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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 278)

NASA captures incredible image of dying star in deep space

Talk about an exit.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope managed to snap an incredible picture of a dying star in the Gemini constellation.

The constellation of Gemini, which is also known as the Twins, confused astronomers when it was first studied, the government agency said in a blog post. “Rather than being classified as a single object, it was instead recorded as two objects, owing to its symmetrical lobed structure (known as NGC 2371 and NGC 2372, though sometimes referred to together as NGC 2371/2).”

Westlake Legal Group nasa-dying-star NASA captures incredible image of dying star in deep space fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox news fnc/science fnc e867edd2-cf23-5d0b-91ca-94b747875801 Chris Ciaccia article

This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a dark, gloomy scene in the constellation of Gemini. It confused astronomers when it was first studied. Instead of being classified as a single object, it was recorded as two objects, owing to its symmetrical lobed structure (known as NGC 2371 and NGC 2372, though sometimes referred to together as NGC 2371/2). (Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. Wade et al.

ASTRONOMERS BAFFLED BY ‘COSMIC MOUNTAIN RANGES’ JUTTING THROUGH THE MILKY WAY

The two objects (or lobes) form what’s known as a planetary nebula, which is described as “shells of gas and dust that have been ejected from a star during the process of its evolution from a hydrogen-burning main sequence star into a red giant and eventually into a white dwarf.”

Despite the term, it has nothing to do with planets or exoplanets. Instead, NGC 2371/2 was created when a star, similar to our Sun, reached the end of its life and “blasted off its outer layers, shedding the constituent material and pushing it out into space to leave just a superheated stellar remnant behind.” What’s left behind is visible as the bright star in the center between the lobes,” NASA added in the post.

It’s expected that there will be a significant change to the region over the next few thousand years, as the lobes eventually dissipate completely, “and the remnant star will cool and dim to form a white dwarf.”

The Hubble Space Telescope, which has been in orbit since 1990, continues to allow incredible discoveries. However, it is slated to be replaced by the long-delayed James Webb telescope, which will provide great resolution and sensitivity over the Hubble, among several other improvements.

Last month, the telescope was assembled for the first time, as engineers joined the two halves together using a crane in Redondo Beach, Calif.

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Westlake Legal Group nasa-dying-star NASA captures incredible image of dying star in deep space fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox news fnc/science fnc e867edd2-cf23-5d0b-91ca-94b747875801 Chris Ciaccia article   Westlake Legal Group nasa-dying-star NASA captures incredible image of dying star in deep space fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox news fnc/science fnc e867edd2-cf23-5d0b-91ca-94b747875801 Chris Ciaccia article

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This Is What No One Tells You About Getting (And Having) Herpes

Westlake Legal Group 5d6e844c2500007e0401f396 This Is What No One Tells You About Getting (And Having) Herpes

“Why are you crying?”

Those were the first words my doctor said to me after telling me I had herpes. I was just post-divorce, in excruciating pain, and I thought I would never date again. I think crying was an understated reaction, all things considered.

My knowledge about herpes was limited at the time; I “knew” what everyone “knew.” I knew that herpes was sexually transmitted, that it was an easy punchline and that obviously it was something to be ashamed of.

I knew the language we use to talk about STIs, and that if you don’t have any, you’re “clean,” which means that if you do have one, you’re dirty.

When I texted the only person who could have given herpes to me, given the timing, he denied having it, and then said he’d “still fuck me.” Thanks?

I went home from my doctor’s appointment with a prescription for acyclovir and an inner certainty that my life was over. I called my mom, an experienced RN, who was as understanding as she could be, and gave me advice on how to cope with my first outbreak. (Pro tip: If you have an outbreak and it hurts to pee, pour lukewarm water over your bits to get things moving).

Once I was able to sit for more than a few minutes at a time, I crawled to my computer and asked Google for help. For once, Google delivered.

I discovered that there are two types of herpes, which is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV-1 is sometimes referred to as oral herpes, and that’s its preferred place to live. HSV-2 is sometimes referred to as genital herpes, as that’s where it prefers to live. In reality, you can get either type of herpes in either location.

Planned Parenthood describes getting HSV-1 or HSV-2 around your mouth as oral herpes. Cold sores are oral herpes. Planned Parenthood also says that if you get sores around your genitals, you have genital herpes, regardless of which virus has decided to reside there.

After my initial outbreak cleared, I waited for another outbreak to arrive. I didn’t get another one for six months, and it was very mild. After some testing, I found out that I had genital HSV-1. Since the virus wasn’t living in its “preferred” location, my outbreaks were rare. I honestly don’t remember the last time I had one, and I’ve had herpes now for over nine years.

I know not everyone with herpes has my experience. Some have outbreaks monthly, some occasionally, and a few have serious symptoms during their initial outbreaks that require hospitalization (initial outbreaks are often accompanied by flulike symptoms). I’m grateful that, despite my shame, I sought out competent medical care, and that Planned Parenthood was also there to support me when I was uninsured.

And to be fair to the person who gave me herpes, he probably didn’t know he had it. Not everyone realizes cold sores are herpes, and I wasn’t diligent about asking. I didn’t even know I needed to, and like many, we didn’t use a barrier for oral sex.

My Googling also showed me that I was not alone. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 1 in 6 people aged 14 to 49 years have HSV-2, and almost half (48%) have HSV-1. Like my partner at the time, many people with herpes don’t realize they have it, either because they don’t have any symptoms or because their symptoms are mild and attributed to something else.

Of course, none of that really addressed my most pressing concern: Would I date again? As I searched the internet, I discovered something interesting: dating sites for people with herpes. Some have argued that dating sites for people with herpes are unnecessary and further stigmatizing. To be perfectly honest, I didn’t have a lot of great dates from those sites. I didn’t have a lot of great dates from any dating sites, though.

