally from the South Texas border, graduated from the University of Iowa and now out in DC. I’ve spent the past week in Iowa for the state’s first-in-the-nation caucuses and am here to answer all of your questions.

Here’s some of my recent work:

Proof: https://i.redd.it/sa9bobzwdre41.jpg

UPDATE: That’s it for me today y’all. Thanks for all the questions! Keep udpated with what’s happening in Iowa and the rest of the 2020 election cycle at usatoday.com or my Twitter @RebeccaMorin_

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Half Of Delayed Iowa Caucus Results Expected By End Of Day

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Clouded by doubts on a chaotic day-after, Democratic Party officials planned to release a majority of Iowa’s delayed presidential caucus results by late Tuesday, according to details shared with campaigns on a private conference call.

The news did little to stem rising confusion and concern more than 12 hours after voting ended without the release of a single result in the opening contest of the Democrats 2020 primary season.

State party chairman Troy Price informed campaigns that he would release at least 50% of all caucus results at 5 p.m. EST, but he declined to answer pointed questions from frustrated campaign representatives about when the party would release the full results or how it could ensure their integrity ― even whether it would be a matter of days or weeks.

“We will continue to work through the process,” Price said on the call, which was monitored by The Associated Press. “We want to get some results out there.”

At the same time, the leading candidates tried to spin the uncertainty to their advantage, claiming momentum as they pivoted their campaigns to next-up New Hampshire.

“Ï’m feeling good,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren told a capacity crowd at theater in Keene, New Hampshire Tuesday morning. “It’s a tight, three-way race at the top. We know that the three of us will be dividing up most of the delegates coming out of Iowa.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e39b3ed220000aa0823e626 Half Of Delayed Iowa Caucus Results Expected By End Of Day

ASSOCIATED PRESS Precinct 68 Iowa Caucus voters seated in the Biden section hold up their first votes.

In a sign of the murkiness in the race, it was clear which three candidates Warren was referring to.

The party’s caucus crisis was an embarrassing twist after months of promoting the contest as a chance for Democrats to find some clarity in a jumbled field with no clear front-runner.

Instead, caucus day ended with no winner, no official results and many fresh questions about whether Iowa can retain its coveted “first” status.

The party told campaigns earlier Tuesday that the delay was a result of a “coding issue in the reporting system” that it said has since been fixed. The state party said the plan was to release results “as soon as possible” later Tuesday. It said it had verified the accuracy of the collected data and said the problem was not a result of “a hack or an intrusion.”

Still, there were signs that the process was ongoing and laborious.

Price confirmed that party official were sending volunteers and staffers across the state to retrieve hard-copy results so they could check them against numbers reported from precincts via a mobile app that proved problematic for many users, according to multiple sources working for the state party and granted anonymity to discuss sensitive party information. Many precinct organizers were forced to call-in results, experiencing long delays, while aides entered results from some 1,600 sites manually.

Like Warren, former Vice President Joe Biden also said he was “feeling good” and predicted that the results would be close. Meanwhile, his campaign raised questions about the integrity of the results if and when they are released.

Before leaving Iowa, an attorney for Biden’s campaign issued a letter to the state party raising concerns about “acute failures … occurring statewide” and insisting on “full explanations and relevant information regarding the methods of quality control you are employing, and an opportunity to respond, before any official results are released.”

Other candidates turned to New Hampshire, which holds its primary in seven days.

WHAT HAPPENED IN IOWA?

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said he had “a good feeling we’re going to be doing very, very well here in Iowa” once results were posted. “Today marks the beginning of the end for Donald Trump,” he predicted.

Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, essentially declared victory.

“So we don’t know all the results, but we know by the time it’s all said and done, Iowa, you have shocked the nation,” he said before leaving Iowa. “By all indications, we are going on to New Hampshire victorious.”

Beyond 2020, the debacle invited fresh criticism about Iowa caucuses, a complicated set of political meetings staged in a state that is whiter and older than the Democratic Party. Many used the moment to question whether it was a quaint political tradition whose time had passed.

The party has tried to accommodate critics before, this year by promising to report three different data points about voters’ preferences, presumably improving transparency. But the new system created new headaches.

