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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 297)

San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall

Westlake Legal Group SFHomeless20iStock San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc f720e352-19d7-51b0-90d3-a547c0fc4252 Brie Stimson article

A San Francisco resident recently blocked an alleyway known to be used for drug deals and defecation by the homeless with a plywood wall in the latest effort to combat the growing homelessness crisis in the city, according to reports.

“This walkway has been a burden on city resources for some time now,” the neighbor, who wished to remain anonymous, told KGO-TV in a statement. “The walkway requires multiple trips a week for power washing and city records confirm that over 100 calls were received for emergency services.”

SAN FRANCISCO HOMELESS STATS SOAR: CITY BLAMES BIG BUSINESS, RESIDENTS BLAME OFFICIALS

City records show the neighbor had permission from the San Francisco Public Works to build the wall, The San Francisco Examiner reported.

“They come in here, they pee there, they poo there. Every day,” Tom Pan, who owns a nail salon, told The Examiner. “The police cannot do anything, it’s dirty and disgusting. In the summertime on a hot day, I can’t even open my window because of the smell.”

After a few days, the blockade to what’s known as the “Ingleside Path” was removed after several complaints.

Neighbors plan to meet Wednesday to discuss putting up a gate, KGO reported.

Residents in the Clinton Park area of the city have also installed sidewalk boulders meant to keep the homeless from erecting tents.

In May, city officials braced themselves when a preliminary homeless count was released. They expected the numbers to rise and they were right. Initial data showed that it had jumped 17 percent from 2017. The double-digit growth was bad enough but then it got a whole lot worse.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

When the final report was released a couple of months later, it showed the street count increase would have been 30 percent if the city had stuck to the same definition of homelessness as they had in the past. This year, San Francisco opted to use the federal definition instead of the one they wrote themselves.

Fox News’  Barnini Chakraborty contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group SFHomeless20iStock San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc f720e352-19d7-51b0-90d3-a547c0fc4252 Brie Stimson article   Westlake Legal Group SFHomeless20iStock San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc f720e352-19d7-51b0-90d3-a547c0fc4252 Brie Stimson article

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Trump policies, racism may cause some black women’s weight problems, professor says

Westlake Legal Group StudyGestationaldiabetesscreeningshappenfartoolate Trump policies, racism may cause some black women’s weight problems, professor says fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/health fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 90768cab-e99f-51e9-8762-bbb3b4d693fb

Do President Trump’s policies make me look fat?

That’s the sort of question some black women may be asking themselves, a Rutgers University professor suggested during a recent appearance on the Oprah Winfrey Network.

Although, more accurately, the problem may be the stress and anxiety caused by the policies than the policies themselves, Brittney Cooper, who teaches gender studies at the New Jersey-based university, said on a recent episode of “Black Women OWN the Conversation.”

NYT COLUMNIST DISCLOSES ‘INSOMNIA’ SHE’S HAD SINCE ‘CURSED NIGHT’ OF TRUMP’S ELECTION

Research shows black women lose weight more slowly than white women, and the Trump presidency may be exacerbating the situation, Cooper said on the program, according to CampusReform.org.

“We are living in the Trump era,” she said, “and look, those policies kill our people. You can’t get access to good health care, good insurance.

Increased stress could be changing black women’s metabolisms to the point where it becomes more difficult to shed extra pounds, she said.

“I hate when people talk about black women being obese,” Cooper continued. “I hate it because it becomes a way to blame us for a set of conditions that we didn’t create.”

She added: “It’s literally that the racism that you’re experiencing and the struggle to make ends meet actually means the diet don’t [sic] work for you the same.”

In a separate interview, Cooper told CampusReform.org she was citing 1990s information from Dr. Arline Geronimus, a public health research professor at the University of Michigan.

Geronimus “argues pretty convincingly that black women have physiological stress responses to racial stimuli and this affects our long-term health,” Cooper said.

I was citing this body of work and the president’s status as a racially polarizing figure that contributes to issues of racial stress for people of color.”

Cooper previously criticized the president in August during an appearance on MSNBC.

She was asked whether Trump was “feeling the heat” from GOP lawmakers as the president continued a bitter trade war with China, but Cooper worried the president might consider a different type of war to drive the economy.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“One of the ways we got ourselves out of the slump of protectionism in the 1940s was, we entered World War II,” she told host Al Sharpton.

