web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 296)

NCAA Board of Governors opens door to athletes benefiting from name, image and likeness

The NCAA’s top policy-making group on Tuesday voted “unanimously to permit students participating in athletics the opportunity to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness in a manner consistent with the collegiate model,” the association said in a news release.

The release followed a Board of Governors meeting at which the group received a report from a special committee that had been appointed in May to examine the name, image and likeness issue.

The statement about the board action did not provide specifics, but said changes to NCAA rules in each of the three divisions could occur immediately, as long as they occur within principles and guidelines that include: 

►Assuring student-athletes are treated similarly to non-athlete students unless a compelling reason exists to differentiate.

►Maintaining the priorities of education and the collegiate experience to provide opportunities for student-athlete success. 

►Ensuring rules are transparent, focused and enforceable and facilitate fair and balanced competition.

►Making clear the distinction between collegiate and professional opportunities. 

►Making clear that compensation for athletics performance or participation is impermissible.

►Reaffirming that student-athletes are students first and not employees of the university.

The board said the special committee will continue to gather feedback through April 2020 and it asked each of the associations’s three divisions to make rules changes no later than January 2021.

The NCAA’s action comes about a month after California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law a bill that will make it easier for college athletes in the state to profit from their own name, image and likeness, beginning in 2023.

“I’m thrilled that with the California Legislature’s and Gov. Newsom’s support (of the new law), it was the push that the NCAA needed to do the right thing,” said California State Sen. Nancy Skinner, who authored the bill. “I’m encouraged by the vote today, but the devil’s in the details. … We’ll be monitoring.” 

The lead time in the law’s effective date resulted from an amendment to the bill that was made out of consideration for the NCAA working group. Still, the NCAA pushed against the legislation, with Board of Governors sending a letter to Newsom in early September that said enactment “would result in (California schools) being unable to compete in NCAA competitions” and would be “unconstitutional.”

Reference to the bill’s legality signaled the NCAA’s potential willingness to sue California under the commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution, which says that only Congress has the power to regulate commerce among states.

COLLEGE ATHLETES’ WORTH:In some cases, it could be millions

NCAA ATHLETES’ BENEFITS:Here are some benefits you might not know about

Westlake Legal Group  NCAA Board of Governors opens door to athletes benefiting from name, image and likeness

But well before Newsom (D) gave his assent, similar legislative efforts had begun in Congress and in the states of Washington and Colorado. And while the action in California was being finalized, lawmakers in four other states either introduced, or announced their intention to introduce, bills similar to California’s. Since then, at least 10 more states have seen at least talk of proposals.

On Tuesday, the Illinois House of Representatives’ Higher Education Committee approved a measure similar to California’s — and also with a 2023 effective date — by a 9-6 margin. The vote puts the bill on the House floor, where it could soon receive afull vote. 

Another significant activity in another state occurred last week, when Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, endorsed a bi-partisan proposal in his state that would take effect as early as July 2020. Like California, Florida has numerous major-college programs — and a law there would put the Southeastern and Atlantic Coast conferences directly alongside the Pac-12 in having to confront the issue.

NCAA rules presently allow athletes to make money from their name, image or likeness, but only under a series of specific conditions, including that no reference can be made to their involvement in college sports.

The setup has come under criticism from a wide range of sources, including former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who headed an NCAA commission to look at issues in college basketball and came away calling the association’s name-image-and-likeness rules “incomprehensible.” That comment, in May 2018, came in the wake of Notre Dame women’s basketball star Arike Ogunbowale receiving a waiver from the NCAA that allowed her to make money as a participant on Dancing with the Stars. The NCAA said it was granting the waiver because the show was unrelated to her basketball abilities.

“I couldn’t for the life of me understand the explanation,” Rice told USA TODAY Sports’ Christine Brennan, “because obviously she’s there because she hit two winning shots in two basketball games (in the women’s Final Four), so that’s the connection.”

In May 2019, with legislation pending, the association unveiled what it called the NCAA Board of Governors Federal and State Legislation Working Group. The announcement naming the group said a “final report” would be due to the board in October.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Meet Alexander Vindman, the Colonel Testifying on Trump’s Phone Call

WASHINGTON — Alexander S. Vindman and his twin brother, Yevgeny, were 3 years old when they fled Ukraine with their father and grandmother, Jewish refugees with only their suitcases and $750, hoping for a better life in the United States.

In the 40 years since, he has become a scholar, diplomat, decorated lieutenant colonel in the United States Army and Harvard-educated Ukraine expert on the White House National Security Council.

On Tuesday, his past and his present converged, when he became the first sitting White House official to testify in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s dealings with the country of his birth.

The testimony of Colonel Vindman, 44, is one of the more riveting turns in an inquiry that has been full of them. He told impeachment investigators in an opening statement that he “did not think it was proper” for Mr. Trump to push Ukraine’s leader to dig up dirt on his political rivals during a July phone call, and felt duty-bound to report the conversation to a White House lawyer, fearing that it jeopardized the country’s national security.

But more than that, Colonel Vindman’s testimony offered a compelling immigrants’ tale and a glimpse into the story of twin brothers who have lived a singular American experience. From their days as little boys in matching short pants and blue caps, toddling around the Brighton Beach neighborhood of Brooklyn — known as Little Odessa for its population of refugees from the former Soviet Union — and into adulthood, they have followed strikingly similar paths.