However, I did find posts on those sites about local meetups, and I decided to go to one.

What did I find? A group of remarkably friendly people, which is impressive considering all we have in common is a skin condition. I discovered people who were dating, who had gotten married, all after being diagnosed with herpes. Some had found partners with herpes, some found partners without herpes.

I was also introduced to a vast network of secret herpes Facebook groups, some of which are for dating, but most of which are just for commiserating, chatting, posting memes and asking questions.

As I found the courage to date, I also made a commitment to disclose that I have herpes to potential partners I found in the wild.

I typically disclosed as soon as I thought things were moving in the direction of it being relevant. I also disclosed to past partners whom I thought I might reconnect with in the future. I disclosed in person, by phone or even by email depending on how I usually connected with that particular person. Honestly, I prefer email since I can include links to relevant, accurate and nonshaming information about herpes and potential risks.

When it did go well, that led to another conversation about making sure they understood the risk. First, I would encourage them to get tested, as lots of people have herpes and don’t realize it. They also needed to know that herpes can shed any time, even when there is no visible outbreak. As people get more familiar with how their body acts with herpes, they can usually feel an outbreak starting (there’s a sort of tingly feeling before an outbreak for some people) and they can avoid sexual activities that might spread the virus.

Condoms and dental dams can help, but the virus can spread through skin-to-skin contact from areas not covered by those. I could take a daily suppressive therapy, and I have, and that lowers the risk of transmission as well.

Some people are willing to accept the risk, and some aren’t. That’s OK, though. Dating doesn’t always go well for lots of reasons. Even when someone chose not to date me, I hope they left a bit more informed about STIs.

Eventually, I met a charming, gender nonconforming individual in one of these groups. We talked a lot online and met up at a national event for people with herpes. Yep, those exist too. They’re a chance to meet folks from all over the country, see a new place and have some fun (however you choose to define that). Reader, I had fun. And eventually moved across the country to be with my person.

Honestly, I don’t give a lot of thought to my herpes these days. Since my partner and I both have herpes, we don’t take any special precautions sexually. I know my partner likely has both types of herpes, so there is a risk I could get HSV-2 at some point, but that’s an acceptable level of risk for me.

Herpes and other STIs don’t mean your dating life is over. It’s different, and it’s a bit stressful sometimes, but it’s far from over. Find good medical advice, look for support (searching Facebook for public or closed groups about herpes is a great place to start) and dip your toes back into the dating pool when you’re ready. In the meantime, there’s a whole community of people ready to support you. I promise.

Do you have a compelling personal story you’d like to see published on HuffPost? Find out what we’re looking for here and send us a pitch!

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NTSB report says California Tesla driver was using Autopilot when he hit a firetruck

A government report says the driver of a Tesla that slammed into a firetruck near Los Angeles last year was using the car’s Autopilot system when a vehicle in front of him suddenly changed lanes and he didn’t have time to react.

Westlake Legal Group tesla-crash NTSB report says California Tesla driver was using Autopilot when he hit a firetruck fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox-news/auto/attributes/innovations fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fnc/auto fnc cecdc883-86c6-5e65-bda3-47c92fabde54 Associated Press article

(Culver City Firefighters Local 1927)

The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday the driver never saw the parked firetruck and didn’t brake. Apparently the man’s 2014 Tesla Model S didn’t brake either.

The report raises further questions about the effectiveness of Tesla’s system, which was in operation before several other crashes including two fatalities in Florida and one in Silicon Valley. Tesla warns drivers that the system is not fully autonomous and drivers must be ready to intervene.

The NTSB report didn’t state a cause of the crash. The agency will issue a final report Wednesday.

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The driver in the Jan. 22, 2018 firetruck crash on Interstate 405 was not hurt. But the NTSB report says he did not have his hands on the steering wheel at the time of the crash.

The firetruck from Culver City, California, had stopped in the northbound high occupancy vehicle lane with its emergency lights flashing as it responded to another crash. The firefighters were also uninjured.

The Tesla driver, from suburban Woodland Hills, told the NTSB that he was traveling to work in Los Angeles when the crash happened. He told investigators he was looking forward with his hand rested on his knee while touching the bottom of the steering wheel.

Just before the crash, a large vehicle, an SUV or pickup truck, changed lanes in front of him, the driver told the NTSB.

“Although the driver stated that he was looking forward, he was unable to see the firetruck in time enough to avoid the crash. The driver had coffee and a bagel at the time, but he wasn’t sure if either was in his hand when the crash occurred,” according to the report.

Cellphone data showed the driver was not using his phone to talk or text in the minutes leading up to the crash.

A statement from a driver in a nearby vehicle provided by Tesla said the driver appeared to be looking down at a cellphone or other device he was holding in his left hand before the crash.

The NTSB determined in September 2017 that design limitations of the Tesla Model S Autopilot played a major role in a May 2016 fatal crash in Florida involving a vehicle operating under Autopilot. But it blamed the crash on an inattentive Tesla driver’s overreliance on technology and a truck driver who made a left turn in front of the car.

The California investigation comes as the federal government has few regulations governing autonomous vehicles and driver-assist systems that can drive a car under certain circumstances. The systems can significantly reduce crashes, but computer-driven vehicles also can make mistakes.

Westlake Legal Group tesla-crash NTSB report says California Tesla driver was using Autopilot when he hit a firetruck fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox-news/auto/attributes/innovations fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fnc/auto fnc cecdc883-86c6-5e65-bda3-47c92fabde54 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group tesla-crash NTSB report says California Tesla driver was using Autopilot when he hit a firetruck fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/auto/make/tesla fox-news/auto/attributes/safety fox-news/auto/attributes/innovations fox-news/auto/attributes/electric fnc/auto fnc cecdc883-86c6-5e65-bda3-47c92fabde54 Associated Press article

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Survivor in the Brock Turner rape case has revealed her identity

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Survivor in the Brock Turner rape case has revealed her identity

A former Stanford University swimmer whose sexual assault of an incapacitated woman drew national headlines and widespread scorn lost his bid for a new trial, pushing him closer to having to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life. USA TODAY

Who is Emily Doe? 

