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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 292)

Kaepernick, ‘Squad’ members targeted in ad by Alabama Republican looking to defeat Sessions, Jones for Senate seat

Westlake Legal Group squad-members-together-aoc-omar-tlaib-pressley Kaepernick, 'Squad' members targeted in ad by Alabama Republican looking to defeat Sessions, Jones for Senate seat fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-senate-races fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 19e2c348-0f2d-5979-ae3c-f5fd0b4f415d

Outspoken ex-NFL player Colin Kaepernick and  Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn. and other far-left “Squad” members all repeatedly make a mockery of veterans and are tearing the U.S. apart.

That’s according to U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, an Alabama Republican who’s hoping to unseat Democratic incumbent U.S. Sen. Doug Jones come November.

PETE HEGSETH FIRES BACK AT AOC FOR ‘WAR CRIME’ TWEET: ‘YOU’VE LOST YOUR MIND’

Byrne also makes his message personal in a new campaign ad released Monday by referencing his brother Dale Byrne, an Army veteran who died in 2013 of a heart attack following a lengthy respiratory illness that family members claim he contracted while deployed in the Middle East.

“When the towers fell, I knew my brother would be going to war. Dale was a true patriot. I can’t bring him back. I miss him every day,” Bradley Byrne tells the camera while seated in front of a campfire outside his family’s farmhouse in north Baldwin County where he and his brother grew up.

“It hurts me to hear Ilhan Omar cheapening 9/11. Entitled athletes dishonoring our flag. The Squad attacking America,” he continues while images of Kaepernick, Omar and Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., and Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., flash over the campfire flames.

“It hurts me to hear Ilhan Omar cheapening 9/11. Entitled athletes dishonoring our flag. The Squad attacking America.”

— U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, candidate for U.S. Senate seat

“Dale fought for that right,” a visibly emotional Byrne says, “but I will not let them tear our country apart.”

“That’s why I’m running for U.S. Senate,” he concludes.

Kaepernick previously faced a wave of backlash after he claimed to protest systemic racism by kneeling during the national anthem before NFL games before completed his contract with the San Francisco 49ers.

Meanwhile, the four members of the Democratic “Squad” of freshman congresswomen frequently clash with President Trump, as well as their own party’s establishment, making headlines last year for a war of words with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi who spoke of them in dismissive terms. Ocasio-Cortez and Tlaib recently drew criticism from veterans and others after accusing President Trump of committing “war crimes” for ordering the drone strike that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani and other military officials last week.

Byrne will compete against former U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and five others for the GOP nomination in this year’s Senate race. They’re all vying to take on Jones — who is considered the most endangered Democrat in the U.S. Senate because he represents a usually reliably red state.

Jones defeated Republican Roy Moore in a 2017 special election to fill the Senate vacancy created when Sessions joined the Trump administration. He’s the first Democrat to represent Alabama in the Senate since 1997.

In a December interview, Jones brushed off concerns that a vote to remove President Trump from office would doom his chances of reelection in 2020.

The GOP primary in Alabama is scheduled for March 3, AL.com reported.

Fox News’ Andrew O’Reilly and Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group squad-members-together-aoc-omar-tlaib-pressley Kaepernick, 'Squad' members targeted in ad by Alabama Republican looking to defeat Sessions, Jones for Senate seat fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-senate-races fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 19e2c348-0f2d-5979-ae3c-f5fd0b4f415d   Westlake Legal Group squad-members-together-aoc-omar-tlaib-pressley Kaepernick, 'Squad' members targeted in ad by Alabama Republican looking to defeat Sessions, Jones for Senate seat fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fox-news/politics/elections/senate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-senate-races fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace article 19e2c348-0f2d-5979-ae3c-f5fd0b4f415d

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Burger King to give Bronx residents free Whoppers for dealing with ‘Joker Stairs’ tourists

Whopper > Golden Globe.

The Bronx is still putting up with moviegoers who are flocking to the borough to climb the stairs made famous by Golden Globe winner Joaquin Phoenix in “Joker” — even snapping photos of themselves dressed in full clown suits, dancing and vogueing along the meme-plagued stairwell. The steps between Shakespeare and Anderson avenues has become such a landmark, in fact, that the staircase even has its own Instagram location tag, #Jokerstairs.

BURGER KING EMPLOYEE ACCUSED OF PULLING GUN OVER INCORRECT ORDER

For all the Bronxites who have had to politely dodge film fanatics on their daily route — or chosen to avoid the area altogether for a while — Burger King is promising to give one free Whopper to anyone who lives there. The promotion, which is tied to the film’s DVD release, can be redeemed by using Uber Eats and entering the code KINGSTAIRS at check-out until Jan. 12.