Like Alexander Vindman, Yevgeny is a lieutenant colonel in the Army. He also serves on Mr. Trump’s National Security Council, as a lawyer handling ethics issues.

When Alexander Vindman decided to alert a White House lawyer to his concerns about Mr. Trump’s July telephone call with the Ukrainian president, he turned to his twin, bringing him along as he reported the conversation to John A. Eisenberg, the top National Security Council lawyer.

The twins both married and they have offices across from one another in the West Wing of the White House, according to Carol Kitman, a photographer who met the family when they were boys, chronicled their growing up and remains a close family friend.

“They say nothing,” Ms. Kitman said, when asked if the two had revealed their views about Mr. Trump. “They’re very smart and they’re very discreet.”

Along with their older brother, Leonid, the twins left Kiev with their father, Semyon, shortly after their mother died there. Their maternal grandmother came along to help care for them. The family sold its possessions to survive in Europe while waiting for visas to the United States.

“I think their father felt they would do better in the United States as Jews,” said Ms. Kitman, who recalls spotting the grandmother and the two boys, then known as Sanya and Genya, under the elevated train in Brooklyn. She spoke to the grandmother in Yiddish, she said, and returned the following day, aiming to do a book about their lives.

“Upon arriving in New York City in 1979, my father worked multiple jobs to support us, all the while learning English at night,” Colonel Vindman told House lawmakers on Tuesday. “He stressed to us the importance of fully integrating into our adopted country. For many years, life was quite difficult. In spite of our challenging beginnings, my family worked to build its own American dream.”

Ms. Kitman’s website tells the story in pictures.

“Genya is always the smiling twin. Sanya is serious,” she wrote in the caption accompanying the image of them in their blue ball caps and short pants in 1980, the year after they arrived. A 1985 photograph of them with their grandmother on a boardwalk appeared in a documentary by the filmmaker Ken Burns, she wrote.

When they were 13, Ms. Kitman captured the Vindman twins in matching red shirts. When Colonel Vindman married, she photographed him and his bride under a tallit, a Jewish prayer shawl, that served as a huppah, or wedding canopy.

The twins’ father, Semyon Vindman, went on to become an engineer, Ms. Kitman said, and the twins’ older brother entered the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps in college. She said the younger boys looked up to Leonid and decided to pursue their own military paths.

In 1998, Alexander Vindman graduated from the State University of New York at Binghamton. He received his military commission from Cornell University, completed basic training at Fort Benning, Ga., in 1999, and deployed to South Korea, where he led infantry and anti-armor platoons, the following year.

In his testimony, the colonel mentioned his “multiple overseas tours,” including in South Korea and Germany, and a 2003 combat deployment to Iraq that left him wounded by a roadside bomb, for which he was awarded a Purple Heart.

Since 2008, he has been an Army foreign area officer — an expert in political-military operations — specializing in Eurasia. Colonel Vindman has a master’s degree from Harvard in Russian, Eastern Europe and Central Asian Studies. He has served in the United States’ embassies in Kiev, Ukraine, and in Moscow, and was the officer specializing in Russia for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff before joining the National Security Council in 2018.

By this spring, he said in his opening statement, he became troubled by what he described as efforts by “outside influencers” to create “a false narrative” about Ukraine. Documents reviewed by The New York Times suggest the reference is to Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and his efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and implicate Ukraine, rather than Russia, in interfering with the 2016 elections.

Westlake Legal Group vindman-statement-impeachment-1572300930303-articleLarge Meet Alexander Vindman, the Colonel Testifying on Trump’s Phone Call Vindman, Alexander S United States Defense and Military Forces Ukrainian-Americans Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Refugees and Displaced Persons impeachment Immigration and Emigration Brighton Beach (Brooklyn, NY)

Read Alexander Vindman’s Opening Statement on Trump and Ukraine

He twice reported concerns about President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine, according to a draft statement.

In May, a month after Volodymyr Zelensky was elected president of Ukraine in a landslide victory, Mr. Trump asked the colonel to join Energy Secretary Rick Perry to travel to Ukraine to attend the new president’s inauguration.

By July, Colonel Vindman had grown deeply concerned that administration officials were pressuring Mr. Zelensky to investigate Mr. Biden. That concern only intensified, he told investigators, when he listened in to the now-famous July 25 phone conversation between Mr. Zelensky and Mr. Trump.

“I did not think it was proper to demand that a foreign government investigate a U.S. citizen,” his testimony said, “and I was worried about the implications for the U.S. government’s support of Ukraine.”

His heritage gave Colonel Vindman, who is fluent in both Ukrainian and Russian, unique insight into Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign; on numerous occasions, Ukrainian officials sought him out for advice about how to deal with Mr. Giuliani.

Colonel Vindman’s testimony was sprinkled with references to duty, honor and patriotism — but also his life as an immigrant and a refugee.

“I sit here, as a lieutenant colonel in the United States Army, an immigrant,” he said, adding, “I have a deep appreciation for American values and ideals and the power of freedom. I am a patriot, and it is my sacred duty and honor to advance and defend our country, irrespective of party or politics.”

Ms. Kitman, the photographer, said that was what she would expect from both the Vindman twins.

“When you talk about what good immigrants do,” she said, “look at what these immigrants are doing for this country.”

