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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 260)

Benjamin Netanyahu places military on high alert, praises Trump for Soleimani killing: He ‘deserves all the credit’

Westlake Legal Group AP19328605653321 Benjamin Netanyahu places military on high alert, praises Trump for Soleimani killing: He 'deserves all the credit' Paulina Dedaj fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/benjamin-netanyahu fox news fnc/world fnc d27726e4-20b6-5a95-a616-2c0a70732778 article

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered its military on high alert as he expressed strong support for President Trump on Friday, less than a day after the U.S. killed top Iranian military general Qassem Soleimani in an airstrike at Baghdad International Airport.

Netanyahu called the U.S.’s recent attacks on Iran a “just struggle,” adding that President Trump should be praised for his actions, which likely thwarted future attacks on American citizens.

IRAN VOWS ‘HARSH RETALIATION’ AFTER US AIRSTRIKE KILLS IRANIAN GEN. QASSEM SOLEIMANI 

“Just as Israel has the right of self-defense, the United States has exactly the same right,” he told reporters after returning from a recent trip to Greece.

“Qassem Soleimani is responsible for the death of American citizens and many other innocent people. He was planning more such attacks,” he said.

“President Trump deserves all the credit for acting swiftly, forcefully and decisively. Isreal stands with the United States in its just struggle for peace, security and self-defense.”

In addition to backing the U.S., Israel placed its military on heightened alert while top leaders and intelligence chiefs gathered for a “situational assessment,” according to Reuters.

Cabinet leaders have been instructed not to comment but a spokesperson for the Israeli military told Reuters that the Mount Hermon ski resort, which sits close to the Syrian border, had been shut down “following an assessment of the situation.”

While the longtime U.S. ally reacted positively to Soleimani’s killing, the global reaction has been less than optimistic.

ESMAIL QAANI, THE NEW LEADER OF IRAN’S QUDS FORCE, IS A FAMILIAR FOE TO THE US WHO HAS REPEATEDLY SLAMMED TRUMP 

Some country leaders are saying that stability in the Middle East has become more questionable in the wake of the killing, with France’s deputy minister for foreign affairs, Amelie de Montchalin, calling it a “more dangerous world.”

“Military escalation is always dangerous,” she told RTL radio. “When such actions, such operations, take place, we see that escalation is underway.”

“We are waking up in a more dangerous world.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo dismissed her comments though, telling CNN: “Well, the French are just wrong about that. The world’s a much safer place today, and I can assure you Americans in the region are much safer today, after the demise of Qassem Soleimani.”

Russia echoed this sentiment, warning in a statement from the Foreign Ministry Office that “such actions don’t help resolve complicated problems in the Middle East, but instead lead to a new round of escalating tensions.”

Beijing also chimed in, expressing that it was “highly concerned” over Soleimani’s death.

“Peace in the Middle East and the Gulf region should be preserved,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said. “We urge all parties concerned, especially the United States, to maintain calm and restraint and avoid further escalation of tensions.”

SOLEIMANI’S TAKEDOWN FUELS NEW PARTISAN WARFARE ON CAPITOL HILL

Germany and Britain spoke just shy of voicing support for the U.S., instead expressing an understanding of what triggered the killing.

The Pentagon confirmed Thursday evening that Trump had ordered the attack that killed Soleimani and other military officials. Iran’s top “shadow commander” was responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American and coalition service members and the wounding of thousands more, the State Department said.

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The State Department said the airstrike “was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans.”

“General Soleimani was actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region,” the department said in a statement. “The United States will continue to take all necessary action to protect our people and our interests wherever they are around the world.”

Fox News’ Danielle Wallace contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP19328605653321 Benjamin Netanyahu places military on high alert, praises Trump for Soleimani killing: He 'deserves all the credit' Paulina Dedaj fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/benjamin-netanyahu fox news fnc/world fnc d27726e4-20b6-5a95-a616-2c0a70732778 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19328605653321 Benjamin Netanyahu places military on high alert, praises Trump for Soleimani killing: He 'deserves all the credit' Paulina Dedaj fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/benjamin-netanyahu fox news fnc/world fnc d27726e4-20b6-5a95-a616-2c0a70732778 article

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Oil Prices Jump, and Stocks Slide, After U.S. Kills Iranian General

Westlake Legal Group 03oil-1sub-facebookJumbo Oil Prices Jump, and Stocks Slide, After U.S. Kills Iranian General Terrorism Suleimani, Qassim Stocks and Bonds Prices (Fares, Fees and Rates) Oil (Petroleum) and Gasoline Iraq Iran Futures and Options Trading

Oil prices jumped about 4 percent Friday, and Wall Street opened about 1 percent lower, on news that a powerful Iranian military leader had been killed in a strike authorized by the United States, ratcheting up geopolitical tensions in a region that supplies around 25 percent of the world’s oil and threatening to disrupt global supply.

The price of Brent oil, the international benchmark, surged to nearly $70 a barrel after the Pentagon said President Trump had authorized the airstrike against Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani at Baghdad’s airport. West Texas Intermediate, the American oil benchmark, also rose more than 2 percent, to $62.51 a barrel.

On Wall Street the S&P 500 opened about 1 percent lower, following global markets, but recovered much of that ground later in the morning. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng lost 0.3 percent, and Germany’s DAX index was trading 1.7 percent lower.

Analysts warned that Iran would interpret the strike as an act of war. Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, pledged “harsh retaliation,” according to Iran’s state news media. These developments raised the prospect of volatility in Iran and Iraq, two major oil producers.

Around noon in New York, Brent crude oil was trading at about $68 a barrel.

The immediate price jump was among the largest since an attack on a critical Saudi oil installation in September temporarily knocked out 5 percent of the world’s oil supply. While Friday’s strike did not target any oil production, it raised fears of a protracted conflict in the region that could involve strategic attacks on oil fields.

In other markets, investments that are considered havens safe from market turmoil, such as gold and currencies like Japan’s yen, strengthened on the news.

The coming days could bring further pressure on assets that investors consider riskier, like stocks. It could also threaten a rally that began just a day ago in global markets.

The killing of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards commander inevitably raises fears about further instability in a region critical to the world’s oil supply. While sanctions imposed by the United States have cut Iranian oil exports to a trickle, other critical oil producers, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq and the United Arab Emirates, are clustered around the Persian Gulf.

It remains to be seen how Iran will respond to the loss of a top leader, but there is widespread concern that whatever action Tehran takes might affect these crucial oil supplies and push prices higher.

“Iran’s ability to impact the U.S. will probably be mostly within the Middle East theater,” said Neil Beveridge, a senior analyst at Bernstein, a market research firm. “Iraq and Saudi Arabia are obvious targets.”

Tankers carrying most of the oil leaving the Persian Gulf region — about 18 million barrels a day — as well as giant vessels loaded with liquefied natural gas, must pass through the Strait of Hormuz, a narrow channel that separates the United Arab Emirates, Oman and Iran and leads to the Indian Ocean.

The strait is 21 miles wide at its narrowest point, and the width of the shipping lane in either direction is just two miles wide, according to United States Energy Information Administration.

Iran’s coastline covers much of the east side of the Gulf, leaving Tehran well-placed to harass shipping with small boats, missiles, mines and other weapons. Last year, Iran seized a number of tankers in the area in an apparent effort to show that if Tehran were not permitted to export its oil, then supplies from other producers in the area were at risk.

Market participants worry that Iran could step up such attacks on shipping, although such a move would be likely to bring a quick response from United States military forces in the area.

Iran has other options for retaliating against Washington and its allies. It was clear in September that key Saudi oil installations could be knocked out with missile and drone attacks. Analysts worry about a similar strike by Iran, or a larger version.

Analysts also say that the oil installations of Saudi Aramco and other producers around the Persian Gulf could prove vulnerable to cyberattacks that might severely disrupt their operations.

Having just raised more than $25 billion through Aramco’s initial public offering, the Saudis have an interest in easing tensions in the region, and have been trying to solve problems like a long-running dispute over oil with Kuwait. But they could still find their oil industry under attack, analysts say.

Analysts say that Iraq, which has become the second largest oil producer in OPEC after the Saudis, could be where conflict between the United States and Iran plays out.

