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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 284)

San Francisco is losing residents because it’s too expensive for nearly everyone

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close San Francisco is losing residents because it's too expensive for nearly everyone

Nine of the ten highest-rent cities in the U.S. are in California. USA TODAY

SAN FRANCISCO — Social media influencer Sarah Tripp and her husband, Robbie Tripp, moved to San Francisco in 2016 brimming with optimism. 

“We thought, here’s a city full of opportunities and connections where you go to work hard and succeed,” says Tripp, 27, founder of the lifestyle blog Sassy Red Lipstick.

But after a year-long hunt for suitable housing in San Francisco only turned up “places for $1 million that looked like rundown shacks and needed a remodel,” the couple packed up and moved to Phoenix.

They went from paying San Francisco rents of $2,500 for a one-bedroom, one-bath apartment that was far from shopping and other amenities, to purchasing a newly constructed 3,000-square-foot, four-bedroom, four-bathroom home where they’ll raise their newly arrived baby boy.

“It was cool to be living near all those high-tech start-ups,” Tripp says of her Bay Area years. “But you quickly saw that if you weren’t part of that, you’d be pushed out. It’s just sad.”

For the better part of two decades, the Bay Area has been a magnet for newcomers lured by a modern-day technology Gold Rush. But increasingly only those who have struck it rich can afford to stay.

Once a bohemian mecca that welcomed the Beat Poets and ’60s hippies, San Francisco now lays claim to the most expensive housing in the West, with a median home price of $1.4 million. There’s also $5-a-gallon gas, private schools priced like universities and chic restaurants that cost nearly double the national average.

Earlier this year, the San Francisco Bay Area was second only to New York — and ahead of Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Chicago — when it came to people leaving major U.S. cities. More than 28,190 departed in the second quarter of 2019, almost double 2017’s rate, according to real estate brokerage Redfin.

The most popular in-state option for San Franciscans fleeing high costs is Sacramento, where the median home price is $350,000. Out of state, Seattle, at a $580,000 median, offers the biggest draw, Redfin data shows.

Yet another popular destination is even farther afield: Austin, a capital city with no state taxes and a booming tech scene that is home to Apple’s latest HQ. The most recent quarter ending July 30 saw Austin receive 5,403 newcomers, the majority of which came from San Francisco, Redfin says.

California overall also is losing residents. In 2018, 38,000 more people left the Golden State than entered, the second year in a row for this negative trend, according to the U.S. Census. A recent Edelman Trust Barometer survey found 53% of residents and 63% of millennials were considering leaving because of the high cost of living.

“The great tragedy is this place was a middle-class paradise, and now you’ve got the flight of the middle class with all their aspirations, leaving the poor, the rich and a transient population,” says Joel Kotkin, presidential fellow in Urban Futures at Chapman University in Orange, California. 

In the Bay Area, median household income is around $100,000, a tidy sum in most cities. But after federal and state taxes, residents have to cover rents that range from $3,600 a month in San Francisco to $4,600 in Silicon Valley, according to rental site Rent Cafe. That economic reality has left many of the city’s low-income residents living in their cars or on the streets.

“I don’t recognize my city, to be honest,” says Shannon Way, executive director of HomeownershipSF, a non-profit umbrella group that helps residents secure housing. “When you only have people at the extremes, it tears at the very fiber of what it means to live in a community.”

Way says her organization does what it can to steer locals toward the city’s few below market rate housing options, as well as a city down payment assistance loan program. “We focus on those who really want to stay,” she says. “But it’s getting harder and harder to survive here.”

That desire to leave also hits the wealthiest of San Francisco residents, some of whom are perched in Pacific Heights mansions that fetch as much as $39 million.

Over the past year, a wave of initial public offerings have involved San Francisco-based tech companies such as Lyft and Airbnb (and, coming soon, Uber). Some of those newly minted millionaires aren’t keen to lose “a lot of their windfalls to state taxes, so they start looking elsewhere,” says Daryl Fairweather, chief economist at Redfin. Typical tax-free landing spots include Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and Incline Village, Nevada.

California’s biggest challenge

Business and political leaders — from Salesforce billionaire Marc Benioff to Gov. Gavin Newsom — have sounded the alarm over the growing housing crisis.

Last year, Benioff lobbied to pass a controversial San Francisco corporate tax to fund homelessness initiatives. And Newsom, who in his State of the State address early this year called housing “our most overwhelming challenge,” has committed $1.75 billion to fund new building projects.

During a statewide tour in October, Newsom signed various housing bills, including one that puts an annual cap on rent increases at 5% plus inflation, and another that aims to block predatory evictions.

“We’re living in the wealthiest as well as the poorest state in America,” Newsom said as he signed the bills at a ceremony in Oakland. “Cost of living. It is the issue that defines more issues than any other issue in this state.”

San Jose natives Halie and Jim Casey assumed that by getting into the housing market they could keep costs under control. They had purchased a small house well suited to the two of them and were happy. But then Halie got pregnant.

“We quickly saw we couldn’t afford anything bigger,” she says.

Their appreciating asset served as a ticket out. The couple had purchased their home for $700,000, and two years later it was worth $1,000,000, thanks in part to Google buying up land in San Jose.

Jim, 40, decided to become a stay at home dad for a spell, while Halie, 32, arranged to transfer in May 2018 with her employer, Apple, to the company’s new Austin offices.

“We got a great house with a nice yard, have great schools, and all for less money which allowed us to pay off our debts,” she says. “There’s also a flexible, family-friendly nature to life here that doesn’t exist in the intense, pressurized world of Bay Area tech.”

Housing threatens booming economy

For some experts, families opting to leave the state foreshadows larger problems. They worry a lack of affordable housing could jeopardize a state growth rate — one fueled in large part by Bay Area tech giants — that typically outpaces the national average. That could mean fewer jobs for those who stay.