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The “Joker” stairs join a list of other notable staircases made famous by Hollywood, including the “Rocky” steps at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (cue “Eye of the Tiger”) and “The Exorcist” stairs in Washington, D.C. — but none of those were around during the age of the selfie.

Westlake Legal Group joker-movie Burger King to give Bronx residents free Whoppers for dealing with ‘Joker Stairs' tourists New York Post Hannah Sparks fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fnc/food-drink fnc c0c26e35-cbfa-5d51-8d41-263d24d68fd6 article

The Bronx is still putting up with moviegoers who are flocking to the borough to climb the stairs made famous by Golden Globe winner Joaquin Phoenix in “Joker.” (AP/Warner Bros. Pictures)

Many Bronx residents have taken to social media to beg relentless comic book fans to relinquish their neighborhood.

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“Please, if you’re reading this and you’re not from around here (or ever been to the Bronx, Yankee stadium does not count) PLEASE DO NOT COME HERE,” wrote one Bronx resident on Twitter.

Things are getting heated offline, too. In October, Gothamist reported that posters had been attached to walls and lampposts around the stairwell, reading, “It is disrespectful to treat our community and residents as a photo opportunity.”

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Given such terse pleas from Bronx-dwellers, it seems unlikely that a free Whopper will appease their plight of inconvenience.

On Sunday, “Joker” — which grossed over $1 billion in global box office sales — took home gold Hollywood Foreign Press statues for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama for its star Phoenix and for Best Original Score for Hildur Guðnadóttir.

This article originally appeared on the New York Post.

Westlake Legal Group Burger-King-top-of-page Burger King to give Bronx residents free Whoppers for dealing with ‘Joker Stairs' tourists New York Post Hannah Sparks fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fnc/food-drink fnc c0c26e35-cbfa-5d51-8d41-263d24d68fd6 article   Westlake Legal Group Burger-King-top-of-page Burger King to give Bronx residents free Whoppers for dealing with ‘Joker Stairs' tourists New York Post Hannah Sparks fox-news/food-drink/food/fast-food fnc/food-drink fnc c0c26e35-cbfa-5d51-8d41-263d24d68fd6 article

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President Trump To Deliver Statement On Iran

Westlake Legal Group ap_20007742643335_wide-d19534aaef4552f587b6ddc2002a3bb546e71a48-s1100-c15 President Trump To Deliver Statement On Iran
Alex Brandon/AP
Westlake Legal Group  President Trump To Deliver Statement On Iran

Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump is expected to make a statement Wednesday morning, hours after Iran launched missile strikes against U.S. military and coalition forces in Iraq in apparent retaliation for the killing of Qassem Soleimani, the Iranian military commander.

“All is well! Missiles launched from Iran at two military bases located in Iraq,” Trump said in a tweet late Tuesday. “Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

If there are no American casualties, there could be a way for the two countries to deescalate from rising tensions that have led to speculation about an armed conflict. Trump had previously warned that “if Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran.”

The president’s Tuesday night tweet follows days of tensions that began last week as Iraqi militiamen and their supporters targeted the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, setting fires and damaging a perimeter gatehouse at the complex.

Days later, the U.S. killed Soleimani, who was visiting Baghdad, along with a senior leader of a Shia militia group. Earlier this week, Trump said that the U.S. would strike Iranian sites, including cultural ones, if the Islamic Republic retaliated. The Pentagon and other officials have since walked back those remarks.

In the days after the Soleimani strike, the Trump administration faced domestic political criticism over the lack of transparency following the operation. The administration maintained that the U.S. faced an imminent threat, however.

“If you’re looking for imminence, you need look no further than the days that led up to the strike,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tuesday, alluding to the violent protests outside the U.S. embassy.

Relations between the U.S. and Iran have been fraught since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, but they have deteriorated sharply since the Trump administration withdrew from the nuclear deal that Tehran signed with the world’s powers in 2015. The Trump administration maintained that the agreement gave Iran too much in exchange for too little — and subsequently imposed harsh sanctions designed to squeeze Iran’s already moribund economy.

Since Soleimani’s killing, Iran has said it will no longer abide by the restrictions imposed on its nuclear program by the deal, but added that its decision is reversible if the other signatories to the accord — Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the European Union — provide it economic benefits.

