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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 28)

Finland’s Sanna Marin, 34, to become world’s youngest prime minister

The woman set to become Finland’s next prime minister will break the mold not just for becoming the country’s third female in the top role, but also the world’s youngest leader.

Finland’s ruling Social Democratic Party council voted 32-29 late Sunday to name 34-year-old Sanna Marin over rival Antti Lindtman to take over the government’s top post from incumbent Antti Rinne, who quit last week.

Marin, who currently serves as the country’s transport and communications minister, will be sworn in this week.

UK BREXIT ENVOY IN DC QUITS, SLAMS GOVERNMENT FOR ‘HALF TRUTHS’ DAYS BEFORE ELECTION

A lawmaker since 2015, the 34-year-old will head a center-left coalition of five parties.  All of her four coalition partners are led by women — four of whom are in their 30s.

Talking to reporters on Sunday, the 34-year-old brushed aside questions about her age, the BBC reported.

“I have never thought about my age or gender,” she said. “I think of the reasons I got into politics and those things for which we have won the trust of the electorate.”

Like New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern — another government leader who is younger than 40 — Marin is a new mother, having given birth to her daughter Emma last year. Raised by a single mother, she has told a Finnish broadcaster how she felt discriminated against when her mother was in a relationship with another woman.

Lawmakers are likely to approve the appointment of Marin and her government this week so she can represent Finland at the Dec. 12-13 EU leaders’ summit in Brussels. Finland holds the European Union’s rotating presidency until the end of the year.

Westlake Legal Group FinlandPM1 Finland's Sanna Marin, 34, to become world's youngest prime minister Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox news fnc/world fnc e30c0388-05f9-5c21-a5b1-607bc6d977d6 article

The candidate for the next Prime Minister of Finland, Sanna Marin, smiles after she won the SDP’s Prime Minister candidate vote against Antti Lindtman, in Helsinki, Finland, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019. (Vesa Moilanen/Lehtikuva via AP)

Rinne, the incumbent prime minister whom Marin is replacing, plans to stay on as the Social Democrats’ chairman until a party congress next summer.

Rinne stepped down last week after a key coalition partner, the Center Party, withdrew its support, citing lack of trust. The Center Party also criticized Rinne’s leadership skills prior to a two-week strike by the country’s state-owned postal service in November that spread to other industries.

Rinne’s resignation prompted the formal resignation of the coalition of the Social Democrats and the Center Party and three junior partners: the Greens, the Left Alliance and the Swedish People’s Party of Finland.

A number of strikes are still taking place in the country, and resolving them will be one of Marin’s first priorities. She said on Sunday she was ready to get to work

“We have a lot of work to do to rebuild trust,” she said.

RUSSIA BANNED FROM TOKYO OLYMPICS, OTHER MAJOR SPORTS EVENTS FOR 4 YEARS

On Sunday, Social Democrats and the four other coalition parties said they are committed to the government program agreed upon after the April election and will continue in Marin’s new government. The new government will still have a comfortable majority of 117 seats at the 200-seat Eduskunta, or Parliament.

Westlake Legal Group FinlandPM2 Finland's Sanna Marin, 34, to become world's youngest prime minister Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox news fnc/world fnc e30c0388-05f9-5c21-a5b1-607bc6d977d6 article

Sanna Marin, a 34-year-old minister and lawmaker has been tapped to become Finland’s youngest prime minister ever and its third female government head, replacing former Cabinet leader who resigned Tuesday. (Vesa Moilanen/Lehtikuva via AP) (Vesa Moilanen/Lehtikuva via AP)

Marin will be Finland’s third female government leader. Women have been present in politics in the Nordic region for decades and today represent half of the party leaders in Sweden. Four of Denmark’s nine parties are headed by women.

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Mette Frederiksen became Denmark’s prime minister in June, while Erna Solberg has been Norway’s head of government since 2013.

Iceland’s Vigdis Finnbogadottir was the first woman to be democratically elected as head of state by voters when she defeated three men for the presidency in 1980.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group FinlandPM1 Finland's Sanna Marin, 34, to become world's youngest prime minister Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox news fnc/world fnc e30c0388-05f9-5c21-a5b1-607bc6d977d6 article   Westlake Legal Group FinlandPM1 Finland's Sanna Marin, 34, to become world's youngest prime minister Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/europe fox-news/topic/the-european-union fox news fnc/world fnc e30c0388-05f9-5c21-a5b1-607bc6d977d6 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Impeachment Hearing Updates: ‘The Evidence is Overwhelming’ Against Trump, Democratic Counsel Says

Video

Westlake Legal Group 09dc-impeach-videoSixteenByNine3000-v3 Impeachment Hearing Updates: ‘The Evidence is Overwhelming’ Against Trump, Democratic Counsel Says United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party

The House Judiciary Committee will hear evidence presented by Democratic and Republican lawyers before it will consider articles of impeachment later in the week.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

In what amounted to the opening argument in the effort to impeach President Trump, the lawyer for Judiciary Democrats told the committee that the president’s actions were “so brazen” that there was no question that he had abused his power to advance his own political interests over those of the nation.

“The evidence is overwhelming,” said Barry H. Berke, the lawyer, repeating the phrase to emphasize the point to counter in advance Republican arguments that the impeachment inquiry has been rushed and inadequate. The facts assembled in recent weeks were “uncontradicted” and “cannot be disputed,” he added, as he played video clips from witnesses who testified last month before the House Intelligence Committee.

“This is a big deal,” Mr. Berke told lawmakers. “President Trump did what a president of our nation is not allowed to do.” Mr. Trump’s actions, he added, were just what the framers had in mind when they put impeachment in the Constitution. “They threaten our rule of law, they threaten our institutions and, as James Madison warned us, they threaten our republic.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 09dc-livechat-sub-articleLarge Impeachment Hearing Updates: ‘The Evidence is Overwhelming’ Against Trump, Democratic Counsel Says United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party

Barry Berke, the lawyer for the House Judiciary Democrats, preparing to testify.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

The House Judiciary Committee opened a new phase in the impeachment inquiry on Monday as Democrats accused President Trump of violating his oath of office by pursuing his own political interests above those of the nation.