State party spokeswoman Mandy McClure said it had “found inconsistencies in the reporting of three sets of results,” forcing officials to try to verify results with “underlying data” and the paper trail.

Some of the trouble stemmed from the buggy app. Organizers at caucuses site reported trouble downloading the app and other glitches. Many turned to a back-up phone system.

In a letter to campaigns Tuesday, the party said the datra collected by the app “sound,” but data it was reported was incomplete.

“While the app was recording data accurately, it was reporting out only partial data,” Iowa Democratic Party chairman Troy Price told campaigns in a somewhat delayed effort to explain the issue. “This issue was identified and fixed. The application’s reporting issue did not impact the ability of precinct chairs to report data accurately.”

Earlier in the night, Iowa Democrats across the state cast their votes, balancing a strong preference for fundamental change with an overwhelming desire to defeat Trump. At least four high-profile candidates vied for the lead in a contest that offered the opening test of who and what the party stands for in the turbulent age of Trump.

It’s just the first in a primary season that will span all 50 states and several U.S. territories, ending at the party’s national convention in mid-July.

For Democrats, the moment was thick with promise for a party that has seized major gains in states since Trump won the White House in 2016. But instead of clear optimism, a growing cloud of uncertainty and intraparty resentment hung over the election as the prospect of an unclear result raised fears of a long and divisive primary fight in the months ahead.

One unsurprising development: Trump won the Republican caucus, a largely symbolic victory given that he faced no significant opposition.

The president eagerly seized on the Democrats’ problems.

“The Democrat Caucus is an unmitigated disaster,” Trump tweeted early Tuesday. “Nothing works, just like they ran the Country.” He added: “The only person that can claim a very big victory in Iowa last night is ‘Trump.’”

Pre-caucus polls suggested Sanders entered the night with a narrow lead, but any of the top four candidates — Sanders, Biden, Warren and Buttigieg — was positioned to score a victory. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, who represents neighboring Minnesota, was also claiming momentum, while outsider candidates including entrepreneur Andrew Yang, billionaire activist Tom Steyer and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard could be factors.

“We know one thing: We are punching above our weight,” Klobuchar said late Monday, promising to keep fighting in New Hampshire.

New voters played a significant role in shaping Iowa’s election.

About one-quarter of all voters reported that they were caucusing for the first time, according to AP VoteCast, a survey of voters who said they planned to take part in Monday’s Democratic caucuses. The first-timers were slightly more likely to support Sanders, Warren or Buttigieg, compared with other candidates.

The 2020 fight has already played out over myriad distractions, particularly congressional Democrats’ push to impeach Trump, which has often overshadowed the primary and effectively pinned several leading candidates to Washington at the pinnacle of the early campaign season.

Meanwhile, ultrabillionaire Mike Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, is running a parallel campaign that ignored Iowa as he prepares to pounce on any perceived weaknesses in the field come March.

Catch up on the 2020 election campaign with AP experts on our weekly politics podcast, “Ground Game.”

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Secret Nazi World War II bunkers discovered near D-Day beaches

Researchers have uncovered secret Nazi bunkers in Normandy that were used against U.S. forces at the D-Day landings during World War II.

The discovery will be featured in the season premiere of “Expedition Unknown,” which airs on Discovery Channel on Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. EST.

“We discovered huge Nazi bunkers that haven’t seen the light of day in 75 years,” Josh Gates, host and executive producer of “Expedition Unknown,” told Fox News. “We were able to dig down and reveal the doors and go inside them – they are frozen in time, there are artifacts inside there.”

10 INCREDIBLE TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPED FOR D-DAY

“It’s two large bunkers, each one of them contains three or four large rooms,” he said. “These are fairly large structures with hallways and multiple rooms, staircases.”

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Josh Gates investigates the newly unearthed WWII bunker at Maisy Battery, in Normandy, France. (Discovery Channel)

The bunkers are part of a complex known as the Maisy Battery that is about 2 miles inland from Omaha beach. When it was operational, the battery had a total of 14 huge guns, including 150 mm Howitzers.

Experts used LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology, which uses a laser to measure distances to the Earth’s surface, to study the site.

