web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 291)

Trump Says He Wants Identity Of Whistleblower

Westlake Legal Group 5d94d65b21000018025193b2 Trump Says He Wants Identity Of Whistleblower

President Donald Trump wants to know the identity of the whistleblower who raised concerns to intelligence community officials over the president asking a foreign leader to look into his political rival, and those who gave the whistleblower information.

“He either got it totally wrong, made it up, or the person giving the information to the whistleblower was dishonest,” Trump said in the Oval Office on Wednesday. “And this country has to find out who that person was because that person’s a spy, in my opinion.”

Trump’s comments are at odds with members of Congress, who are seeking to keep the whistleblower anonymous for his or her own safety. Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said in a Tuesday statement that the whistleblower should be protected. 

“This person appears to have followed the whistleblower protection laws and ought to be heard out and protected. We should always work to respect whistleblowers,” Grassley said. “Complaints based on second-hand information should not be rejected out of hand, but they do require additional leg work to get at the facts and evaluate the claim’s credibility.”

At the center of the whistleblower’s complaint was a July phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. In the phone call, which  was made public last month, Trump asked Zelensky to investigate 2020 Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden.

House members began a formal impeachment inquiry based on the whistleblower complaint.

Trump called the whistleblower who first alerted officials of the phone call “dishonest” and said the person should be protected only if the whistleblower is “legitimate.” 

Trump also attacked House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), who is helping to lead the impeachment inquiry, falsely accusing him of “treason” and saying he should resign from office. 

Trump previously made his intention clear that he wanted to know the identity of the whistleblower when he said he “deserved” to meet his accuser who filed the complaint, The New York Times reported earlier this week.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ex-Dallas officer Amber Guyger could be sentenced to as few as 2 years for killing neighbor Botham Jean

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Ex-Dallas officer Amber Guyger could be sentenced to as few as 2 years for killing neighbor Botham Jean

A former Dallas police officer has been found guilty of murder after fatally shooting a neighbor she thought was an intruder. Wochit

A former Dallas police officer convicted of murder in the fatal shooting of a black neighbor in his own home could be sentenced to as little as two years in prison, a judge ruled at a sentencing hearing Wednesday.

Amber Guyger, who fatally shot Botham Jean a year ago as he ate a bowl of ice cream, normally would face a sentence ranging from five years to 99 years. But Judge Tammy Kemp ruled the jury can consider a “sudden passion” defense that could reduce a sentence.

Kemp made the ruling at the behest of the defense – with the support of prosecutors.

Guyger, who is white, had testified at trial that she returned from an extended police shift and incorrectly believed she had entered her own apartment. She said she panicked when she saw Jean, an accountant from St. Lucia who she had never met. Guyger, 31, shot Jean, 26, with her service weapon. 

Jean family lawyer S. Lee Merritt said the verdict should have been expected but that convictions of white officers who kill unarmed black men are rare. The community had been “on pins and needles” awaiting the decision, Merritt said.

“It’s a signal that the tide is going to change,” he said of the verdict from the predominantly non-white jury. “Police officers are going to be held accountable for their actions.”

Rep. Marc Veasey, D-Texas, who is black, was less certain. He called the conviction “a small step toward justice for Botham Jean and his family” but noted that all their lives have been changed forever.

“Justice will never fully be served until we as a country address the systemic failure in our criminal justice system and rightfully prosecute the spate of unjustified shootings of black men and boys in this country,” Veasey said.

NAACP President Derrick Johnson lauded the jury for convicting Guyger despite a judge’s order that they consider the state’s “Castle Doctrine,” a law similar to stand-your-ground laws that allows use of force, including deadly force, when someone believes their home, property or life are being threatened.

“We’re one step closer to seeing justice for our brother #BothamJean,” Johnson tweeted. “While the judge introduced a form of #StandYourGround on behalf of the killer #AmberGuyger, we applaud the jury for holding her accountable with a guilty verdict.”

Testimony in the sentencing phase began Tuesday, with Jean’s mother, Allison, saying her life has not been the same since her son’s death.

“It’s just been like a roller coaster. I can’t sleep, I cannot eat,” she said. “It’s just been the most terrible time for me.”

Botham Jean’s father, Bertrum, testified Wednesday that his son called his family back home every Sunday. Now his Sundays are “destroyed,” Bertrum Jean said.