Danny Hakim and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Lost cemetery may be on Florida high school campus

A lost cemetery may be on the campus of a Florida high school, say experts and officials, sparking a high-tech search of the school’s grounds.

Researchers have been using a ground-penetrating radar to hunt for the cemetery on the campus of King High School in Tampa. “On Thursday, October 17th, it was brought to the district’s attention that a possible unmarked cemetery for indigent citizens may be on the campus of King High School,” said Hillsborough County Public Schools, in a statement released Oct. 24.

The Tampa Bay Times reports that 250 people are buried at the lost Ridgewood cemetery. Almost all of the people interred at the cemetery are African-American, according to Fox 13.

“It hurts, we have been through a lot in this city, we are a part of this city — where is our history?” Hillsborough County NAACP President Yvette Lewis told Fox 13. Lewis is also a member of the historical response committee formed by Hillsborough County Public Schools to handle the lost cemetery.

CIVIL WAR SOLDIER’S GRAVESTONE DISCOVERED, MAY OFFER VITAL CLUE TO LONG-LOST AFRICAN-AMERICAN CEMETERY

The school district notes that there is conflicting information on the cemetery’s possible location based on appraisals, deeds, aerial maps and historical and county records.

Westlake Legal Group CemeterySchoolFloridaCrop1 Lost cemetery may be on Florida high school campus James Rogers fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2651047c-ebdf-5e02-b0b6-3070a3521b95

Researchers have been using ground-penetrating radar to hunt for the cemetery on the campus of King High School in Tampa. (Hillsborough County Public Schools)

“It is a high priority of our district to make sure we find this cemetery, while respecting the people who may be buried there, as well as their families,” the school district said, explaining that it has brought in geophysical exploration specialist GeoView to map and scan the areas where the cemetery may be located.

The company began its work on Oct. 23. “If no signs of a cemetery are found during this initial scan, the radar scanning will move to the northeast corner of the King High School property where another document says the cemetery may be located.”

MYSTERIOUS TUNNELS DISCOVERED IN FLORIDA

Westlake Legal Group CemeterySchoolFloridaCrop2 Lost cemetery may be on Florida high school campus James Rogers fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2651047c-ebdf-5e02-b0b6-3070a3521b95

There is conflicting information on the cemetery’s possible location. (Hillsborough County Public Schools)

In a YouTube video posted by Hillsborough County Public Schools, GeoView President Paul Wightman explained that the radar scanning will be used to create a tridimensional representation of the area’s subsurface.

“Typically, for cemeteries with Christian burial, the remains are interred on an east to west orientation and so we get our best response when we go across the short axis of those buried remains,” he added. “By going north and south we’re going to be able to go across the short axis of it, and that’s going give us our cleanest response in terms of whether there’s something actually present or not.”

A spokesperson for Hillsborough County Public Schools told Fox News that results from the scanning are expected in one to two weeks. “We still have a crew doing the Ground Penetrating Radar at the school site,” she said.

Three “lost cemeteries” have been discovered in the Tampa area in the last year, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

MYSTERIOUS FLORIDA TUNNELS’ SECRETS REVEALED

Earlier this year, archaeologists in Delaware announced the discovery of a Civil War soldier’s gravestone that may provide a vital clue in uncovering a long-lost African-American cemetery.

Westlake Legal Group CemeterySchoolFloridaCrop3 Lost cemetery may be on Florida high school campus James Rogers fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2651047c-ebdf-5e02-b0b6-3070a3521b95

Ground-penetrating radar has been deployed in the search for the cemetery. (Hillsborough County Public Schools)

Last year, a newspaper article from almost 100 years ago shed new light on the mysterious tunnel network beneath the historic neighborhood of Ybor City in Tampa, Fla. A National Historic Landmark District, Ybor City is located northeast of downtown Tampa. The district’s tunnel network remains a source of fascination for historians.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group CemeterySchoolFloridaCrop1 Lost cemetery may be on Florida high school campus James Rogers fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2651047c-ebdf-5e02-b0b6-3070a3521b95   Westlake Legal Group CemeterySchoolFloridaCrop1 Lost cemetery may be on Florida high school campus James Rogers fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc article 2651047c-ebdf-5e02-b0b6-3070a3521b95

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Alexander Vindman, a White House Official, Testifies in Impeachment Inquiry

WASHINGTON — Alexander S. Vindman and his twin brother, Yevgeny, were 3 years old when they fled Ukraine with their father and grandmother, Jewish refugees with only their suitcases and $750, hoping for a better life in the United States.

In the 40 years since, he has become a scholar, diplomat, decorated lieutenant colonel in the United States Army and Harvard-educated Ukraine expert on the White House National Security Council.

On Tuesday, his past and his present converged, when he became the first sitting White House official to testify in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s dealings with the country of his birth.

The testimony of Colonel Vindman, 44, is one of the more riveting turns in an inquiry that has been full of them. He told impeachment investigators in an opening statement that he “did not think it was proper” for Mr. Trump to push Ukraine’s leader to dig up dirt on his political rivals during a July phone call, and felt duty-bound to report the conversation to a White House lawyer, fearing that it jeopardized the country’s national security.