“The Bay Area’s strength is also its greatest weakness,” says Jordan Levine, deputy chief economist of the California Association of Realtors. “The area has a strong economy and some of the most innovative companies in the nation, but it’s also a poster child for housing supply issues that haven’t kept up with growth.”

Chapman University’s Kotkin says he’s alarmed by the growing number of California companies moving to states where cheap housing and sometimes no state taxes make it easier to pay middle-managers a living wage. These include automakers (Mitsubishi leaving L.A. for Tennessee), defense contractors (Parsons leaving Pasadena for Washington, D.C.), and technology enterprises (Apple building in Austin). 

“In the end, you want a middle class in your state,” says Kotkin. “Because a society without one is unstable.”

Solutions will have to come from public officials and citizens alike, says Dowell Myers, professor of policy, planning and demography at the University of Southern California’s Sol Price School of Public Policy.

“I’m not despondent, but it requires many people to see how their interests are negatively impacted,” he says. “If you own a house, you benefit as your value goes up in a housing shortage. But your children and grandchildren will be impacted, they may not be able to live and work here. So that’ll be the way things will change.”

The alternative is bleak, says state Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco).

“We’re headed to a future where the middle class won’t be able to raise families here, where restaurants increasingly will close because they can’t hire workers, where teachers and police officers can’t live anywhere near where they work,” he says. “We need a much greater sense of urgency.”

Wiener, who has been criticized by housing activists who claim his various housing bills haven’t been accommodating enough to low-income residents, says “it’s easy to just blame someone else when we need to look in the mirror.”

He notes that tech companies such as Facebook and Google have put forth plans to build housing near their headquarters, only to be stopped by local zoning laws.

“Tech companies didn’t cause our housing problems or create bad housing laws,” says Wiener. “This whole thing won’t be easy politically or financially, and it won’t happen fast.”

West Seattle = New California

But time is of the essence. Many young, educated, upwardly mobile workers in San Francisco say they can’t afford to wait around for government officials and business leader to come up with solutions.

Deborah Neisuler, 42, never really thought she would leave her beloved Francisco.

In 2006, she and her husband Justin, 44 — he’s in banking, she’s a curriculum developer — bought a small house south of town that had easy access to local freeways leading to Silicon Valley.

As the years passed, two children arrived, and suddenly the house started to feel cramped. What’s more, the prospect of private school tuition loomed given the city’s lottery system doesn’t guarantee a first-choice public school. 

That’s when a real estate agent friend offered to quietly test the waters for a sale, given their house had gone up in value 66%. Although “no one had heard of our neighborhood when we bought there, it was close to the freeway and offered a good commute to Silicon Valley,” says Deborah Neisuler.

The house sold quickly. Since both worked largely from home, their options were wide open. The couple didn’t want to move back East, where they are both from, and Bay Area suburbs did not appeal. “We are city people,” she says.

Instead, lured by a body of water and a sense of community, the family chose West Seattle. The area has become so popular with newcomers from down south “people call it New California, because it seems people from there are taking over,” Neisuler says with a laugh. “And I’m like, ‘Yup, that’s us.’”

Although over the past few years she has longed for San Francisco’s hip urban culture and sometimes struggles with Seattle’s dark winters, Neisuler is thrilled with the change.

“I do really miss San Francisco, it holds a special place in my heart and we were there 13 years,” says Neisuler. “But I know it’s not the best place for my family.”

Follow USA TODAY national correspondent Marco della Cava: @marcodellcava

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/19/california-housing-crisis-residents-flee-san-francisco-because-costs/3985196002/

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Former ICE Director: Crimes in sanctuary cities are all preventable

Westlake Legal Group a712c3e4-HOMAN-CROP Former ICE Director: Crimes in sanctuary cities are all preventable Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc c044512f-c6e1-5481-bc92-a6df7d5c0322 article

Crimes in sanctuary cities are preventable, former Acting U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Director and Fox News contributor Tom Homan argued Saturday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends: Weekend,” Homan told host Griff Jenkins that while some sanctuary jurisdictions will hand ICE “the most violent of the criminals,” some jurisdictions “won’t work with us at all.”

Federal officials said Tuesday that New York Authorities released a Guyanese convicted child abuser into the community, defying an ICE request that he be held for deportation. The offender went on to be arrested for yet another case of abuse in July.

CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR PARDONS 3 CONVICTED IMMIGRANTS TO HELP BLOCK DEPORTATIONS

Deportation officers tracked the perpetrator down on October 9 in Queens, NY.

New York is one of the country’s most prominent sanctuary cities. The city won a court case last year to preserve its sanctuary policy, with a judge ruling that the Department of Justice couldn’t withhold federal funds in order for the city to surrender its policy.

ICE: ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT TARGETED ALLEGED RAPE VICTIM AGAIN AFTER RELEASE

The PEW Research Center reported a staggering 1.1 million illegal immigrants in New York City in 2016.

“Every one of these crimes are preventable, and it’s just a shame that sanctuary city policies still are alive today,” Homan said.

32 ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS DISCOVERED INSIDE REFRIGERATED SEMI TRUCK IN AZ, OFFICIALS SAY

In a statement, NYPD Spokesman Alfred J. Baker said that “The NYPD does not engage in civil immigration enforcement.”

But, Homan says that’s a “false narrative.”

“They don’t want to be immigration officers. They don’t want to be involved in the immigration enforcement process. But, we’re not asking them to,” he told Jenkins.

“What we’re saying is we know when we notify you that we have probable cause — you have detained someone that’s in the country illegally — notify us before you release them.

“You don’t have to hold them one minute past when you would normally hold them in your charges. But before he walks out the door: call us and we’ll be there. There’s no liability there. There’s no legal question there.”

“That’s not enforcing immigration law. That’s cops working with cops to protect the community.”

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He concluded: “That’s the false narrative being pushed by the politicians, and that’s what upsets me every time we talk about these cases. It’s a false narrative. The American people deserve the truth and they need to hear the truth.”