It’s what many wondered about the anonymous woman Brock Turner sexually assaulted in 2015 after her 7,000-word victim impact statement went viral, sparking outrage and declaring to a nation swollen with survivors that they were not alone. 

Three years later, the woman who demanded we absorb the horrors of rape wants us to know something else: her name.

Early Wednesday morning, the New York Times reported the survivor who wrote the 12 pages of gut-wrenching eloquence is Chanel Miller.

Rape at college: Why back to school is so dangerous for women

In her memoir out this September, “Know My Name,” Miller will “reclaim the story of her sexual assault,” publisher Viking Books said in a press release in June.

“Emily Doe’s experience illuminates a culture built to protect perpetrators and a criminal justice system designed to fail the most vulnerable,” said Viking editor-in-chief Andrea Schulz. “The book will introduce readers to the writer whose words have already changed their world and move them with its accounting of her courage and resilience.”

Turner was convicted of assault with intent to commit rape of an intoxicated/unconscious person, penetration of an intoxicated person and penetration of an unconscious person. He faced up to 14 years in prison but was sentenced to six months in county jail. He served just three for “good behavior.”

Aaron Persky, the judge who sentenced him, was recalled from office in June 2018 — becoming the first California jurist recalled from the bench in 86 years. 

One in 5 U.S. women is raped at some point in their lives and 1 in 3 is a victim of sexual violence involving physical contact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

“It is one of the most important books that I’ve ever published,” Schulz told the Times, saying she hopes it will “change the culture that we live in and the assumptions we make about what survivors should be expected to go through to get justice.”

If you are a survivor of sexual assault, you can call the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800.656.HOPE (4673) or visit hotline.rainn.org and receive confidential support.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/04/brock-turner-stanford-rape-case-chanel-miller-survivor-emily-doe/2207106001/

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‘Supergirl’ star Melissa Benoist marries Chris Wood

Melissa Benoist and Chris Wood have tied the knot.

The “Supergirl” couple married on Sunday at a private estate in Ojai, Calif., E! News reported on Tuesday.

Westlake Legal Group melissa-benoist-chris-wood-getty 'Supergirl' star Melissa Benoist marries Chris Wood New York Post fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/marriage fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc ef89a82f-8baf-5795-9c90-c4e7edb43c7c Chelsea Hirsch article

“Super Girl” star Melissa Benoist and Chris Wood attend the 72nd Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 10, 2018 in New York City. The pair married in early September 2019. (Getty)

MELISSA BENOIST SAYS IT’S HARD WORK TO BE ‘SUPERGIRL’

“It was a beautiful setting for a wedding, very peaceful and quiet. The vows were brief and lasted about 15 minutes. There was lots of cheering and applause as it ended,” a source told the outlet.

Wood, 31, and Benoist, 30, announced their engagement on social media in February. Her ring, designed by Jennifer Meyer, is estimated to be worth $100,000.

The couple first met while working on “Supergirl” in 2016 and reportedly started dating in 2017.

‘SUPERGIRL’ AND ‘ARROW’ STARS RESPOND TO REPORTS OF ALLEGED SHOWRUNNER HARASSMENT

Benoist was previously married to her “Glee” co-star Blake Jenner. They split in 2016 and their divorce was finalized in 2017.

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Reps for Benoist and Wood didn’t immediately get back to us.

This article originally appeared on Page Six.

Westlake Legal Group melissa-benoist-chris-wood-getty 'Supergirl' star Melissa Benoist marries Chris Wood New York Post fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/marriage fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc ef89a82f-8baf-5795-9c90-c4e7edb43c7c Chelsea Hirsch article   Westlake Legal Group melissa-benoist-chris-wood-getty 'Supergirl' star Melissa Benoist marries Chris Wood New York Post fox-news/entertainment/tv fox-news/entertainment/events/marriage fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fnc/entertainment fnc ef89a82f-8baf-5795-9c90-c4e7edb43c7c Chelsea Hirsch article

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Most voters will blame Donald Trump if America enters recession: Poll

Westlake Legal Group oUavkid1MN8-zBLeFCPypjk_wJCeeko7uPAIDJweCT0 Most voters will blame Donald Trump if America enters recession: Poll r/politics

Do people a recession isn’t coming?

We went through longest expansion in the history of the US, almost everyone thought a recession was coming for who ever was in charge this time weather it would be Trump or Clinton or whoever.

Germany is entering a recession, Canada has had half the growth and income growth as the US, australlia after 27 years of growth (coming from selling coal to China) is turning and the biggest reason is China’s boom is slowing bringing down everyone else.

Trump is a factor but much smaller than most want to believe here.

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Hong Kong’s Leader, Carrie Lam, to Withdraw Extradition Bill That Ignited Protests

HONG KONG — Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, said Wednesday that the government would withdraw a contentious extradition bill that ignited months of protests in the city, moving to quell the worst political crisis since the former British colony returned to Chinese control 22 years ago.

The move eliminates a major objection among protesters, but it was unclear if it would be enough to bring an end to intensifying demonstrations, which are now driven by multiple grievances with the government.

“Incidents over these past two months have shocked and saddened Hong Kong people,” she said in an eight-minute televised statement broadcast shortly before 6 p.m. “We are all very anxious about Hong Kong, our home. We all hope to find a way out of the current impasse and unsettling times.”

Her decision comes as the protests near their three-month mark and show little sign of abating, roiling a city known for its orderliness and hurting its economy.

Mrs. Lam had suspended the bill in June and later said that it was “dead,” but demonstrators have long been suspicious of her government’s refusal to formally withdraw the bill and feared it could be revived at a later date.