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President Trump To Deliver Statement On Iran

Westlake Legal Group ap_20007742643335_wide-d19534aaef4552f587b6ddc2002a3bb546e71a48-s1100-c15 President Trump To Deliver Statement On Iran
Alex Brandon/AP
Westlake Legal Group  President Trump To Deliver Statement On Iran

Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump is expected to make a statement Wednesday morning, hours after Iran launched missile strikes against U.S. military and coalition forces in Iraq in apparent retaliation for the killing of Qassem Soleimani, the Iranian military commander.

“All is well! Missiles launched from Iran at two military bases located in Iraq,” Trump said in a tweet late Tuesday. “Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

If there are no American casualties, there could be a way for the two countries to deescalate from rising tensions that have led to speculation about an armed conflict. Trump had previously warned that “if Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran.”

The president’s Tuesday night tweet follows days of tensions that began last week as Iraqi militiamen and their supporters targeted the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, setting fires and damaging a perimeter gatehouse at the complex.

Days later, the U.S. killed Soleimani, who was visiting Baghdad, along with a senior leader of a Shia militia group. Earlier this week, Trump said that the U.S. would strike Iranian sites, including cultural ones, if the Islamic Republic retaliated. The Pentagon and other officials have since walked back those remarks.

In the days after the Soleimani strike, the Trump administration faced domestic political criticism over the lack of transparency following the operation. The administration maintained that the U.S. faced an imminent threat, however.

“If you’re looking for imminence, you need look no further than the days that led up to the strike,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tuesday, alluding to the violent protests outside the U.S. embassy.

Relations between the U.S. and Iran have been fraught since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, but they have deteriorated sharply since the Trump administration withdrew from the nuclear deal that Tehran signed with the world’s powers in 2015. The Trump administration maintained that the agreement gave Iran too much in exchange for too little — and subsequently imposed harsh sanctions designed to squeeze Iran’s already moribund economy.

Since Soleimani’s killing, Iran has said it will no longer abide by the restrictions imposed on its nuclear program by the deal, but added that its decision is reversible if the other signatories to the accord — Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the European Union — provide it economic benefits.

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Anti-Trump demonstrators walk in circles in Senate building’s lobby, call for president’s conviction

Demonstrators gathered at the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington on Tuesday, where they walked quietly in circles to call for President Trump‘s conviction following last month’s impeachment vote — and protest the prospect of war due to escalated tensions between the U.S. and Iran.

Capitol police using a megaphone told the demonstrators that protests are prohibited within Senate office buildings — although no one was reportedly arrested.

“If you do not cease and desist you will be placed under arrest,” police told them, according to a video taken by Julio Rosas of Townhall.

GRAHAM SAYS HE TOLD TRUMP ON IRAN: ‘CULTURAL SITES, RELIGIOUS SITES ARE NOT LAWFUL TARGETS’

The group wore black T-shirts with each person donning a single letter that spelled “Remove Trump,” when they each stood side by side in the building’s lobby. As they stood, numerous people behind them were seen walking in circles in a trance-like state.

Many appeared to have “No War” written on their hands in black ink — and held up there hands as if to say, “Don’t shoot!”

Because they were there on a weekday, and announced they planned to be in the building every day, Rosas asked the group’s spokeswoman if they had jobs.

She said they came from all different walks of life and some were from the local area.

Westlake Legal Group 2a696149-protest2 Anti-Trump demonstrators walk in circles in Senate building's lobby, call for president's conviction fox-news/us fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 3dc526d5-ad38-5b52-8e9a-b9f55ab71e1a

The protest, which included 100 demonstrators and possibly just as many police, took place in the Hart Senate Office Building. (Fox News’ Raymond Bogan)

“Some people have taken time off from work. … Our country is in danger and you have to make a choice to go away from your families and friends and your work and sacrifice your life for the better good of the nation,” the spokeswoman said.

IRANIAN OFFICIAL TWEETS PHOTO OF IRANIAN FLAG AFTER ATTACK ON U.S. TROOPS IN IRAQ

The group — which started protesting in the Hart Building on Monday — advocated on Twitter for others to join them Wednesday.

Users on Twitter had a range of reactions to the protests.

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The Hart Senate Office Building is the third office structure designed to serve the U.S. Senate, according to the Architect of the Capitol.