But more than that, Colonel Vindman’s testimony offered a compelling immigrants’ tale and a glimpse into the story of twin brothers who have lived a singular American experience. From their days as little boys in matching short pants and blue caps, toddling around the Brighton Beach neighborhood of Brooklyn — known as Little Odessa for its population of refugees from the former Soviet Union — and into adulthood, they have followed strikingly similar paths.

Like Alexander Vindman, Yevgeny is a lieutenant colonel in the Army. He also serves on Mr. Trump’s National Security Council, as a lawyer handling ethics issues.

When Alexander Vindman decided to alert a White House lawyer to his concerns about Mr. Trump’s July telephone call with the Ukrainian president, he turned to his twin, bringing him along as he reported the conversation to John A. Eisenberg, the top National Security Council lawyer.

The twins both married and they have offices across from one another in the West Wing of the White House, according to Carol Kitman, a photographer who met the family when they were boys, chronicled their growing up and remains a close family friend.

“They say nothing,” Ms. Kitman said, when asked if the two had revealed their views about Mr. Trump. “They’re very smart and they’re very discreet.”

Along with their older brother, Leonid, the twins left Kiev with their father, Semyon, shortly after their mother died there. Their maternal grandmother came along to help care for them. The family sold its possessions to survive in Europe while waiting for visas to the United States.

“I think their father felt they would do better in the United States as Jews,” said Ms. Kitman, who recalls spotting the grandmother and the two boys, then known as Sanya and Genya, under the elevated train in Brooklyn. She spoke to the grandmother in Yiddish, she said, and returned the following day, aiming to do a book about their lives.

“Upon arriving in New York City in 1979, my father worked multiple jobs to support us, all the while learning English at night,” Colonel Vindman told House lawmakers on Tuesday. “He stressed to us the importance of fully integrating into our adopted country. For many years, life was quite difficult. In spite of our challenging beginnings, my family worked to build its own American dream.”

Ms. Kitman’s website tells the story in pictures.

“Genya is always the smiling twin. Sanya is serious,” she wrote in the caption accompanying the image of them in their blue ball caps and short pants in 1980, the year after they arrived. A 1985 photograph of them with their grandmother on a boardwalk appeared in a documentary by the filmmaker Ken Burns, she wrote.

When they were 13, Ms. Kitman captured the Vindman twins in matching red shirts. When Colonel Vindman married, she photographed him and his bride under a tallit, a Jewish prayer shawl, that served as a huppah, or wedding canopy.

The twins’ father, Semyon Vindman, went on to become an engineer, Ms. Kitman said, and the twins’ older brother entered the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps in college. She said the younger boys looked up to Leonid and decided to pursue their own military paths.

In 1998, Alexander Vindman graduated from the State University of New York at Binghamton. He received his military commission from Cornell University, completed basic training at Fort Benning, Ga., in 1999, and deployed to South Korea, where he led infantry and anti-armor platoons, the following year.

In his testimony, the colonel mentioned his “multiple overseas tours,” including in South Korea and Germany, and a 2003 combat deployment to Iraq that left him wounded by a roadside bomb, for which he was awarded a Purple Heart.

Since 2008, he has been an Army foreign area officer — an expert in political-military operations — specializing in Eurasia. Colonel Vindman has a master’s degree from Harvard in Russian, Eastern Europe and Central Asian Studies. He has served in the United States’ embassies in Kiev, Ukraine, and in Moscow, and was the officer specializing in Russia for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff before joining the National Security Council in 2018.

By this spring, he said in his opening statement, he became troubled by what he described as efforts by “outside influencers” to create “a false narrative” about Ukraine. Documents reviewed by The New York Times suggest the reference is to Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and his efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and implicate Ukraine, rather than Russia, in interfering with the 2016 elections.

Westlake Legal Group vindman-statement-impeachment-1572300930303-articleLarge Alexander Vindman, a White House Official, Testifies in Impeachment Inquiry Vindman, Alexander S United States Defense and Military Forces Ukrainian-Americans Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Refugees and Displaced Persons impeachment Immigration and Emigration Brighton Beach (Brooklyn, NY)

Read Alexander Vindman’s Opening Statement on Trump and Ukraine

He twice reported concerns about President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine, according to a draft statement.

In May, a month after Volodymyr Zelensky was elected president of Ukraine in a landslide victory, Mr. Trump asked the colonel to join Energy Secretary Rick Perry to travel to Ukraine to attend the new president’s inauguration.

By July, Colonel Vindman had grown deeply concerned that administration officials were pressuring Mr. Zelensky to investigate Mr. Biden. That concern only intensified, he told investigators, when he listened in to the now-famous July 25 phone conversation between Mr. Zelensky and Mr. Trump.

“I did not think it was proper to demand that a foreign government investigate a U.S. citizen,” his testimony said, “and I was worried about the implications for the U.S. government’s support of Ukraine.”

His heritage gave Colonel Vindman, who is fluent in both Ukrainian and Russian, unique insight into Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign; on numerous occasions, Ukrainian officials sought him out for advice about how to deal with Mr. Giuliani.

Colonel Vindman’s testimony was sprinkled with references to duty, honor and patriotism — but also his life as an immigrant and a refugee.

“I sit here, as a lieutenant colonel in the United States Army, an immigrant,” he said, adding, “I have a deep appreciation for American values and ideals and the power of freedom. I am a patriot, and it is my sacred duty and honor to advance and defend our country, irrespective of party or politics.”