She added later: “Trump wants one big key thing under his belt. Either he wants his wall or to ride out on the glory of the economy. If he can’t have that, he’s absolutely willing to start a physical war in order to do it.”

Westlake Legal Group StudyGestationaldiabetesscreeningshappenfartoolate Trump policies, racism may cause some black women’s weight problems, professor says fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/health fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 90768cab-e99f-51e9-8762-bbb3b4d693fb   Westlake Legal Group StudyGestationaldiabetesscreeningshappenfartoolate Trump policies, racism may cause some black women’s weight problems, professor says fox-news/us/education/college fox-news/health fox news fnc/politics fnc Dom Calicchio article 90768cab-e99f-51e9-8762-bbb3b4d693fb

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Bozell and Graham: Democrats and media collude to impeach Trump and remove him from office

Westlake Legal Group newspaperrack2 Bozell and Graham: Democrats and media collude to impeach Trump and remove him from office Tim Graham L. Brent Bozell III fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fnc/opinion fnc f54241da-413a-5575-bfa6-c5dfa11d0eeb Creators Syndicate article

The partisans at The Washington Post pretended in a front-page Sunday “news” article that somehow, President Trump was losing his marbles in rage, going “beyond his often-untethered bounds.”

Readers were supposed to be highly disturbed about the president’s mental state after learning he held a raucous rally in Minneapolis and said supposedly crazy things like how the Democrats are carrying out “a brazen attempt to overthrow our government.”

What is this attempt to impeach and remove Trump, if not overthrow him? Democrats might argue that even if Trump were removed, Vice President Mike Pence would remain and, thus, there would be a continuum.

CNN LAUGHS OFF TRUMP’S CLAIM THAT BOSS JEFF ZUCKER COULD WALK AWAY FROM NETWORK

But does anyone believe Democrats would be satisfied with that? The Post recently published a kooky article laying out how it could also take down Pence and make House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., president.

More from Opinion

Pelosi placed House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff in charge of this impeachment attempt, and the whole thing is getting stranger and more secretive by the hour.

First we were told that an allegedly patriotic whistleblower must testify to underline how Trump committed some kind of impeachable high crime on a phone call with the president of Ukraine. This whistleblower wasn’t even present at the scene of the supposed crime.

There’s an obvious reason why this alleged hero’s identity has been obscured. It was reported that he worked with Joe Biden in the White House on Ukraine issues. A story worth explaining? The whole scheme began to look like a Democratic plot. And suddenly, the incessant pro-impeachment media went dark on their central figure.

The whistleblower’s testimony was no longer the piece de Resistance. Pardon the pun.

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Susan Ferrechio at the Washington Examiner noted that Republicans planned to ask this whistleblower all kinds of questions about when he met with Schiff’s staff and how they coordinated. “But it is appearing more likely Republicans will never have the chance to ask the whistleblower any questions at all about how closely he worked with Schiff’s team,” she said.

Even some of the liberal “fact-checkers” felt pressed to admit Schiff lied when he claimed on national TV that he and his staff never met with this whistleblower. Clearly, he doesn’t want any more questions about how coordinated this impeachment plot is.

A GOP source told the Examiner: “At some point, both Schiff and the whistleblower came to the conclusion that his personal testimony stands to do more harm than good to both of them.”

The backpedaling has been furious. Schiff appeared on CBS’ “Face the Nation” and said that “given that we already have the call record, we don’t need the whistleblower who wasn’t on the call to tell us what took place during the call.”

Both Schiff and Margaret Brennan of CBS agreed the most important priority of this probe is keeping the identity of the whistleblower a secret – without questioning for a moment how that could be considered fair to the president, who’s the subject of the impeachment inquiry.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Imagine the Republicans had tried to impeach then-President Bill Clinton in 1998 for some phone call he made to a foreign leader, and that they’d said they had an anonymous whistleblower who never heard Clinton’s phone call. The press would have mocked all of it as an enormous waste of time and money and a huge distraction from the legislative “business of the people.”