“Such a sweet boy. He tried his best to live a good honest life,” Jean told the court through tears. “He loved God. He loved everyone. How could this happen to him?”

Prosecutors showed the jury text messages from Guyger’s cellphone that hint at insensitivity toward black people.

On Wednesday, defense witnesses testified, starting with Guyger’s mother, Karen Guyger, who testified her daughter was sexually abused as a child. Former colleagues also testified – Officer Cathy Odhiambo, who is black, describing Amber Guyger, who is white, as “the sweetest person.”

The jury took only hours to render the verdict after six days of testimony. It was not clear how long the sentencing phase would take.

During her trial, Guyger said she had parked on the wrong level of her apartment building’s parking garage by mistake and walked down a corridor to the apartment directly above hers, thinking it was her own. She became worried when she noticed the door was unlocked, she said. Prosecutors said that was when Guyger should have called for backup.

Instead, Guyger testified that she feared for her safety and shot Jean when he failed to obey her command to put his hands up.

Guyger called 911 after the shooting. She can be heard repeatedly apologizing to Jean and saying she thought she was in her own apartment. Guyger was arrested days after the shooting and subsequently fired by the Dallas Police Department.

Contributing: Jorge L. Ortiz; The Associated Press

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/02/amber-guyger-sentencing-jury-decides-prison-time-botham-jean-death/3838835002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Lufthansa passenger claims he watched bag get left behind on tarmac during takeoff despite alerting crew

Westlake Legal Group lufthansaistock Lufthansa passenger claims he watched bag get left behind on tarmac during takeoff despite alerting crew fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article Alexandra Deabler 3eded2d0-6381-520f-a94f-e29891b6a4f8

A passenger was left fuming at Lufthansa after the airline allegedly left his suitcase on the tarmac at an airport in Munich.

Karn Rateria posted an image on Twitter of what he claims is his suitcase sitting on the tarmac while his plane prepares to take off on Sunday.

CHICAGO AIRPORT CATERING CART NEARLY SLAMS INTO PLANE ON TARMAC, VIRAL VIDEO SHOWS

Rateria wrote in the post that he alerted the cabin crew, and was assured the loading was completed – despite that fact that he could see his luggage.

“Uhm @lufthansa you’ve left my bag on the tarmac! I told the crew and they just said loading is complete. I can SEE the bag,” the tweet read.

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

The airline responded to Rateria’s concerns, stating there was an “outage of the baggage system” at an airport in Frankfurt.

“There was an outage of the baggage system at the airport in Frankfurt. My colleagues are doing their best to locate the bags and send them as quick as possible,” Lufhansa tweeted.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

However, the passenger pointed out that his bag was left at a Munich airport.

Fortunately, Rateria reported that he was reunited with his bag the next day, and thanked everyone for their digital support.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

Lufthansa did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group lufthansaistock Lufthansa passenger claims he watched bag get left behind on tarmac during takeoff despite alerting crew fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article Alexandra Deabler 3eded2d0-6381-520f-a94f-e29891b6a4f8   Westlake Legal Group lufthansaistock Lufthansa passenger claims he watched bag get left behind on tarmac during takeoff despite alerting crew fox-news/travel/general/airports fox-news/travel/general/airlines fox news fnc/travel fnc article Alexandra Deabler 3eded2d0-6381-520f-a94f-e29891b6a4f8

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Houston pays tribute to ‘humble’ and ‘fearless’ deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal who was killed during traffic stop

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Houston pays tribute to 'humble' and 'fearless' deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal who was killed during traffic stop

Hundreds of mourners turned out for a candlelight vigil near Houston Monday night for slain Harris County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal. (Oct. 1) AP, AP

Thousands of police officers, Sikh believers and Houston-area residents turned out for daylong ceremonies Wednesday to honor Harris County sheriff’s deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal, who was shot to death during a traffic stop last week.

Dhaliwal, 42, was the first Sikh sheriff’s deputy in Harris County, part of a Gulf Coast region that is home to as many as 10,000 Sikhs.

At the service, Simratpal Singh, a U.S. Army Captain, flanked by other members of the Sikh community in military service, described Dhaliwal as “humble, fearless, not dissuaded by negativity.”

“Our lion may be gone physically but his legacy of selfless service and of breaking down barriers will continue to live,” he said.