HOW D-DAY TECHNOLOGY MADE OPERATION OVERLORD A SUCCESS

LiDAR can prove extremely valuable to study structures that are hidden out of sight or in areas with thick vegetation. The technology is also used extensively in other applications, including autonomous cars where it allows vehicles to have a continuous 360 degrees view.

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The end of a gas mask filter that was found in the newly excavated WWII bunker at Maisy Battery, France. (Discovery Channel)

Researchers found evidence on the bunker’s ceiling that indicates it was burned, either during the firefight to capture the site or afterward. “It’s a strange feeling entering a place like that,” Gates added. “It’s exciting – on the other hand, it’s a somber, dark experience – this was a place that housed Nazi soldiers.”

The Maisy Battery is now open to the public, although, as Gates found, the complex is still revealing its secrets. The Battery was one of the largest German defensive positions in the landing area used by U.S. Forces on D-Day, according to its website, and was used to target the Omaha and Utah beachheads. The base was captured by U.S. Army Rangers.

HITLER’S SECRET NAZI WAR MACHINE REVEALED IN HIDDEN BASES

“The Maisy Battery played a crucial part in the events of D-Day,” explains its website. “The German Army had built Maisy in total secrecy, whilst letting the world know all about the nearby battery at Pointe du Hoc, a position that was under construction on D-Day.”

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The entrance to an unearthed WWII bunker at Maisy Battery, France. (Discovery Channel)

“It’s an overwhelming place to visit – this was part of one of the darkest chapters in modern history,” said Gates. “There’s all sorts of things inside the bunker, we discovered the remains of gas masks, ammunition, Nazi helmets.”

“What is unique is that a lot of the military installations around Normandy have been cleaned up,” he continued. “Maisy is one of the few places where you can explore trenches and beaches and get a sense of what it was like on D-Day.”

RUSSIAN SCIENTISTS UNEARTH REMAINS OF SECRET NAZI ARCTIC BASE

Excavations at the Maisy Battery will continue, according to the explorer, who notes that the site was once part of the infamous “Atlantic Wall” – a chain of defensive installations built by the German military on the coast of Northern France.

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Members of a US, Ranger unit are packed shoulder to shoulder an a small landing craft at a British port, before embarking for the landing on the Normandy beaches in France (D-Day -June 6, 1944). (Photo by Photo12/UIG/Getty Images)

“A lot of Hitler’s Atlantic Wall was not on the sea,” Gates explained. “Big compounds like this were essentially forgotten to time.”

Researchers made another startling discovery during their filming in late 2019. The team was investigating the nearby wreck of the USS Partridge, a minesweeper that was sunk by a torpedo during the Normandy landings when they spotted German parachute mine.

HUNDREDS OF CHILLING ITEMS DISCOVERED AT NAZI MASSACRE SITES

Gates explained that the French navy was alerted, but noted that the area where the mine is located has been experiencing bad weather. “The idea is, in the coming months, to have a team from the French navy come out there and detonate the mine,” he told Fox News.

In other projects, experts have been looking to unlock the sinister secrets of hidden Nazi bases dotted across Europe.

In 2016, scientists at the Russian Arctic National Park discovered the remains of a secret Nazi base on the remote island of Alexandra Land, in the Franz Josef Land archipelago.

HOLOCAUST ESCAPE TUNNEL FOUND: PRISONERS DUG WITH SPOONS TO ESCAPE NAZIS

Researchers found German mines, hand grenade fragments, cartridge boxes, cartridges for Mauser 98 rifles and boxes for MG-34 machine gun feed belts. Parts of uniforms, overcoats, underwear, socks and pieces of footwear were also uncovered, as were sacks bearing the label of the German army.

Last year, local government officials announced the discovery of hundreds of chilling items at Nazi massacre sites in northwestern Germany.

Other excavations have also offered a glimpse into the horrific events of World War II. In 2017, experts uncovered two ritual baths in the remains of the Great Synagogue of Vilnius, in Lithuania, more than 70 years after its destruction during the Holocaust.

HITLER’S SECRET HISTORY REVEALED: STUDY SUGGESTS NAZI LEADER’S GRANDFATHER WAS JEWISH

In a separate project in Lithuania, a tunnel used by Jewish prisoners to escape the Nazis was discovered.