Withdrawal of the bill, which would allow extradition to mainland China, has remained at the top of the list of protesters’ demands. But the list has grown to include an independent investigation into the police response, amnesty for arrested protesters and direct elections for all lawmakers and the chief executive.

Video

Westlake Legal Group 03hk-lam4-videoSixteenByNine3000 Hong Kong’s Leader, Carrie Lam, to Withdraw Extradition Bill That Ignited Protests Lam, Carrie (1957- ) Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots China

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, has earned a reputation as a tenacious politician in her nearly 40 years in government. But her close ties with China’s central leadership have made her a divisive figure at home.CreditCreditJerome Favre/EPA, via Shutterstock

[What’s going on in Hong Kong? What to know about the protests.]

Michael Tien, a moderate pro-Beijing lawmaker, said withdrawal alone might have been enough to calm the protests in mid-June. But since then, “with the accumulation of so much resentment, so many accusations and so many disputes,” the establishment of an independent inquiry “is 100 percent necessary,” Mr. Tien said.

Mrs. Lam described the withdrawal as a step to initiate dialogue. She also said she would add two members to an existing police review board, but that step was far short of calls for an independent investigation.

Claudia Mo, a pro-democracy lawmaker, described Mrs. Lam’s announcement as a “political performance.”

“That it took her three months to formally use the word withdraw is truly too little, too late,” Ms. Mo told reporters. “A big mistake has been made.”

This summer has seen peaceful marches involving hundreds of thousands of people, as well as street protests by smaller groups who have become increasingly violent in recent weeks, throwing bricks and firebombs at the police. More than 1,100 people have been arrested since early June. The police, who have used batons, rubber bullets and tear gas against protesters, have faced allegations of excessive force.

Mrs. Lam’s move came a day after China’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office had signaled an uncompromising stance toward the protests. “Whoever truly loves Hong Kong should clear their eyes and firm their stance,” Yang Guang, a spokesman for the office, said at a briefing in Beijing. “They should be crystal clear that there is no middle ground, no hesitance and no dithering, when it comes to stopping the violence and controlling riots in Hong Kong.”

A possible hint of a change in Beijing’s stand, however, came from the country’s leader, Xi Jinping. In a speech on Tuesday to the Party School of the Communist Party’s Central Committee, Mr. Xi called on rising party officials to show resolve for a long struggle but suggested that the leadership could adjust its tactics to achieve its aims.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_156527316_4ee5d551-40c9-42ab-8334-b792f7a00b5e-articleLarge Hong Kong’s Leader, Carrie Lam, to Withdraw Extradition Bill That Ignited Protests Lam, Carrie (1957- ) Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots China

Demonstrators turned out in force on June 16. Organizers said nearly two million people marched.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

“On matters of principle, not an inch will be yielded,” Mr. Xi said, “but on matters of tactics there can be flexibility.”

Months of protests have started to ripple through the economy, hurting some small businesses and the tourism industry. Many economists believe the city’s economy is now slipping into recession.

Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index closed up 3.9 percent on Wednesday after news of the planned meeting emerged. Cathay Pacific, the Hong Kong-based airline that has faced criticism from the Chinese government for its employees’ participation in the protests, climbed more than 7 percent. After the market closed, the company announced the resignation of its chairman.

Withdrawal of the extradition bill was the initial demand of protesters, and the rallying cry when, by organizers’ estimates, more than one million people marched on June 9 and nearly two million marched a week later, more than one in every four people in Hong Kong.

Withdrawal of the bill “will help to an insignificant extent,” said Willy Lam, an adjunct professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong’s Center for China Studies.

The concession “might pacify a small sector of the population but it will not have any impact on whether the waves of protests would subside,” he added.

On LIHKG, an online forum popular with protesters, several posts on Wednesday repeated longstanding calls not to compromise until all demands are met.

Saturday saw some of the most intense clashes since the protests began, including the use of firebombs by demonstrators.CreditLaurel Chor for The New York Times

Full withdrawal of the extradition bill has long been seen as the easiest compromise that the government could make. But mainland Chinese officials had objected to that possibility, saying that doing so would suggest that the original intentions behind the legislation were mistaken.

Chinese officials had also said that any independent inquiry into the police’s conduct and other aspects of the unrest could not be started until the protests died down.

As the protests dragged on, pro-Beijing lawmakers had expressed concern that the anger at the government would hurt their camp in district council elections in November and legislative elections next year.

Saturday, the fifth anniversary of a decision by China’s legislature to put limits on direct elections in Hong Kong, saw some of the most intense clashes since the protests began. After a march by tens of thousands, some protesters gathered around the main government offices, hurling rocks and firebombs. Riot police fired tear gas and pumped blue-dyed water from trucks at protesters.

Protesters built barricades and set fires, and the police later pursued them across several neighborhoods, arresting dozens. In a subway station in the Prince Edward neighborhood, officers from the police’s Special Tactical Squad entered a stopped train, hitting people who were crouching on the floor with batons and dousing them with pepper spray.

The Chinese government was initially silent on this summer’s protests, then began to condemn them in increasingly strident tones, warning that the military could be called in. Images of Chinese police officers and paramilitary troops conducting anti-riot drills in Shenzhen, a mainland city near Hong Kong, were given regular coverage by state media outlets.

On Friday, the police in Hong Kong arrested several prominent activists and three pro-democracy lawmakers as a crackdown on the opposition intensified.

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California dive boat fire was ‘freak accident,’ underwater cinematographer says

Westlake Legal Group fireguest California dive boat fire was 'freak accident,' underwater cinematographer says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc David Montanaro article 1049ee70-5c26-5357-a175-a10d5e3ab8c1

An underwater cinematographer said on “Fox & Friends” Wednesday that a California boat fire that killed dozens of scuba diving enthusiasts would not dissuade him from traveling on the same type of boat.