“President Trump put himself before country,” Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said, repeating the phrase five times during his opening statement as the panel prepared to hear evidence.

His Republican counterpart, Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, said the Democrats were out to get “a president they don’t like” from the moment he took office regardless of the evidence. “They spent two years trying to figure out what do we impeach him on,” he said.

After the opening statements, lawyers for both sides will make their opening argument for and against impeachment, and separately outline and analyze the information gathered by the House Intelligence Committee during its investigation into Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine to help him incriminate his Democratic political rivals. While the White House refuses to participate, Mr. Trump’s Republican allies will argue that the case is a partisan witch hunt.

The hearing may be an important factor in shaping the articles of impeachment that House Democrats are drafting against Mr. Trump amid an intense debate about how expansive the charges of high crimes and misdemeanors should be.

Democrats appear poised to accuse Mr. Trump of abuse of power and bribery for pressuring Ukraine to help him incriminate Democratic rivals while withholding American security aid. They also expect to charge him with obstructing the congressional investigation by defying subpoenas, blocking current and former administration officials from testifying, and trying to intimidate those who have.

Less clear is whether they will include charges of obstruction of justice for trying to impede the Russia investigation by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III. In his report last spring, Mr. Mueller submitted evidence of 10 instances of possible obstruction but said he could not judge whether they were illegal. Attorney General William P. Barr, a Trump appointee, declared that the president’s actions were not illegal, but Democrats dismiss his judgment as skewed and partisan.

Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he and his fellow Democrats would not decide the shape of the articles of impeachment until after hearing evidence on Monday.

“There are possible drafts that various people are writing,” Mr. Nadler said on “State of the Union” on CNN on Sunday. “But the fact is we’re not going to make any decision as to how broad the articles should be — as to what they contain, what the wording is — until after the hearing.”

Republicans on the Judiciary Committee intend to use the hearing to complain about how the Democrats have handled the inquiry and accuse them of rigging the process to achieve a preordained outcome rather than to get to the truth.

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the committee, called on Mr. Nadler over the weekend to delay the hearing because Republicans were provided with thousands of pages of documents related to the inquiry only 48 hours beforehand.

“Chairman Nadler has no choice but to postpone Monday’s hearing in the wake of a last-minute document transmission that shows just how far Democrats have gone to pervert basic fairness,” Mr. Collins said in a statement.

Some Republicans may also use the hearing to accuse Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, of inappropriately obtaining phone records that documented the dates and duration of calls involving his Republican counterpart, Representative Devin Nunes of California.

Phone records cited in the Intelligence Committee’s report indicated that Mr. Nunes was in contact with Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and one of his associates, Lev Parnas, who helped Mr. Giuliani with his efforts to turn up incriminating information about Democrats in Ukraine.

The White House refused to participate in Monday’s hearing, arguing that it was tilted against Mr. Trump and part of an illegitimate effort to overturn his election. But that does not mean Mr. Trump himself will not participate — at least via social media.

Given that the president posted or reposted nearly 100 messages on Twitter on Sunday, most of which were defending his actions or attacking his accusers, he could easily do the same on Monday, weighing in from afar with his own play-by-play commentary for his 67 million followers.

“Less than 48 hours before start of the Impeachment Hearing Hoax, on Monday, the No Due Process, Do Nothing Democrats are, believe it or not, changing the Impeachment Guidelines because the facts are not on their side,” Mr. Trump wrote on Sunday. “When you can’t win the game, change the rules!” He did not explain what he meant about changing the rules. The committee released a report on Saturday discussing the constitutional grounds for impeachment.

Most of Mr. Trump’s barrage on Sunday was retweets of his supporters, but he once again made clear that he expected nothing but complete loyalty from Fox News.

“Don’t get why @FoxNews puts losers on like @RepSwalwell (who got ZERO as presidential candidate before quitting), Pramila Jayapal, David Cicilline and others who are Radical Left Haters?” he wrote, naming several House Democrats. “The Dems wouldn’t let @FoxNews get near their bad ratings debates, yet Fox panders. Pathetic!”

  • The president and his advisers repeatedly pressured President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine and his government to investigate people and issues of political concern to Mr. Trump, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Here’s a timeline of events since January.

  • A C.I.A. officer who was once detailed to the White House filed a whistle-blower complaint on Mr. Trump’s interactions with Mr. Zelensky. Read the complaint.

Video

transcript

Who Are the Main Characters in the Whistle-Blower’s Complaint?

President Trump’s personal lawyer. The prosecutor general of Ukraine. Joe Biden’s son. These are just some of the names mentioned in the whistle-blower’s complaint. What were their roles? We break it down.

Congressman: “Sir, let me repeat my question: Did you ever speak to the president about this complaint?” Congress is investigating allegations that President Trump pushed a foreign government to dig up dirt on his Democratic rivals. “It’s just a Democrat witch hunt. Here we go again.” At the heart of an impeachment inquiry is a nine-page whistle-blower complaint that names over two dozen people. Not counting the president himself, these are the people that appear the most: First, Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani. According to documents and interviews, Giuliani has been involved in shadowy diplomacy on behalf of the president’s interests. He encouraged Ukrainian officials to investigate the Biden family’s activities in the country, plus other avenues that could benefit Trump like whether the Ukrainians intentionally helped the Democrats during the 2016 election. It was an agenda he also pushed on TV. “So you did ask Ukraine to look into Joe Biden.” “Of course I did!” A person Giuliani worked with, Yuriy Lutsenko, Ukraine’s former prosecutor general. He pushed for investigations that would also benefit Giuliani and Trump. Lutsenko also discussed conspiracy theories about the Bidens in the U.S. media. But he later walked back his allegations, saying there was no evidence of wrongdoing by the Bidens. This is where Hunter Biden comes in, the former vice president’s son. He served on the board of a Ukrainian energy company run by this guy, who’s had some issues with the law. While Biden was in office, he along with others, called for the dismissal of Lutsenko’s predecessor, a prosecutor named Viktor Shokin, whose office was overseeing investigations into the company that Hunter Biden was involved with. Shokin was later voted out by the Ukrainian government. Lutsenko replaced him, but was widely criticized for corruption himself. When a new president took office in May, Volodymyr Zelensky, Zelensky said that he’d replace Lutsenko. Giuliani and Trump? Not happy. They viewed Lutsenko as their ally. During a July 25 call between Trump and the new Ukrainian president, Trump defended him, saying, “I heard you had a prosecutor who is very good and he was shut down and that’s really unfair.” In that phone call, Trump also allegedly asked his counterpart to continue the investigation into Joe Biden, who is his main rival in the 2020 election. Zelensky has publicly denied feeling pressured by Trump. “In other words, no pressure.” And then finally, Attorney General William Barr, who also came up in the July 25 call. In the reconstructed transcript, Trump repeatedly suggested that Zelensky’s administration could work with Barr and Giuliani to investigate the Bidens and other matters of political interest to Trump. Since the whistle-blower complaint was made public, Democrats have criticized Barr for dismissing allegations that Trump had violated campaign finance laws during his call with Zelensky and not passing along the complaint to Congress. House Democrats have now subpoenaed several people mentioned in the complaint, as an impeachment inquiry into the president’s conduct continues.