“Iraq is potentially the geopolitical flash point for 2020,” said Amrita Sen, chief oil analyst at Energy Aspects, a market research firm. If Iraq does become the scene of escalating conflict between Tehran and Washington, “you can imagine, then, that the fields could be at risk,” she said, referring to the oil fields that supply around 5 percent of world oil supplies and leading to a much larger surge in prices.

American oil companies operating in Iraq, including Exxon Mobil, could also become targets in this proxy war, said Helima Croft, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets, an investment bank.

Exxon Mobil and Chevron, which has been exploring in the Kurdistan region in the north, said they are monitoring the situation. “Exxon Mobil has programs and measures in place to provide security to protect its people, operations and facilities,” said Julie King, a company spokeswoman in an email.

“With trade wars receding, the heightened tensions in the Middle East may be poised to make a more meaningful impact on the oil market in 2020,” Ms. Croft wrote in a note to clients on Thursday.

Even before Friday’s events oil prices were edging higher as the outlook for supplies tightened. An agreement in December between the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and Russia to cut output has given oil prices a lift.

Analysts at Kpler, a firm that tracks oil shipments, said in a note published Friday that Saudi Arabia “clearly attempted to send a message” by cutting December exports by nearly 800,000 barrels a day, to 6.3 million barrels a day, the largest monthly decrease in five years. Analysts said that some refiners have not been able to buy as much oil as they wanted.

The prospect that President Trump will sign a partial trade deal with China has also eased the concerns about weak oil demand that weighed on the oil market in 2019. China is the world’s largest oil importer.

“Nobody’s worried about China now this year,” said Mr. Beveridge of Bernstein, who said that markets may be shifting back to a focus on geopolitics.

Thanks to the shale oil boom the United States is now much less dependent on oil from the Persian Gulf than it once was.

The United States is now a net exporter, competing with the Saudis and other Persian Gulf producers for markets. Asian countries like China, Japan and India are now major destinations for oil from the Persian Gulf, and would be most directly threatened by any disruption.

Oil, though, is a globally traded commodity, and so American consumers would feel the impact of any outages in the Persian Gulf or elsewhere in the prices they pay at the pump.

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16th-century shipwreck uncovered in the center of Stockholm

A shipwreck dating back to the 16th century has been discovered beneath the city of Stockholm.

Experts uncovered the ship in the Kundstradgarden district in the center of the Swedish capital last summer, according to a recent statement from archaeological consultancy Arkeologikonsult.

Analysis of the ship’s timbers indicates that it dates back to the 1590s. The ship, which is over 98.4 feet long, once sailed on Stockholm’s former waterways that were later filled to accommodate the city’s expansion.

17TH-CENTURY WARSHIP WRECKS DISCOVERED OFF SWEDISH ISLAND

“The ship was probably abandoned and left on the shore at the beginning of the 17th century and then covered with garbage from residents in the area,” said Arkeologikonsult, in its statement.

Westlake Legal Group SamsonShipwreck 16th-century shipwreck uncovered in the center of Stockholm James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b3d2f0e0-89c3-5c56-af04-ba383f87f131 article

Archaeologists examine the wreck. (Arkeologikonsult)

“We have found everything from coins and pipes to ceramics and glass but also a small ball of clay in clay, possibly dropped by a child who played in the wreck during the early 1600s,” explained archaeologist Philip Tonemar, in the statement.

Experts from Sweden’s Vrak Museum of Wrecks were brought in to help identify the shipwreck. The vessel is believed to be the cargo ship Samson, which was commissioned by Duke Karl in 1598. The pine ship disappeared from archives in 1607, according to Arkeologikonsult.

RESEARCHERS EXPLORE CURSED 450-YEAR-OLD SHIPWRECK AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BALTIC SEA

Other Swedish shipwrecks have been garnering attention recently. The wrecks of two large 17th-century warships, for example, were discovered off a Swedish island, one of which may be linked to a famous doomed ship from that era.

Westlake Legal Group SamsonShipwreck2 16th-century shipwreck uncovered in the center of Stockholm James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b3d2f0e0-89c3-5c56-af04-ba383f87f131 article

Reconstruction of a section of the Samson. The yellow mark denotes the part of the ship that was discovered. (Illustration: Vrak – Museum of wrecks, State Maritime and Transport History Museums)

Researchers believe that one of the warships found off the island of Vaxholm in Stockholm’s archipelago may be the Applet. The warship was the sister ship of the Vasa, a famed 17th-century Swedish warship that sank on its maiden voyage.

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Westlake Legal Group SamsonShipwreck3 16th-century shipwreck uncovered in the center of Stockholm James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b3d2f0e0-89c3-5c56-af04-ba383f87f131 article

Photo of the wreck. (Vrak – Museum of wrecks, National Maritime and Transport History Museums)

In 2014, researchers started exploring the wreckage of the Mars, a Swedish warship that sank in the Baltic during a naval battle in 1564.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.  Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers.

Westlake Legal Group SamsonShipwreck 16th-century shipwreck uncovered in the center of Stockholm James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b3d2f0e0-89c3-5c56-af04-ba383f87f131 article   Westlake Legal Group SamsonShipwreck 16th-century shipwreck uncovered in the center of Stockholm James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc b3d2f0e0-89c3-5c56-af04-ba383f87f131 article

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How the U.S. Airstrike Could Affect the 2020 Race

Westlake Legal Group 03iran-dems-facebookJumbo How the U.S. Airstrike Could Affect the 2020 Race Warren, Elizabeth Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Sanders, Bernard Presidential Election of 2020 Buttigieg, Pete (1982- ) Biden, Joseph R Jr

The American military strike in Baghdad that killed the Iranian general Qassim Suleimani rippled instantly through the Democratic presidential primary on Friday, forcing national security issues to the fore of a race dominated so far by domestic policy and perhaps stirring debates among Democrats over matters of war and peace.

The party’s presidential candidates reacted to the strike with a measure of unity, at least on the surface level, with expressions of concern about what they called the Trump administration’s penchant for reckless action and the possibility of all-out war. While several deplored Suleimani’s role in directing violence against Americans, the Democrats expressed anxiety rather than jubilation over the circumstances of his demise.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. said President Trump had “tossed a stick of dynamite into a tinderbox,” while Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont warned that the attack “brings us closer to another disastrous war in the Middle East.”

“Our priority must be to avoid another costly war,” Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts said.

In North Conway, N.H., on Friday, Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., described the strike as an “extremely provocative act” that both the Obama and George W. Bush administrations had opted not to take against Suleimani.

“If we have learned nothing else from the Middle East in the last 20 years, it’s that taking out a bad guy is not a good idea unless you are ready for what’s coming next,” said Mr. Buttigieg, who uncharacteristically donned a suit jacket over his shirt and tie, apparently conveying the gravity of the moment.

But there were also distinctions in how the leading Democrats responded, pointing the way toward a larger debate in the party about foreign wars and the American presence in the Middle East. Mr. Sanders, for instance, notably used the word “assassination” to describe the killing of the Iranian commander — a term with serious legal and diplomatic implications — and pointed out that he had opposed the 2002 resolution authorizing war in Iraq, leaving unsaid that Mr. Biden had supported it.

The degree to which military matters come to dominate the primary, in the remaining month before the Iowa caucuses, will likely depend on events in the Middle East, and how severe and visible any ensuing clash with Iran turns out to be. Foreign affairs have played a strictly limited role so far in the Democratic race. There have been major debate-stage duels over health care, taxation, immigration, criminal justice and gun control, but only glancing disagreements about the role of the United States abroad and the proper way to resolve American military engagements in the Middle East and Central Asia.

In 2020, the possibility of a new and protracted conflict abroad could well reshape the general election, even beyond the Democratic race. Mr. Trump ran for president on a pledge to pull back the United States from foreign wars, drawing support from unconventional quarters for a Republican because of the perception that he would pursue an “America First” policy of relative isolationism and national self-interest.

But Mr. Trump had already drawn criticism from his Democratic rivals, and even within his own party, for presiding over a chaotic pullback from Syria, and the eruption of large-scale violence in Iran and Iraq could profoundly complicate his aim to seek a second term on a message of peace and prosperity.

In the Democratic primary, foreign policy experience has largely been regarded as an asset of Mr. Biden, given his global stature as a former vice president and his background as chairman of the foreign relations committee in the Senate. He has made restoring American alliances around the world a central theme of his campaign and criticized Mr. Trump for turning the United States into a punch line at gatherings of global leaders.