Ms. Kitman, the photographer, said that was what she would expect from both the Vindman twins.

“When you talk about what good immigrants do,” she said, “look at what these immigrants are doing for this country.”

Danny Hakim and Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

CEO says Amazon will turn US cities into ‘ghost towns,’ calls for ‘Internet tax’

Westlake Legal Group Mike-Lindell-Amazon-getty CEO says Amazon will turn US cities into 'ghost towns,' calls for 'Internet tax' Yael Halon fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 010f14a3-1c21-58f6-a50f-2e084243fa69

“I believe that Amazon is going to destroy the box stores … and when box stores go under, restaurants go under, the movie theaters go under, the gas stations go under. You become ghost towns,” inventor and CEO of My Pillow Inc. Mike Lindell explained.

Appearing in the latest episode of Fox Nation’s “Wise Guys”  Lindell joined a group of business leaders to discuss the “nature of purchase” and how the shift toward online shopping will affect the U.S. economy.

As Amazon, the largest online retailer in the country, continues to grow, Lindell worries the number of big box stores or superstores will begin to diminish.

10 HIDDEN TRICKS EVERY AMAZON SHOPPER SHOULD USE

Offering his opinion as a solution, Lindell called for an “Internet tax” to be put on large online retailers in order to “level the playing field” — advocating against his personal interests as a CEO who largely profits from online sales.

“These box stores, they pay rent, they pay taxes, they charge sales tax,” said Lindell.

“And… I would get taxed tax. You know, you start here…and Amazon was built in the beginning on no sales tax, but we all were supposed to pay sales tax at that time on your honor. You still are,” he said.

“If you buy something on the Internet, and they didn’t collect tax, you’re supposed to pay it — but nobody knows that. So there’s trillions of dollars that were never collected,” he said.

AMAZON PUSHES ALEXA PRIVACY WITH NEW DELETE OPTIONS

Fox Business host David Asman challenged Lindell’s position, warning that a new Internet tax would “feed the beast and give more money to the federal government.”

“I don’t like that,” Asman said. “Whenever you start a tax somewhere, it’s not like they get rid of other taxes. They just add it on, and you’re pouring more money in what I think is the most dysfunctional organization in our country, and that’s the federal government.”

“You’re just growing something that is an obstacle to business in the United States,” he added, “and that’s the bureaucracy that keeps so many businesses from growing. That’s what scares me,” said Asman.

Also joining the conversation was American Strategy Group Director Joel Farkas, who said that while “big box stores are clearly going the way of the dinosaur,” there are some items and services that cannot be obtained online.

AMAZON SELLS CLOTHES FROM FACTORIES BLACKLISTED BY OTHER RETAILERS

“I don’t like monopolies and Amazon is becoming a monopoly,” he said, “but on the retail side…there is still a lot of good business there.”

“You still have retail shopping centers where you have grocery stores and they master the supply chain better than Amazon. They have places where you get your eyes checked, dental, fast food — a lot of things that you cannot get from Amazon, but you also have apparel. Burlington, Ross, Five Below. They can sell things cheaper than Amazon can ship things,” Farkas added.

Later in the segment, Fox News contributor and former Secretary of Education Bill Bennett asked the business leaders to predict where the online market will be in relation to big box stores, 20 years from now.

“I believe right now with our president, he is a businessman,” said Lindell, who is an outspoken supporter of the president. “He will figure out about Amazon. You can’t have this monopoly… I believe you will have a balance of still having box stores and places to physically buy,” Lindell explained.

To see the guests respond and for the full episode of “Wise Guys” covering multiple topics and issues of the day, visit Fox Nation and sign up today.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR A FOX NATION FREE TRIAL

Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but available only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group Mike-Lindell-Amazon-getty CEO says Amazon will turn US cities into 'ghost towns,' calls for 'Internet tax' Yael Halon fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 010f14a3-1c21-58f6-a50f-2e084243fa69   Westlake Legal Group Mike-Lindell-Amazon-getty CEO says Amazon will turn US cities into 'ghost towns,' calls for 'Internet tax' Yael Halon fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/tech/companies/amazon fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 010f14a3-1c21-58f6-a50f-2e084243fa69

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

US home prices rise in August but cool in major markets, a potential boon to buyers

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close US home prices rise in August but cool in major markets, a potential boon to buyers

Home prices picked up in August but are losing momentum in larger markets, a potential boon for buyers.

National home prices rose 3.2% in August, up from 3.1% in July, according to the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller National Home Price Index. 

To be sure, some of the largest cities are struggling, which could benefit homebuyers. Prices in the nation’s 10 major cities rose 1.5%, down from the 1.6% gain in July. On the index’s 20-city composite, prices were 2% higher, unchanged from July’s gain.

The housing sector — a pillar for the U.S. economy — rebounded this summer following a weak start to the year, helping to ease recession fears. At the same time, lower mortgage rates have given homebuyers a reprieve. 

Lifesaver or not? Automatic braking can be lifesaving (except when it’s not), IIHS study finds

Buds vs. Pods: Amazon’s Echo Buds sound great – but not as great as AirPods

Recent data, however, has remained mixed. The pace of existing-home sales fell in September after two months of gains, according to the National Association of Realtors. Meanwhile, new-home sales dipped last month, the Commerce Department said. The batch of weaker-than-expected housing data could be temporary, some analysts said. 