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A recent study also suggested that Hitler’s paternal grandfather was Jewish, following years of rumors surrounding the Nazi leader’s family.

Fox News’ Chris Ciaccia contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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Awaiting Iowa Results, Democratic Rivals Jostle for Advantage

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DES MOINES — The Iowa Democratic Party will begin to release results from Monday’s caucuses at 5 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, the party chairman, Troy Price, told the Democratic presidential campaigns in a conference call.

Mr. Price told the campaigns that “the majority” of results would be made public later in the day but dodged questions about when final totals would become available. He and the party’s executive director, Kevin Geiken, said officials were in the process of collecting paper preference cards and results work sheets from more than 1,600 precincts in Iowa.

The pending release of results was certain to upend the Democratic contest once more on Tuesday, as a frustrated pack of Democratic presidential candidates arrived in New Hampshire and sought to turn the mood of chaos to their own advantage.

Even before the candidates boarded chartered jets late Monday and headed east, their senior aides were effectively backstabbing one another — and leaders of the Iowa Democratic Party. Some campaigns were trying cast their likely Iowa caucus outcome in the best possible light, as the final results remained in limbo because of inconsistencies in the reporting of data. Others were angling to make a rival pay for a potentially dismal finish.

And a new order could be glimpsed in the race, as former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. did his best to play down the significance of Iowa and several other candidates positioned themselves as victors even in the absence of official results.

Mr. Price, said in a statement Tuesday morning that the party hoped to release the results as soon as possible but that “the integrity and accuracy of the process” was the paramount concern. He attributed the delay to inconsistencies in the reporting of results to a new app that Democrats were using, which he said reported only partial data “due to a coding issue.”

But the top candidates were also moving on to New Hampshire, with events scheduled across the state on Tuesday. Others who sat out Iowa, like Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado and Representative Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, were also campaigning in New Hampshire.

Mr. Buttigieg, alluding to precinct-level data he said his campaign gathered on Monday, repeated the claim on Tuesday morning that his campaign had prevailed in Iowa — the most aggressive effort by any candidate to claim credit for a win based on private and unverifiable data.

“It’s clearly a victory for us,” Mr. Buttigieg said in an interview on CNN, adding, “By any reckoning, we had an extraordinary night that is propelling us toward a win in New Hampshire.”

He made an early morning appearance in Nashua, N.H., on Tuesday, where he was endorsed by the city’s mayor, Jim Donchess, meeting him for coffee at a cafe and chatting with several voters. He ignored questions from reporters about whether his speech last night in Iowa, seemingly declaring victory absent any official results, was premature.

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts landed in Manchester, N.H., shortly after 4 a.m., surrounded by senior aides and top surrogates. In brief remarks to supporters, Ms. Warren said she felt good about her campaign’s position — even as the official Iowa results remained unclear.

“When I left Iowa, I said it is too close to call and it still is — but I feel good,” she said. “We are in 31 states and have thousands of people on the ground.”

What unfolded in the hours before was an extraordinary spectacle of political gamesmanship, from a group of campaigns that had long anticipated the Iowa caucuses as a moment that could bring the first dose of clarity to a volatile primary.

The delay kept the still-unknown winner from being able to quickly harness his or her triumph to raise money and build momentum while shielding those who finished poorly from an immediate reckoning. It was also an embarrassment for a party trying to show unity and strength as it prepares to take on President Trump.

Mr. Trump eagerly called attention to the chaos, writing on Twitter that the Democrats’ caucuses were “an unmitigated disaster.”

The Iowa contest was already wedged in between a number of high-profile news events that threatened to siphon attention from the caucuses and dull their impact, including the Super Bowl, Mr. Trump’s State of the Union address on Tuesday and an expected vote in the Senate to acquit Mr. Trump of impeachment charges.

Democratic officials in Iowa said the delays on Monday were because of a breakdown in the reporting of results, but the chaos across more than 1,600 caucus sites appeared widespread. As the night proceeded caucus leaders and volunteers described struggling with a byzantine new system of tabulation and an app that confused many of those responsible for reporting final tallies.