On Friday, Mr. Biden declared on Twitter that the world “has been set on edge by an erratic, unstable and dangerously incompetent commander in chief.” Proposing himself as a safe alternative, Mr. Biden posted a campaign advertisement that showed him meeting with troops and walking beside former President Barack Obama.

“Every day that Donald Trump directs American national security is a dangerous day for the United States and the world,” Mr. Biden said.

But an intensifying debate over foreign policy could have the effect of both spotlighting Mr. Biden’s extensive résumé and also subjecting his track record in the region to new scrutiny. There have been signs in recent days that several of the leading Democratic candidates were angling for a foreign policy debate with Mr. Biden, even before the outbreak of violence in Iraq and the Suleimani killing came to dominate the news.

Mr. Sanders has campaigned consistently on his antiwar record, and he has repeatedly highlighted Mr. Biden’s past support for the Iraq war, warning Democrats that Mr. Trump would use that record against the former vice president in a general election. On Friday morning, an aide to Mr. Sanders posted images on Twitter showing the progressive lawmaker speaking out against war in Iraq in 1991, 1998, 2002 and 2014.

Mr. Buttigieg has attempted to counter questions about his own relative inexperience by pointing to Mr. Biden’s stances on Iraq, as an example of how experience was not always an asset in campaigning or governing.

“He supported the worst foreign policy decision made by the United States in my lifetime, which was the decision to invade Iraq,” Mr. Buttigieg said in an Iowa television interview.

And in his statement on Friday, Mr. Buttigieg repeatedly cited his own military service to suggest he had a distinctive grasp of the situation.

Ms. Warren, too, has indicated in the past that she takes a skeptical view of American military involvement in the Middle East, and declared in one of the fall debates that the United States should remove its combat troops from the region. That stance could become a dividing line in the primary, separating progressives like her and Mr. Sanders from Mr. Biden and others.

For now, much of the Democratic field was proceeding with — and recommending — caution. Former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg of New York released a statement questioning whether the president had fully considered “the grave risks involved,” while Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota called on the administration to consult with Congress about a “strategy for preventing a wider conflict.”

There is some precedent for events overseas reshaping American primary elections, usually to the benefit of a candidate regarded as a figure of experience. In December 2003, the capture of Saddam Hussein in Iraq formed a backdrop for the final phase of a Democratic presidential primary that yielded the quick nomination of John F. Kerry, a Vietnam veteran who served on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Four years later, in 2007, the troop surge in Afghanistan and the December assassination of Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan pushed national security to the center of an unsettled Republican primary that ended with the nomination of John S. McCain, the war hero whose campaign focused overwhelmingly on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Kevin Madden, a political strategist who advised Mr. Bush and Mitt Romney’s presidential campaigns, said national security tended to become an election issue — in primaries and general elections — mainly in response to major external developments. He cited the Benghazi attack in the fall of 2012 and the Paris nightclub massacre in 2015 as other recent examples.

”The economy is baked into the cake of every presidential election. But the national security issue focus tends to be driven by big events,” Mr. Madden said. “Every recent contest has had one of these events where everything seems to stop and cause all the participants, from the candidates and campaigns to the voters and the media, to recalibrate the stakes of the election through the lens of national security and foreign policy.”

Reid J. Epstein contributed reporting from North Conway, N.H.

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Trump Says He Ordered Killing of Iranian to Prevent New Attack on Americans

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Friday that he ordered the operation that killed Iran’s top security and intelligence commander not just to retaliate for past attacks on Americans, but also to forestall an active effort “to kill many more” Americans, as the region braced for a possible escalation in violence.

In his first comments on the drone strike against Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, who led the powerful Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, Mr. Trump suggested that the Iranian commander “got caught” preparing to hit American targets. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said a planned attack on Americans had been “imminent” before the drone strike.

Video

transcript

Video Shows Aftermath of U.S. Strike That Killed Top Iran Commander

President Trump authorized the attack early Friday at Baghdad International Airport that killed Iran’s top security and intelligence commander, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

What was sitting before us was his travels throughout the region, and his efforts to make a significant strike against Americans — there would have been many Muslims killed as well — Iraqis, people in other countries as well.”

Westlake Legal Group merlin_166605342_bb1d07c1-25be-4a96-8815-857e98b24a47-videoSixteenByNine3000 Trump Says He Ordered Killing of Iranian to Prevent New Attack on Americans Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Soleimani, Qassem Pompeo, Mike Obama, Barack Iraq Iran Bush, George W bin Laden, Osama

President Trump authorized the attack early Friday at Baghdad International Airport that killed Iran’s top security and intelligence commander, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.CreditCredit…Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg News

“General Qassem Soleimani has killed or badly wounded thousands of Americans over an extended period of time, and was plotting to kill many more…but got caught!” Mr. Trump wrote on Twitter, using a different spelling of the commander’s name. “He was directly and indirectly responsible for the death of millions of people, including the recent large number of PROTESTERS killed in Iran itself.”

As oil prices surged and stock markets slid, the State Department urged Americans to leave Iraq, where the attack on General Suleimani was carried out and where Iranian elements play a powerful role. The American Embassy in Baghdad, which had been under siege by pro-Iranian protesters chanting “Death to America” in recent days, suspended consular operations. “U.S. citizens should not approach the Embassy,” the State Department warned on Twitter.

The White House approved the strike on General Suleimani after a rocket attack last Friday on an Iraqi military base outside Kirkuk killed an American civilian contractor and injured other American and Iraqi personnel, according to an American official who insisted on anonymity to discuss internal decision making. The Joint Special Operations Command spent the next several days looking for an opportunity.

The option that was eventually approved depended on General Suleimani’s arrival on Thursday at Baghdad International Airport. If he was met by Iraqi officials, the American official said, the strike would be called off. But the official said it turned out to be a “clean party” and the strike was approved.

The strike touched off an immediate debate in Washington, with Republicans hailing the action as a decisive blow against a longtime enemy with American blood on his hands and Democrats expressing concern that the president was risking a new war in the Middle East.

With Congress returning to town after the holidays for a presumed Senate impeachment trial, Mr. Trump risked suspicion that he was taking action overseas to distract from his political troubles at home, à la the political movie “Wag the Dog.”

As a private citizen, Mr. Trump repeatedly accused President Barack Obama of preparing to go to war with Iran to bolster his re-election chances in 2012.

Democratic leaders complained that Mr. Trump acted without consulting or even informing Congress first. Mr. Trump responded by retweeting a post comparing Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, to the Iranians.

The post by Dinesh D’Souza, a conservative commentator who was pardoned by Mr. Trump for a campaign finance violation, scoffed at Mr. Schumer’s complaint that he was not told in advance. “Neither were the Iranians, and for pretty much the same reason,” Mr. D’Souza wrote.

Mr. Pompeo said in news network appearances that the United States had intelligence that General Suleimani was preparing a specific, new operation to target Americans in the Middle East, but declined to elaborate.

“He was actively plotting in the region to take actions, a big action as he described it, that would have put dozens if not hundreds of American lives at risk,” Mr. Pompeo said on CNN. “It was imminent.”

He dismissed concerns raised by American allies, who expressed fear of a wider war in the Middle East. A French minister suggested that “we are waking up in a more dangerous world” following the strike.

“Yeah, well, the French are just wrong about that,” Mr. Pompeo said. “The world is a much safer place today. And I can assure you Americans in the region are much safer today after the demise of Qassim Suleimani.”

Mr. Pompeo spoke to top diplomats in France, Britain, Germany and China on Friday about the strike and told his foreign counterparts that the United States was committed to de-escalation, according to State Department statements.

One American official familiar with the internal discussions about the strike said the administration was still trying to figure out what is next and how to be prepared for it.

The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the backlash over General Suleimani’s death could be more fraught than that after the American raid in 2011 that killed Osama bin Laden, who led a stateless group and had no international support.

The decision to hit General Suleimani complicates relations with Iraq’s government, which has tried to balance itself between the United States and Iran.

A senior Iraqi official said Friday that there was a good chance the Iraqi Parliament, which is being convened by the prime minister for an emergency session, would vote to force American troops to leave Iraq. Top Iraqi leaders earlier had wanted to accommodate the troop presence because of the persistent threat from the Islamic State and other regional security matters.