The media’s completely different and partisan reaction to this only underlines how much collusion goes on between the journalists and the Democrats. They’re hard to distinguish from one another. They use all the same talking points and catchphrases. They’ve had a shared goal of impeaching Trump since the day he was inaugurated. There is no balance or fairness in anything the media “reports” on this brazen attempt to overthrow this administration.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY L. BRENT BOZELL III

Tim Graham is director of media analysis at the Media Research Center and executive editor of the blog NewsBusters.org.

Westlake Legal Group newspaperrack2 Bozell and Graham: Democrats and media collude to impeach Trump and remove him from office Tim Graham L. Brent Bozell III fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fnc/opinion fnc f54241da-413a-5575-bfa6-c5dfa11d0eeb Creators Syndicate article   Westlake Legal Group newspaperrack2 Bozell and Graham: Democrats and media collude to impeach Trump and remove him from office Tim Graham L. Brent Bozell III fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/media fnc/opinion fnc f54241da-413a-5575-bfa6-c5dfa11d0eeb Creators Syndicate article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall

Westlake Legal Group SFHomeless20iStock San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc f720e352-19d7-51b0-90d3-a547c0fc4252 Brie Stimson article

A San Francisco resident recently blocked an alleyway known to be used for drug deals and defecation by the homeless with a plywood wall in the latest effort to combat the growing homelessness crisis in the city, according to reports.

“This walkway has been a burden on city resources for some time now,” the neighbor, who wished to remain anonymous, told KGO-TV in a statement. “The walkway requires multiple trips a week for power washing and city records confirm that over 100 calls were received for emergency services.”

SAN FRANCISCO HOMELESS STATS SOAR: CITY BLAMES BIG BUSINESS, RESIDENTS BLAME OFFICIALS

City records show the neighbor had permission from the San Francisco Public Works to build the wall, The San Francisco Examiner reported.

“They come in here, they pee there, they poo there. Every day,” Tom Pan, who owns a nail salon, told The Examiner. “The police cannot do anything, it’s dirty and disgusting. In the summertime on a hot day, I can’t even open my window because of the smell.”

After a few days, the blockade to what’s known as the “Ingleside Path” was removed after several complaints.

Neighbors plan to meet Wednesday to discuss putting up a gate, KGO reported.

Residents in the Clinton Park area of the city have also installed sidewalk boulders meant to keep the homeless from erecting tents.

In May, city officials braced themselves when a preliminary homeless count was released. They expected the numbers to rise and they were right. Initial data showed that it had jumped 17 percent from 2017. The double-digit growth was bad enough but then it got a whole lot worse.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

When the final report was released a couple of months later, it showed the street count increase would have been 30 percent if the city had stuck to the same definition of homelessness as they had in the past. This year, San Francisco opted to use the federal definition instead of the one they wrote themselves.

Fox News’  Barnini Chakraborty contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group SFHomeless20iStock San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc f720e352-19d7-51b0-90d3-a547c0fc4252 Brie Stimson article   Westlake Legal Group SFHomeless20iStock San Francisco resident blocks alleyway known for homelessness with plywood wall fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc f720e352-19d7-51b0-90d3-a547c0fc4252 Brie Stimson article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

North Korea’s Absurd New Propaganda Pics Of Kim Jong Un Go Awry

Eat your heart out, Vladimir Putin. North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un seems to want his own Putin moment. 

Just as the Russian leader likes to publish “action” photos of himself ― including one shirtless on a horse ― North Korea’s state media has released a few “action” pics of Kim on a horse. In one, he appears to be holding on for dear life as the steed gallops: 

Westlake Legal Group 5da6c65a200000ba0c505d0d North Korea’s Absurd New Propaganda Pics Of Kim Jong Un Go Awry

KCNA KCNA / Reuters North Korean leader Kim Jong Un rides a horse during snowfall in Mount Paektu in this image released by North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency.

Another looks like a scene from a Christmas movie gone wrong: 

Westlake Legal Group 5da6c7af210000510fad2e99 North Korea’s Absurd New Propaganda Pics Of Kim Jong Un Go Awry

KCNA KCNA / Reuters North Korean leader Kim Jong Un rides a horse during snowfall in Mount Paektu.