Fox News reached out to Mayor Bill DeBlasio’s office for comment, but they declined to do so.

The Washington Times contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group a712c3e4-HOMAN-CROP Former ICE Director: Crimes in sanctuary cities are all preventable Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc c044512f-c6e1-5481-bc92-a6df7d5c0322 article   Westlake Legal Group a712c3e4-HOMAN-CROP Former ICE Director: Crimes in sanctuary cities are all preventable Julia Musto fox-news/us/immigration/illegal-immigrants fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc c044512f-c6e1-5481-bc92-a6df7d5c0322 article

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Bernie Sanders Adds New York Endorsements Ahead Of Comeback Rally In Queens

Westlake Legal Group 5daa7bd52000009f11506272 Bernie Sanders Adds New York Endorsements Ahead Of Comeback Rally In Queens

The presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) secured the endorsements of three additional New York lawmakers ahead of his comeback rally in Queens on Saturday: state Sens. Michael Gianaris and Jessica Ramos of Queens, and state Sen. Luis Sepúlveda of the Bronx.

“Bernie is the best candidate to fight back against the deep-pocketed corporate interests that weaken our democracy and exploit our economy,” Ramos, who unseated a Queens Democrat aligned with state Republicans in September 2018, said in a statement announcing her endorsement. “In Senator Sanders we have a leader who will protect all members of our society, especially those seeking human rights and better working conditions free from unethical practices.” 

Gianaris, who as deputy state Senate majority leader is one of the most powerful Democrats in New York, echoed Ramos’ sentiments. “Bernie Sanders is the best choice to reduce this growing chasm between the ultra-rich and working people,” he said in a statement.

The trio joins a group of five New York lawmakers who had already endorsed Sanders’ bid: New York City Councilman Rafael Espinal, state Assemblymen Ron Kim and Phil Steck, and state Sens. Julia Salazar and James Sanders. (James Sanders is not related to the Vermont senator.)

Although New Yorkers cast ballots in the Democratic presidential primary in April, well after the crucial early states, some presidential contenders have already sought endorsements from the state’s robust bench of young, progressive lawmakers. Sanders still has fewer endorsements from New York state and New York City elected officials than Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who announced that she had secured the backing of 14 lawmakers at a mid-September rally in Manhattan.

Sanders, 78, is hoping to regain momentum after suffering a heart attack on Oct. 1 that polling indicates raised doubts in the minds of many Democrats about his fitness to serve in the White House.

Sanders, seeking to reassure the public of his health and vitality, delivered a strong debate performance on Tuesday and hours later announced he’d secured endorsements from Reps. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, two of the Democratic Party’s young, progressive stars.

Saturday’s rally in Queensbridge Park, chosen in part for its proximity to the country’s largest public housing development, is Sanders’ first major campaign event since his hospitalization.

He will be joined onstage at the rally by Ocasio-Cortez, who is expected to formally announce her endorsement there. Sanders courted Ocasio-Cortez in conversations over the course of a month, culminating in a visit she paid to Burlington, Vermont, at the end of September. She met with Sanders and his wife, as well as a group of aides, over two meals, where they developed a rapport, according to someone familiar with Ocasio-Cortez’s thinking.

Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement of Sanders is not altogether surprising. Ocasio-Cortez got her start in politics volunteering for Sanders’ 2016 bid; the pair are both self-described democratic socialists and have collaborated on, among other things, legislation limiting interest rates on credit card debt.

But prior to announcing her endorsement of Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez had spoken positively about Warren, too. And Warren had apparently made efforts to develop a relationship with her.

Ocasio-Cortez was drawn to Sanders’ vision of a rejuvenated democracy where ordinary Americans take a more active role in the political process, according to the person with knowledge of her thinking.

“They’re ideologically aligned, but they’re mission-aligned as well,” the person said. “They get along really well. They brighten each other up.”

Saturday’s rally will give Ocasio-Cortez an opportunity to show if her star power is a major draw for aspiring national leaders.

“If he gets enough of the young, left-wing demo out, the age issue disappears, the health issue is softened and Bernie gets new life. It makes him young again,” said Hank Sheinkopf, a veteran New York City Democratic strategist. “If he doesn’t get a big crowd, then those two issues remain in place.”

Michael Ceraso, a Democratic campaign consultant who worked on Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign, expressed doubt that Ocasio-Cortez’s blessing would help him broaden his appeal “in the areas where he has deficits,” such as older voters.

But it is likely to help him maximize turnout among the young voters Sanders is relying on to carve a path to the Democratic nomination, according to Ceraso.

Ocasio-Cortez “resonates with those young voters who are looking for a reason to vote,” he said.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hollywood stars dress up as their favorite celebs for Halloween

Every year, Hollywood stars go all out for Halloween, and when they do, there are undoubtedly some who pay tribute to their own favorite icons. Sometimes it’s funny, sometimes it’s cute, but it’s always awesome.

Here’s your definitive list to some of the best celebs as… other celebs.

Ellen DeGeneres as Sia

Every year, Ellen DeGeneres dresses in an outrageous costume as one of the year’s biggest stars.

Past costumes have included Sofia Vergara and Nikki Minaj, but her dressing up as Sia (and performing “Chandelier”) takes the cake.

HEIDI KLUM IS ALREADY PREPPING FOR HER NEXT HALLOWEEN COSTUME

Westlake Legal Group Ellen-DeGeneres-Sia-2016 Hollywood stars dress up as their favorite celebs for Halloween Nate Day fox-news/person/kylie-jenner fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/person/hoda-kotb fox-news/person/ellen-degeneres fox-news/person/chrissy-teigen fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 398038ba-b838-5706-a13b-a62724191111

Ellen DeGeneres dressed as the Australian singer-songwriter Sia in 2016. (The Ellen DeGeneres Show )

Kylie Jenner as Christina Aguilera

From one diva to another: Kylie Jenner lovingly dressed as Christina Aguilera from her music video for “Dirrty.”