Westlake Legal Group vidxx-trump-ukraine-1-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Impeachment Hearing Updates: ‘The Evidence is Overwhelming’ Against Trump, Democratic Counsel Says United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party

President Trump’s personal lawyer. The prosecutor general of Ukraine. Joe Biden’s son. These are just some of the names mentioned in the whistle-blower’s complaint. What were their roles? We break it down.CreditCredit…Illustration by The New York Times

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker Dies at 92

Westlake Legal Group ap_627312032736-0683939f904645a91aa47b8f26d35cf8fc7c234c-s1100-c15 Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker Dies at 92

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul Volcker listens to a question as he appears before the Senate Banking Committee in Washington, D.C., in 1980. Chick Harrity/AP hide caption

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Chick Harrity/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker Dies at 92

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul Volcker listens to a question as he appears before the Senate Banking Committee in Washington, D.C., in 1980.

Chick Harrity/AP

Former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, the closest thing to a rock star economist as this country has seen, died Monday at 92, NPR has confirmed. He was reportedly suffering from prostate cancer.

It has been more than three decades since Volcker stepped down from the Fed. And it’s a safe bet that many younger Americans do not even know his name.

Here’s how Robert Kavesh, a longtime professor at New York University, remembers his life-long friend: “The economic hero of post-World War II America I would have to say was Paul Volcker. And that’s saying something.”

Indeed. Volcker’s leadership moment came shortly after President Carter appointed him chairman of the Fed in 1979. The U.S. economy was in crisis. Stagflation — a highly unusual combination of both high inflation and rising unemployment — gripped the country.

To address spiraling inflation, Volcker dramatically constricted the nation’s money supply and let interest rates rise. The interest rates on a conventional mortgage soared to more than 18 percent.

Within two years, his plan worked. But it’s hard to overstate how much the public reviled Volcker at the time. Unemployment increased, and Volcker was blamed for plunging the country into recession — deliberately. Many say he ruined Carter’s re-election chances. Ads pointed out Volcker’s middle name was Adolph, insinuating similarities to Adolph Hitler.

Friends say Volcker privately worried about the impact of his policies, yet never wavered in his convictions.

“Ultimately, the only way, I think that just say flatly interest rates will be brought down and stay down is to get the inflation rate down,” he said at a Senate Banking Committee hearing in 1981.

Paul Volcker was born in Cape May, N.J., and grew up in Teaneck, a well-off community where his father was city manager.

He was a man of stature. Literally. He stood over 6-foot-7 and towered over all the presidents he served under.

Volcker believed that times of crisis give leaders more freedom to enact change.

“Well, when you’ve been in government and in public life a long time, you begin to realize you need a crisis to move the United States government, and other governments aren’t all that different,” he said in an NPR interview in 1992.

As the recession deepened in the early 1980s, Volcker received death threats, so he had Secret Service protection.

“We read the papers at the time and we knew what he was doing and trying to do was not popular, obviously,” his son James Volcker said. “And I think the entire family knew that this was one of the things that comes with public service.”

James Volcker, who was born with cerebral palsy, says his parents were not ones to shy away from hardship. At a time when many with his disease were kept out of public, he says his parents encouraged him to live in what he calls the “able-bodied world.”

Paul Volcker’s tenure as Fed chairman lasted eight years, until 1987. He returned to Wall Street, and then came back to Washington as an adviser to President Obama in the aftermath of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-81081166-0e41191335bbff273c6f202cd0e7e016c1b25285-s1100-c15 Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker Dies at 92

Paul Volcker testifies before the Joint Economic Committee in 2008. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker Dies at 92

Paul Volcker testifies before the Joint Economic Committee in 2008.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

During that time, he proposed a measure, which became known as the Volcker Rule, that sought to reduce the risk big banks posed to the economy by curbing their ability to trade their own funds speculatively. It took years for the Volcker Rule to be implemented and it was watered down along the way, but it is still part of the regulatory overhaul known as Dodd-Frank. In 2017, President Trump ordered the rule be be rewritten to further soften its impact.

If Volcker was the nation’s most powerful money man for a number of years, his lifestyle was one that spoke of neither wealth nor power. As chairman of the Fed, he lived in a tiny Washington apartment. He wore flimsy suits and smoked cheap cigars. His son says one of his greatest pleasures was making Thanksgiving dinner every year.

In a 1982 People Magazine profile, his late wife Barbara joked that his government job — as Fed chairman — could no longer afford them nights out. Broadway tickets for two — at $40 a piece — were not in the budget. She took a bookkeeping job to make ends meet.

When it came to household purchases, James Volcker recalls his father’s bouts with buyer’s remorse. “He agonized for a month after they bought the sofa that they could have gotten a better deal on another sofa. It kinda drove my mom crazy, in a way. And she told me more than once, ‘When you grow up, don’t be a Volcker! ‘ “

It was only after his 60th birthday that Volcker took his first big Wall Street salary.