“This was a terrible accident, but it was a freak accident. That’d be like saying if you knew someone in a car accident, you’d never drive in a car again,” said Jonathan Bird, who has traveled on many boats similar to the one involved in the Monday morning tragedy.

Santa Barbara County officials announced Tuesday that the search for survivors had been suspended; 34 people were presumed dead. The bodies of 20 people – 9 men and 11 women – were recovered, and divers found at least four others in the hollowed wreckage. The identification process will require DNA testing, investigators said.

HURRICANE DORIAN’S PATH: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

A total of 39 people were aboard the Conception when it caught fire off the coast of Santa Cruz on the final day of the Labor Day weekend expedition.

25 BODIES FOUND AFTER CALIFORNIA SCUBA DIVING BOAT FIRE, COAST GUARD SAYS

The Conception’s captain, Jerry Boylan, made a mayday call to a Coast Guard dispatcher around 4 a.m. on Monday.

Ventura County firefighters were able to reach the burning vessel within 15 minutes but struggled to extinguish the scorching boat as it continued to erupt in flames. The boat’s owner, Truth Aquatics, did not respond to a request for comment.

Bird said there was no way the passengers who were trapped in the cabin below deck were locked in their rooms. He said there would typically be a staircase leading to the deck, as well as an escape hatch for the guests to leave their rooms.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“There isn’t even a door you could lock if you wanted to,” he said, emphasizing that boats are designed this way because guests would be less likely to become seasick below deck.

“These are how most live-aboard are built. The passengers, the ones who are paying money to be there, are put in the most comfortable place on the boat.”

Fox News’ Hollie McKay contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group fireguest California dive boat fire was 'freak accident,' underwater cinematographer says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc David Montanaro article 1049ee70-5c26-5357-a175-a10d5e3ab8c1   Westlake Legal Group fireguest California dive boat fire was 'freak accident,' underwater cinematographer says fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc David Montanaro article 1049ee70-5c26-5357-a175-a10d5e3ab8c1

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Maryland grandma who gave birth to daughter’s triplets inspired foundation that funded $800,000-worth of infertility procedures

Westlake Legal Group 5f0d3795-ivf-istock-large Maryland grandma who gave birth to daughter's triplets inspired foundation that funded $800,000-worth of infertility procedures fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/reproductive-health/pregnancy fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e9fc0966-8151-5d00-8aa5-2c8366d0f0ea Danielle Wallace article

A Maryland woman who at the age of 55 carried triplets for her daughter inspired a foundation that helps couples who are struggling to get pregnant afford fertility procedures, according to a report.

Camille and Jason Hammond tried for years to get pregnant and went through six rounds of vitro fertilization (IVF) before finally asking Camille’s mother to help them give her a grandchild.

ILLINOIS BABY HAS 5-INCH GROWTH REMOVED FROM NECK HOURS AFTER BIRTH

The couple launched the Tinina Q. Cade Foundation, named after Camille’s mom, in 2005, a year after their children’s birth. This year the fund announced it has given out more than $800,000 in grants to 113 families struggling to get pregnant since its inception, according to a report by Atlanta’s WXIA-TV.

“Even despite all that we had, we still struggled with infertility. It almost broke us as a family,” Camille said. “It’s great that we overcame, but there are so many that don’t have all these advantages that we have.”

Camille has endometriosis, a condition that causes the uterine lining to grow outside the uterus, which makes it difficult to become pregnant. After years of trying naturally and undergoing six rounds of in vitro fertilization, doctors told the couple their best chances of having a child were either adoption or asking a surrogate to carry the couple’s child for them.

“We were devastated,” Camille said. “The prospect of another woman that you don’t know carrying that baby, that’s really an awful thought.”

Camille’s mother, Tinina Cade, eventually came forward and agreed to receive IVF at the age of 55, so that her daughter and son-in-law would be able to trust their surrogate would stay healthy throughout the pregnancy.

“I saw my beautiful daughter, who was always a happy spirit, become sad,” Cade said. She said the day she told her daughter she was pregnant was “one of the best days, highly emotional.”

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Even though she was post-menopausal, doctors determined she could still carry a fertilized egg. On the second round of the fertilization procedure, she found out all three embryos survived and she was carrying triplets. Cade carried the triplets for seven months before doctors delivered her grandchildren via Caesarean section in December 2004, Atlanta’s WXIA-TV reported.

“I saw these beautiful little people and they were ours, we had overcome,” Camille said.

Westlake Legal Group 5f0d3795-ivf-istock-large Maryland grandma who gave birth to daughter's triplets inspired foundation that funded $800,000-worth of infertility procedures fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/reproductive-health/pregnancy fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e9fc0966-8151-5d00-8aa5-2c8366d0f0ea Danielle Wallace article   Westlake Legal Group 5f0d3795-ivf-istock-large Maryland grandma who gave birth to daughter's triplets inspired foundation that funded $800,000-worth of infertility procedures fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/health/reproductive-health/pregnancy fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc e9fc0966-8151-5d00-8aa5-2c8366d0f0ea Danielle Wallace article

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Hear Margaret Atwood Read From ‘The Testaments,’ Her Sequel To ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’

Hear Margaret Atwood’s Exclusive Reading Of ‘The Testaments’

Margaret Atwood’s classic dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale ended on a cliffhanger: The rebellious handmaid Offred stepping into a mysterious black van, on her way to freedom — or to arrest.

Handmaids are in the public eye again thanks to the hit TV series — and the frequent appearance of silent, red-robed protesters at political events. Now, Atwood is returning to the world of Gilead, the repressive theocracy she created out of the ruins of present-day America. The Testaments opens 15 years after the events of the first book, and follows an old familiar character as well as introducing some new voices. As for what happens to Offred … well, no spoilers here.