Aguilera’s song was released in 2002, and Jenner donned the costume in 2016.

Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan as Katy Perry and Left Shark

Every year, “Live!” co-hosts dress up together in clever and kooky costumes, and 2015 was no exception.

Ripa and former co-host Strahan dressed as Katy Perry — during the star’s 2015 Superbowl halftime show — and Left Shark, a background dancer from the set that went viral after the game.

HAILEY BIEBER WILL DRESS UP AND EAT CANDY ‘FOR THE GLORY OF GOD’ TO CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN, SHE SAYS

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-494985390 Hollywood stars dress up as their favorite celebs for Halloween Nate Day fox-news/person/kylie-jenner fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/person/hoda-kotb fox-news/person/ellen-degeneres fox-news/person/chrissy-teigen fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 398038ba-b838-5706-a13b-a62724191111

Michael Strahan as Left Shark and Kelly Ripa as Katy Perry on the Super Bowl Halftime Show in 2015. (Photo by Taylor Hill/WireImage)

John Legend and Chrissy Teigen as Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth

The music legend and the cookbook author took to Instagram to show off arguably the best couples costume of all time.

Just last year, the power couple took to Instagram to show off their look, but revealed they were too tired to actually go anywhere.

Beyonce as Toni Braxton

Beyonce is a big fan of paying tribute to some of her favorite artists every year on Halloween.

Last year, she recreated the iconic album art for Toni Braxton’s self-titled album, but with a twist: the text reads “Phoni Braxton.”

Hoda Kotb as Blake Shelton

The “Today Show” co-host participated in the show’s Halloween-themed episode by dressing as one of today’s biggest country crooners: Blake Shelton.

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-868605244 Hollywood stars dress up as their favorite celebs for Halloween Nate Day fox-news/person/kylie-jenner fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/person/hoda-kotb fox-news/person/ellen-degeneres fox-news/person/chrissy-teigen fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 398038ba-b838-5706-a13b-a62724191111

Hoda Kotb as Blake Shelton attends Today’s Halloween Extravaganza 2017. (Photo by John Lamparski/WireImage)

Kourtney Kardashian as Ariana Grande

The Kardashian sisters are well-known for their detailed Halloween costumes, and last year, Kourtney did not disappoint.

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Kardashian shared her look as the pop princess Ariana Grande, high pony and all.

Westlake Legal Group Celeb-halloween-costumes-1 Hollywood stars dress up as their favorite celebs for Halloween Nate Day fox-news/person/kylie-jenner fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/person/hoda-kotb fox-news/person/ellen-degeneres fox-news/person/chrissy-teigen fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 398038ba-b838-5706-a13b-a62724191111   Westlake Legal Group Celeb-halloween-costumes-1 Hollywood stars dress up as their favorite celebs for Halloween Nate Day fox-news/person/kylie-jenner fox-news/person/kelly-ripa fox-news/person/hoda-kotb fox-news/person/ellen-degeneres fox-news/person/chrissy-teigen fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 398038ba-b838-5706-a13b-a62724191111

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Anti-Brexit Protesters Descend on London as Parliament Debates

Westlake Legal Group 19brexit-protest3-facebookJumbo Anti-Brexit Protesters Descend on London as Parliament Debates Referendums Politics and Government London (England) Johnson, Boris Great Britain Withdrawal from EU (Brexit) Great Britain European Union Europe Demonstrations, Protests and Riots

LONDON — As lawmakers huddled inside the House of Commons on Saturday to debate Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal, huge crowds of protesters gathered outside the Palace of Westminster to demand that voters be given the final say on Brexit.

Organizers said they hoped to draw more than a million protesters, which would make it one of the largest demonstrations in British history, and by noon tens of thousands of people were already filling the streets.

Many of the protesters were demanding a second referendum on any Brexit deal that lawmakers approve.

“We are now reaching a crucial moment in the Brexit crisis,” the organizers of the demonstration, called the People’s Vote March, said in a statement. “The government has adopted the slogan ‘Get Brexit Done’ to try and browbeat an exhausted public into accepting whatever botched Brexit Boris Johnson presents to them, but we know this slogan is a lie.”

Carrying banners and waving the blue and gold-starred flag of the European Union alongside the red, white and blue of the Union Jack, they marched from the center of London, through Trafalgar Square and past the many monuments to past days of imperial power.

Even as the protesters were assembling on the streets, Mr. Johnson was making the case to Parliament that it was time for lawmakers to pass “a deal that can heal the rift in British politics” and “unite the warring instincts in our soul.”

It was the first time the House of Commons had been called into session on a Saturday in nearly four decades, when lawmakers gathered to discuss the war in the Falkland Islands.

In a referendum three years ago, British voters narrowly supported leaving the European Union, which it had joined in 1973.

Those three years have been marked by division, frustration, confusion, sadness and despair.

And growing public anger.

Out on the streets, Milou de Castellane, 52, who works as a child minder in London, said she had voted to remain in the European Union and would like the ultimate choice to be left to the people.

“There is no tangible evidence that there is any benefit to us leaving the European Union,” she said. “But there is plenty of evidence to the detriment of us leaving. We will suffer in the economy and our strength in the world community if we leave.”

She acknowledged that many had “Brexit fatigue” and that protesters might just be shouting into the wind, but she said it was still important to make her voice heard.

“I hope that the deal will not pass,” she said. “But I have a sinking feeling that it might.”

Even before Saturday, the anger over Brexit had led to some of the largest protests in British history.

The first People’s Vote March, which drew hundreds of thousands people, was held a year ago on the eve of a vote on an agreement put forth by Theresa May, who was then prime minister.

Mrs. May tried to persuade Parliament to pass her deal three times, and three times failed. Supporters of a people’s vote had hoped that the chaos would help build support for their cause.