The late Fed historian Allan Meltzer said history has vindicated Paul Volcker’s policy stands. Meltzer said Volcker will be remembered for his rare combination of economic acumen and his ability to defend his principles against fierce political criticism.

“I think he’s regarded as one of the stellar people of his generation,” Meltzer said.

Volcker left public life for some time to care for his wife of four decades, Barbara Volcker, who suffered from diabetes. She died in 1998. Twelve years later, at the age of 82, Volcker married his long-time assistant, Anke Dening.

He is survived by Dening and his children.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Impeachment Hearing Updates: Evidence to be Presented on Impeachment

Video

Westlake Legal Group 09dc-impeach-videoSixteenByNine3000-v3 Impeachment Hearing Updates: Evidence to be Presented on Impeachment United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party

The House Judiciary Committee will hear evidence presented by Democratic and Republican lawyers before it will consider articles of impeachment later in the week.CreditCredit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

In what amounted to the opening argument in the effort to impeach President Trump, the lawyer for Judiciary Democrats told the committee that the president’s actions were “so brazen” that there was no question that he had abused his power to advance his own political interests over those of the nation.

“The evidence is overwhelming,” said Barry H. Berke, the lawyer, repeating the phrase to emphasize the point to counter in advance Republican arguments that the impeachment inquiry has been rushed and inadequate. The facts assembled in recent weeks were “uncontradicted” and “cannot be disputed,” he added, as he played video clips from witnesses who testified last month before the House Intelligence Committee.

“This is a big deal,” Mr. Berke told lawmakers. “President Trump did what a president of our nation is not allowed to do.” Mr. Trump’s actions, he added, were just what the framers had in mind when they put impeachment in the Constitution. “They threaten our rule of law, they threaten our institutions and, as James Madison warned us, they threaten our republic.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 09dc-livechat-sub-articleLarge Impeachment Hearing Updates: Evidence to be Presented on Impeachment United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party

Barry Berke, the lawyer for the House Judiciary Democrats, preparing to testify.Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

The House Judiciary Committee opened a new phase in the impeachment inquiry on Monday as Democrats accused President Trump of violating his oath of office by pursuing his own political interests above those of the nation.

“President Trump put himself before country,” Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said, repeating the phrase five times during his opening statement as the panel prepared to hear evidence.

His Republican counterpart, Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, said the Democrats were out to get “a president they don’t like” from the moment he took office regardless of the evidence. “They spent two years trying to figure out what do we impeach him on,” he said.

After the opening statements, lawyers for both sides will make their opening argument for and against impeachment, and separately outline and analyze the information gathered by the House Intelligence Committee during its investigation into Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine to help him incriminate his Democratic political rivals. While the White House refuses to participate, Mr. Trump’s Republican allies will argue that the case is a partisan witch hunt.

The hearing may be an important factor in shaping the articles of impeachment that House Democrats are drafting against Mr. Trump amid an intense debate about how expansive the charges of high crimes and misdemeanors should be.

Democrats appear poised to accuse Mr. Trump of abuse of power and bribery for pressuring Ukraine to help him incriminate Democratic rivals while withholding American security aid. They also expect to charge him with obstructing the congressional investigation by defying subpoenas, blocking current and former administration officials from testifying, and trying to intimidate those who have.

Less clear is whether they will include charges of obstruction of justice for trying to impede the Russia investigation by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III. In his report last spring, Mr. Mueller submitted evidence of 10 instances of possible obstruction but said he could not judge whether they were illegal. Attorney General William P. Barr, a Trump appointee, declared that the president’s actions were not illegal, but Democrats dismiss his judgment as skewed and partisan.

Representative Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he and his fellow Democrats would not decide the shape of the articles of impeachment until after hearing evidence on Monday.

“There are possible drafts that various people are writing,” Mr. Nadler said on “State of the Union” on CNN on Sunday. “But the fact is we’re not going to make any decision as to how broad the articles should be — as to what they contain, what the wording is — until after the hearing.”

Republicans on the Judiciary Committee intend to use the hearing to complain about how the Democrats have handled the inquiry and accuse them of rigging the process to achieve a preordained outcome rather than to get to the truth.

Representative Doug Collins of Georgia, the top Republican on the committee, called on Mr. Nadler over the weekend to delay the hearing because Republicans were provided with thousands of pages of documents related to the inquiry only 48 hours beforehand.

“Chairman Nadler has no choice but to postpone Monday’s hearing in the wake of a last-minute document transmission that shows just how far Democrats have gone to pervert basic fairness,” Mr. Collins said in a statement.

Some Republicans may also use the hearing to accuse Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, of inappropriately obtaining phone records that documented the dates and duration of calls involving his Republican counterpart, Representative Devin Nunes of California.

Phone records cited in the Intelligence Committee’s report indicated that Mr. Nunes was in contact with Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and one of his associates, Lev Parnas, who helped Mr. Giuliani with his efforts to turn up incriminating information about Democrats in Ukraine.

The White House refused to participate in Monday’s hearing, arguing that it was tilted against Mr. Trump and part of an illegitimate effort to overturn his election. But that does not mean Mr. Trump himself will not participate — at least via social media.

Given that the president posted or reposted nearly 100 messages on Twitter on Sunday, most of which were defending his actions or attacking his accusers, he could easily do the same on Monday, weighing in from afar with his own play-by-play commentary for his 67 million followers.

“Less than 48 hours before start of the Impeachment Hearing Hoax, on Monday, the No Due Process, Do Nothing Democrats are, believe it or not, changing the Impeachment Guidelines because the facts are not on their side,” Mr. Trump wrote on Sunday. “When you can’t win the game, change the rules!” He did not explain what he meant about changing the rules. The committee released a report on Saturday discussing the constitutional grounds for impeachment.

Most of Mr. Trump’s barrage on Sunday was retweets of his supporters, but he once again made clear that he expected nothing but complete loyalty from Fox News.