We’re excited to bring you a pre-publication excerpt of The Testaments, and an exclusive recording of Atwood herself reading these first three chapters. You can also hear her in conversation with Weekend Edition’s Scott Simon on Saturday, Sept. 8, and the book will be released on Sept. 10th.

The Ardua Hall Holograph

Only dead people are allowed to have statues, but I have been given one while still alive. Already I am petrified.

Westlake Legal Group margaret-atwood-credit-liam-sharp-7f9076092f91e5b7d4ebcdfa49b5c7a092397989-s800-c15 Hear Margaret Atwood Read From 'The Testaments,' Her Sequel To 'The Handmaid's Tale'

Margaret Atwood says reader questions about the world of The Handmaid’s Tale — and the world we live in now — inspired The Testaments. Liam Sharp hide caption

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Liam Sharp

Westlake Legal Group  Hear Margaret Atwood Read From 'The Testaments,' Her Sequel To 'The Handmaid's Tale'

Margaret Atwood says reader questions about the world of The Handmaid’s Tale — and the world we live in now — inspired The Testaments.

Liam Sharp

This statue was a small token of appreciation for my many contributions, said the citation, which was read out by Aunt Vidala. She’d been assigned the task by our superiors, and was far from appreciative. I thanked her with as much modesty as I could summon, then pulled the rope that released the cloth drape shrouding me; it billowed to the ground, and there I stood. We don’t do cheering here at Ardua Hall, but there was some discreet clapping. I inclined my head in a nod.

My statue is larger than life, as statues tend to be, and shows me as younger, slimmer, and in better shape than I’ve been for some time. I am standing straight, shoulders back, my lips curved into a firm but benevolent smile. My eyes are fixed on some cosmic point of reference understood to represent my idealism, my unflinching commitment to duty, my determination to move forward despite all obstacles. Not that anything in the sky would be visible to my statue, placed as it is in a morose cluster of trees and shrubs beside the footpath running in front of Ardua Hall. We Aunts must not be too presumptuous, even in stone.

Clutching my left hand is a girl of seven or eight, gazing up at me with trusting eyes. My right hand rests on the head of a woman crouched at my side, her hair veiled, her eyes upturned in an expression that could be read as either craven or grateful — one of our Handmaids — and behind me is one of my Pearl Girls, ready to set out on her missionary work. Hanging from a belt around my waist is my Taser. This weapon reminds me of my failings: had I been more effective, I would not have needed such an implement. The persuasion in my voice would have been enough.

As a group of statuary it’s not a great success: too crowded. I would have preferred more emphasis on myself. But at least I look sane. It could well have been otherwise, as the elderly sculptress — a true believer since deceased — had a tendency to confer bulging eyes on her subjects as a sign of their pious fervour. Her bust of Aunt Helena looks rabid, that of Aunt Vidala is hyperthyroid, and that of Aunt Elizabeth appears ready to explode.

At the unveiling the sculptress was nervous. Was her rendition of me sufficiently flattering? Did I approve of it? Would I be seen to approve? I toyed with the idea of frowning as the sheet came off, but thought better of it: I am not without compassion. “Very lifelike,” I said.

That was nine years ago. Since then my statue has weathered: pigeons have decorated me, moss has sprouted in my damper crevices. Votaries have taken to leaving offerings at my feet: eggs for fertility, oranges to suggest the fullness of pregnancy, croissants to reference the moon. I ignore the breadstuffs — usually they have been rained on — but pocket the oranges. Oranges are so refreshing.

I write these words in my private sanctum within the library of Ardua Hall — one of the few libraries remaining after the enthusiastic bookburnings that have been going on across our land. The corrupt and blood-smeared fingerprints of the past must be wiped away to create a clean space for the morally pure generation that is surely about to arrive. Such is the theory.

But among these bloody fingerprints are those made by ourselves, and these can’t be wiped away so easily. Over the years I’ve buried a lot of bones; now I’m inclined to dig them up again — if only for your edification, my unknown reader. If you are reading, this manuscript at least will have survived. Though perhaps I’m fantasizing: perhaps I will never have a reader. Perhaps I’ll only be talking to the wall, in more ways than one.

That’s enough inscribing for today. My hand hurts, my back aches, and my nightly cup of hot milk awaits me. I’ll stash this screed in its hiding place, avoiding the surveillance cameras — I know where they are, having placed them myself. Despite such precautions, I’m aware of the risk I’m running: writing can be dangerous. What betrayals, and then what denunciations, might lie in store for me? There are several within Ardua Hall who would love to get their hands on these pages.

Wait, I counsel them silently: it will get worse.

* * *

Transcript of Witness Testimony 369A

You have asked me to tell you what it was like for me when I was growing up within Gilead. You say it will be helpful, and I do wish to be helpful. I imagine you expect nothing but horrors, but the reality is that many children were loved and cherished, in Gilead as elsewhere, and many adults were kind though fallible, in Gilead as elsewhere.

I hope you will remember, too, that we all have some nostalgia for whatever kindness we have known as children, however bizarre the conditions of that childhood may seem to others. I agree with you that Gilead ought to fade away — there is too much of wrong in it, too much that is false, and too much that is surely contrary to what God intended — but you must permit me some space to mourn the good that will be lost.

At our school, pink was for spring and summer, plum was for fall and winter, white was for special days: Sundays and celebrations. Arms covered, hair covered, skirts down to the knee before you were five and no more than two inches above the ankle after that, because the urges of men were terrible things and those urges needed to be curbed. The man eyes that were always roaming here and there like the eyes of tigers, those searchlight eyes, needed to be shielded from the alluring and indeed blinding power of us — of our shapely or skinny or fat legs, of our graceful or knobbly or sausage arms, of our peachy or blotchy skins, of our entwining curls of shining hair or our coarse unruly pelts or our straw-like wispy braids, it did not matter. Whatever our shapes and features, we were snares and enticements despite ourselves, we were the innocent and blameless causes that through our very nature could make men drunk with lust, so that they’d stagger and lurch and topple over the verge — The verge of what? we wondered. Was it like a cliff? — and go plunging down in flames, like snowballs made of burning sulphur hurled by the angry hand of God. We were custodians of an invaluable treasure that existed, unseen, inside us; we were precious flowers that had to be kept safely inside glass houses, or else we would be ambushed and our petals would be torn off and our treasure would be stolen and we would be ripped apart and trampled by the ravenous men who might lurk around any corner, out there in the wide sharp-edged sin-ridden world.