Dhaliwal was fatally shot in an ambush-style attack during a routine traffic stop on Friday.

The events Wednesday included a procession, two funeral services, and a law enforcement memorial with a 21-gun salute from fellow officers and a flyover. The procession route was lined with blue and white signs reading “Always in Our Hearts,” and “In Loving Memory of Deputy Dhaliwal.”

The Sikh National Center asked those attending the ceremonies to wear navy blue, just like the Harris County Sheriff’s Office uniform.

‘Gem of a person, a beautiful soul’: Houston mourns trailblazing Sikh deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaking before thousands during the Sikh part of the ceremony, addressed Dhaliwal’s wife and three children in saying the community “supports you and lifts you up.” 

“We are grateful for your father’s service, and his sacrifice and his legacy,” Cruz said.

The father of three joined the force 10 years ago and was the state’s first law enforcement officer to receive permission to wear a religious turban and beard while on duty.

Sikhism, which shares some philosophical concepts with the much-older Hinduism, was founded in the 15th century in the Indian region of Punjab. It has about 27 million followers worldwide, most of them in India, and more than half a million in the U.S.

“There are no words to speak to how heartbroken we are, how devastated,’’ said Sheriff Ed Gonzalez, who marveled on Twitter about the outpouring of support from the community following Dhaliwal’s shooting.

“So many have shared pics they took with Deputy Dhaliwal and the many kids he met in the community and named ‘honorary HCSO junior deputies,'” Gonzalez said.

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Houston pays tribute to 'humble' and 'fearless' deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal who was killed during traffic stop

Services will be held this week for a Texas sheriff’s deputy who was fatally shot during a traffic stop. Family and friends remembered Sandeep Dhaliwal at a vigil in Houston Saturday. ‘He didn’t deserve all this,’ his sister said.(September 29) AP, AP

The services on Wednesday followed a candlelight vigil by the sheriff’s office for Dhaliwal on Monday and a 48-hour-long prayer-vigil at the Gurdwara Sikh National Center.

“He was just a gem of a person. He was a beautiful soul,” said Simran Jeet Singh, a senior religion fellow at the New York-based Sikh Coalition. “Everyone who knew him admired him greatly.”

The public was invited to attend the viewing and funeral services. Services were held at the Berry Center, which can accommodate up to 8,000 people, and space was set aside for overflow crowds. The services were carried live on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Dhaliwal was killed in the town of Cypress after pulling over a vehicle for running a stop sign. Investigators said video from a dashboard camera shows the suspect, 47-year-old Robert Solis, getting out of his car, approaching Dhaliwal from behind and shooting him twice in the head.

Law enforcement officials said Solis had a warrant for his arrest on parole violations and likely feared that his arrest would mean a return to prison.

Solis, who has been charged with capital murder, was arrested at a nearby grocery parking lot following a tip by a witness and a description of his car taken from Dhaliwal’s video camera.

At a hearing for Solis on Monday, Harris County Judge Chris Morton was blunt was the seriousness of the charge: “It’s a likely outcome that death will be the sentence here.”

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/02/sandeep-dhaliwal-funeral-thousands-mourn-sikh-houston-police-officer/3839140002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘We’re Not Fooling Around’: House Democrats Tell White House Subpoena Is Coming

WASHINGTON — House Democrats said Wednesday they planned to subpoena the White House by Friday if it did not comply with broad requests for documents related to President Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine into investigating a leading political rival, and any attempt by the administration to conceal his actions.

Representative Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland, the chairman of the Oversight and Reform Committee, notified his panel of the impending subpoena on Wednesday. He said the White House had thus far ignored voluntary requests he submitted with the House Intelligence and Foreign Affairs committees.

“I do not take this step lightly,” Mr. Cummings wrote. “Over the past several weeks, the committees tried several times to obtain voluntary compliance with our requests for documents, but the White House has refused to engage with — or even respond to — the committees.”

Video

Westlake Legal Group vidxx-trump-ukraine-1-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 ‘We’re Not Fooling Around’: House Democrats Tell White House Subpoena Is Coming United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry State Department Pompeo, Mike Linick, Steve A Inspectors General impeachment

President Trump’s personal lawyer. The prosecutor general of Ukraine. Joe Biden’s son. These are just some of the names mentioned in the whistle-blower’s complaint. What were their roles? We break it down.CreditCreditIllustration by The New York Times

The threat kicked off what promised to be another momentous day in Washington, where in just over two weeks, revelations about attempts by Mr. Trump and his private lawyer to pressure Ukraine to help smear Joseph R. Biden Jr., the former vice president, have touched off an inquiry that threatens his presidency.