The Iraqi official noted angry statements condemning the strike on General Suleimani from Iraqi politicians and religious leaders who, until now, have been tolerant of the Americans. He added that he expected Iran to take retaliatory action soon, and that moderates in Tehran would not be able to hold off the hard-liners. Iraq would be caught in the middle, he said.

Mr. Trump said Iraq should not welcome Iranian influence. “The United States has paid Iraq Billions of Dollars a year, for many years,” he wrote on Twitter. “That is on top of all else we have done for them. The people of Iraq don’t want to be dominated & controlled by Iran, but ultimately, that is their choice.”

A Swiss diplomat in Tehran delivered a message on the killing of General Suleimani on behalf of the United States to the Iranian government on Friday, said an official with knowledge of the action. The Swiss have long acted as interlocutors between Washington and Tehran, which broke off diplomatic relations in 1979 after the Islamic Revolution and siege of the United States Embassy in Tehran.

The official did not give details of the message. The Swiss aided in a prisoner exchange last month in which Iran freed an American graduate student confined for three and a half years, Xiyue Wang, for the release of an Iranian scientist held in Atlanta for violating American sanctions against Tehran.

Mr. Trump ordered the strike from his holiday retreat at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. He was scheduled to travel to Miami on Friday afternoon to address a group of evangelical supporters of his re-election campaign.

In his tweets on the strike, Mr. Trump argued that Iranians would actually welcome General Suleimani’s death.

“While Iran will never be able to properly admit it, Soleimani was both hated and feared within the country,” he wrote. “They are not nearly as saddened as the leaders will let the outside world believe. He should have been taken out many years ago!”

President George W. Bush and Mr. Obama both opted against targeting General Suleimani for fear that it would lead to a spiraling conflict.

“What always kept both Democratic and Republican presidents from targeting Soleimani himself was the simple question: Was the strike worth the likely retaliation, and the potential to pull us into protracted conflict?” said Representative Elissa Slotkin, a Democrat from Michigan and former C.I.A. analyst who served in Iraq and worked at the White House under both of Mr. Trump’s immediate predecessors.

“The two administrations I worked for both determined that the ultimate ends didn’t justify the means,” she said. “The Trump administration has made a different calculation.”

Thomas Gibbons-Neff and Lara Jakes contributed reporting.

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Austin ‘stabbing incident’ sees one killed, three hurt; suspect in custody

One person was killed, three others hurt and a suspect was in custody following a “stabbing incident” Friday morning in downtown Austin, police and emergency officials said.

Austin-Travis County EMS said a man in his 20s was pronounced dead and a man in his 50s was taken to a hospital with life-threatening injuries. Two others were being treated on the scene on South Congress Avenue.

Austin police said a suspect was in custody and that “no other known suspects are outstanding” but they did not immediately say whether the suspect was among the injured or what led to the stabbings.

‘AFFLUENZA TEEN’ ETHAN COUCH ARRESTED AGAIN, FOR VIOLATING PROBATION AFTER TESTING POSITIVE FOR THC

Stacy Romine said she witnessed the attack while out to get her morning coffee and then saw the attacker leap head-first from the roof of a nearby building.

Westlake Legal Group AP20003557537727 Austin 'stabbing incident' sees one killed, three hurt; suspect in custody fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article a9df1940-e7a3-58cc-afc0-c70cf4cb3e07

Paramedics perform CPR on a stabbing victim in Austin, Texas on Friday, Jan. 3, 2020. (Austin American-Statesman via AP)

“There was nothing that provoked it,” Romine, 33, told The Associated Press. “This guy was not OK.”

Romine said the man was “obviously under the influence of something” when he hit an elderly man at a coffee shop off a retail plaza near the heart of the popular South Congress shopping corridor, about a mile south of the Texas Capitol.

TEXAS CHURCH SHOOTER’S EX-WIFE SAYS SHE’S ‘GLAD THEY STOPPED HIM’

A group of people tried to stop the attacker, and he struggled with them before eventually breaking free and running out of the building, Romine said. She said she never saw a knife.

Westlake Legal Group AP20003557824765 Austin 'stabbing incident' sees one killed, three hurt; suspect in custody fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article a9df1940-e7a3-58cc-afc0-c70cf4cb3e07

Paramedics transport a stabbing victim as Austin Police secure the area of a shopping complex in Austin, Texas, on Friday, Jan. 3, 2020. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

After he ran out, Romine said she saw the attacker jump from the roof of a nearby building. He did not move after hitting the ground, she said. Police said the suspect was transported to the hospital and is still alive.

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Police cordoned the retail plaza where the stabbing was reported around 8 a.m. during the typically congested morning commute.

Westlake Legal Group AP20003557537727 Austin 'stabbing incident' sees one killed, three hurt; suspect in custody fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article a9df1940-e7a3-58cc-afc0-c70cf4cb3e07   Westlake Legal Group AP20003557537727 Austin 'stabbing incident' sees one killed, three hurt; suspect in custody fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime fnc/us fnc Associated Press article a9df1940-e7a3-58cc-afc0-c70cf4cb3e07

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Delta employees say uniforms are still causing skin irritation and breathing problems, file lawsuit

A number of Delta employees are itching to get rid of the company’s new uniforms.

Hundreds of Delta Air Lines employees have filed a lawsuit against Land’s End — which produced the uniforms for the airline in 2018 — claiming the chemicals used in the manufacturing of their work-mandated attire has caused itching, rashes and breathing difficulties, among other health issues.

DELTA PASSENGER FILMS TRAVELER DOING ‘THE MOST DISGUSTING THING I’VE EVER SEEN’

“These uniforms are high stretch, wrinkle and stain-resistant, waterproof, anti-static, and deodorizing. Lands’ End used various chemical additives and finishes to achieve these characteristics,” the lawsuit alleges, according to The New York Post.

Additional issues reported by Delta Air Lines employees include coughing, tightness of the chest, hair loss, hives and headaches, leading to “severe emotional distress” in some.

The lawsuit claims the health problems were reported soon after the uniforms were debuted in May 2018, and “continue to this day.”

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Following the initial launch in 2018, Delta Air Lines said the uniforms were tested on 1,000 employees across 80 focus groups.

“When we began working with employees to design new uniforms, we wanted to improve design, fit and function, while ensuring the health and safety of all Delta people. That’s why we took three years to collect feedback and listen, including three months of testing live in the operation on 1,000 randomly selected employees,” the airline told Fox News in June 2018.

The airline also admitted that it had received “a few reports” of “potential chafing of skin irritation,” but claimed that the clothing articles believed to be responsible were optional.

The uniforms, which were designed by Zac Posen and consisted of 1.2 million individual articles of clothing, cost Delta Air Lines “probably in the $20 million range,” CEO Ed Bastian said at the time.

Westlake Legal Group DeltaUniforms Delta employees say uniforms are still causing skin irritation and breathing problems, file lawsuit Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/travel fnc article 23b545e0-38b9-570f-954c-fb6138a8a123

The uniforms, which were designed by Zac Posen, cost the airline somewhere “in the $20 million range,” Delta CEO Ed Bastian said at the time. (Delta Air Lines)

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In a statement shared with Fox News on Friday, the airline claimed its own study verified the “highest textile standards” of the uniform.

“Our top priority continues to be the safety of our employees, which is why we invested in a rigorous toxicology study to determine if there was a universal scientific issue with the uniform,” the airline shared in a statement. “The results of the study confirm our uniforms meet the highest textile standards – OEKO-TEX – with the exception of the optional flight attendant apron, which we removed from the collection.”

The airline has earlier confirmed that the uniforms were provided to some 64,000 employees. About 24,000 of those are flight attendants, the lawsuit claims, according to the New York Post.

The workers are accusing Land’s End of negligence and providing defective uniforms, as well as the alleged failure to call on Delta to recall the uniforms.

A representative for Land’s End said the company would not comment on pending litigation.

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Delta’s uniform issues are not unique to the industry. In Nov. of 2016, the Association of Professional Flight Attendants called on American Airlines to recall its then-new uniforms following complaints of rashes and hives. In March of 2017, American Airlines officially announced that alternatives would be provided.