But after her resignation, Mr. Johnson, a champion of Brexit, won the Conservative Party’s backing to take up residence at 10 Downing Street and set about pushing for a swift exit, deal or no deal.

He has steadfastly opposed the idea of another vote, saying that the people have already had their say.

Those who took to the streets on Saturday called that argument flawed.

They say that voters were misled before the referendum and that they should be given a chance to vote on a specific Brexit deal — with the benefit of being informed by years of debate and discussion — rather than the abstract notion of a withdrawal.

The protesters were joined by the former prime ministers Tony Blair, of the Labour Party, and John Major, a Conservative, who united to make a short film that was to be screened at the rally warning about the dangers Brexit posed to Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom.

Organizers opposing Brexit have sought to build support outside London and have staged rallies around Britain, including in Glasgow and Edinburgh in Scotland; in Belfast, Northern Ireland; and in Cheltenham, in southern England.

On Saturday, more than 170 buses had been arranged to bring protesters from around the country into London.

In Parliament, Jeremy Corbyn, Britain’s left-wing opposition leader, cited those gathered outside in his rebuke of Mr. Johnson’s deal.

“The people should have the final say,” he said.

Anna Schaverien contributed reporting.

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Review of Russia Inquiry Grows as F.B.I. Witnesses Are Questioned

Westlake Legal Group merlin_144012531_edbac8a7-52fc-43a5-9a2d-17362315d5df-facebookJumbo Review of Russia Inquiry Grows as F.B.I. Witnesses Are Questioned Wiretapping and Other Eavesdropping Devices and Methods United States Politics and Government Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Strzok, Peter Steele, Christopher (1964- ) Special Prosecutors (Independent Counsel) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Russia Presidential Election of 2016 Great Britain Fringe Groups and Movements Espionage and Intelligence Services Durham, John H Barr, William P Australia

WASHINGTON — Federal prosecutors reviewing the origins of the Russia investigation have asked witnesses pointed questions about any anti-Trump bias among former F.B.I. officials who are frequent targets of President Trump and about the earliest steps they took in the Russia inquiry, according to former officials and other people familiar with the review.

The prosecutors, led by John H. Durham, the United States attorney in Connecticut, have interviewed about two dozen former and current F.B.I. officials, the people said. Two former senior F.B.I. agents are assisting with the review, the people said.

The number of interviews shows that Mr. Durham’s review is further along than previously known. It has served as a political flash point since Attorney General William P. Barr revealed in the spring that he planned to scrutinize the beginnings of the Russia investigation, which Mr. Trump and his allies have attacked without evidence as a plot by law enforcement and intelligence officials to prevent him from winning the 2016 election.

Closely overseen by Mr. Barr, Mr. Durham and his investigators have sought help from governments in countries that figure into right-wing attacks and unfounded conspiracy theories about the Russia investigation, stirring criticism that they are trying to deliver Mr. Trump a political victory rather than conducting an independent review.

And on Thursday, Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, tied Mr. Durham’s investigation to the Ukraine scandal, infuriating people inside the Justice Department. But Mr. Mulvaney’s comments also put the spotlight on the fact that Ukraine is one country that Mr. Durham has sought help from. His team has interviewed private Ukrainian citizens, a Justice Department spokeswoman has said without explaining why.

A spokesman for Mr. Durham declined to comment. Mr. Barr has said that he viewed some investigative steps as “spying” on the Trump campaign and that there was a “failure among a group of leaders” in the intelligence community. He has said he began the Durham review in part to prevent future missteps.

Mr. Durham has yet to interview all the F.B.I. officials who played key roles in opening the Russian investigation in the summer of 2016, the people familiar with the review said. He has not spoken with Peter Strzok, a former top counterintelligence official who opened the inquiry; the former director James B. Comey or his deputy, Andrew G. McCabe; or James A. Baker, then the bureau’s general counsel.

Those omissions suggest Mr. Durham may be waiting until he has gathered all the facts before he asks to question the main decision makers in the Russia inquiry.

Though criticism has been set off by the revelations that Mr. Durham is examining politically tinged accusations and outright conspiracy theories about the origins of the Russia investigation, he would naturally have to run down all leads to conduct a thorough review.

The president granted Mr. Barr sweeping powers for the review, though he did not open it as a criminal investigation. That means he gave Mr. Durham the power only to read materials the government had already gathered and to request voluntary interviews from witnesses, not to subpoena witnesses or documents. It is not clear whether the status of the review has changed.

Mr. Durham’s investigators appeared focused at one point on Mr. Strzok, said one former official who was interviewed. Mr. Strzok opened the Russia inquiry in late July 2016 after receiving information from the Australian government that the Russians had offered damaging information on Hillary Clinton to a Trump campaign adviser. Mr. Durham’s team has asked about the events surrounding the Australian tip, some of the people familiar with the review said.

Mr. Durham’s team, including Nora R. Dannehy, a veteran prosecutor, has questioned witnesses about why Mr. Strzok both drafted and signed the paperwork opening the investigation, suggesting that was unusual for one person to take both steps. Mr. Strzok began the inquiry after consulting with F.B.I. leadership, former officials familiar with the episode said.

Mr. Durham has also questioned why Mr. Strzok opened the case on a weekend, again suggesting that the step might have been out of the ordinary. Former officials said that Mr. McCabe had directed Mr. Strzok to travel immediately to London to interview the two Australian diplomats who had learned about the Russians’ offer to help the Trump campaign and that he was trying to ensure he took the necessary administrative steps first.

It is not clear how many people Mr. Durham’s team has interviewed outside of the F.B.I. His investigators have questioned officials in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence but apparently have yet to interview C.I.A. personnel, people familiar with the review said. Mr. Durham would probably want to speak with Gina Haspel, the agency’s director, who ran its London station when the Australians passed along the explosive information about Russia’s offer of political dirt.