Just minutes later in the Capitol, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the Intelligence Committee chairman leading the impeachment investigation, starkly warned the Trump administration that any attempt to stonewall the House’s request or intimidate witnesses would be construed as obstruction worthy of impeachment itself.

Responding in real time on Twitter, Mr. Trump called their efforts “BULLSHIT.”

At the same time, lawmakers were preparing to hear a mysterious bit of new information abruptly offered up by the State Department’s independent watchdog, which could add a fresh twist to the inquiry. Steven A. Linick, the State Department’s inspector general, was to brief lawmakers in the afternoon about urgent material he signaled could be relevant to the investigation.

Democrats said they would act quickly to uncover the facts.

“We’re not fooling around here,” Mr. Schiff said. “We don’t want this to drag on months and months and months, which would be the administration’s strategy. So they just need to know even as they try to undermine our ability to find the facts around the president’s effort to coerce a foreign leader to create dirt that he can use against a political opponent, that they will be strengthening the case on obstruction.”

After asserting that Congress would not let impeachment entirely eclipse its legislative agenda, Ms. Pelosi accused the president of an “assault on the Constitution.”

The impeachment inquiry is escalating in rapid-fire fashion; already in the past week, the House has issued two subpoenas for records. Mr. Cummings’s warning suggests lawmakers and their staffs are working methodically to collect the evidence they believe they need to evaluate an anonymous C.I.A. whistle-blower complaint that touched off their inquiry. First, they targeted the State Department, then Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and now the White House.

What exactly Mr. Linick intended to share with Congress remained a matter of intense speculation on Wednesday. Mr. Linick, who was not believed to be investigating the Ukraine matter himself, contacted lawmakers early Tuesday afternoon and extended a cryptic and urgent invitation to meet the next day “to discuss and provide staff with copies of documents,” according to an invitation reviewed by The New York Times.

The invitation noted only that the documents had been shared with Mr. Linick by the State Department’s acting legal adviser.

Inspectors general frequently share information with Congress, but lawmakers and other government officials familiar with the process said Mr. Linick’s request was highly unusual, particularly given the extraordinary political pressure surrounding the State Department and Ukraine.

The draft subpoena circulated by Mr. Cummings reads like a dragnet of potential records related to the Ukraine matter, and is all but certain to touch off a battle with a White House that has a long history of refusing to comply with congressional requests.

It explicitly asks for records that could indicate whether the White House or other administration officials took steps to conceal or destroy the records to prevent Congress or the public from learning what had happened.

Among the documents requested are any recordings, transcripts, notes or other records related to a July phone call in which Mr. Trump pressed President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to conduct investigations that would bolster the American leader politically, or an earlier April call between the two men. It asks for a full list of White House staff members involved or aware of the calls, any communications that reference the July call and details about how the White House maintained records of the call.

The draft subpoena also directs the White House to hand over records of any calls with other foreign leaders referring to the topics Mr. Trump discussed with Mr. Zelensky; records of meetings related to Ukraine; and the decision to temporarily withhold $391 million in security aid from the country this summer at the same time Mr. Trump was pressing Mr. Zelensky.

Mr. Trump, continuing to fume over the investigation, sniped back at the Democratic leaders on Twitter in real time with mounting agitation.

He said Ms. Pelosi’s pledge to continue to legislate on prescription drug pricing and Mr. Trump’s proposed trade deal with Canada and Mexico was “just camouflage for trying to win an election through impeachment.” He said Mr. Schiff “should only be so lucky to have the brains, honor and strength of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo,” who the congressman criticized for intervening in his investigation. And Mr. Trump even claimed that the Democratic effort was “driving the Stock Market, and your 401K’s, down” and Democrats were glad about it.

“The Do Nothing Democrats should be focused on building up our Country, not wasting everyone’s time and energy on BULLSHIT, which is what they have been doing ever since I got overwhelmingly elected in 2016, 223-306,” Mr. Trump wrote. “Get a better candidate this time, you’ll need it!”