Janine Puhak contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group DeltaUniforms Delta employees say uniforms are still causing skin irritation and breathing problems, file lawsuit Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/travel fnc article 23b545e0-38b9-570f-954c-fb6138a8a123   Westlake Legal Group DeltaUniforms Delta employees say uniforms are still causing skin irritation and breathing problems, file lawsuit Michael Bartiromo fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox-news/style-and-beauty fox news fnc/travel fnc article 23b545e0-38b9-570f-954c-fb6138a8a123

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Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166605342_bb1d07c1-25be-4a96-8815-857e98b24a47-articleLarge Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

Iranians mourned the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in Tehran on Friday.Credit…Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg News

Iranian leaders issued strident calls on Friday for revenge against the United States after the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in an overnight airstrike at the Baghdad airport.

His death is a considerable blow to Tehran, and Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called for retaliation and for three days of national mourning.

“His departure to God does not end his path or his mission, but a forceful revenge awaits the criminals who have his blood and the blood of the other martyrs last night on their hands,” the supreme leader said in a statement.

Ira’s security body also pledged to avenge General Suleimani’s killing in the “right place and time.”

General Suleimani was the head of the powerful Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps and the architect of nearly every significant operation by Iranian intelligence and military forces over the past two decades.

The general’s prominent role meant that his death could have a ripple effect in any number of countries across the Middle East where Iran and the United States compete for influence.

Westlake Legal Group sat-airport-900 Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

Baghdad

International

Airport

airport st.

Suleimani was in

a vehicle struck

by two missiles as

his convoy exited the airport.

Westlake Legal Group sat-airport-600 Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

Baghdad

International

Airport

airport st.

Suleimani was in a vehicle struck by two missiles as his convoy exited the airport.

Westlake Legal Group sat-airport-335 Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

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Suleimani was in a vehicle struck by two missiles as his convoy exited the airport.

The New York Times; satellite image by Maxar via Bing.

The strike was carried out by an MQ-9 Reaper drone that fired missiles on a convoy of vehicles leaving the airport. Several other officials from Iraqi militias backed by Tehran were also killed.

“This strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans,” the Pentagon said in a statement. The United States has long been at odds with Iran over its nuclear program and influence in Iraq and other countries in the region. Those tensions have surged under Mr. Trump since he abruptly pulled the United States out of a landmark 2015 nuclear deal and reintroduced punishing sanctions against Tehran.

The strike on Friday was the latest escalation between the two nations after a rocket attack on an Iraqi military base, believed to have been carried out by an Iran-backed militia, killed an American contractor in December.

The State Department urged American citizens to leave Iraq immediately following the strike that killed General Suleimani in Baghdad, citing “heightened tensions.”

Oil prices jumped on Friday after the news of the general’s death: The price of Brent oil, the international benchmark, surged in the early hours of Hong Kong trading to nearly $70 a barrel — an increase of $3.

The immediate increase in the price of oil was among the largest since an attack on a critical Saudi oil installation in September that temporarily knocked out 5 percent of the world’s oil supply.

By 11 a.m. in London, the price of Brent crude oil was at a three-month high of $69.20 a barrel. International oil companies based in the southeastern Iraqi city of Basra have begun evacuating American employees, according to Al Arabiya news outlet.

The Dow Jones industrial average and the S & P 500 each opened about 1 percent lower on Friday, while oil company shares rose, with Exxon Mobil up 1.3 percent and Chevron up 1.2 percent in premarket trading.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he had spoken to top diplomats in Britain, China and Germany on Friday about what the State Department described as President Trump’s recent decision “to take defensive action to eliminate Qassim Suleimani in response to imminent threats to American lives.”

Mr. Pompeo also told his foreign counterparts that the United States was committed to de-escalation, according to the State Department. Mr. Pompeo posted several statements and a video on Twitter that he said showed Iraqis “dancing in the street” at the news of General Suleimani’s killing.

Mr. Pompeo said the American strike on General Suleimani was a proactive measure to stave off what American intelligence officials saw as an “imminent attack” in the region.

“This was a man who has put American lives at risk for an awfully long time,” Mr. Pompeo said on Friday on CNN. “Last night was the time that we needed to strike to make sure that this imminent attack that he was working actively was disrupted.”

He declined to provide more details about the looming attack.

One American official familiar with the internal discussions about the drone strike said the administration was still trying to figure out what would come next and how to be prepared for it.

The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the backlash over General Suleimani’s death could be even more fraught than the tensions after an American raid in 2011 that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of Al Qaeda, who was part of a stateless group and had no international support.

“What was sitting before us was his travels throughout the region, his efforts to make a significant strike against Americans,” Mr. Pompeo told Fox News on Friday morning. “It was a strike that was aimed at both disrupting that plot, deterring further aggression.”

The Swiss Foreign Ministry said in a statement that diplomat from Switzerland, which represents American interests in Iran to maintain communication, had delivered a message from the United States to the Iranian foreign ministry in Tehran on Friday concerning the death of General Suleimani. It did not elaborate.

“Given the latest events in the region, Switzerland invites both parties to avoid any escalation,” the ministry said.

As the leader of the Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, which leads Iran’s operations abroad, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, who was 62, was the country’s top security and intelligence commander.

General Suleimani was behind nearly all military and intelligence operations orchestrated by Iran in the past two decades.

He directed Iran-backed militias in the fight against the Islamic State. American officials have also accused him of causing the deaths of hundreds of soldiers during the Iraq war and he was believed to have played a central role in orchestrating Iran’s support for the government of President Bashar al-Assad in Syria.

In Iran, General Suleimani was a respected political figure among hard-liners and was close to the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. He was described by some officials as the country’s de facto second foreign minister.

To many Iranians, he was also a war hero, after becoming a commander while he was only in his 20s during the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s.

The general’s deputy succeeded him within hours, according to Iranian news agencies. Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, appointed Brig. Gen. Ismail Qaani as leader of the Quds Force on Friday.

General Qaani, 62, had been the force’s deputy commander since 1997, according to Reuters.

The United States Treasury Department put General Qaani on a blacklist in 2012 for what it called “financial disbursements” to various terrorist groups, including Hezbollah.

In 2017, General Qaani was reported as warning that Iran had “buried many” like President Trump. “We are not a warmongering country,” he said at the time, according to the semiofficial news agency Tasnim. “But any military action against Iran will be regretted.”

Large crowds gathered for Friday Prayer in Iran and filled public squares with mass protests, while officials met privately to plot strategy and leaders vowed to avenge General Suleimani’s death.

Images broadcast on Iranian state television showed hundreds of supporters of General Suleimani gathered in mourning outside his house in the southeastern town of Kerman, and later footage shows thousands gathered on the streets.

“The great nation of Iran will take revenge for this heinous crime,” President Hassan Rouhani wrote on Twitter.

Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, called the strike an “act of international terrorism.”

Iran was working with Iraqi officials to repatriate the general’s body for a funeral service, perhaps as soon as Saturday, a number of Iranian journalists reported.

Iran’s Supreme National Security Council also held an emergency meeting. According to two people with knowledge of the discussion, council members received a written order from Mr. Khamenei that ordered that Iran “strike America directly and in exact proportion to the attack.”

In Iraq, the strike appeared likely to accelerate calls for the departure of American troops. Along with General Suleimani, it killed Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the leader of a powerful militia that is backed by Iran but technically under the umbrella of the Iraqi military.

Mr. al-Muhandis was one of the most powerful figures in this coalition of militia but also is a senior military figure in the Iraqi armed forces, according to IISS, an international research institute. He was also designated a terrorist by the United States for his role in an Iran-sponsored 1983 attack targeting American forces in Kuwait.

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq praised Mr. al-Muhandis and General Suleimani as heroes in the fight against the Islamic State and condemned their killing as “a brazen violation of Iraq’s sovereignty and a blatant attack on the nation’s dignity.”

Iraq’s Parliament planned to convene an emergency session on Saturday to address the strike, which could accelerate calls to push United States forces from the country.

Friday’s strike in Baghdad also killed Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the deputy commander of the umbrella group that oversees Iraq’s militias, a veteran of the Iraq war and the battle against the Islamic State, and a lifelong ally to Iran.

Born Jamal Jaafar Ibrahimi, he was better known by his nom de guerre and gained prominence as mostly Shiite militias formed to fight the Islamic State in 2014. But he was a powerful force in Iraq for years, and his death alone would have sent shock waves through the country.

In 2009, the United States Treasury Department designated Mr. al-Muhandis a “threat to stability in Iraq” and accused him of helping smuggle rockets, sniper rifles and other weapons into the country from Iran.