That was the kind of thing runny-nosed Aunt Vidala would tell us at school while we were doing petit-point embroidery for handkerchiefs and footstools and framed pictures: flowers in a vase, fruit in a bowl were the favoured patterns. But Aunt Estée, the teacher we liked the best, would say Aunt Vidala was overdoing it and there was no point in frightening us out of our wits, since to instill such an aversion might have a negative influence on the happiness of our future married lives.

“All men are not like that, girls,” she would say soothingly. “The better kind have superior characters. Some of them have decent self-restraint. And once you are married it will seem quite different to you, and not very fearsome at all.” Not that she would know anything about it, since the Aunts were not married; they were not allowed to be. That was why they could have writing and books.

“We and your fathers and mothers will choose your husbands wisely for you when the time comes,” Aunt Estée would say. “So you don’t need to be afraid. Just learn your lessons and trust your elders to do what is best, and everything will unfold as it should. I will pray for it.”

But despite Aunt Estée’s dimples and friendly smile, it was Aunt Vidala’s version that prevailed. It turned up in my nightmares: the shattering of the glass house, then the rending and tearing and the trampling of hooves, with pink and white and plum fragments of myself scattered over the ground. I dreaded the thought of growing older — older enough for a wedding. I had no faith in the wise choices of the Aunts: I feared that I would end up married to a goat on fire.

The pink, the white, and the plum dresses were the rule for special girls like us. Ordinary girls from Econofamilies wore the same thing all the time — those ugly multicoloured stripes and grey cloaks, like the clothes of their mothers. They did not even learn petit-point embroidery or crochet work, just plain sewing and the making of paper flowers and other such chores. They were not pre-chosen to be married to the very best men — to the Sons of Jacob and the other Commanders or their sons — not like us; although they might get to be chosen once they were older if they were pretty enough.

Nobody said that. You were not supposed to preen yourself on your good looks, it was not modest, or take any notice of the good looks of other people. Though we girls knew the truth: that it was better to be pretty than ugly. Even the Aunts paid more attention to the pretty ones. But if you were already pre-chosen, pretty didn’t matter so much.

I didn’t have a squint like Huldah or a pinchy built-in frown like Shunammite, and I didn’t have barely-there eyebrows like Becka, but I was unfinished. I had a dough face, like the cookies my favourite Martha, Zilla, made for me as a treat, with raisin eyes and pumpkinseed teeth. But though I was not especially pretty, I was very, very chosen. Doubly chosen: not only pre-chosen to marry a Commander but chosen in the first place by Tabitha, who was my mother.

That is what Tabitha used to tell me: “I went for a walk in the forest,” she would say, “and then I came to an enchanted castle, and there were a lot of little girls locked inside, and none of them had any mothers, and they were under the spell of the wicked witches. I had a magic ring that unlocked the castle, but I could only rescue one little girl. So I looked at them all very carefully, and then, out of the whole crowd, I chose you!”

“What happened to the others?” I would ask. “The other little girls?”

“Different mothers rescued them,” she would say.

“Did they have magic rings too?”

“Of course, my darling. In order to be a mother, you need to have a magic ring.”

“Where’s the magic ring?” I would ask. “Where is it now?”

“It’s right here on my finger,” she would say, indicating the third finger of her left hand. The heart finger, she said it was. “But my ring had only one wish in it, and I used that one up on you. So now it’s an ordinary, everyday mother ring.”

At this point I was allowed to try on the ring, which was gold, with three diamonds in it: a big one, and a smaller one on either side. It did look as if it might have been magic once.

“Did you lift me up and carry me?” I would ask. “Out of the forest?” I knew the story off by heart, but I liked to hear it repeated.

“No, my dearest, you were already too big for that. If I had carried you I would have coughed, and then the witches would have heard us.” I could see this was true: she did cough quite a lot. “So I took you by the hand, and we crept out of the castle so the witches wouldn’t hear us. We both said Shh, shh” — here she would hold her finger up to her lips, and I would hold my finger up too and say Shh, shh delightedly — “and then we had to run very fast through the forest, to get away from the wicked witches, because one of them had seen us going out the door. We ran, and then we hid in a hollow tree. It was very dangerous!”

I did have a hazy memory of running through a forest with someone holding my hand. Had I hidden in a hollow tree? It seemed to me that I had hidden somewhere. So maybe it was true.

“And then what happened?” I would ask.

“And then I brought you to this beautiful house. Aren’t you happy here? You are so cherished, by all of us! Aren’t we both lucky that I chose you?”

I would be nestled close to her, with her arm around me and my head against her thin body, through which I could feel her bumpy ribs. My ear would be pressed to her chest, and I could hear her heart hammering away inside her — faster and faster, it seemed to me, as she waited for me to say something. I knew my answer had power: I could make her smile, or not.

What could I say but yes and yes? Yes, I was happy. Yes, I was lucky. Anyway it was true.

* * *

Transcript of Witness Testimony 369B

They say I will always have the scar, but I’m almost better; so yes, I think I’m strong enough to do this now. You’ve said that you’d like me to tell you how I got involved in this whole story, so I’ll try; though it’s hard to know where to begin.