Many of the questions from Mr. Durham’s team overlapped with ones that the Justice Department inspector general, Michael C. Horowitz, has posed in his own look into aspects of the Russia inquiry, according to the people.

Mr. Horowitz’s report, which is most likely to be made public in the coming weeks, is expected to criticize law enforcement officials’ actions in the Russia investigation. Mr. Horowitz’s findings could provide insights into why Mr. Barr thought that the Russia investigation needed to be examined.

Mr. Durham’s questions seem focused on elements of the conservative attacks on the origins of the Russia inquiry. It is not clear whether he has asked about other parts of the sprawling probe, which has grown to include more than 2,800 subpoenas, nearly 500 search warrants, 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence and interviews of about 500 witnesses.

In his review, Mr. Durham has asked witnesses about the role of Christopher Steele, a former intelligence official from Britain who was hired to research Mr. Trump’s ties to Russia by a firm that was in turn financed by Democrats. Law enforcement officials used some of the information Mr. Steele compiled into a now-infamous dossier to obtain a secret wiretap on a Trump campaign adviser, Carter Page, whom they suspected was an agent of Russia.

The president and his supporters have vilified Mr. Steele, saying that investigators should have kept his information out of the application for the wiretap because they viewed him as having a bias against Mr. Trump. The Steele information served as one piece of the lengthy application.

They have accused the F.B.I. and Justice Department of failing to disclose that Democrats were funding Mr. Steele’s research, but the wiretap application contains a page-length explanation alerting the court that the person who commissioned Mr. Steele’s research was “likely looking for information” to discredit Mr. Trump.

Mr. Durham’s investigators asked why F.B.I. officials would use unsubstantiated or incorrect information in their application for a court order allowing the wiretap and seemed skeptical about why agents relied on Mr. Steele’s dossier.

The inspector general has also raised concerns that the F.B.I. inflated Mr. Steele’s value as an informant in order to obtain the wiretap on Mr. Page. Mr. Durham’s investigators have done the same, according to the people familiar with his review.

Mr. Horowitz has asked witnesses about an assessment of Mr. Steele that MI6, the British spy agency, provided to the F.B.I. after bureau officials received his dossier on Mr. Trump in September 2016. MI6 officials said Mr. Steele, a Russia expert, was honest and persistent but sometimes showed questionable judgment in pursuing targets that others viewed as a waste of time, two people familiar with the assessment said.

One former official said that in his interview with Mr. Durham’s team, he pushed back on the notion that law enforcement and intelligence officials had plotted to thwart Mr. Trump’s candidacy, laying out facts that prove otherwise.

For example, the former official compared the F.B.I.’s handling of its two investigations related to Mr. Trump and his 2016 opponent, Hillary Clinton. Agents overtly investigated Mrs. Clinton’s use of a private email server but kept secret their counterintelligence investigation into the Trump campaign. If the F.B.I. had been trying to bolster Mrs. Clinton’s candidacy and hurt Mr. Trump’s, they could have buried the email investigation or taken more overt steps in the Russia inquiry.

Instead, the former official noted, the opposite happened.

The former official said he was reassured by the presence of John C. Eckenrode, one of the former senior F.B.I. agents assisting Mr. Durham. Like Mr. Durham, who investigated C.I.A. torture of detainees overseas, Mr. Eckenrode is also familiar with high-stakes political inquiries.

He is probably best known for working with Patrick J. Fitzgerald, the former United States attorney who in 2003 was appointed to investigate the leak of the identity of an undercover C.I.A. officer, Valerie Plame, to a journalist.

“Jack is as straight a shooter as you can get in the F.B.I.,” Asha Rangappa, a former F.B.I. agent, said of Mr. Eckenrode, a friend. “It’s the first reassuring thing I’ve heard about this review.”

Mr. Eckenrode and Mr. Durham appear to know each other from Mr. Eckenrode’s time as agent in New Haven, Conn., where Mr. Durham has spent most of his career as a prosecutor. Mr. Eckenrode also worked in Boston and eventually ran the F.B.I.’s office in Philadelphia before retiring in 2006.

Adam Goldman reported from Washington, and William K. Rashbaum from New York.

Follow them on Twitter: @adamgoldmanNYT and @WRashbaum.

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27 Maya ritual sites discovered on online map by eagle-eyed archaeologist

An eagle-eyed archaeologist has used a freely available online map to locate 27  Maya ceremonial sites in Mexico.

Takeshi Inomata, a professor of archaeology at the University of Arizona, made the discovery using a LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) map he found online last year, according to the New York Times. LiDAR technology harnesses a laser to measure distances to the Earth’s surface and can prove extremely valuable to study what is hidden in areas with thick vegetation.

The 2011 map, which covers 4,400 square miles of the Mexican states of Tabasco and Chiapas, was published by Mexico’s National Institute of Statistics and Geography, the Times reported.

‘FIRST OF ITS KIND’ ANCIENT MAYA TOOL DISCOVERED IN LAGOON

Inomata told Fox News that the discovery followed his research at the site of Ceibal in Guatemala, where a ceremonial complex dating back to 1000 to 900 B.C. was found. “We then went to this area (Tabasco) thinking that there may be similar ceremonial complexes of this period,” he explained, via email. “It was great to see that there [are] more sites of this type than we expected. It is also remarkable that they had very standardized rectangular formations.”

Westlake Legal Group LidarElSaraguato 27 Maya ritual sites discovered on online map by eagle-eyed archaeologist James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article a0bed8a6-87b8-5d3a-86cb-1f8a01c869d3

LiDAR image of the El Saraguato site. (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía)

Although visible on LiDAR maps, many sites, such as one dubbed “La Carmelita” are difficult to find in ground-based surveys, according to the Times.