Long before the Iraq war, he was accused of playing a role in the bombings of French and American Embassies in Kuwait in 1983, and the later attempt to assassinate Kuwait’s emir.

Much of Mr. al-Muhandis’s history remains murky, including his age: He would have been about 66 or 67 at the time of his death, according to the United States government, which has said he was born 1953 in Basra, Iraq.

Mr. al-Muhandis fled Iraq with the rise of Saddam Hussein and spent years in exile in Iran, cultivating close ties with Iranian officials, becoming fluent in Persian and keeping a home in Tehran, according to The Wall Street Journal.

He and many other Shiite leaders returned to Iraq in the aftermath of the American invasion in 2003, and Mr. al-Muhandis briefly served in Iraq’s Parliament before dropping out of public view.

In the midst of the Iraq war, he helped found Kataib Hezbollah, a militia that fought against the United States, and was accused of training and equipping a network of anti-American groups. The militia has continued to oppose the United States, and American officials blamed it for a rocket attack that killed an American contractor last week. The group is separate from Hezbollah in Lebanon, though both are backed by Iran and are considered terrorist groups by the State Department.

In a reflection of the chaos that has engulfed Iraq and the region in recent years, Mr. al-Muhandis found himself effectively on the same side as the United States against the Islamic State, which Iran and his militia regarded as a common enemy.

Iranian allies across the Arab world condemned the United States, reflecting the strength of the regional network General Suleimani spent much of his life building, including links to the government of Syria and militant groups in Lebanon, Gaza, Yemen and elsewhere.

The leader of Hezbollah, the Lebanese militant group and political party that General Suleimani helped build over three decades into the country’s top military forces and a grave threat to Israel, vowed in a statement that his group would continue on the path the general set and “work night and day to achieve his goals.”

It was the responsibility of all resistance fighters to seek “just retribution” against “the most evil criminals in the world,” the leader, Hassan Nasrallah, said, meaning the United States.

In Yemen, the administration run by the Houthi rebels, who have received support from Iran in their war against Saudi Arabia, condemned the United States strike as a “cowardly attack” that “makes clear the increasing American spite against all who are in favor of justice for the Islamic world.”

In Syria, where General Suleimani oversaw a huge effort to shore up the government of President Bashar al-Assad, a foreign ministry official condemned the “treacherous, criminal American aggression” that led to his killing, the state news agency SANA reported on Friday.

But other regional powers stressed restraint. The Turkish Foreign Ministry in a statement said it was concerned by the escalating tensions.

“Turkey has always been against interventions, assassination and sectarian conflict in the region,” the statement said, calling for caution and prioritizing diplomacy.

Antonio Guterres, the United Nations’ secretary general, voiced his deep concern over the recent rise in tensions in the Middle East, his spokesman, Farhan Haq, said in a statement.

“The world cannot afford another war in the Gulf,” the statement read. “This is a moment in which leaders must exercise maximum restraint.”

The killing of General Suleimani “most likely” violated international law, Agnes Callamard, the United Nations expert on extrajudicial executions, said in a post on Twitter.

“Use of lethal force is only justified to protect against an imminent threat to life, Ms. Callamard wrote. An individual’s past involvement in “terrorist” acts “is not sufficient to take his targeting for killing legal,” she said. Use of drones for targeted killings outside active hostilities was “almost never likely to be legal,” she added.

Many experts also said on Friday that the strike probably ended any prospect of negotiations to save the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the landmark nuclear agreement Iran signed in 2015 with the United States, China, Russia, Britain, France and Germany. The recent escalation in tensions between the United States and Iran began with the 2018 decision by President Trump to withdraw from the deal.

The Russian Foreign Ministry called the killing of General Suleimani “an adventurist step that will increase tensions throughout the region,” according to local news agencies.

“Suleimani served the cause of protecting Iran’s national interests with devotion,” the ministry added.

A spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry called for restraint on all sides, “especially the United States.”

“China has always opposed the use of force in international relations,” the spokesman, Geng Shuang, said at a daily news briefing, according to news agencies.

Britain’s foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, called on Friday for a de-escalation in tensions and said that further conflict in the region was not in his country’s interest.

“We have always recognized the aggressive threat posed by the Iranian Quds force led by Qassim Suleimani,” Mr. Raab said in a statement. “Following his death, we urge all parties to de-escalate.”

Federica Mogherini, the European high representative for foreign and security policy, said on Twitter that the general’s killing was “an extremely dangerous escalation.”

In France, the country’s junior minister for European affairs, Amélie de Montchalin, said that she would soon consult with countries in the region.

“We have woken up to a more dangerous world,” Ms. de Montchalin told French radio, calling for “stability and de-escalation.”

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel cut short an official visit to Greece to return to Israel on Friday after the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

Before boarding the plane, Mr. Netanyahu praised President Trump for “acting swiftly, forcefully and decisively.”

General Suleimani, a longtime adversary of Israel, was credited with overseeing many attacks against Israeli and Jewish targets and he was linked with an attack on the Israeli embassy in Argentina in the 1990s. More recently he was behind military actions from Syria, across Israel’s northern frontier.

Some Israeli opposition politicians issued congratulatory messages. Moshe Yaalon, a former military chief and defense minister — and now a leader of the centrist Blue and White party — thanked the Americans for what he called a “determined and precise” operation.

“The world and the Middle East have been freed today from an arch murderer,” he said, adding, “Good riddance!”

But Hamas, the Islamic militant group that controls the Palestinian coastal territory of Gaza, condemned what it called “U.S. bullying” that it said served the interests of Israel.

It offered condolences to Iran on the death of General Suleimani, saying in a statement that he had “played a major and critical role in supporting Palestinian resistance at all levels.”

Bassem Naim, a spokesman for the group, said on Twitter that the assassination “opens the doors of the region to all possibilities, except calm & stability.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi demanded that the administration brief the full Congress on the strike and the next steps under consideration, noting that the move was made without lawmakers’ consultation or an authorization of military force.

Ms. Pelosi spoke with Mark T. Esper, the defense secretary, Thursday night after the attack, an aide said, but was not given advance notice.

The strike, Ms. Pelosi said in a statement late Thursday evening, “risks provoking further dangerous escalation of violence. America — and the world — cannot afford to have tensions escalate to the point of no return.”

In stark contrast, Republican lawmakers — including both Iran hawks and those who have frequently clashed with Mr. Trump over his foreign policy — have uniformly praised the move.

“Will there be escalation? Yes. But the escalation is not on our part,” Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, who was stationed twice in Iraq with the Air Force, told CNN. “We’re finally responding to continued provocations by Iran.”

The strike at the Baghdad airport immediately spurred debate among American lawmakers about President Trump’s war powers and left congressional leaders sharply divided along party lines.

Senator Tom Udall, Democrat of New Mexico, accused Mr. Trump of bringing the nation “to the brink of an illegal war with Iran.”

Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, said on Twitter that Mr. Trump had “exercised admirable restraint” and added that the Quds Force were “entirely to blame.”

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. said in a statement, “President Trump just tossed a stick of dynamite into a tinderbox, and he owes the American people an explanation of the strategy and plan to keep safe our troops and embassy personnel, our people and our interests, both here at home and abroad, and our partners throughout the region and beyond.”

Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, also a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, condemned the strikes as a “dangerous escalation” in a post on Twitter.

“Trump promised to end endless wars, but this action puts us on the path to another one,” he wrote.

Reporting was contributed by Ben Hubbard, Farnaz Fassihi, Megan Specia, Isabel Kershner, Ronen Bergman, Lara Jakes, Eileen Sullivan, Elian Peltier, Catie Edmondson, Benjamin Mueller, Alan Yuhas and Nick Cumming-Bruce.

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Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166605342_bb1d07c1-25be-4a96-8815-857e98b24a47-articleLarge Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

Iranians mourned the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in Tehran on Friday.Credit…Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg News

Iranian leaders issued strident calls on Friday for revenge against the United States after the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani in an overnight airstrike at the Baghdad airport.

His death is a considerable blow to Tehran, and Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called for retaliation and for three days of national mourning.

“His departure to God does not end his path or his mission, but a forceful revenge awaits the criminals who have his blood and the blood of the other martyrs last night on their hands,” the supreme leader said in a statement.

Ira’s security body also pledged to avenge General Suleimani’s killing in the “right place and time.”