I’ll start just before my birthday, or what I used to believe was my birthday. Neil and Melanie lied to me about that: they’d done it for the best of reasons and they’d meant really well, but when I first found out about it I was very angry at them. Keeping up my anger was difficult, though, because by that time they were dead. You can be angry at dead people, but you can never have a conversation about what they did; or you can only have one side of it. And I felt guilty as well as angry, because they’d been murdered, and I believed then that their murder was my fault.

I was supposed to be turning sixteen. What I was most looking forward to was getting my driver’s licence. I felt too old for a birth­day party, though Melanie always got me a cake and ice cream and sang “Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer true,” an old song I’d loved as a child and was now finding embarrassing. I did get the cake, later — chocolate cake, vanilla ice cream, my favourites — but by then I couldn’t eat it. By that time Melanie was no longer there.

That birthday was the day I discovered that I was a fraud. Or not a fraud, like a bad magician: a fake, like a fake antique. I was a forg­ery, done on purpose. I was so young at that moment — just a split second ago, it seems — but I’m not young anymore. How little time it takes to change a face: carve it like wood, harden it. No more of that wide-eyed daydream gazing I used to do. I’ve become sharper, more focused. I’ve become narrowed.

Neil and Melanie were my parents; they ran a store called The Clothes Hound. It was basically used clothing: Melanie called it “previously loved” because she said “used” meant “exploited.” The sign outside showed a smiling pink poodle in a fluffy skirt with a pink bow on its head, carrying a shopping bag. Underneath was a slogan in italics and quotation marks: “You’d Never Know!” That meant the used clothes were so good you’d never know they were used, but that wasn’t true at all because most of the clothes were crappy.

Melanie said she’d inherited The Clothes Hound from her grand­mother. She also said she knew the sign was old-fashioned, but people were familiar with it and it would be disrespectful to change it now.

Our store was on Queen West, in a stretch of blocks that had once all been like that, said Melanie — textiles, buttons and trims, cheap linens, dollar stores. But now it was going upmarket: cafés with fair trade and organic were moving in, big-brand outlets, name bou­tiques. In response, Melanie hung a sign in the window: Wearable Art. But inside, the store was crowded with all kinds of clothes you would never call wearable art. There was one corner that was kind of designer, though anything really pricey wouldn’t be in The Clothes Hound in the first place. The rest was just everything. And all sorts of people came and went: young, old, looking for bargains or finds, or just looking. Or selling: even street people would try to get a few dollars for T-shirts they’d picked up at garage sales.

Melanie worked on the main floor. She wore bright colours, like orange and hot pink, because she said they created a positive and energetic atmosphere, and anyway she was part gypsy at heart. She was always brisk and smiling, though on the lookout for shoplifting. After closing, she sorted and packed: this for charity, this for rags, this for Wearable Art. While doing the sorting she’d sing tunes from musicals — old ones from long ago. “Oh what a beautiful morning” was one of her favourites, and “When you walk through a storm.” I would get irritated by her singing; I’m sorry about that now.

Sometimes she’d get overwhelmed: there was too much fabric, it was like the ocean, waves of cloth coming in and threatening to drown her. Cashmere! Who was going to buy thirty-year-old cash­mere? It didn’t improve with age, she would say — not like her.

Neil had a beard that was going grey and wasn’t always trimmed, and he didn’t have much hair. He didn’t look like a businessman, but he handled what they called “the money end”: the invoices, the accounting, the taxes. He had his office on the second floor, up a flight of rubber-treaded stairs. He had a computer and a filing cabi­net and a safe, but otherwise that room wasn’t much like an office: it was just as crowded and cluttered as the store because Neil liked to collect things. Wind-up music boxes, he had a number of those. Clocks, a lot of different clocks. Old adding machines that worked with a handle. Plastic toys that walked or hopped across the floor, such as bears and frogs and sets of false teeth. A slide projector for the kind of coloured slides that nobody had anymore. Cameras — he liked ancient cameras. Some of them could take better pictures than anything nowadays, he’d say. He had one whole shelf with nothing on it but cameras.

One time he left the safe open and I looked inside. Instead of the wads of money I’d been expecting, there was nothing in it but a tiny metal-and-glass thing that I thought must be another toy, like the hopping false teeth. But I couldn’t see where to wind it up, and I was afraid to touch it because it was old.

“Can I play with it?” I asked Neil.

“Play with what?”

“That toy in the safe.”

“Not today,” he said, smiling. “Maybe when you’re older.” Then he shut the safe door, and I forgot about the strange little toy until it was time for me to remember it, and to understand what it was.

Neil would try to repair the various items, though often he failed because he couldn’t find the parts. Then the things would just sit there, “collecting dust,” said Melanie. Neil hated throwing any­thing out.

On the walls he had some old posters: LOOSE LIPS SINK SHIPS, from a long-ago war; a woman in overalls flexing her biceps to show that women could make bombs — that was from the same olden-days war; and a red-and-black one showing a man and a flag that Neil said was from Russia before it was Russia. Those had belonged to his great-grandfather, who’d lived in Winnipeg. I knew nothing about Winnipeg except that it was cold.

I loved The Clothes Hound when I was little: it was like a cave full of treasures. I wasn’t supposed to be in Neil’s office by myself because I might “touch things,” and then I might break them. But I could play with the wind-up toys and the music boxes and the adding machines, under supervision. Not the cameras though, because they were too valuable, said Neil, and anyway there was no film in them, so what would be the point?

We didn’t live over the store. Our house was a long distance away, in one of those residential neighbourhoods where there were some old bungalows and also some newer, bigger houses that had been built where the bungalows had been torn down. Our house was not a bungalow — it had a second floor, where the bedrooms were — but it was not a new house either. It was made of yellow brick, and it was very ordinary. There was nothing about it that would make you look at it twice. Thinking back, I’m guessing that was their idea.

Excerpt from The Testaments by Margaret Atwood copyright 2019 by O. W. Toad, Ltd. Published by Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, a division of Penguin Random House. All rights reserved.

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