The discovery of the 27 lost Maya ritual sites sheds new light on the ancient culture. “This is the period when people were just starting to use ceramics and adopting a sedentary way of life,” he explained. “The presence of these formal ceremonial complex in this early period indicates that certain rituals and religious ideas spread over a wide area as people accepted new ways of life.”
INCREDIBLE MAYA DISCOVERY: ANCIENT KING’S MASK UNCOVERED IN MEXICO

The Mexican Institute of Anthropology and History also participated in the project.

Westlake Legal Group MayaLaCarmelitaWest 27 Maya ritual sites discovered on online map by eagle-eyed archaeologist James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article a0bed8a6-87b8-5d3a-86cb-1f8a01c869d3

View of the La Carmelita site from the west. (Takeshi Inomata)

There have been a number of fascinating Maya discoveries across central America in recent years.

Experts recently discovered a unique ancient tool that was used by Maya salt workers more than 1,000 years ago. Fashioned from the mineral jadeite, the chisel-style implement was found at the site of Ek Way Nal, a Maya salt works in southern Belize that is now submerged in a saltwater lagoon.

MYSTERIOUS LOST MAYA CITIES DISCOVERED IN GUATEMALAN JUNGLE

Last year an ancient mask depicting a 7th-century Maya king was discovered in southern Mexico.

Westlake Legal Group LaCarmelitaSouth 27 Maya ritual sites discovered on online map by eagle-eyed archaeologist James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article a0bed8a6-87b8-5d3a-86cb-1f8a01c869d3

View of La Carmelita from the south. (Takeshi Inomata)

Also in 2018, archaeologists harnessed sophisticated technology to reveal lost cities and thousands of ancient structures deep in the Guatemalan jungle, confirming that the Maya civilization was much larger than previously thought.

LiveScience reports that hundreds of Maya artifacts that may have been used in ritual animal sacrifices have also been discovered at the bottom of a Guatemalan lake.

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From its heart in what is now Guatemala, the Maya empire reached the peak of its power in the sixth century A.D., according to History.com, although most of the civilization’s cities were abandoned around 900 A.D.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

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Hans Van Spakovsky: DOJ needs to open investigation into the Bidens’ Ukraine dealings

Westlake Legal Group HANS-CROP Hans Van Spakovsky: DOJ needs to open investigation into the Bidens' Ukraine dealings Julia Musto fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 04c496e1-cac8-5c9f-b9e8-e7f6825bd436

The Justice Department (DOJ) needs to open an investigation into Hunter and Joe Biden’s dealings in Ukraine, former DOJ official and Senior Legal Fellow at The Heritage Foundation Hans Van Spakovsky asserted Saturday.

In a closed-door deposition before committees spearheading the formal House impeachment inquiry, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent told congressional investigators that he had qualms about Hunter Biden’s role on the board of the Ukrainian energy company Burisma Holdings in 2015, but was rebuffed by former Vice President Biden’s staff which said the office was preoccupied with Beau Biden’s cancer battle.

HUNTER BIDEN GOT $83G PER MONTH FOR UKRAINE ‘CEREMONIAL’ GIG: REPORT

The Washington Post first reported details of Kent’s testimony on Friday, which included his concerns that the younger Biden’s role in the company could complicate U.S. diplomatic efforts with Ukrainian officials, and raised the issue of a possible conflict of interest. Kent also testified that he was worried that Hunter Biden’s position would make Ukrainian officials think he was a channel of influence to his father, who was vice president at the time.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends: Weekend” with host Ed Henry, Van Spakovsky said that he found the details unveiled in Kent’s hearing “unbelievable and frankly shocking.”

HUNTER BIDEN’S QUESTIONABLE PAST AND BUSINESS DEALINGS COULD UNDO DAD’S BID FOR WHITE HOUSE

“This is just more evidence that there needs to be a law enforcement investigation of the vice president’s possible abuse of the powers of his office to both enrich his family and to stop any prior investigation of it,” he said.

“Look, we all know why he got that job. [It] was because his father was the vice president and was in charge of diplomatic efforts and foreign aid issues in the Ukraine. That’s a clear conflict of interest,” said Van Spakovsky.

Hunter Biden was reportedly paid $83,333 per month after being hired in 2014, while serving as a non-executive “ceremonial figure” with a “powerful name,” a report said Friday.

Biden’s campaign responded to this story on Friday by ripping into President Trump.

“Donald Trump’s unprecedently corrupt administration is melting down because of the scandal he touched-off by trying to get Ukraine to lie about Joe Biden — and as the vice president said yesterday, he should release his tax returns or shut up,” a Biden campaign spokesperson told Fox News. “On Joe Biden’s watch, the U.S. made eradicating corruption a centerpiece of our policies toward Ukraine including achieving the removal of an inept prosecutor who shielded wrongdoers from accountability.”

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“What I say is that there needs to be a current, open, law enforcement investigation by our Justice Department of what exactly happened,” Van Spakovsky told Henry.

“Why is the Biden camp and why are Democrats so against investigating that potential wrongdoing?” he asked.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman and Brie Stimson contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group HANS-CROP Hans Van Spakovsky: DOJ needs to open investigation into the Bidens' Ukraine dealings Julia Musto fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 04c496e1-cac8-5c9f-b9e8-e7f6825bd436   Westlake Legal Group HANS-CROP Hans Van Spakovsky: DOJ needs to open investigation into the Bidens' Ukraine dealings Julia Musto fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 04c496e1-cac8-5c9f-b9e8-e7f6825bd436

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Brooklyn Nets fans target LeBron James, support Hong Kong in Barclays Center protest

A group of fans held signs, wore shirts and chanted support for Hong Kong and Tibet in the Brooklyn Nets’ first game since returning from China.

The fans sat behind the backboard near the Nets’ bench at Barclays Center in their 123-107 loss to Toronto on Friday night.