The Korean Central News Agency claimed Kim was visiting Mount Paektu. North Korea has mythologized the mountain as the birthplace of Kim’s father, Kim Jong Il, who was actually born in the Soviet Union, near Siberia. 

The state media report was replete with the usual over-the-top language praising the 35-year-old authoritarian. However, analysts focused on a line claiming “there will be a great operation to strike the world with wonder,” which the BBC, among others, said could be an indication of planned missile tests.

If the photos were intended to show a heroic leader in command of his nation, they had the opposite effect on social media. Twitter users compared the images to scenes from “Game of Thrones,” “Shrek,” “Narnia.” And a few critics couldn’t help but find some flaws in the images:  

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He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1135844906_wide-8d3e7a5845dcdde5ff7ab13f45a0b8ddf285135e-s1100-c15 He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

Bathrooms remain a key issue for employers and for coworkers who don’t feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people, says Mark Marsen, a human resources director. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

Bathrooms remain a key issue for employers and for coworkers who don’t feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people, says Mark Marsen, a human resources director.

Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

It’s a pivotal time for LGBTQ people in the workplace. Last week, the Supreme Court heard arguments in cases testing whether people in that community are protected by the country’s workplace anti-discrimination laws.

That’s happening at a time when more workplaces are adapting to an increasing number of people openly identifying as gender nonbinary — that is, they don’t consider themselves categorically male or female, and favor gender-neutral pronouns like “them,” instead of “he” or “she.”

Some employers are including those preferences on email signatures and name tags. But workers and employers are also navigating changing social norms around gender that can be confusing, and shifting workplace culture away from traditional gender identifiers can also be tricky.

This is something Joshua Byron has thought about a great deal. As a child, Byron realized dressing up as Princess Leia was unconventional for a boy. It wasn’t until young adulthood that Byron first encountered the concept that someone could identify as something other than male or female. For Byron, the idea of being gender neutral — or part one, part the other — felt like it fit.

Byron, 24, came out as such to his inner circle of friends three years ago, requesting to be referred to as “they,” not as “he.” But they didn’t feel comfortable doing so at work.

“I had a very supportive friend group, and then I would go to work and not think about that part of myself,” Byron says.

That changed two years ago, after Byron applied for a teaching job in New York, and a reference outed them as nonbinary.

The new employer had no problem with it and hired Byron. But being out at work meant fielding endless questions from colleagues: Is this really a thing? How can a plural pronoun refer to one person? Byron feels caught in the middle of a culture war.

“I think people feel really intense about it … like this is breaking some rule,” Byron says.

This kind of scenario is playing out in many workplaces, especially as surveys show more people are identifying as gender nonbinary.

“Employers are going to be faced with an increasing percentage of employees over time who have nonbinary identities,” because there is greater prevalence of gender ambiguity among young people, says Jody Herman, a public policy scholar at the Williams Institute at UCLA law school, which researches sexual orientation and gender identity.

There is still not a lot of research quantifying this population, especially since there are so many diverse terms around gender identity. Two years ago, Herman’s study found 27% of youth in California aged 12 to 17 said their peers would identify them as gender nonconforming. Other studies show a much smaller prevalence of people who identify themselves as transgender or gender nonbinary.

Some employers are already shifting policies. United Airlines gives customers the option to identify as nonbinary when booking tickets. Retirement company TIAA instructed employees to introduce themselves to clients with their preferred pronouns.

The law firm Baker McKenzie earlier this year set its staffing targets to 40% men, 40% women and 20% flexible — including nonbinary people.

Anna Brown, the firm’s director of global diversity and inclusion, says the policy was designed to reflect the shifting demographics. “These are prospective policies. And as we go forward, we know we have nonbinary colleagues,” she says.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1141482956-7f7e3d83abe899e48b96156b353eb358ebc3d4bd-s800-c15 He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

New York psychotherapist Laura Jacobs says most employers don’t know how to deal with the issue of gender-nonbinary identity in the workplace. Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival hide caption

toggle caption

Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

Westlake Legal Group  He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

New York psychotherapist Laura Jacobs says most employers don’t know how to deal with the issue of gender-nonbinary identity in the workplace.

Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

But New York psychotherapist Laura Jacobs, who counsels many transgender and nonbinary individuals, says that kind of openness is still new and somewhat rare. “How to handle nonbinary people is still something that I don’t think most employers really have a sense for how to handle,” Jacobs says.

Employment forms, for example, often include only male or female options. References from old jobs might have known someone before the person assumed a different name or identity. And often, employer health insurance requires a person to choose.

“You had to be binary in order to get care and that that was enforced by the medical community, the legal community and so on,” says Jacobs, who identifies as both transgender and nonbinary.

But on a day-to-day basis, some of the persistent challenge comes from coworker questions: “Everybody wonders what’s in our pants,” Jacobs says.

Nowhere does this feel more personal than the bathroom.

For transgender populations, bathrooms are places associated with uncomfortable staring, harassment and even violence. They’ve also been at the center of political controversy. Three years ago, North Carolina passed a law requiring people to use bathrooms corresponding to their assigned gender at birth. That law was struck down.

But Mark Marsen says bathrooms remain a hot-button issue for employers and for coworkers who don’t feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people. Marsen is director of human resources at Allies For Health + Wellbeing, a community health clinic. He recently participated in an online discussion with other HR executives about making the workplace gender neutral.

“A good 60% — at least — of the conversation was about bathrooms,” Marsen says.

At the time, Marsen says, he was re-thinking his company’s restroom policies. Marsen realized a bathroom is just a bathroom. He ended up re-labeling them simply, “restroom” and “restroom with urinals.”

For Joshua Byron, bathrooms are a central emotional issue.

For Byron, things like restrooms and dress codes become litmus tests for how their manager might react — how strictly masculinity might be enforced. It makes Byron wonder: “Will it be a thing that there is argument or stress over?”

But changing long-held gender paradigms isn’t easy. The terms used by nonbinary people can be difficult to understand.

In fact, it can still be confusing even for people who identify as nonbinary, like Mich Dopiro. Dopiro recently stumbled over pronouns for someone they just met.

“I don’t think they took offense, but it was an embarrassing moment for myself,” says Dopiro, 25, who works as a teacher in Seattle. Among middle school students, gender norms have already changed . One student recently called Dopiro by the wrong pronoun, then apologized.

“They felt like, ‘Oh this is something that I grew up with that I should know not to mess up,’ ” Dopiro says.

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A Coffee Crisis Is Brewing And It Could Make Your Morning Joe Less Tasty

Whether it’s a quickly chugged-down morning cup, a lukewarm afternoon jolt from the coffee machine at work, a pumpkin spiced latte in the fall or a specialty cold brew in the summer, coffee has cemented itself as an important ritual in the lives of many Americans. 

But what the latest generation of coffee lovers may not know is that the coffee industry is in crisis. Even as we get used to what seems like an ever-expanding range of coffees, this diversity of taste and flavor could disappear. Poverty, the impact of climate change and the spread of disease are driving small coffee farmers out of business ― and leaving your morning brew in the hands of mass producers.

Once diversity is gone, it won’t be replenished. Earlier this year, researchers revealed that 60% of all wild coffee species are under threat of extinction due to deforestation, climate change, and the increasing severity of fungal pathogens and pests.

The result will be consumers waking up in the morning to far less choice, warned Peter Kettler, a senior coffee manager at Fairtrade International, which works to protect the interests of farmers in lower-income countries. That would be a loss, he said. “I think there’s a lot of people today who are looking to coffee for more than just a caffeine delivery service.”

Coffee is big business, worth around $90 billion globally. Americans drink more than 400 million cups every day and U.S. coffee consumption has increased by nearly 3% over the past four years. Global production also continues to rise, led by Brazil and Vietnam, which together already produce more than half of all the coffee in the world. 

But an oversupply has helped push global coffee prices close to their lowest level in a decade. With dropping prices, farmers ― particularly those operating the small farms that make up much of production in developing countries like Honduras and Burundi ― are struggling to stay afloat. 

Westlake Legal Group 5da5de222100004c0facf10f A Coffee Crisis Is Brewing And It Could Make Your Morning Joe Less Tasty

Timothy Fadek via Getty Images Farmworkers pick Arabica coffee beans in Gigante, Colombia. Many small producers are being forced out of business due to low international prices.