General Suleimani was the head of the powerful Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps and the architect of nearly every significant operation by Iranian intelligence and military forces over the past two decades.

The general’s prominent role meant that his death could have a ripple effect in any number of countries across the Middle East where Iran and the United States compete for influence.

Westlake Legal Group sat-airport-900 Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

Baghdad

International

Airport

airport st.

Suleimani was in

a vehicle struck

by two missiles as

his convoy exited the airport.

Westlake Legal Group sat-airport-600 Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

Baghdad

International

Airport

airport st.

Suleimani was in a vehicle struck by two missiles as his convoy exited the airport.

Westlake Legal Group sat-airport-335 Live Updates: Iran Vows ‘Forceful Revenge’ After U.S. Kills General United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Khamenei, Ali Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iran Defense and Military Forces Deaths (Fatalities) Baghdad International Airport (Iraq) Baghdad (Iraq)

Baghdad

International

Airport

airport st.

Suleimani was in a vehicle struck by two missiles as his convoy exited the airport.

The New York Times; satellite image by Maxar via Bing.

The strike was carried out by an MQ-9 Reaper drone that fired missiles on a convoy of vehicles leaving the airport. Several other officials from Iraqi militias backed by Tehran were also killed.

“This strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans,” the Pentagon said in a statement. The United States has long been at odds with Iran over its nuclear program and influence in Iraq and other countries in the region. Those tensions have surged under Mr. Trump since he abruptly pulled the United States out of a landmark 2015 nuclear deal and reintroduced punishing sanctions against Tehran.

The strike on Friday was the latest escalation between the two nations after a rocket attack on an Iraqi military base, believed to have been carried out by an Iran-backed militia, killed an American contractor in December.

The State Department urged American citizens to leave Iraq immediately following the strike that killed General Suleimani in Baghdad, citing “heightened tensions.”

Oil prices jumped on Friday after the news of the general’s death: The price of Brent oil, the international benchmark, surged in the early hours of Hong Kong trading to nearly $70 a barrel — an increase of $3.

The immediate increase in the price of oil was among the largest since an attack on a critical Saudi oil installation in September that temporarily knocked out 5 percent of the world’s oil supply.

By 11 a.m. in London, the price of Brent crude oil was at a three-month high of $69.20 a barrel. International oil companies based in the southeastern Iraqi city of Basra have begun evacuating American employees, according to Al Arabiya news outlet.

The Dow Jones industrial average and the S & P 500 each opened about 1 percent lower on Friday, while oil company shares rose, with Exxon Mobil up 1.3 percent and Chevron up 1.2 percent in premarket trading.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he had spoken to top diplomats in Britain, China and Germany on Friday about what the State Department described as President Trump’s recent decision “to take defensive action to eliminate Qassim Suleimani in response to imminent threats to American lives.”

Mr. Pompeo also told his foreign counterparts that the United States was committed to de-escalation, according to the State Department. Mr. Pompeo posted several statements and a video on Twitter that he said showed Iraqis “dancing in the street” at the news of General Suleimani’s killing.

Mr. Pompeo said the American strike on General Suleimani was a proactive measure to stave off what American intelligence officials saw as an “imminent attack” in the region.

“This was a man who has put American lives at risk for an awfully long time,” Mr. Pompeo said on Friday on CNN. “Last night was the time that we needed to strike to make sure that this imminent attack that he was working actively was disrupted.”

He declined to provide more details about the looming attack.

One American official familiar with the internal discussions about the drone strike said the administration was still trying to figure out what would come next and how to be prepared for it.

The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the backlash over General Suleimani’s death could be even more fraught than the tensions after an American raid in 2011 that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of Al Qaeda, who was part of a stateless group and had no international support.

“What was sitting before us was his travels throughout the region, his efforts to make a significant strike against Americans,” Mr. Pompeo told Fox News on Friday morning. “It was a strike that was aimed at both disrupting that plot, deterring further aggression.”

The Swiss Foreign Ministry said in a statement that diplomat from Switzerland, which represents American interests in Iran to maintain communication, had delivered a message from the United States to the Iranian foreign ministry in Tehran on Friday concerning the death of General Suleimani. It did not elaborate.

“Given the latest events in the region, Switzerland invites both parties to avoid any escalation,” the ministry said.

As the leader of the Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, which leads Iran’s operations abroad, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, who was 62, was the country’s top security and intelligence commander.

General Suleimani was behind nearly all military and intelligence operations orchestrated by Iran in the past two decades.

He directed Iran-backed militias in the fight against the Islamic State. American officials have also accused him of causing the deaths of hundreds of soldiers during the Iraq war and he was believed to have played a central role in orchestrating Iran’s support for the government of President Bashar al-Assad in Syria.

In Iran, General Suleimani was a respected political figure among hard-liners and was close to the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. He was described by some officials as the country’s de facto second foreign minister.

To many Iranians, he was also a war hero, after becoming a commander while he was only in his 20s during the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s.

The general’s deputy succeeded him within hours, according to Iranian news agencies. Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, appointed Brig. Gen. Ismail Qaani as leader of the Quds Force on Friday.

General Qaani, 62, had been the force’s deputy commander since 1997, according to Reuters.

The United States Treasury Department put General Qaani on a blacklist in 2012 for what it called “financial disbursements” to various terrorist groups, including Hezbollah.

In 2017, General Qaani was reported as warning that Iran had “buried many” like President Trump. “We are not a warmongering country,” he said at the time, according to the semiofficial news agency Tasnim. “But any military action against Iran will be regretted.”

Large crowds gathered for Friday Prayer in Iran and filled public squares with mass protests, while officials met privately to plot strategy and leaders vowed to avenge General Suleimani’s death.

Images broadcast on Iranian state television showed hundreds of supporters of General Suleimani gathered in mourning outside his house in the southeastern town of Kerman, and later footage shows thousands gathered on the streets.

“The great nation of Iran will take revenge for this heinous crime,” President Hassan Rouhani wrote on Twitter.

Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, called the strike an “act of international terrorism.”

Iran was working with Iraqi officials to repatriate the general’s body for a funeral service, perhaps as soon as Saturday, a number of Iranian journalists reported.

Iran’s Supreme National Security Council also held an emergency meeting. According to two people with knowledge of the discussion, council members received a written order from Mr. Khamenei that ordered that Iran “strike America directly and in exact proportion to the attack.”

In Iraq, the strike appeared likely to accelerate calls for the departure of American troops. Along with General Suleimani, it killed Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the leader of a powerful militia that is backed by Iran but technically under the umbrella of the Iraqi military.

Mr. al-Muhandis was one of the most powerful figures in this coalition of militia but also is a senior military figure in the Iraqi armed forces, according to IISS, an international research institute. He was also designated a terrorist by the United States for his role in an Iran-sponsored 1983 attack targeting American forces in Kuwait.

Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq praised Mr. al-Muhandis and General Suleimani as heroes in the fight against the Islamic State and condemned their killing as “a brazen violation of Iraq’s sovereignty and a blatant attack on the nation’s dignity.”

Iraq’s Parliament planned to convene an emergency session on Saturday to address the strike, which could accelerate calls to push United States forces from the country.

Friday’s strike in Baghdad also killed Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the deputy commander of the umbrella group that oversees Iraq’s militias, a veteran of the Iraq war and the battle against the Islamic State, and a lifelong ally to Iran.

Born Jamal Jaafar Ibrahimi, he was better known by his nom de guerre and gained prominence as mostly Shiite militias formed to fight the Islamic State in 2014. But he was a powerful force in Iraq for years, and his death alone would have sent shock waves through the country.

In 2009, the United States Treasury Department designated Mr. al-Muhandis a “threat to stability in Iraq” and accused him of helping smuggle rockets, sniper rifles and other weapons into the country from Iran.

Long before the Iraq war, he was accused of playing a role in the bombings of French and American Embassies in Kuwait in 1983, and the later attempt to assassinate Kuwait’s emir.

Much of Mr. al-Muhandis’s history remains murky, including his age: He would have been about 66 or 67 at the time of his death, according to the United States government, which has said he was born 1953 in Basra, Iraq.

Mr. al-Muhandis fled Iraq with the rise of Saddam Hussein and spent years in exile in Iran, cultivating close ties with Iranian officials, becoming fluent in Persian and keeping a home in Tehran, according to The Wall Street Journal.