Westlake Legal Group AP19292067634840 Brooklyn Nets fans target LeBron James, support Hong Kong in Barclays Center protest fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/sports/nba/brooklyn-nets fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 6cdd54b6-0dca-55e9-97a6-2441e2a5a320

People raise signs referencing Tibet and Hong Kong during the fourth quarter of a preseason NBA basketball game between the Toronto Raptors and the Brooklyn Nets, Friday, Oct. 18, 2019, in New York.  (AP)

The Nets returned this week after playing exhibition games against the Los Angeles Lakers in Shanghai and Shenzhen. The games were not televised in China after relations between the NBA and Chinese officials became strained following Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey’s tweet in support of pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong.

One sign was aimed at LeBron James and Nets owner Joe Tsai, the co-founder of the Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, who were critical of Morey’s tweet. Tsai wrote a Facebook post explaining why the since-deleted tweet was upsetting to the Chinese.

HONG KONG DEMONSTRATORS PARODY XI JINPING, LEBRON JAMES

Westlake Legal Group AP19292067724239 Brooklyn Nets fans target LeBron James, support Hong Kong in Barclays Center protest fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/sports/nba/brooklyn-nets fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 6cdd54b6-0dca-55e9-97a6-2441e2a5a320

People raise signs referencing Tibet and Hong Kong during the fourth quarter of a preseason NBA basketball game between the Toronto Raptors and the Brooklyn Nets, Friday, Oct. 18, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Sarah Stier)

SOUTH PARK RIPS LEBRON JAMES FOR CHINA REMARKS

Nets guard Kyrie Irving said he understood why the protesters came to the game.

“I think that when you think about communities across the world, I think that a lot of people would stand for world peace,” he said.

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“Government gets involved and impacts different communities in different ways. The reality is that as individuals it’s our job to stand up for what we believe in. I understand Hong Kong and China is dealing with their issues respectively, but there’s enough oppression and stuff going on in America for me not to be involved in the community issues here as well.”

Westlake Legal Group AP19292067724239 Brooklyn Nets fans target LeBron James, support Hong Kong in Barclays Center protest fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/sports/nba/brooklyn-nets fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 6cdd54b6-0dca-55e9-97a6-2441e2a5a320   Westlake Legal Group AP19292067724239 Brooklyn Nets fans target LeBron James, support Hong Kong in Barclays Center protest fox-news/world/world-regions/hong-kong fox-news/world/world-regions/china fox-news/world/world-regions/asia fox-news/sports/nba/brooklyn-nets fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 6cdd54b6-0dca-55e9-97a6-2441e2a5a320

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California governor pardons 3 convicted immigrants to help block deportations

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Friday he’s pardoning three immigrants who’ve been convicted of crimes as part of an effort to protect them from deportation to their home countries.

The three men — originally from El Salvador, Iran and Cambodia — broke the law as teens or young adults, served their sentences and have taken steps to rehabilitate themselves, the governor’s office said.

CALIFORNIA SALON OWNER BLASTS GOV. NEWSOM OVER HOMELESS CRISIS: HE’S MORE CONCERNED WITH ‘TROLLING’ TRUMP

But Newsom’s pardons do not completely shield the men from deportation. The move instead erases the mens’ criminal records to prevent past offenses from being considered in their deportation cases. All three men live in Los Angeles County and were brought to the U.S. legally as children, the governor’s office said.

“The Governor regards clemency as an important part of the criminal justice system that can incentivize accountability and rehabilitation, increase public safety by removing counterproductive barriers to successful reentry, and correct unjust results in the legal system,” a news release said.

The governor, a Democrat, pardoned 38-year old Victor Ayala, who in 2001 at age 21 was convicted of felony robbery and sentenced to probation for pushing a security guard while shoplifting from an electronics store, The Sacramento Bee reported. He also had four prior misdemeanor convictions for theft and a hit-and-run in which no one suffered injuries, Los Angeles’ KTLA-TV reported.

According to the governor’s office, Ayala’s parents brought him legally into the U.S. from El Salvador when he was 2. He is now a father of three who owns a carpet-cleaning business.

Newsom also pardoned 41-year-old Thear Seam, who at age 18 was convicted of robbing a man’s wallet and backpack. He was convicted as an accessory the next year after leading police on a high-speed chase while helping another man, a car thief whole stole a separate vehicle, evade arrest, KTLA reported.

Seam entered the U.S. legally as a 4-year-old refugee fleeing Cambodia from the Khmer Rouge. His wife and daughter are both U.S. citizens and he’s worked for 17 years at an aviation company.

The third immigrant to be pardoned was Arnou Aghamalian, 42, who as a 22-year-old in 1999 was convicted of helping his cousin set a nightclub owner’s unoccupied car on fire after a dispute. Newson’s office said Aghamalian entered the U.S. with his family at age 15 as a refugee from Iran. He and his wife are the parents to newborns twins. He now owns a solar energy company.

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In addition to pardoning the three immigrants, Newsom pardoned a fourth man, 59-year-old Curtis Reynolds of Sacramento Country, who was convicted of six drug felonies including possession for sale between 1998 and 2003, The Bee reported. Newsom said since his convictions, Reynolds has dedicated his life to volunteering to help those struggling with addiction.

Newsom also commuted the sentences for two men previously facing life in prison. Esdvin Flores, 44, has served 20 years behind bars for robbing a woman at gunpoint at age 23. Jensen Ramos, 35, has served 17 years for attempted murder after firing at a car fleeing a brawl at a house party when he was 17. The governor’s office said both men have taken steps to rehabilitate themselves from behind bars. The commutations make both eligible to enter into parole hearings.

Westlake Legal Group AP19211631934809 California governor pardons 3 convicted immigrants to help block deportations fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d39f3e86-997e-5362-af0d-948d806701f3 article   Westlake Legal Group AP19211631934809 California governor pardons 3 convicted immigrants to help block deportations fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d39f3e86-997e-5362-af0d-948d806701f3 article

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