Fresh housing data released Tuesday signaled the housing market is continuing to gain strength. Pending home sales, a gauge of purchases before they become final, rose 1.5% in September, the National Association of Realtors said. Meanwhile, the homeownership rate climbed to 64.8% in the third quarter, up from 64.4% a year earlier, the Commerce Department reported.

The Federal Reserve has signaled that it would take a more measured approach to lowering borrowing costs, which could contain the recent drop in mortgage rates. Even so, some experts say that homebuyers will continue to benefit from low rates in the near term. 

“The consumer is in excellent shape,” said Sam Dunlap, senior portfolio manager at Angel Oak Capital Advisors. “Concerns about rising home prices have moderated, which should help Americans from an affordability perspective.” 

The Case-Shiller data offered signs that markets on the West Coast are continuing to slow. Las Vegas dropped from second to eight among the cities in the 20-city composite, falling from a 4.7% annual gain in July to 3.3% in August.

Phoenix led the U.S. with an annual home-price increase of 6.3%. Meanwhile, price gains in the Southeast remained strong. Charlotte, North Carolina; Tampa, Florida and Atlanta, Georgia, were among the cities that saw prices rise 4.5%, 4.3% and 4%, respectively.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/10/29/housing-market-home-prices-cool-major-markets/2496972001/

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Tick-borne illness that can cause brain inflammation detected in UK for the first time: officials

A potentially fatal tick-borne disease has been detected in ticks in the United Kingdom for the first time, Public Health England (PHE) announced this week.

LYME DISEASE-RELATED TICK ILLNESS WITH MORE SEVERE SYMPTOMS DETECTED IN NEW YORK: REPORT 

Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV)  was found in a “small number” of ticks in Thetford Forest in eastern England as well as an “area on the border between Hampshire and Dorset,” officials said in a Tuesday news release. TBEV can cause tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in humans if they are bitten by an infected tick.

In the release, PHE said there has been at least one “highly probable” case of TBE. Earlier this year, a European visitor was sickened with what officials said was likely TBE after he or she was bitten by a tick in the New Forest area. The patient has since recovered, however.

No other cases of TBE in the UK have been reported and health officials said the risk to the public is “very low.”

Westlake Legal Group tick-istock Tick-borne illness that can cause brain inflammation detected in UK for the first time: officials Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article a38217dc-a4bf-5dad-bab4-6bb039fe2c19

At least one case of TBE occurred in the UK earlier this year, officials said. (iStock)

TBE, a human viral infectious disease, is endemic in Asia, Scandinavia and mainland Europe, according to PHE. Most people infected with TBE won’t experience any symptoms, though certain flu-like symptoms — fever, headache, fatigue, and nausea, among others — can occur. However, a person’s central nervous system can be affected during the second phase of the illness, which occurs in roughly 20 to 30 percent of TBE patients, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The second phase can lead to meningitis or encephalitis (swelling of the brain). Death can occur as a result of the disease, though mortality is rare.

UK MOM BITTEN BY LYME DISEASE-CARRYING TICK DEVELOPS ‘BULLSEYE RASH,’ WARNS OTHERS ABOUT COMMON SIGNS OF ILLNESS

“These are early research findings and indicate the need for further work, however, the risk to the general public is currently assessed to be very low,” said Dr. Nick Phin, with PHE, in a statement. “Ticks carry a number of infections including Lyme disease, so we are reminding people to be ‘tick aware’ and take tick precautions, particularly when visiting or working in areas with long grass such as woodlands, moorlands, and parks.”

Westlake Legal Group tick-istock Tick-borne illness that can cause brain inflammation detected in UK for the first time: officials Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article a38217dc-a4bf-5dad-bab4-6bb039fe2c19   Westlake Legal Group tick-istock Tick-borne illness that can cause brain inflammation detected in UK for the first time: officials Madeline Farber fox-news/world/world-regions/united-kingdom fox-news/health/infectious-disease fox news fnc/health fnc article a38217dc-a4bf-5dad-bab4-6bb039fe2c19

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Murray Energy Is 8th Coal Company in a Year to Seek Bankruptcy

Westlake Legal Group 29coal2-facebookJumbo Murray Energy Is 8th Coal Company in a Year to Seek Bankruptcy Trump, Donald J Murray, Robert E Murray Energy Corp Mines and Mining Layoffs and Job Reductions Energy and Power Coal Bankruptcies

Murray Energy, once a symbol of American mining prowess, has become the eighth coal company in a year to file for bankruptcy protection. The move on Tuesday is the latest sign that market forces are throttling the Trump administration’s bid to save the industry.

The collapse of the Ohio-based company had long been expected as coal-fired power plants close across the country.

Its chief executive, Robert E. Murray, has been an outspoken supporter and adviser of President Trump. He had lobbied extensively for Washington to support coal-fired power plants.

Mr. Murray gave up his position as chief executive and was replaced on Tuesday by Robert Moore, the former chief financial officer. Mr. Murray, who will remain chairman, expressed optimism that the company would survive with a lighter debt load.

“Although a bankruptcy filing is not an easy decision, it became necessary to access liquidity,” he said in a statement, “and best position Murray Energy and its affiliates for the future of our employees and customers and our long-term success.”