He and many other Shiite leaders returned to Iraq in the aftermath of the American invasion in 2003, and Mr. al-Muhandis briefly served in Iraq’s Parliament before dropping out of public view.

In the midst of the Iraq war, he helped found Kataib Hezbollah, a militia that fought against the United States, and was accused of training and equipping a network of anti-American groups. The militia has continued to oppose the United States, and American officials blamed it for a rocket attack that killed an American contractor last week. The group is separate from Hezbollah in Lebanon, though both are backed by Iran and are considered terrorist groups by the State Department.

In a reflection of the chaos that has engulfed Iraq and the region in recent years, Mr. al-Muhandis found himself effectively on the same side as the United States against the Islamic State, which Iran and his militia regarded as a common enemy.

Iranian allies across the Arab world condemned the United States, reflecting the strength of the regional network General Suleimani spent much of his life building, including links to the government of Syria and militant groups in Lebanon, Gaza, Yemen and elsewhere.

The leader of Hezbollah, the Lebanese militant group and political party that General Suleimani helped build over three decades into the country’s top military forces and a grave threat to Israel, vowed in a statement that his group would continue on the path the general set and “work night and day to achieve his goals.”

It was the responsibility of all resistance fighters to seek “just retribution” against “the most evil criminals in the world,” the leader, Hassan Nasrallah, said, meaning the United States.

In Yemen, the administration run by the Houthi rebels, who have received support from Iran in their war against Saudi Arabia, condemned the United States strike as a “cowardly attack” that “makes clear the increasing American spite against all who are in favor of justice for the Islamic world.”

In Syria, where General Suleimani oversaw a huge effort to shore up the government of President Bashar al-Assad, a foreign ministry official condemned the “treacherous, criminal American aggression” that led to his killing, the state news agency SANA reported on Friday.

But other regional powers stressed restraint. The Turkish Foreign Ministry in a statement said it was concerned by the escalating tensions.

“Turkey has always been against interventions, assassination and sectarian conflict in the region,” the statement said, calling for caution and prioritizing diplomacy.

Antonio Guterres, the United Nations’ secretary general, voiced his deep concern over the recent rise in tensions in the Middle East, his spokesman, Farhan Haq, said in a statement.

“The world cannot afford another war in the Gulf,” the statement read. “This is a moment in which leaders must exercise maximum restraint.”

The killing of General Suleimani “most likely” violated international law, Agnes Callamard, the United Nations expert on extrajudicial executions, said in a post on Twitter.

“Use of lethal force is only justified to protect against an imminent threat to life, Ms. Callamard wrote. An individual’s past involvement in “terrorist” acts “is not sufficient to take his targeting for killing legal,” she said. Use of drones for targeted killings outside active hostilities was “almost never likely to be legal,” she added.

Many experts also said on Friday that the strike probably ended any prospect of negotiations to save the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the landmark nuclear agreement Iran signed in 2015 with the United States, China, Russia, Britain, France and Germany. The recent escalation in tensions between the United States and Iran began with the 2018 decision by President Trump to withdraw from the deal.

The Russian Foreign Ministry called the killing of General Suleimani “an adventurist step that will increase tensions throughout the region,” according to local news agencies.

“Suleimani served the cause of protecting Iran’s national interests with devotion,” the ministry added.

A spokesman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry called for restraint on all sides, “especially the United States.”

“China has always opposed the use of force in international relations,” the spokesman, Geng Shuang, said at a daily news briefing, according to news agencies.

Britain’s foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, called on Friday for a de-escalation in tensions and said that further conflict in the region was not in his country’s interest.

“We have always recognized the aggressive threat posed by the Iranian Quds force led by Qassim Suleimani,” Mr. Raab said in a statement. “Following his death, we urge all parties to de-escalate.”

Federica Mogherini, the European high representative for foreign and security policy, said on Twitter that the general’s killing was “an extremely dangerous escalation.”

In France, the country’s junior minister for European affairs, Amélie de Montchalin, said that she would soon consult with countries in the region.

“We have woken up to a more dangerous world,” Ms. de Montchalin told French radio, calling for “stability and de-escalation.”

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel cut short an official visit to Greece to return to Israel on Friday after the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

Before boarding the plane, Mr. Netanyahu praised President Trump for “acting swiftly, forcefully and decisively.”

General Suleimani, a longtime adversary of Israel, was credited with overseeing many attacks against Israeli and Jewish targets and he was linked with an attack on the Israeli embassy in Argentina in the 1990s. More recently he was behind military actions from Syria, across Israel’s northern frontier.

Some Israeli opposition politicians issued congratulatory messages. Moshe Yaalon, a former military chief and defense minister — and now a leader of the centrist Blue and White party — thanked the Americans for what he called a “determined and precise” operation.

“The world and the Middle East have been freed today from an arch murderer,” he said, adding, “Good riddance!”

But Hamas, the Islamic militant group that controls the Palestinian coastal territory of Gaza, condemned what it called “U.S. bullying” that it said served the interests of Israel.

It offered condolences to Iran on the death of General Suleimani, saying in a statement that he had “played a major and critical role in supporting Palestinian resistance at all levels.”

Bassem Naim, a spokesman for the group, said on Twitter that the assassination “opens the doors of the region to all possibilities, except calm & stability.”

Speaker Nancy Pelosi demanded that the administration brief the full Congress on the strike and the next steps under consideration, noting that the move was made without lawmakers’ consultation or an authorization of military force.

Ms. Pelosi spoke with Mark T. Esper, the defense secretary, Thursday night after the attack, an aide said, but was not given advance notice.

The strike, Ms. Pelosi said in a statement late Thursday evening, “risks provoking further dangerous escalation of violence. America — and the world — cannot afford to have tensions escalate to the point of no return.”

In stark contrast, Republican lawmakers — including both Iran hawks and those who have frequently clashed with Mr. Trump over his foreign policy — have uniformly praised the move.

“Will there be escalation? Yes. But the escalation is not on our part,” Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, who was stationed twice in Iraq with the Air Force, told CNN. “We’re finally responding to continued provocations by Iran.”

The strike at the Baghdad airport immediately spurred debate among American lawmakers about President Trump’s war powers and left congressional leaders sharply divided along party lines.

Senator Tom Udall, Democrat of New Mexico, accused Mr. Trump of bringing the nation “to the brink of an illegal war with Iran.”

Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, said on Twitter that Mr. Trump had “exercised admirable restraint” and added that the Quds Force were “entirely to blame.”

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. said in a statement, “President Trump just tossed a stick of dynamite into a tinderbox, and he owes the American people an explanation of the strategy and plan to keep safe our troops and embassy personnel, our people and our interests, both here at home and abroad, and our partners throughout the region and beyond.”

Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, also a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, condemned the strikes as a “dangerous escalation” in a post on Twitter.

“Trump promised to end endless wars, but this action puts us on the path to another one,” he wrote.

Reporting was contributed by Ben Hubbard, Farnaz Fassihi, Megan Specia, Isabel Kershner, Ronen Bergman, Lara Jakes, Eileen Sullivan, Elian Peltier, Catie Edmondson, Benjamin Mueller, Alan Yuhas and Nick Cumming-Bruce.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Karlie Kloss Gets Dragged By ‘Project Runway’ Contestant’s Kushner Comment

Westlake Legal Group 5e0f5c0d250000201998fb03 Karlie Kloss Gets Dragged By ‘Project Runway’ Contestant’s Kushner Comment

A “Project Runway” contestant was not happy with host Karlie Kloss’ opinion of the garment he created, dishing back a sassy remark about the model’s marriage to the brother of presidential aide Jared Kushner

Contestant Tyler Neasloney was eliminated from Bravo’s fashion competition series after judges panned the outfit he designed for Kloss to wear to a fashion event in Paris. Neasloney said the look was inspired by former U.S. first ladies, but the judges weren’t feeling it ― particularly Kloss, who said it missed the mark.

When judge Brandon Maxwell said he couldn’t imagine Kloss wearing the garment anywhere, Neasloney snapped: “Not even to the dinner with Kushners?”

Kloss is married to businessman Joshua Kushner, who’s the younger brother of Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and a senior White House adviser.

The dig seemed to shock fellow cast members and Kloss herself, whose reaction was similar to Kombucha Girl’s:

Neasloney later said he didn’t mean anything by the comment. Many, however, suspected the ill-timed joke was part of the reason he was sent home.

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