With no official returns to trumpet as the night proceeded, a handful of leading candidates released their own data portraying themselves in a favorable light and sought to use the uncertainty to cripple Mr. Biden, who has led in most national polls but appeared highly vulnerable in Iowa. Advisers to three different campaigns suggested that the final outcome could represent a tepid finish for Mr. Biden based on their own internal data, and his campaign did little to rebut that analysis.

The campaigns of Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Mr. Buttigieg released portions of their own caucus-night intelligence, both claiming that they were on track to emerge triumphant. And aides to Ms. Warren forecast a close finish among her, Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg while chastising her opponents for releasing partial information.

“Any campaign saying they won or putting out incomplete numbers is contributing to the chaos and misinformation,” said Joe Rospars, a top adviser to Ms. Warren, alluding to Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg.

But Mr. Sanders’s campaign made no apologies for the projection of strength, arguing that it would be reflected in the final results.

“We feel very confident about our performance in Iowa,” said Ari Rabin-Havt, a senior adviser to Mr. Sanders.

It was not only the top-tier candidates who clashed as Monday gave way to Tuesday, however. The campaign manager for Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota posted on Twitter that their data suggested that Ms. Klobuchar could overtake Mr. Biden in the vote count — an unverifiable claim for outside observers, but one that could be debilitating for Mr. Biden if it came to pass. Ms. Klobuchar has been running well behind the four leaders in both national polls and surveys of Iowa.

“With the numbers we’ve seen internally and publicly, we’re running even or ahead of Vice President Biden,” wrote Justin Buoen, Ms. Klobuchar’s top aide. “Wheels up to New Hampshire!”

Mr. Biden’s campaign released no data of its own and appeared eager to turn the page on the contest. In brief remarks to supporters on Monday, Mr. Biden raised an eyebrow at the disorder; both he and his campaign manager, Greg Schultz, said little about what they expected, other than Mr. Biden would win his “fair share” of delegates in Iowa.

“Our own model shows that Biden over-performed in key districts we needed to be competitive in, and we feel confident that this is a tight race with bunched up candidates,” Mr. Schultz said in a statement.

In a far more aggressive tactic, a lawyer for the Biden campaign sent a letter to the Iowa Democratic Party expressing alarm at the “acute failures” of the procedures intended to tabulate votes on caucus night.

“We believe that the campaigns deserve full explanations and relevant information regarding the methods of quality control you are employing, and an opportunity to respond, before any official results are released,” wrote Dana Remus, general counsel to the Biden campaign.

Altogether, it appeared to be the approach of a candidate aiming to throw a permanent shadow over the Iowa results — and to obscure what could be a poor showing.

Mr. Biden’s campaign was not the only one to raise questions about the caucus process: speaking to reporters after midnight, Roger Lau, Ms. Warren’s campaign manager, said the interminable delays were damaging the vote.

“Every second that passes undermines the process a little bit,” Mr. Lau said.

Mr. Lau said that the campaign saw Ms. Warren in a “really tight” race with Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg, but declined to list an order.

Like senior strategists for other campaigns, Mr. Lau offered a clear and negative prognosis for one prominent competitor, even without definitive results to back up his argument.

“It’s clear that Biden’s a distant fourth,” he said.

Alone among the candidates in enjoying the Iowa meltdown may have been Michael R. Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City who is not contesting any of the earliest primary and caucus states. Mr. Bloomberg has been counting on a split decision or a weak finish by Mr. Biden in February, opening the way for him to vigorously compete for delegates starting in March.

One of Mr. Bloomberg’s closest aides made little effort to hide his delight at the events of Monday evening. Mr. Bloomberg’s campaign manager, Kevin Sheekey, quipped in a television interview that had Iowa Democrats used the financial-information technology marketed by Mr. Bloomberg’s company — the source of the fortune he is now spending on his campaign — they would have assembled the results in a timely fashion.

“Obviously a Bloomberg Terminal would have delivered your results by tonight,” Mr. Sheekey said.

Astead Herndon contributed reporting from Manchester, N.H., Nick Corasaniti from Nashua, N.H., and Reid J. Epstein from Des Moines.

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