According to Fairtrade, around 60% of producers are now selling their coffee at prices below the cost of production. Today’s market price of less than $1 per pound is significantly below the $1.20 to $1.50 that Kettler said growers in poorer countries such as Honduras need to break even.

Low prices mean small farmers have less ability to protect their crops against rising climate threats such as more frequent and longer-lasting droughts and the spread and growing severity of devastating fungal pathogens, including coffee leaf rust and coffee wilt disease. 

The double whammy of grinding poverty and climate change is reportedly driving Latin American coffee growers to leave home and emigrate northwards in search of employment. While small farms in poorer countries like Honduras go out of business, Kettler said the bigger operations in Brazil and Vietnam are becoming more dominant.

In some parts of the world, he said, “coffee is grown in mountainous regions where large-scale coffee farms can’t be developed. These farmers can’t compete or adapt as well” to threats like climate change and disease.

Big Agriculture tends to embrace the commercial benefits of monoculture: In the short term, it can be more efficient to grow a lot of a smaller range of plants. The global coffee trade currently relies on only two species: Arabica, which makes up around 60% of the coffee produced, and Robusta, which accounts for around 40%.

But those coffee species that the large operations ignore and that are at risk of extinction could be key to the world’s future coffee supply. To breed resistance to climate and disease threats, researchers say other coffee species are likely to be needed. 

It’s like we had a library of books and burnt most of them. Lenore Newman, a professor at the University of the Fraser Valley, Canada

This extinction story, and the damage it brings, is not limited to coffee. Diversity is narrowing across our food system. Despite the existence of an estimated 30,000 plant species that humans could eat, 60% of our plant-based calories come from just three: wheat, corn and rice. 

Globally, 90%-95% of vegetables and 80%-90% of fruits have already gone extinct since 1950, according to “Lost Feast,” a new book by Lenore Newman, a professor in food security and the environment at the University of the Fraser Valley, Canada.

“It’s like we had a library of books and burnt most of them,” Newman told HuffPost. 

The first step in solving this problem is recognizing the value of diversity, Newman said. “Shrinking the gene pool” doesn’t just mean a loss of tastes and flavors, she said, but also a loss of species with which to fight climate change and disease. 

Newman pointed to the devasting impact of banana monoculture. The Cavendish banana, which accounts for virtually all those eaten in the U.S., is now under threat from two devastating diseases. But because large growers have invested so heavily in just one type of banana, there are no other types resistant to these diseases that they can easily switch to. 

Retailers, governments and consumers should be encouraging and supporting local production of food. “Seasonal and regional production is crucial for maintaining diversity, rather than always relying on food shipped around the world,” said Newman. “Individuals should try to support anyone growing food in their neighborhood as they are the ones maintaining that diversity.”

For coffee, any lasting solution must include getting more of the money consumers pay for their latte back into the farmers’ pockets, said Kettler. “The coffee market was set up as a way of extracting as much money as possible from the Global South,” he said. “It works on a commercial level as it’s generating revenue, but it’s skewed against farmers.”

Kettler pointed to a report published this month by economics professor Jeffrey Sachs of Columbia University that called for minimum prices for coffee growers and assistance to help them sell directly to consumers. With more revenue, those farmers would be better able to adapt to the threats of climate change and more willing to keep growing coffee. 

Alternatively, if we sit back and let more coffee producers go out of business, then we’ll wake up to a future of far more limited choice. “Unless something changes,” Kettler said, “in 20 years you’ll only have two choices of coffee when we walk into a cafe: Brazilian or Vietnamese.”

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Ingraham: ‘Swampiness of the Biden’s’ reminds Americans why they voted for Trump

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095135152001_6095135517001-vs Ingraham: 'Swampiness of the Biden's' reminds Americans why they voted for Trump Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 131c538a-055b-57ca-a349-50603bf1f2b3

Laura Ingraham had a rough time keeping her laughter in check while responding to Hunter Biden’s interview with ABC News’ “Good Morning America,” criticizing not only Biden but ABC’s Amy Robach’s interview skills.

“After months of hiding out Hunter Biden showed his face for a media interview with an amiable anchor, GMA’s Amy Robach,” Ingraham said Tuesday on “The Ingraham Angle.” “It was filmed in a cozy kitchen and the exchange at times felt more like an episode of ‘Oprah.'”