On Tuesday, Mr. Pompeo became one of the first Trump administration officials to throw himself into the gears of the churning House investigation, writing in a letter to Democratic chairmen that their demands for confidential interviews with diplomats with knowledge of the case was “an act of intimidation” and would not be immediately met.

But instead of bringing it to a halt, Mr. Pompeo’s actions seem only to have fueled the case. The Democrats said any attempt to block witnesses from speaking to Congress would be construed by them as witness intimidation. And at least two of the diplomats Mr. Pompeo objected to speaking had indicated to the House that they would appear for private depositions anyway. Mr. Schiff indicated on Wednesday, though, that three other scheduled depositions may not yet be assured.

Late Tuesday, the chairmen wrote to Mr. Pompeo’s deputy saying the secretary had an “obvious conflict of interest” in light of news reports that he listened in on the July phone call.

“Given the secretary’s own potential role, and reports of other State Department officials being involved in or knowledgeable of the events under investigation,” they wrote, “the committee may infer that he is trying to cover up illicit activity and misconduct, including by the president.”

On Wednesday, in Rome, Mr. Pompeo confirmed for the first time that he had been listening in on the call.

“I was on the phone call,” he said at a news conference in the Italian capital.

Related coverage
As Impeachment Fights Begin, Administration and Congress Clash Over Deposition

Oct. 1, 2019

Westlake Legal Group vidxx-trump-ukraine-1-threeByTwoSmallAt2X ‘We’re Not Fooling Around’: House Democrats Tell White House Subpoena Is Coming United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry State Department Pompeo, Mike Linick, Steve A Inspectors General impeachment
Pompeo Confirms He Listened to Trump’s Call to Ukraine President

Oct. 2, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 02pompeo-italy-alt-threeByTwoSmallAt2X-v3 ‘We’re Not Fooling Around’: House Democrats Tell White House Subpoena Is Coming United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry State Department Pompeo, Mike Linick, Steve A Inspectors General impeachment

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Multiple deaths reported, Hartford’s Bradley airport closed after WWII vintage plane crash

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Multiple deaths reported, Hartford's Bradley airport closed after WWII vintage plane crash

Bradley International Airport in Hartford, Connecticut, closed Wednesday morning following the crash of a privately owned vintage aircraft.

“There are fatalities, of which I will not tell you the number yet because during this investigation, it is far too early to discuss,” said James Rovella, commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, during a press conference.

Due to the nature of the crash and resulting fire, the victims are very difficult to identify, Rovella said.

“We can confirm that there was an accident involving a Collings Foundation World War II aircraft this morning at Bradley Airport,” airport spokeswoman Alisa Sisic said in a statement to USA TODAY. “We have an active fire and rescue operation underway. The airport is closed. We will issue further updates as information becomes available.”

The FAA said via Twitter that a vintage Boeing B-17 crashed at the end of Runway 6 while attempting to land at 10 a.m. local time.

There were 13 people on the plane, 10 passengers and three crew members. One person, who worked at the airport, was also on the ground, Rovella said in the press conference.

The Collings Foundation is an educational group that brought its “Wings of Freedom” vintage aircraft display to Bradley this week.

The B-17 was one of only 18 in the nation, Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., said during the press conference. 

The airport was scheduled to reopen at 1:30 p.m. EDT, authorities announced during the press conference. They planned to reopen one runway and to keep the runway where the crash occurred closed. 

At 1 p.m. EDT, Twitter user @MarioBooneTV shared a photo of Terminal A being reopened by TSA. 

FlightAware is showing 10 flight cancellations and 16 flight delays on flights headed to or from Hartford.

Bradley is relatively small but is served by most major airlines. 

American Airlines has 24 daily departures from Bradley. Two flights that were enroute to Hartford this morning were diverted to nearby airports, spokesman Ross Feinstein said.

Southwest Airlines has 13 daily departures from Bradley. Six took off before the incident, and the airline has canceled the remaining seven flights for today, spokesman Brad Hawkins said.

Contributing: The Associated Press

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/airline-news/2019/10/02/bradley-airport-plane-crash-closed-after-wwii-plane-crashes-hartford/3840353002/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Amps Up Demands To Know Whistleblower’s Identity

Westlake Legal Group 5d94d65b21000018025193b2 Trump Amps Up Demands To Know Whistleblower’s Identity

President Donald Trump wants to know the identity of the whistleblower who raised concerns to intelligence community officials over the president asking a foreign leader to look into his political rival, and those who gave the whistleblower information.