“Don’t get why @FoxNews puts losers on like @RepSwalwell (who got ZERO as presidential candidate before quitting), Pramila Jayapal, David Cicilline and others who are Radical Left Haters?” he wrote, naming several House Democrats. “The Dems wouldn’t let @FoxNews get near their bad ratings debates, yet Fox panders. Pathetic!”

  • The president and his advisers repeatedly pressured President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine and his government to investigate people and issues of political concern to Mr. Trump, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Here’s a timeline of events since January.

  • A C.I.A. officer who was once detailed to the White House filed a whistle-blower complaint on Mr. Trump’s interactions with Mr. Zelensky. Read the complaint.

Video

transcript

Who Are the Main Characters in the Whistle-Blower’s Complaint?

President Trump’s personal lawyer. The prosecutor general of Ukraine. Joe Biden’s son. These are just some of the names mentioned in the whistle-blower’s complaint. What were their roles? We break it down.

Congressman: “Sir, let me repeat my question: Did you ever speak to the president about this complaint?” Congress is investigating allegations that President Trump pushed a foreign government to dig up dirt on his Democratic rivals. “It’s just a Democrat witch hunt. Here we go again.” At the heart of an impeachment inquiry is a nine-page whistle-blower complaint that names over two dozen people. Not counting the president himself, these are the people that appear the most: First, Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani. According to documents and interviews, Giuliani has been involved in shadowy diplomacy on behalf of the president’s interests. He encouraged Ukrainian officials to investigate the Biden family’s activities in the country, plus other avenues that could benefit Trump like whether the Ukrainians intentionally helped the Democrats during the 2016 election. It was an agenda he also pushed on TV. “So you did ask Ukraine to look into Joe Biden.” “Of course I did!” A person Giuliani worked with, Yuriy Lutsenko, Ukraine’s former prosecutor general. He pushed for investigations that would also benefit Giuliani and Trump. Lutsenko also discussed conspiracy theories about the Bidens in the U.S. media. But he later walked back his allegations, saying there was no evidence of wrongdoing by the Bidens. This is where Hunter Biden comes in, the former vice president’s son. He served on the board of a Ukrainian energy company run by this guy, who’s had some issues with the law. While Biden was in office, he along with others, called for the dismissal of Lutsenko’s predecessor, a prosecutor named Viktor Shokin, whose office was overseeing investigations into the company that Hunter Biden was involved with. Shokin was later voted out by the Ukrainian government. Lutsenko replaced him, but was widely criticized for corruption himself. When a new president took office in May, Volodymyr Zelensky, Zelensky said that he’d replace Lutsenko. Giuliani and Trump? Not happy. They viewed Lutsenko as their ally. During a July 25 call between Trump and the new Ukrainian president, Trump defended him, saying, “I heard you had a prosecutor who is very good and he was shut down and that’s really unfair.” In that phone call, Trump also allegedly asked his counterpart to continue the investigation into Joe Biden, who is his main rival in the 2020 election. Zelensky has publicly denied feeling pressured by Trump. “In other words, no pressure.” And then finally, Attorney General William Barr, who also came up in the July 25 call. In the reconstructed transcript, Trump repeatedly suggested that Zelensky’s administration could work with Barr and Giuliani to investigate the Bidens and other matters of political interest to Trump. Since the whistle-blower complaint was made public, Democrats have criticized Barr for dismissing allegations that Trump had violated campaign finance laws during his call with Zelensky and not passing along the complaint to Congress. House Democrats have now subpoenaed several people mentioned in the complaint, as an impeachment inquiry into the president’s conduct continues.

Westlake Legal Group vidxx-trump-ukraine-1-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Impeachment Hearing Updates: Evidence to be Presented on Impeachment United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Republican Party impeachment House Committee on the Judiciary Democratic Party

President Trump’s personal lawyer. The prosecutor general of Ukraine. Joe Biden’s son. These are just some of the names mentioned in the whistle-blower’s complaint. What were their roles? We break it down.CreditCredit…Illustration by The New York Times

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Paul A. Volcker, Fed Chairman Who Waged War on Inflation, Is Dead at 92

Westlake Legal Group 00volcker-toppix-sub-facebookJumbo Paul A. Volcker, Fed Chairman Who Waged War on Inflation, Is Dead at 92 Volcker, Paul A United States Economy Federal Reserve Bank of New York Deaths (Obituaries)

Paul A. Volcker, who helped shape American economic policy for more than six decades, most notably by leading the Federal Reserve’s brute-force campaign to subdue inflation in the late 1970s and early ’80s, died on Sunday in New York. He was 92.

The death was confirmed by his daughter, Janice Zima.

Mr. Volcker, a towering, taciturn and somewhat rumpled figure, arrived in Washington as America’s postwar economic hegemony was beginning to crumble. He would devote his professional life to wrestling with the consequences.

As a Treasury Department official under Presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon, Mr. Volcker waged a long, losing struggle to preserve the postwar international monetary system established by the Bretton Woods agreement.

As a senior Federal Reserve official from 1975 to 1987, in addition to battling inflation, he sought to limit the easing of financial regulation and warned that the rapid growth of the federal debt threatened the nation’s economic health.

In his last official post, as chairman of President Barack Obama’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board, formed in response to the 2008 financial crisis, he persuaded lawmakers to impose new restrictions on big banks — a measure known as the “Volcker Rule.”

Mr. Volcker interlaced his long stretches of public service with a lucrative career on Wall Street, most prominently as chief executive of the investment bank Wolfensohn & Company.

His reputation for austere integrity also made him a popular choice as an independent arbiter. In one instance he oversaw the reclamation of deposits that Swiss banks had failed to return to the families of Holocaust victims.

His defining achievement, however, was his success in ending an extended period of high inflation after President Jimmy Carter chose him to be the Fed’s chairman in 1979.

He prevailed by delivering shock therapy, driving the economy into a deep recession to persuade Americans to abandon their entrenched expectation that prices would keep rising rapidly.