HUNTER MAY HAVE MADE ‘MILLIONS’ IN UKRAINE, NEWLY REVEALED DOCS SUGGEST

“How does she not burst into laughter throughout this entire interview?” Ingraham asked.

Biden said Tuesday in his first televised interview since his overseas business dealings came under scrutiny, that he did nothing improper while he served on the board of a Ukrainian gas company.

The 49-year-old son of former Vice President Joe Biden told ABC’s “Good Morning America” that accepting the lucrative position was, in retrospect, “poor judgment.”

Robach asked Biden if he would have gotten the board seat if he had a different last name.

“I don’t know, probably not,” Biden responded.

Ingraham found Biden’s response laughable and criticized Robach for not pressing him more on his dealings with Ukraine and China, at one point saying she was “throwing the lifeline” to Biden.

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Ingraham said the Biden scandal is a reminder why voters chose to vote for President Trump.

“The swampiness of the Biden’s just reminds folks why they elected Trump in the first place. To drain the swamp,” Ingraham said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095135152001_6095135517001-vs Ingraham: 'Swampiness of the Biden's' reminds Americans why they voted for Trump Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 131c538a-055b-57ca-a349-50603bf1f2b3   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095135152001_6095135517001-vs Ingraham: 'Swampiness of the Biden's' reminds Americans why they voted for Trump Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/ingraham-angle fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 131c538a-055b-57ca-a349-50603bf1f2b3

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Lakers’ Anthony Davis grateful thumb injury isn’t serious

Anthony Davis hopes to return to the Los Angeles Lakers‘ lineup for their next preseason game after confirming his thumb injury isn’t serious.

Davis went through a full practice with the Lakers on Tuesday.

The Lakers’ superstar newcomer jammed his thumb while playing in an exhibition game in China last week. An MRI determined the injury was only a sprain, which is what Davis suspected all along.

He sat out of Monday’s game at Staples Center against the Golden State Warriors, but he hopes to play in the rematch on Wednesday night.

Coach Frank Vogel says the team hasn’t decided whether Davis will play Wednesday.

Kyle Kuzma also has been cleared for noncontact practice activity in his return from a foot injury.

Westlake Legal Group NBA-Anthony-Davis4 Lakers' Anthony Davis grateful thumb injury isn't serious fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/anthony-davis fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 3519a4f9-53dc-53a2-a7b8-cc262e449da9   Westlake Legal Group NBA-Anthony-Davis4 Lakers' Anthony Davis grateful thumb injury isn't serious fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/anthony-davis fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 3519a4f9-53dc-53a2-a7b8-cc262e449da9

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He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1135844906_wide-8d3e7a5845dcdde5ff7ab13f45a0b8ddf285135e-s1100-c15 He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

Bathrooms remain a key issue for employers and for coworkers who don’t feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people, says Mark Marsen, a human resources director. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

Bathrooms remain a key issue for employers and for coworkers who don’t feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people, says Mark Marsen, a human resources director.

Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

It’s a pivotal time for LGBTQ people in the workplace. Last week, the Supreme Court heard arguments in cases testing whether people in that community are protected by the country’s workplace anti-discrimination laws.

That’s happening at a time when more workplaces are adapting to an increasing number of people openly identifying as gender nonbinary — that is, they don’t consider themselves categorically male or female, and favor gender-neutral pronouns like “them,” instead of “he” or “she.”

Some employers are including those preferences on email signatures and name tags. But workers and employers are also navigating changing social norms around gender that can be confusing, and shifting workplace culture away from traditional gender identifiers can also be tricky.

This is something Joshua Byron has thought about a great deal. As a child, Byron realized dressing up as Princess Leia was unconventional for a boy. It wasn’t until young adulthood that Byron first encountered the concept that someone could identify as something other than male or female. For Byron, the idea of being gender neutral — or part one, part the other — felt like it fit.

Byron, 24, came out as such to his inner circle of friends three years ago, requesting to be referred to as “they,” not as “he.” But they didn’t feel comfortable doing so at work.

“I had a very supportive friend group, and then I would go to work and not think about that part of myself,” Byron says.