“He either got it totally wrong, made it up, or the person giving the information to the whistleblower was dishonest,” Trump said in the Oval Office on Wednesday. “And this country has to find out who that person was because that person’s a spy, in my opinion.”

Trump’s comments are at odds with members of Congress, who are seeking to keep the whistleblower anonymous for his or her own safety. Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said in a Tuesday statement that the whistleblower should be protected. 

“This person appears to have followed the whistleblower protection laws and ought to be heard out and protected. We should always work to respect whistleblowers,” Grassley said. “Complaints based on second-hand information should not be rejected out of hand, but they do require additional leg work to get at the facts and evaluate the claim’s credibility.”

At the center of the whistleblower’s complaint was a July phone call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. In the phone call, which  was made public last month, Trump asked Zelensky to investigate 2020 Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden.

House members began a formal impeachment inquiry based on the whistleblower complaint.

Trump called the whistleblower who first alerted officials of the phone call “dishonest” and said the person should be protected only if the whistleblower is “legitimate.” 

Trump also attacked House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), who is helping to lead the impeachment inquiry, falsely accusing him of “treason” and saying he should resign from office. 

Trump previously made his intention clear that he wanted to know the identity of the whistleblower when he said he “deserved” to meet his accuser who filed the complaint, The New York Times reported earlier this week.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Petition Calls for CPD Chief Brackney to Resign Over Gun Control Comments

Westlake Legal Group 18237113_G Petition Calls for CPD Chief Brackney to Resign Over Gun Control Comments

“I’m not sure that the chief needs to resign over this, but I do think the chief needs to clarify,” said former Charlottesville City Councilor Rob Schilling. “That’s a very broad statement, and any weapon that can be used to hunt a person would not necessarily be limited to firearms.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

‘I don’t care.’ Trump dismisses GOP concern over protecting whistleblower

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'I don't care.' Trump dismisses GOP concern over protecting whistleblower

In a series of tweets, President Trump attacked accusers in the whistleblower allegations and touted a pastor’s “civil war” prediction if he is impeached. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump dismissed concerns Wednesday – including from some GOP lawmakers – about protecting the identity of a whistleblower at the center of allegations that he pressured Ukraine to dig up dirt on Joe Biden.

Asked about those concerns Trump responded: “I don’t care.”

Trump, who has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the unnamed person who filed a complaint about Trump’s phone call with Ukrainian leaders, said “a whistleblower should be protected if the whistleblower’s legitimate.” 

The whistleblower’s report is at the heart of the impeachment investigation of Trump at the House of Representatives. The complaint filed Aug. 12 alleged Trump abused the power of his office when he urged Ukraine’s president to gather dirt on Biden.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, a co-founder of the Senate Whistleblower Caucus, said on Tuesday that the whistleblower deserves to be heard and protected. “We should always work to respect whistleblowers’ requests for confidentiality,” Grassley said.

Trump, in a combative mood on the issue after several days of more subdued messaging, also repeated his attacks on House Democrats, including Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif. and the chair of the House Intelligence Committee. Trump said Schiff couldn’t carry Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s “blank strap,” apparently a reference to a “jockstrap.” 

Earlier, Trump blasted a tweet storm minutes after a Democratic news conference, condemning impeachment as an attempt to force him from office that will damage the country. Trump challenged House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s stated desire to work on trade and drug prices, saying Democrats are obsessed with impeachment.

Democrats: Lawmakers threaten to subpoena White House for documents 

Response: Trump sets Twitter record as White House fights off impeachment inquiry

Pompeo: Secretary of State was listening to Trump’s call with Ukraine

Pelosi is “incapable” of working on other issues, the president wrote. “It is just camouflage for trying to win an election through impeachment. The Do Nothing Democrats are stuck in mud!”

During a tweet storm that preceded the meeting with the president of Finland, Trump also dropped a barnyard epithet in condemning the impeachment drive. The president described Democrats as wasting their time on “bullshit” despite his election in 2016. 

He added: “Get a better candidate this time, you’ll need it!”

House Democrats have questioned the president’s past attacks on the whistleblower.

“I hope that you understand, and I suspect that you do, the seriousness of the president of the United States saying he wants to interview that person,” Pelosi said earlier Wednesday.