Westlake Legal Group 2a696149-protest2 Anti-Trump demonstrators walk in circles in Senate building's lobby, call for president's conviction fox-news/us fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 3dc526d5-ad38-5b52-8e9a-b9f55ab71e1a   Westlake Legal Group 2a696149-protest2 Anti-Trump demonstrators walk in circles in Senate building's lobby, call for president's conviction fox-news/us fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox news fnc/politics fnc David Aaro article 3dc526d5-ad38-5b52-8e9a-b9f55ab71e1a

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Joe Biden saw Iran’s Clinton-era attack as ‘act of war’ requiring payback — now warns Trump about ‘escalatory move’

Westlake Legal Group biden-1996 Joe Biden saw Iran's Clinton-era attack as 'act of war' requiring payback -- now warns Trump about 'escalatory move' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc d7e4922f-e12a-5628-b406-3117d65de2cd Brie Stimson article

Former Vice President Joe Biden took some heat on social media this week after an old TV clip surfaced in which Biden called a deadly Iranian attack against U.S. airmen an “act of war.”

The U.S. can “take whatever action it deems appropriate,” the then-U.S. senator told ABC’s Sam Donaldson on “This Week” regarding Iran’s tanker truck bombing of the Khobar Towers, a U.S. Air Force military housing complex in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, that killed 19 airmen and injured more than 500 others.

Critics were quick to point out the difference between Biden’s rhetoric back then — when Democrat Bill Clinton was president — and his rebuke this week of the U.S. airstrike ordered by President Trump that killed top Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani last Friday, which Biden called a “hugely escalatory move.”

“Didn’t Joe just criticize President Trump for doing exactly what he states in this interview should be done?” one Twitter user wrote. “How can people stand this level of lies and hypocrisy? Either side? What have we become? Lie when it benefits you.”

“Hypocrisy just comes naturally to all Democrats,” another Twitter user wrote.

In his statement this week, Biden said: “President Trump just tossed a stick of dynamite into a tinderbox, and he owes the American people an explanation of the strategy and plan to keep safe our troops and embassy personnel, our people and our interests, both here at home and abroad, and our partners throughout the region and beyond.”

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Biden has not made a statement on his previous remarks.

Westlake Legal Group biden-1996 Joe Biden saw Iran's Clinton-era attack as 'act of war' requiring payback -- now warns Trump about 'escalatory move' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc d7e4922f-e12a-5628-b406-3117d65de2cd Brie Stimson article   Westlake Legal Group biden-1996 Joe Biden saw Iran's Clinton-era attack as 'act of war' requiring payback -- now warns Trump about 'escalatory move' fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/politics/the-clintons fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/joe-biden fox news fnc/politics fnc d7e4922f-e12a-5628-b406-3117d65de2cd Brie Stimson article

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Michael Pregent: Iran fears US war – May have deliberately missed hitting Americans in missile attacks

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120562340001_6120558759001-vs Michael Pregent: Iran fears US war – May have deliberately missed hitting Americans in missile attacks Michael Pregent fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/conflicts fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc edf812b9-0d90-50cd-9cff-b135869ceb5c article

Iranian missile attacks on two joint U.S.-Iraqi military bases Wednesday morning didn’t kill or injure any Americans, according to initial reports – and that appears to have been a deliberate move by Iran to avoid a retaliatory strike by U.S. forces.

Iran had to strike back at the U.S. in some way after an American drone attack ordered by President Trump killed Iranian terrorist Gen. Qassem Soleimani and other terrorists Friday morning in Iraq. But the leaders of the Iranian regime are smart enough to know that if they had killed Americans in their retaliatory attack, Trump would have responded with deadly force.

This could have sparked a rapidly escalating series of strikes and counterstrikes as each side hit back at the other and could have eventually led to a costly war that would have hurt Iran far more than the U.S.

IRAN LAUNCHES 15 BALLISTIC MISSILES INTO IRAQ TARGETING US, COALITION FORCES, OFFICIALS SAY

Iran called on the U.S. not to retaliate after the Islamic Republic launched as many as 15 ballistic missiles at the bases where U.S. troops were stationed – a clear indication that Iran wants to avoid further military conflict with the far more powerful American forces.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif tweeted after the attacks: “Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense under Article 51 of UN Charter targeting base from which cowardly armed attack against our citizens & senior officials were launched. We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression.”

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The lesson here is that despite Iran’s tough talk and threats, it fears the power of the U.S. and doesn’t want a military confrontation with America that could lead to a U.S. invasion – the fate that befell its neighbors Iraq and Afghanistan.

In fact, the U.S. killing of Soleimani was such a severe blow to the Iranian regime that it may be the de-escalation event we were looking for to ratchet down tensions with Iran.