The cost was steep. As consumers stopped buying homes and cars, millions of workers lost their jobs. Angry homebuilders mailed chunks of two-by-fours to the Fed’s marble headquarters in Washington. But Mr. Volcker managed to wring most inflation from the economy.

His victory inaugurated an era in which the leaders of both political parties largely deferred to the central bank, allowing technocrats to chart the course of monetary policy with little political interference.

Ben S. Bernanke, the Fed’s chairman from 2006 to 2014, kept on his bookshelf one of the chunks of wood that Mr. Volcker received during the anti-inflation campaign.

“He came to represent independence,” Mr. Bernanke said in an interview for this obituary. “He personified the idea of doing something politically unpopular but economically necessary.”

Proud, confident and 6-foot-7 in socks, Mr. Volcker struck many as remote and intimidating. Those who knew him well said the gruff exterior concealed a shy man with a puckish wit. His first wife told a biographer that she had waited vainly for a proposal before she finally asked him if he wanted to marry.

He was famously frugal, favoring drugstore cigars and ill-fitting suits. In the 1960s, when the driver’s seat in his Nash Rambler collapsed, Mr. Volcker propped it up with a chair and continued to drive the car. As chairman of the Fed, he lived in an apartment building populated by George Washington University students and took his laundry to his daughter’s house in the Virginia suburbs.

His time in the national spotlight began in August 1979. Mr. Carter, struggling to salvage public confidence in his administration, decided to reshuffle his cabinet, plucking the Fed chairman G. William Miller to serve as Treasury secretary. Mr. Volcker, who was then serving as president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, was not Mr. Carter’s first choice as a replacement.

Mr. Volcker was known to be frustrated with the Fed’s halfhearted efforts to curb inflation, leading Mr. Carter’s aides to warn that he might drive the economy into recession.

Meeting Mr. Carter in the Oval Office, Mr. Volcker slumped on a couch, a familiar cigar in hand, and gestured at Mr. Miller, who was in the room. “You have to understand,” Mr. Volcker said he told the president, “if you appoint me, I favor a tighter policy than that fellow.”

In taking the job, Mr. Volcker strained his finances and his family life.

The job of chairman paid half as much as his post at the New York Fed, and Mr. Volcker’s wife at the time, Barbara Volcker, who struggled for much of her life from debilitating rheumatoid arthritis as well as diabetes, remained in New York to be near her longtime physician. (She died in 1998.) Their son, James, who was born with cerebral palsy, also remained in New York.

Mr. Volcker married Barbara Bahnson in 1954. After her death, he married Anke Dening, his longtime assistant, in 2010. Besides her, he is survived by his son, James; a daughter, Janice Volcker Zima; and four grandchildren.

When Mr. Volcker arrived in Washington, the national inflation rate was exceeding 1 percent a month. (By comparison, in 2017 inflation was less than 2 percent for the whole year.) Rapid and unpredictable inflation encourages spending while discouraging investment, a combination that creates economic instability and, often, political instability.

Henry C. Wallich, a Fed governor who had lived through the hyperinflation of Weimar Germany and often told of paying 150 billion marks to use a neighborhood swimming pool, was among those warning that the Fed was losing control.

Many economists still argued that the Fed could reduce inflation gently, without causing a recession, by raising interest rates just enough to slow economic activity. But Mr. Volcker said inflation had become a self-fulfilling prophecy. People had come to expect prices and wages to rise, so they borrowed and spent more and demanded larger pay increases, and prices and wages rose.

The Fed had been promising to crack down on inflation for more than a decade, but it had repeatedly caved in to intense political pressure so as to avoid a recession. Mr. Volcker decided a dramatic gesture was necessary to convince the public that this time would be different.

“I wanted to move the story at least to the front page,” he told a biographer.

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Tiny phones hidden in Nike sneakers intercepted at Oklahoma detention facility

An Oklahoma inmate’s special Christmas delivery was thwarted last week after prison staff intercepted an early – and illegal – holiday gift: a pair of Nike shoes with six mini cellphones hidden inside a secret cavity.

The staff at the Logan County Detention Center inspected the all-black Nike Air Force 1s for contraband before delivering the shoes to the unidentified inmate, the county sheriff’s office said. They discovered that underneath the insoles of each shoe were three cutout cavities that each held a tiny cellphone measuring no more than 3 inches long.

CANADA SUSPECTS LAUNCHED MARIJUANA, METH INTO JAIL USING POTATO GUN: POLICE

“Had our staff not been thorough, this could have easily been missed and ended up in a detention center/prison to be used to continue a criminal operation from inside the walls,” Logan County Sheriff Damon Devereaux said on Facebook.

Westlake Legal Group logan-county-sheriff-nike-shoes-contraband-split Tiny phones hidden in Nike sneakers intercepted at Oklahoma detention facility Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc c232b79e-b4a3-5604-8ab5-fb17f84ca1eb article

A pair of Nike shoes each hiding three tiny cellphones in cut out cavities in their soles was intercepted at Logan County Detention Center. (Logan County Sheriff’s Office)

In September, the governor’s office blamed inmates using cellphone contraband for facilitating a string of violent acts that took place within hours of each other at facilities across the state, according to KFOR-TV. The violence left one inmate dead and more than a dozen others injured while prisons were placed on lockdown for several days.

FLASHBACK: OKLAHOMA INMATE DIES, MULTIPLE PEOPLE INJURED IN PRISON FIGHTS AS STATEWIDE FACILITIES REMAIN ON LOCKDOWN

Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt has since signed an executive order to find new ways to eliminate cellphones in prison, including the use of technology like phone jamming equipment.

Westlake Legal Group logan-county-sheriff-nike-shoes-contraband-2 Tiny phones hidden in Nike sneakers intercepted at Oklahoma detention facility Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc c232b79e-b4a3-5604-8ab5-fb17f84ca1eb article

The tiny cellphones discovered hidden underneath the insoles of the shoes all measured less than 3 inches long. (Logan County Sheriff’s Office)

The sheriff’s office told the station that deputies were working to learn who dropped off the shoes. The individual will face charges.

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It was unclear whether the inmate who was supposed to receive the shoes will face any charges.