Murray, the nation’s largest privately-held coal company, has nearly 7,000 employees and operates 17 mines in six states across Appalachia and the South as well as two mines in Colombia. It produces more than 70 million tons of coal annually.

But with utilities quickly switching to cheap natural gas and renewable sources like wind and solar power, Murray and other coal companies have been shutting down mines and laying off workers. Murray’s bankruptcy follows those of industry stalwarts like Cloud Peak Energy, Cambrian Coal and Blackjewel.

Murray was most closely identified with Trump administration promises to reverse the industry’s fortunes.

Mr. Murray contributed $300,000 to Mr. Trump’s inauguration. Shortly after, he wrote Mr. Trump a confidential memo with his wish list for the industry, including shaving regulations on greenhouse gas emissions and ozone and mine safety, along with cutting the staff at the Environmental Protection Agency by at least 50 percent. Several of the suggestions were adopted.

In July, Mr. Murray hosted a fund-raiser for Mr. Trump attended by the Republican governors of Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.

With Mr. Murray applauding his efforts, President Trump installed former coal lobbyists in regulatory positions and slashed environmental rules. But utilities continued to shut down coal plants that could not compete with a glut of natural gas produced in the nation’s shale fields. More recently, the improved economics of wind and solar energy production hastened coal’s decline.

Once the source of over 40 percent of the country’s power, coal produced 28 percent in 2018. That share has declined to just 25 percent this year and the Energy Department projects that it will drop to 22 percent next year.

The only bright spot for Murray and other coal companies in recent years has been growing demand from Europe, Latin America and Asia, but exports have dropped by nearly 30 percent in the third quarter compared with last year. All told, domestic coal production is expected to decline by 10 percent this year from 2018 and by an additional 11 percent in 2020, the Energy Department said recently.

Environmentalists cheered the bankruptcy.

“Bob Murray and his company are the latest examples of how market forces have sealed the fate of coal and there’s nothing the president can do about it,” said Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group.

Murray entered into a restructuring agreement with some of its lenders and said it had received $350 million in loans to keep operating its mines.

Many coal companies have gone through bankruptcy in recent years only to re-emerge smaller, with reduced debts and eroded pension and health care benefits. Murray had been the last coal company contributing to the pension fund of the United Mine Workers of America.

In a statement, the United Mine Workers president, Cecil E. Roberts, warned that Murray “will seek to be relieved of its obligations to retirees, their dependents and widows,“ adding, “We have seen this sad act too many times before.’’

He promised to fight for the interests of workers in bankruptcy court.

While coal is in sharp decline in the United States, it remains a major power source in developing countries like India and China.

For coal to grow again in the United States and other industrialized countries, energy experts and even some coal executives say a concerted effort will be needed to develop technologies to capture carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. So far, the Trump administration has stopped short of pushing such an initiative.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Bebe Rexha believes ‘every body is beautiful’ in new sultry social media pic

Westlake Legal Group Bebe-Rexha-Instagram-THUMB Bebe Rexha believes 'every body is beautiful' in new sultry social media pic Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/bebe-rexha fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 61025a5e-ef46-5661-9570-8ae23d8ebf69

Bebe Rexha is celebrating her curves in a revealing new photo on social media.

The 30-year-old singer posted a black-and-white “belfie” Tuesday on Instagram.

“Wanted to give you a little real nAss on your timeline today. Love you 🖤 #BootyByGod #everybodyisbeautiful,” she captioned the photo in which she posed on the beach in a butt-bearing swimsuit. She accessorized with a straw hat and dark, oversized sunglasses.

BEBE REXHA EXPLAINS WHY HER THERAPIST TELLS HER TO WALK AROUND NAKED, STRUGGLES WITH BODY IMAGE

Rexha is a body-positive advocate and revealed in August that a male executive said she was “getting too old” to post such sexy pic on social media.

“I recently had a MALE music executive tell me that I was getting too old and that my brand was ‘confusing,'” Rexha wrote on social media at the time.

BEBE REXHA HAS A BETTER SEX LIFE NOW THAT’S SHE’S APPROACHING ‘DIRTY 30’

“Because… I’m a songwriter and I post sexy pics on my Instagram and that’s not what female songwriters are [supposed] to do, especially for my age. I’m 29,” she added. “I’m fed up with being put in a box. I make my own rules. I’m tired of women getting labeled as ‘hags’ when they get old and guys get labeled as sexy with age.”

“I’m gonna celebrate my age because you know what, I’m wiser, I’m stronger and TRUST ME I’m a much better lover than I was 10 years ago,” Rexha concluded the post.

BEBE REXHA CALLS OUT MARRIED FOOTBALL PLAYER WHO KEEPS TEXTING HER

In an interview with Fox News, Rexha discussed the apparent double standard of women embracing their sexuality compared to men, declaring she’s proud to be sexy.

“If I want to be sexy, I’m going to be sexy,” the singer said.

BEBE REXHA SETS THE RECORD STRAIGHT ON PLASTIC SURGERY RUMORS

“If a man were to take off his shirt and show off his abs and rub oil all over his body, I doubt anyone would say that he’s exploiting his sexuality — and that pisses me off. So, I’m definitely going to do what I want and do what I feel.”

Rexha is known for regularly calling out body shaming online.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“To all the people tweeting mean things to me about my weight you just want a response and you will not get it,” the hitmaker tweeted in June.