As a result, Trump’s decision to kill Soleimani – a terrorist responsible for the death of more than 600 Americans and thousands of others – was a double victory for the U.S.

First, eliminating Soleimani ensures he will never lead another deadly attack. And second, the killing is a stern warning to Iran that the Trump administration is not afraid to attack when warranted.

The killing of Soleimani and other terrorists followed an attack by a militia backed by Iran that killed a U.S. contractor and wounded four other Americans in December. The U.S. conducted airstrikes on five bases belonging to the terrorist militia Kataib Hezbollah in retaliation.

That American action prompted Abu Mahdi al-Mohandes – the commander of Kataib Hezbollah – to join with other militia leaders to attack the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

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A day later President Trump decided to target Soleimani – the man responsible for the escalation in Iraq and across the region and the one man whose death would send a clear warning to Iran to back off. Or else.

Trump appears to have asked himself the right question: Who do we take out to stop these Iranian attacks? The answer was Soleimani.

Trump should be commended for ordering the drone strike that killed both Soleimani and Abu Mahdi al-Mohandes –the two most powerful men undermining the U.S. presence in Iraq and the region.

Mohandes’ death could be a de-escalation event for Iraq.

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It’s time now for the Iraqi government to tell Iran to stop killing Iraqis, and time for Iraq to target and arrest members of the Iranian-backed militias.

If Iraq refuses, the U.S. must come to the realization that the Iraqi government is more interested in being allied with Iran. That will lead to a U.S. troop withdrawal and loss of support for the Iraqi government. The big loser, if that happens, will be Iraq and its people.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY MICHAEL PREGENT

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120562340001_6120558759001-vs Michael Pregent: Iran fears US war – May have deliberately missed hitting Americans in missile attacks Michael Pregent fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/conflicts fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc edf812b9-0d90-50cd-9cff-b135869ceb5c article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6120562340001_6120558759001-vs Michael Pregent: Iran fears US war – May have deliberately missed hitting Americans in missile attacks Michael Pregent fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/world fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/defense/conflicts fox-news/politics/defense fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc edf812b9-0d90-50cd-9cff-b135869ceb5c article

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Major TikTok Security Flaws Found

Westlake Legal Group 08tiktok1-facebookJumbo Major TikTok Security Flaws Found Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming TikTok (ByteDance) Mobile Applications Cyberattacks and Hackers Computer Security China Check Point

TEL AVIV — TikTok, the smartphone app beloved by teenagers and used by hundreds of millions of people around the world, had serious vulnerabilities that would have allowed hackers to manipulate user data and reveal personal information, according to research published Wednesday by Check Point, a cybersecurity company in Israel.

The weaknesses would have allowed attackers to send TikTok users messages that carried malicious links. Once users clicked on the links, attackers would have been able to take control of their accounts, including uploading videos or gaining access to private videos. A separate flaw allowed Check Point researchers to retrieve personal information from TikTok user accounts through the company’s website.

“The vulnerabilities we found were all core to TikTok’s systems,” said Oded Vanunu, Check Point’s head of product vulnerability research.

TikTok learned about the conclusions of Check Point’s research on Nov. 20 and said it had fixed all of the vulnerabilities by Dec. 15.

The app, whose parent company is based in Beijing, has been called “the last sunny corner on the internet.” It allows users to post short, creative videos, which can easily be shared on various apps.

It has also become a target of lawmakers and regulators who are suspicious of Chinese technology. Several branches of the United States military have barred personnel from having the app on government-issued smartphones. The vulnerabilities discovered by Check Point are likely to compound those concerns.

TikTok has exploded in popularity over the past two years, becoming a rare Chinese internet success story in the West. It has been downloaded more than 1.5 billion times, according to the data firm Sensor Tower. Near the end of 2019, the research firm said TikTok appeared to be on its way to more downloads for the year than better-known apps from Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Snap.

But new apps like TikTok offer opportunities for hackers looking to target services that haven’t been tested through years of security research and real-world attacks. And many of its users are young and perhaps not mindful of security updates.

“TikTok is committed to protecting user data,” said Luke Deshotels, the head of TikTok’s security team.

“Like many organizations, we encourage responsible security researchers to privately disclose zero day vulnerabilities to us,” he added. “Before public disclosure, Check Point agreed that all reported issues were patched in the latest version of our app. We hope that this successful resolution will encourage future collaboration with security researchers.”

Mr. Deshotels said there was no indication in customer records that a breach or an attack had occurred.

TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, is one of the world’s most valuable tech start-ups. But TikTok’s popularity and its roots in China, where no large corporation can thrive outside the good graces of the government, have prompted intense scrutiny of the app’s content policies and data practices.

American lawmakers have expressed concern that TikTok censors material that the Chinese government does not like and allows Beijing to collect user data. TikTok has denied both accusations. The company also says that although ByteDance’s headquarters are in Beijing, regional managers for TikTok have significant autonomy over operations.

Check Point’s intelligence unit examined how easy it would be to hack into TikTok user accounts. It found that various functions of the app, including sending video files, had security issues.

“I would expect these types of vulnerabilities in a company like TikTok, which is probably more focused on tremendous growth, and on building new features for their users, rather than security,” said Christoph Hebeisen, the head of research at Lookout, another cybersecurity company.

One vulnerability allowed attackers to use a link in TikTok’s messaging system to send users messages that appeared to come from TikTok. The Check Point researchers tested the weakness by sending themselves links with malware that let them take control of accounts, uploading content, deleting videos and making private videos public.

The researchers also found that TikTok’s site was vulnerable to a type of attack that injects malicious code into trusted websites. Check Point researchers were able to retrieve users’ personal information, including names and birth dates.

Check Point sent a summary of its findings to the Department of Homeland Security in the United States.

The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, a panel that reviews investment deals on national security grounds, is also looking into ByteDance’s 2017 acquisition of Musical.ly, a lip-syncing app that the company later merged into TikTok. That deal set the stage for TikTok’s rapid rise in the United States and Europe.

There are also concerns about the company’s data privacy practices. In February, the Federal Trade Commission filed a complaint against TikTok, saying it illegally collected personal information from minors. The complaint claimed that Musical.ly had violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, which requires websites and online companies to direct children under 13 to get parental consent before the companies collect personal information.

TikTok agreed to pay $5.7 million to settle the complaint and said it would abide by COPPA. TikTok is still being investigated by the British Information Commissioner’s Office to determine if it violated European privacy laws that offer special protections to minors and their data.

Ronen Bergman reported from Tel Aviv, Sheera Frenkel from San Francisco, and Raymond Zhong from Hong Kong.

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Major TikTok Security Flaws Found

Westlake Legal Group 08tiktok1-facebookJumbo Major TikTok Security Flaws Found Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming TikTok (ByteDance) Mobile Applications Cyberattacks and Hackers Computer Security China Check Point

TEL AVIV — TikTok, the smartphone app beloved by teenagers and used by hundreds of millions of people around the world, had serious vulnerabilities that would have allowed hackers to manipulate user data and reveal personal information, according to research published Wednesday by Check Point, a cybersecurity company in Israel.

The weaknesses would have allowed attackers to send TikTok users messages that carried malicious links. Once users clicked on the links, attackers would have been able to take control of their accounts, including uploading videos or gaining access to private videos. A separate flaw allowed Check Point researchers to retrieve personal information from TikTok user accounts through the company’s website.

“The vulnerabilities we found were all core to TikTok’s systems,” said Oded Vanunu, Check Point’s head of product vulnerability research.

TikTok learned about the conclusions of Check Point’s research on Nov. 20 and said it had fixed all of the vulnerabilities by Dec. 15.

The app, whose parent company is based in Beijing, has been called “the last sunny corner on the internet.” It allows users to post short, creative videos, which can easily be shared on various apps.

It has also become a target of lawmakers and regulators who are suspicious of Chinese technology. Several branches of the United States military have barred personnel from having the app on government-issued smartphones. The vulnerabilities discovered by Check Point are likely to compound those concerns.

TikTok has exploded in popularity over the past two years, becoming a rare Chinese internet success story in the West. It has been downloaded more than 1.5 billion times, according to the data firm Sensor Tower. Near the end of 2019, the research firm said TikTok appeared to be on its way to more downloads for the year than better-known apps from Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Snap.

But new apps like TikTok offer opportunities for hackers looking to target services that haven’t been tested through years of security research and real-world attacks. And many of its users are young and perhaps not mindful of security updates.

“TikTok is committed to protecting user data,” said Luke Deshotels, the head of TikTok’s security team.

“Like many organizations, we encourage responsible security researchers to privately disclose zero day vulnerabilities to us,” he added. “Before public disclosure, Check Point agreed that all reported issues were patched in the latest version of our app. We hope that this successful resolution will encourage future collaboration with security researchers.”

Mr. Deshotels said there was no indication in customer records that a breach or an attack had occurred.

TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, is one of the world’s most valuable tech start-ups. But TikTok’s popularity and its roots in China, where no large corporation can thrive outside the good graces of the government, have prompted intense scrutiny of the app’s content policies and data practices.

American lawmakers have expressed concern that TikTok censors material that the Chinese government does not like and allows Beijing to collect user data. TikTok has denied both accusations. The company also says that although ByteDance’s headquarters are in Beijing, regional managers for TikTok have significant autonomy over operations.

Check Point’s intelligence unit examined how easy it would be to hack into TikTok user accounts. It found that various functions of the app, including sending video files, had security issues.

“I would expect these types of vulnerabilities in a company like TikTok, which is probably more focused on tremendous growth, and on building new features for their users, rather than security,” said Christoph Hebeisen, the head of research at Lookout, another cybersecurity company.

One vulnerability allowed attackers to use a link in TikTok’s messaging system to send users messages that appeared to come from TikTok. The Check Point researchers tested the weakness by sending themselves links with malware that let them take control of accounts, uploading content, deleting videos and making private videos public.

The researchers also found that TikTok’s site was vulnerable to a type of attack that injects malicious code into trusted websites. Check Point researchers were able to retrieve users’ personal information, including names and birth dates.

Check Point sent a summary of its findings to the Department of Homeland Security in the United States.

The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, a panel that reviews investment deals on national security grounds, is also looking into ByteDance’s 2017 acquisition of Musical.ly, a lip-syncing app that the company later merged into TikTok. That deal set the stage for TikTok’s rapid rise in the United States and Europe.

There are also concerns about the company’s data privacy practices. In February, the Federal Trade Commission filed a complaint against TikTok, saying it illegally collected personal information from minors. The complaint claimed that Musical.ly had violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, which requires websites and online companies to direct children under 13 to get parental consent before the companies collect personal information.

TikTok agreed to pay $5.7 million to settle the complaint and said it would abide by COPPA. TikTok is still being investigated by the British Information Commissioner’s Office to determine if it violated European privacy laws that offer special protections to minors and their data.

Ronen Bergman reported from Tel Aviv, Sheera Frenkel from San Francisco, and Raymond Zhong from Hong Kong.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strike a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_166821168_e614f981-eeeb-42d0-b443-dd0b92cdad53-articleLarge Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strike a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Iranians holding pictures of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani celebrated in Tehran after Iran launched missiles at American forces in Iraq.Credit…Wana News Agency, via Reuters

Iran said on Wednesday it had “concluded” its attacks on American forces in Iraq and did “not seek escalation or war” after firing more than 20 ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif made the remarks in a tweet after Iran conducted the attacks in response to the killing of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, a leader of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

Senior Iraqi defense officials who work with the United States command said no Americans or Iraqis had been killed in the attacks. American officials did not, however, confirm if there were any casualties.

Britain, Sweden, Poland, Australia and Denmark, whose troops are stationed in Iraq alongside American forces, also said none of their service members had been killed.

General Suleimani was killed on Friday in Baghdad in a drone strike ordered by President Trump. American officials said the general, who led the guard’s foreign expeditionary Quds Force, was planning imminent attacks on American interests. An American official has since described that intelligence as thin.

“Iran took & concluded proportionate measures in self-defense under Article 51 of UN Charter targeting base from which cowardly armed attack against our citizens & senior officials were launched,” Mr. Zarif said.

“We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group iraq-embassy-baghdad-airport-attack-1578026455663-articleLarge-v11 Iran’s Supreme Leader Calls Missile Strike a ‘Slap in Face’ to U.S.: Live Updates United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J Suleimani, Qassim Iran Deaths (Fatalities) Aviation Accidents, Safety and Disasters

Maps: How the Confrontation Between the U.S. and Iran Escalated

Here’s how the situation developed over the last two weeks.

In a tweet, President Trump suggested that damages and casualties sustained by American forces were minimal. But he also said the assessment of the attacks was ongoing.

“All is well!,” he said in a tweet. “Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good!”

The missiles, launched from Iran, struck the Al-Asad base in Baghdad and another in Erbil, in northern Iraq.

In a briefing in Washington, an official said that the Pentagon “had no confirmation” that any Americans had been killed.

Iranian news media reported the attacks began hours after the remains of General Suleimani were returned to his hometown in Iran for burial.

Hossein Soleimani, the editor in chief of Mashregh, the main Revolutionary Guards news website, said that more than 30 ballistic missiles had been fired at the base at Asad, in Anbar Province, in western Iraq.