“The president probably doesn’t realize how dangerous his statements are when he says he wants to expose who the whistleblower is and those who may have given the whistleblower that information.”

Contributing: Bart Jansen, Maureen Groppe

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/10/02/donald-trump-dont-care-gop-concerns-whistleblower/2442994001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Peru’s Vice President Bows Out Of Bitter Power Struggle

Westlake Legal Group ap_19274497313095-dcdda62797a1a58ee52d88c595436a5e39f84e1f-s1100-c15 Peru's Vice President Bows Out Of Bitter Power Struggle

A maintenance worker sweeps the street as riot police block the door to the Congress building Tuesday in Lima. Late Tuesday night, Mercedes Aráoz, the vice president who had briefly accepted the mantle of acting president from lawmakers, performed a surprise U-turn by announcing her resignation. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

toggle caption

Martin Mejia/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Peru's Vice President Bows Out Of Bitter Power Struggle

A maintenance worker sweeps the street as riot police block the door to the Congress building Tuesday in Lima. Late Tuesday night, Mercedes Aráoz, the vice president who had briefly accepted the mantle of acting president from lawmakers, performed a surprise U-turn by announcing her resignation.

Martin Mejia/AP

Well, that didn’t last long.

About 24 hours after opposition lawmakers elevated Peruvian Vice President Mercedes Aráoz to the country’s highest office — a move targeted squarely at the president with whom they are feuding — Aráoz has decided to bow out. On Tuesday night, the would-be interim president shuffled off the title, saying in a statement posted to Twitter that she was declining the job because “the constitutional order in Peru has broken down.”

“I deeply wish that our country overcomes this serious institutional crisis for the good of all Peruvians,” she wrote in the letter, “especially the less fortunate who are the most affected by the irresponsibility of politicians.” She is also resigning the vice presidency.

The shocking about-face marks a triumph for President Martín Vizcarra, who has been embroiled in a bitter showdown with the country’s Congress. Vizcarra dissolved the legislative body Monday, claiming that opposition lawmakers were stonewalling his anti-corruption agenda for their personal gain and called for elections to be held in late January to replace them.

The lawmakers rejected the move as unconstitutional and tried to dismiss Vizcarra in turn. This is where Aráoz came in: Shortly after voting to suspend Vizcarra for a year, they swore in his vice president with her initial approval. “I accept this with fortitude,” she said before Congress at the time. “It is one of the most difficult decisions I have made in my life.”

Difficult — yet apparently reversible.

It quickly became clear that Vizcarra had the backing of the country’s security forces, with commanders of the police and every branch of the military standing in his corner. And the streets of Lima, the capital, swarmed with thousands of the president’s supporters, who voiced their frustration with a massive, multinational corruption scandal that has entangled the country’s previous four heads of state, as well as the leader of the principal opposition party.

Vizcarra’s predecessor, Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, stepped down last year amid allegations that he accepted bribes from the Brazilian construction conglomerate Odebrecht. Ollanta Humala, Alan García and Alejandro Toledo, who held office before Kuczynski, also attracted claims of bribery connected with the firm. And Keiko Fujimori, leader of the conservative opposition and daughter of a former authoritarian, is currently in detention on suspicion of accepting illegal payments from Odebrecht.

When Vizcarra took office, he vowed to conduct a campaign against government graft — but his allies in Congress are vastly outnumbered, and he said the situation has become untenable. According to the Peruvian Constitution, the president has the right to dissolve Congress and call new elections — though whether he has met the conditions necessary to do so remains a matter of contention.

The Organization of American States weighed in Tuesday, saying that it was up to Peru’s Constitutional Court — not Congress — to “rule on the legality and legitimacy of the institutional decisions adopted.” The OAS also suggested support for Vizcarra’s position.

“It is a constructive step that the elections have been called according to the constitutional deadlines and that the final decision rests with the Peruvian people, in whom lies the sovereignty of the nation,” the OAS General Secretariat explained in a statement. “It is fair that the political polarization in the country will be resolved by the people at the polls.”

Still, lawmakers have signaled no intention of backing down, labeling the president’s administration a dictatorship and saying that “only civil resistance remains.”

“History will judge the coupist Vizcarra and his accomplices for this betrayal of democracy,” lawmaker Salvador Heresi said Tuesday.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com