She followed this up with a second tweet, saying, “Unless you are completely perfect you have no f—in right to talk about anybody else’s body. The hate you breed that stems from Insecurity don’t look pretty on you.”

Fox News’ Julius Young and Sasha Savitsky contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Bebe-Rexha-Instagram-THUMB Bebe Rexha believes 'every body is beautiful' in new sultry social media pic Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/bebe-rexha fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 61025a5e-ef46-5661-9570-8ae23d8ebf69   Westlake Legal Group Bebe-Rexha-Instagram-THUMB Bebe Rexha believes 'every body is beautiful' in new sultry social media pic Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/bebe-rexha fox-news/entertainment/style fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 61025a5e-ef46-5661-9570-8ae23d8ebf69

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Taxes Can Make ‘Medicare For All’ More Popular — Or Less

More Americans support the idea of a government health care program that covers everybody than oppose it ― but support is still short of a majority, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov poll. 

The polling, conducted Oct. 11-12 and Oct. 18-20, found support for “Medicare for All” at 43% (Oct. 11-12) and 44% (Oct. 18-20) when a source for funding wasn’t mentioned at all. Support for such a program dipped if it would be paid for with a payroll tax on workers.  

But half of Americans said they would support a Medicare for All proposal if it’s financed by an annual tax on people whose net worth is above $50 million. Only one-third of those surveyed said they opposed Medicare for All if it’s paid for with a so-called wealth tax. 

The variation in support highlights the fact that Americans’ opinions about Medicare for All remain fairly malleable and that support depends on assumptions about how such a program would work and be funded. 

Half of Americans said they would support a ‘Medicare for All’ proposal if it’s financed by an annual tax on people worth more than $50 million.

How to pay for a single-payer health system has become a pressing question in the Democratic presidential primary, with candidates berating Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) for refusing to admit she supports higher taxes as part of the proposal. 

Taxing the rich has long been popular in the U.S., but a problem for Warren is that she has already said she’d use a tax on people worth $50 million for her education plan. Another problem is that according to several analysts, other taxes on the rich probably wouldn’t raise enough revenue to cover Medicare for All.

In her public statements, Warren has implied that she’d support new taxes on the middle class as part of her health plan, but she has not said so directly. Instead, she has suggested taxes would replace more onerous health costs such as premiums and deductibles, and she’s insisted the trade-off would benefit the middle class. 

“Costs will go up for the wealthy and for big corporations, and for hard-working middle-class families, costs will go down,” Warren said at a debate this month.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), by contrast, has explicitly said “it is appropriate to acknowledge that taxes will go up,” especially for the wealthy, but the middle class will pay “substantially less than what they were paying for premiums and out-of-pocket expenses.”

In the past, Sanders has floated several new taxes that could be used to offset the cost of Medicare for All, though he has not outright embraced any of them. Options include higher federal income taxes on the wealthy and a 7.5% payroll tax on employers, which would apply in lieu of monthly premiums that currently cost employers more than $14,000 annually per employee

Westlake Legal Group 5db86943210000a33634b604 Taxes Can Make ‘Medicare For All’ More Popular — Or Less

Brian Snyder / Reuters Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) campaigns at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, on Oct. 24, 2019. 

HuffPost/YouGov polling suggests middle-class taxes are indeed a tough sell. If Medicare for All is paid for with a new payroll tax, 36% of Americans say they’d favor it, while 39% said they’d be opposed. 

When the question was framed as a trade-off ― a Medicare for All plan “that reduced your health care costs but increased the amount you pay in taxes” ― only 35% said they supported the proposal, and 42% were opposed. The policy’s proponents, citing favorable cost estimates, say putting the federal government in charge would be more efficient and cheaper than the current system with its patchwork of private insurers. Consumers would save money as a result. 

But so far, the American public hasn’t necessarily bought into the idea that Medicare for All will save them money. Just 20% expect that they’d pay less under a such a plan, while 54% expect to pay the same or more, and 27% aren’t sure. 

Even people who like the proposal don’t necessarily expect it to lower their health care costs: Of those who say they support Medicare for All, just 35% expect it to lower their health care costs, with an equal 35% assuming they’d pay the same, and 13% saying they’d have to shell out more.   

The survey results point to a decadeslong American political stalemate over taxes. Republicans are the party of tax cuts, but so are Democrats, who are willing to endorse taxing the rich but shy away from defending taxes on anyone else. 

Vanessa Williamson, a Brookings Institution scholar who studies public opinion and taxes, said higher taxes could become more popular if politicians like Warren offered a more forthright defense.

“Public opinion on policy is to a substantial degree an outcome of politics,” Williamson said in an email. “It is not a pre-existing landscape in which politics occurs.”

The HuffPost/YouGov polls each consisted of 1,000 completed interviews. They were conducted Oct. 11-12 and Oct. 18-20 among U.S. adults, using a sample selected from YouGov’s opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population.

HuffPost has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov’s nationally representative opinion polling. More details on the polls’ methodology are available here.

Most surveys report a margin of error that represents some but not all potential survey errors. YouGov’s reports include a model-based margin of error, which rests on a specific set of statistical assumptions about the selected sample rather than the standard methodology for random probability sampling. If these assumptions are wrong, the model-based margin of error may also be inaccurate. Click here for a more detailed explanation of the model-based margin of error.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com