Westlake Legal Group logan-county-sheriff-nike-shoes-contraband-1 Tiny phones hidden in Nike sneakers intercepted at Oklahoma detention facility Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc c232b79e-b4a3-5604-8ab5-fb17f84ca1eb article   Westlake Legal Group logan-county-sheriff-nike-shoes-contraband-1 Tiny phones hidden in Nike sneakers intercepted at Oklahoma detention facility Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/oklahoma fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc c232b79e-b4a3-5604-8ab5-fb17f84ca1eb article

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Pete Buttigieg Says ‘No’ When Asked If He Thinks Getting Money Out Of Politics Includes Ending Closed-Door Fundraisers With Billionaires

Westlake Legal Group e2ex2NYZbOVkKe_GIHwcUTnIfbJtBLGY_uCGWqV4iYA Pete Buttigieg Says 'No' When Asked If He Thinks Getting Money Out Of Politics Includes Ending Closed-Door Fundraisers With Billionaires r/politics

To the people that are not aware who pete really is:

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2019/04/29/lis-smith-buttigieg-2020-president-campaign-manager-226756

In reference to lis smith, the person responsible for taking a small time politician into the spotlight:

In New York, she served as a consultant to the state Senate Independent Democratic Conference, a group of breakaway Dems who until earlier this month were in a leadership coalition with the chamber’s Republicans.

So this explains pretty much every position pete has taken, THINK OF THE BUDGET, corporate facism. Fuck pete, fuck lis.

BuT h3 sp3KS 40 L4NGuAg3s!

No, he knows some words, in a few of them. One can converse at his level with a couple of weeks of effort in a language. The bar seems really low with trump in office. You should care about his stances on issues and his record as a embattled major of a small town and nda hidden work at McKinney in the middle east.

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Pete Buttigieg Says ‘No’ When Asked If He Thinks Getting Money Out Of Politics Includes Ending Closed-Door Fundraisers With Billionaires

Westlake Legal Group e2ex2NYZbOVkKe_GIHwcUTnIfbJtBLGY_uCGWqV4iYA Pete Buttigieg Says 'No' When Asked If He Thinks Getting Money Out Of Politics Includes Ending Closed-Door Fundraisers With Billionaires r/politics

To the people that are not aware who pete really is:

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2019/04/29/lis-smith-buttigieg-2020-president-campaign-manager-226756

In reference to lis smith, the person responsible for taking a small time politician into the spotlight:

In New York, she served as a consultant to the state Senate Independent Democratic Conference, a group of breakaway Dems who until earlier this month were in a leadership coalition with the chamber’s Republicans.

So this explains pretty much every position pete has taken, THINK OF THE BUDGET, corporate facism. Fuck pete, fuck lis.

BuT h3 sp3KS 40 L4NGuAg3s!

No, he knows some words, in a few of them. One can converse at his level with a couple of weeks of effort in a language. The bar seems really low with trump in office. You should care about his stances on issues and his record as a embattled major of a small town and nda hidden work at McKinney in the middle east.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

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Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he’s a success — and they can’t stand it

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114133462001_6114140356001-vs Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he's a success -- and they can't stand it Steve Hilton fox-news/shows/the-next-revolution fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ed6213a5-bebc-5ce0-a092-768df46291a5 article

Democrats’ hate-driven attempt to overturn the 2016 election through non-democratic means comes from their fear that none of their presidential candidates are strong enough to beat President Trump in 2020.

One line last week in the impeachment inquiry hearing before the House Judiciary Committee gave the whole game away. It came right at the start of those hours of snooty, snarky, partisan screeching by the Democrats’ legal stooges.

NUNES BLASTS SCHIFF FOR ‘BLATANT DISREGARD’ OF IMPEACHMENT RULES; BLAMES ‘VENDETTA’ AGAINST TRUMP

Noah Feldman, Harvard law professor: Let me begin by stating my conclusions.

That is this whole farce in a nutshell! The Democrats started with their conclusions, all the way back to Trump’s inauguration in January 2017 — before Ukraine, before Mueller, before anything. They wanted Trump impeached.

So let’s translate into the truth Nancy Pelosi’s utterly disingenuous impeachment announcement last week.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House: Sadly but with confidence and humility.

“Sadly?” What, like Maxine Waters leading chants of “Impeach 45!”? Or Rashida Tlaib telling supporters, “We’re going to impeach the mother——“?

Yeah, they’re real sad about it. So sad. Perhaps we should get them some counseling.

They’ve been dying to do this for three years. It’s obvious they hate Trump and it’s obvious they’re loving this. But they know how wrong and divisive it is. So they have to pretend to be sad.

These people are so cynical.

Every single thing the Democrats accuse President Trump of — undermining democracy, ignoring the rule of law, abusing power — they are guilty of themselves.

And then how about this?

Pelosi: The facts are uncontested.

We’ve literally had weeks of the facts being contested. You can agree or disagree with the arguments on either side, but to say the facts are uncontested is truly Orwellian doublespeak.

Equally offensive is how they shamelessly plunder the Constitution to justify their petty partisan scheme.

Pelosi: James Madison, the architect of the Constitution, warned that a president might betray his trust to foreign powers, which might prove fatal to the republic. Another Founder, Gouverneur Morris, feared that the president may be bribed by a greater interest to betray his trust.

Bribed? In these entire proceedings, not a single witness has suggested for a single second that anyone bribed the president to do anything. But because the focus groups say “bribery” is the word to use, the idiotic Democrats just say it anyway.

Here’s another term they trot out with utter vacuity.

Pelosi: In America, no one is above the law.

More from Opinion

Oh. Apart from, let’s see, Democratic presidential candidates who were previously vice president, whose children profited corruptly from their government role. That must never be investigated.

Let’s just clarify the Pelosi doctrine, shall we? No one is above the law except Joe Biden.

And here’s Pelosi’s whole case in a nutshell.

Pelosi: The president has engaged in abuse of power, undermining our national security, and jeopardizing the integrity of our elections.