That changed two years ago, after Byron applied for a teaching job in New York, and a reference outed them as nonbinary.

The new employer had no problem with it and hired Byron. But being out at work meant fielding endless questions from colleagues: Is this really a thing? How can a plural pronoun refer to one person? Byron feels caught in the middle of a culture war.

“I think people feel really intense about it … like this is breaking some rule,” Byron says.

This kind of scenario is playing out in many workplaces, especially as surveys show more people are identifying as gender nonbinary.

“Employers are going to be faced with an increasing percentage of employees over time who have nonbinary identities,” because there is greater prevalence of gender ambiguity among young people, says Jody Herman, a public policy scholar at the Williams Institute at UCLA law school, which researches sexual orientation and gender identity.

There is still not a lot of research quantifying this population, especially since there are so many diverse terms around gender identity. Two years ago, Herman’s study found 27% of youth in California aged 12 to 17 said their peers would identify them as gender nonconforming. Other studies show a much smaller prevalence of people who identify themselves as transgender or gender nonbinary.

Some employers are already shifting policies. United Airlines gives customers the option to identify as nonbinary when booking tickets. Retirement company TIAA instructed employees to introduce themselves to clients with their preferred pronouns.

The law firm Baker McKenzie earlier this year set its staffing targets to 40% men, 40% women and 20% flexible — including nonbinary people.

Anna Brown, the firm’s director of global diversity and inclusion, says the policy was designed to reflect the shifting demographics. “These are prospective policies. And as we go forward, we know we have nonbinary colleagues,” she says.

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1141482956-7f7e3d83abe899e48b96156b353eb358ebc3d4bd-s800-c15 He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

New York psychotherapist Laura Jacobs says most employers don’t know how to deal with the issue of gender-nonbinary identity in the workplace. Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

New York psychotherapist Laura Jacobs says most employers don’t know how to deal with the issue of gender-nonbinary identity in the workplace.

Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

But New York psychotherapist Laura Jacobs, who counsels many transgender and nonbinary individuals, says that kind of openness is still new and somewhat rare. “How to handle nonbinary people is still something that I don’t think most employers really have a sense for how to handle,” Jacobs says.

Employment forms, for example, often include only male or female options. References from old jobs might have known someone before the person assumed a different name or identity. And often, employer health insurance requires a person to choose.

“You had to be binary in order to get care and that that was enforced by the medical community, the legal community and so on,” says Jacobs, who identifies as both transgender and nonbinary.

But on a day-to-day basis, some of the persistent challenge comes from coworker questions: “Everybody wonders what’s in our pants,” Jacobs says.

Nowhere does this feel more personal than the bathroom.

For transgender populations, bathrooms are places associated with uncomfortable staring, harassment and even violence. They’ve also been at the center of political controversy. Three years ago, North Carolina passed a law requiring people to use bathrooms corresponding to their assigned gender at birth. That law was struck down.

But Mark Marsen says bathrooms remain a hot-button issue for employers and for coworkers who don’t feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people. Marsen is director of human resources at Allies For Health + Wellbeing, a community health clinic. He recently participated in an online discussion with other HR executives about making the workplace gender neutral.

“A good 60% — at least — of the conversation was about bathrooms,” Marsen says.

At the time, Marsen says, he was re-thinking his company’s restroom policies. Marsen realized a bathroom is just a bathroom. He ended up re-labeling them simply, “restroom” and “restroom with urinals.”

For Joshua Byron, bathrooms are a central emotional issue.

For Byron, things like restrooms and dress codes become litmus tests for how their manager might react — how strictly masculinity might be enforced. It makes Byron wonder: “Will it be a thing that there is argument or stress over?”

But changing long-held gender paradigms isn’t easy. The terms used by nonbinary people can be difficult to understand.

In fact, it can still be confusing even for people who identify as nonbinary, like Mich Dopiro. Dopiro recently stumbled over pronouns for someone they just met.

“I don’t think they took offense, but it was an embarrassing moment for myself,” says Dopiro, 25, who works as a teacher in Seattle. Among middle school students, gender norms have already changed . One student recently called Dopiro by the wrong pronoun, then apologized.

“They felt like, ‘Oh this is something that I grew up with that I should know not to mess up,’ ” Dopiro says.

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