In December 2018, Mr. Trump visited American military forces at Al-Asad. It was his first trip to troops stationed in a combat zone.

The base is an Iraqi base that has long been a hub for American military operations in western Iraq. Danish troops have also been stationed there in recent years.

The base in Erbil has been a Special Operations hub, home to hundreds of troops, logistics personnel and intelligence specialists. Transport aircraft, gunships and reconnaissance planes have used the airport as an anchor point for operations in both northern Iraq and deep into Syria.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran, said on Wednesday that his military had dealt the United States a “slap in the face” when it unleashed more than 20 missiles at American forces stationed in Iraq.

In a televised address from the holy city of Qom, Ayatollah Khamenei said incremental military actions against the United States alone were “not sufficient.”

“What matters is that the presence of America, which is a source of corruption in this region, should could come to an end,” he said to a hall filled with imams and others.

“Death to America!,” the crowd chanted. “Death to Israel!”

Ayatollah Khamenei said “sitting at the negotiating table” with American envoys opens the door to greater American intervention in the region and such negotiations therefore must “come to an end.”

“This region,” he said, “does not accept the U.S. presence.”

The ayatollah provided no additional details about the strikes on Tuesday night, in which American allies say, no one was killed.

He called General Suleimani, considered the second most powerful man in Iran, a “dear friend to us,” and praised him as a “great, brave warrior.”

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 carrying at least 170 people on Wednesday crashed shortly after takeoff from Tehran, killing everyone aboard, according to the Iranian state news media.

The circumstances of the crash were unclear. The Iranian media cited technical problems with the plane, which was bound for Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital.

Photos posted by Iranian news organizations showed rescuers examining smoking rubble in a field. The Iranian Students’ News Agency, a state-run media organization, shared a video it said showed the predawn crash, with a distant light descending in the distance before a bright burst filled the sky upon impact.

Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 departed Imam Khomeini International Airport in Tehran at 6:12 a.m. on Wednesday and lost contact at 6:14 a.m., according to a flight tracker.

Source: Flightradar24

By The New York Times

“We are aware of the media reports out of Iran and we are gathering more information,” Boeing said in a statement.

Boeing has been under intense scrutiny after the crash of two 737 Max jets in less than five months, which together killed 346 people. The Max has been grounded worldwide since March, creating a crisis for the company and leading to the firing of the chief executive.

The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as political escalations with the United States had the country on edge. On Tuesday, the F.A.A. banned American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft.

The crash could also touch a nerve politically in Ukraine as the airline operating the flight, Ukraine International Airlines, is partly owned through a network of offshore companies by Ihor Kolomoisky, an oligarch with close ties to President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The president later expressed his condolences to the relatives and friends of the passengers and crew. Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s foreign minister, said the victims included 82 Iranians and 11 Ukrainians, including nine Ukrainian crew members. Sixty-three passengers were from Canada, 10 from Sweden, four from Afghanistan, three from Germany and three from Britain, he said.

The crash came at a tense time in Iran, as conflict with the United States had the country on edge. On Tuesday, the F.A.A. barred American airliners from flying over Iran, citing the risk of commercial planes being mistaken for military aircraft. Several non-American carriers rerouted their flights on Wednesday to avoid Iraq and Iran, according to Flightradar24, a site that tracks airplane transponders.

Oil prices jumped and markets slumped in Asia early on Wednesday, as investors tried to parse reports of missile attacks on military bases in Iraq where American troops are stationed.

But market turmoil eased later in the day after Iran suggested it was finished retaliating — for now — against the United States for the killing last week of General Suleimani.

Prices for Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, jumped above $70 a barrel in futures markets, a nearly 4 percent rise from Tuesday, before easing back. Prices were up 1.4 percent midday in Asia to $69.20 a barrel.

West Texas Intermediate, the American oil price benchmark, jumped more than 3 percent to about $65 a barrel, then eased back. As of midday it was up 1.3 percent.

Stock markets also dropped sharply but clawed back some ground later in the day. Shares in Japan opened 2.4 percent lower but was down only 1.2 percent. Markets in Hong Kong, mainland China and South Korea were down less than 1 percent.

Futures contracts representing bets on the American stock market indicated a drop of less than 1 percent in New York’s morning.

Reporting was contributed by Russell Goldman, Farnaz Fassihi, Daniel Victor, Anton Troianovski, Andrew Kramer, Alissa J. Rubin, Eric Schmitt and Vivan Yee.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com