She says Trump undermined America’s national security by withholding military aid to Ukraine in the middle of a hot war with Russia. So terrible for our national security. I mean, only a monster like Trump would do that.

Or maybe also President Obama, who did exactly the same thing. Not a peep out of Pelosi back then about national security.

She says Trump has jeopardized the integrity of our elections. Let’s see. Trump wants to find out if Ukraine interfered in the 2016 election, if U.S. government policy was affected by the fact that when Vice President Biden was in charge of Ukraine policy, his son was being paid by Ukrainian gas company.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

And it’s Pelosi who says she and her Democrat cronies should choose the next president, not you, the voters. Trump is the one jeopardizing our elections? Every single thing the Democrats accuse President Trump of — undermining democracy, ignoring the rule of law, abusing power — they are guilty of themselves.

Any reasonable person can see that on policy results, on the substance — on facts — this is one of the most successful presidencies in history, and the establishment can’t stand it. They were certain Trump would be a disaster. It’s because he’s a success that they’re impeaching him.

Adapted from Steve Hilton’s monologue from “The Next Revolution” on Dec. 8, 2019

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM STEVE HILTON

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114133462001_6114140356001-vs Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he's a success -- and they can't stand it Steve Hilton fox-news/shows/the-next-revolution fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ed6213a5-bebc-5ce0-a092-768df46291a5 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114133462001_6114140356001-vs Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he's a success -- and they can't stand it Steve Hilton fox-news/shows/the-next-revolution fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ed6213a5-bebc-5ce0-a092-768df46291a5 article

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Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he’s a success — and they can’t stand it

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114133462001_6114140356001-vs Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he's a success -- and they can't stand it Steve Hilton fox-news/shows/the-next-revolution fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ed6213a5-bebc-5ce0-a092-768df46291a5 article

Democrats’ hate-driven attempt to overturn the 2016 election through non-democratic means comes from their fear that none of their presidential candidates are strong enough to beat President Trump in 2020.

One line last week in the impeachment inquiry hearing before the House Judiciary Committee gave the whole game away. It came right at the start of those hours of snooty, snarky, partisan screeching by the Democrats’ legal stooges.

NUNES BLASTS SCHIFF FOR ‘BLATANT DISREGARD’ OF IMPEACHMENT RULES; BLAMES ‘VENDETTA’ AGAINST TRUMP

Noah Feldman, Harvard law professor: Let me begin by stating my conclusions.

That is this whole farce in a nutshell! The Democrats started with their conclusions, all the way back to Trump’s inauguration in January 2017 — before Ukraine, before Mueller, before anything. They wanted Trump impeached.

So let’s translate into the truth Nancy Pelosi’s utterly disingenuous impeachment announcement last week.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House: Sadly but with confidence and humility.

“Sadly?” What, like Maxine Waters leading chants of “Impeach 45!”? Or Rashida Tlaib telling supporters, “We’re going to impeach the mother——“?

Yeah, they’re real sad about it. So sad. Perhaps we should get them some counseling.

They’ve been dying to do this for three years. It’s obvious they hate Trump and it’s obvious they’re loving this. But they know how wrong and divisive it is. So they have to pretend to be sad.

These people are so cynical.

Every single thing the Democrats accuse President Trump of — undermining democracy, ignoring the rule of law, abusing power — they are guilty of themselves.

And then how about this?

Pelosi: The facts are uncontested.

We’ve literally had weeks of the facts being contested. You can agree or disagree with the arguments on either side, but to say the facts are uncontested is truly Orwellian doublespeak.

Equally offensive is how they shamelessly plunder the Constitution to justify their petty partisan scheme.

Pelosi: James Madison, the architect of the Constitution, warned that a president might betray his trust to foreign powers, which might prove fatal to the republic. Another Founder, Gouverneur Morris, feared that the president may be bribed by a greater interest to betray his trust.

Bribed? In these entire proceedings, not a single witness has suggested for a single second that anyone bribed the president to do anything. But because the focus groups say “bribery” is the word to use, the idiotic Democrats just say it anyway.

Here’s another term they trot out with utter vacuity.

Pelosi: In America, no one is above the law.

More from Opinion

Oh. Apart from, let’s see, Democratic presidential candidates who were previously vice president, whose children profited corruptly from their government role. That must never be investigated.

Let’s just clarify the Pelosi doctrine, shall we? No one is above the law except Joe Biden.

And here’s Pelosi’s whole case in a nutshell.

Pelosi: The president has engaged in abuse of power, undermining our national security, and jeopardizing the integrity of our elections.

She says Trump undermined America’s national security by withholding military aid to Ukraine in the middle of a hot war with Russia. So terrible for our national security. I mean, only a monster like Trump would do that.

Or maybe also President Obama, who did exactly the same thing. Not a peep out of Pelosi back then about national security.

She says Trump has jeopardized the integrity of our elections. Let’s see. Trump wants to find out if Ukraine interfered in the 2016 election, if U.S. government policy was affected by the fact that when Vice President Biden was in charge of Ukraine policy, his son was being paid by Ukrainian gas company.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

And it’s Pelosi who says she and her Democrat cronies should choose the next president, not you, the voters. Trump is the one jeopardizing our elections? Every single thing the Democrats accuse President Trump of — undermining democracy, ignoring the rule of law, abusing power — they are guilty of themselves.

Any reasonable person can see that on policy results, on the substance — on facts — this is one of the most successful presidencies in history, and the establishment can’t stand it. They were certain Trump would be a disaster. It’s because he’s a success that they’re impeaching him.

Adapted from Steve Hilton’s monologue from “The Next Revolution” on Dec. 8, 2019

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM STEVE HILTON

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114133462001_6114140356001-vs Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he's a success -- and they can't stand it Steve Hilton fox-news/shows/the-next-revolution fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ed6213a5-bebc-5ce0-a092-768df46291a5 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6114133462001_6114140356001-vs Steve Hilton: Trump faces impeachment because Democrats know he's a success -- and they can't stand it Steve Hilton fox-news/shows/the-next-revolution fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc ed6213a5-bebc-5ce0-a092-768df46291a5 article

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