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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 308)

Ron Howard trashes Trump on Twitter, calls him a ‘morally bankrupt ego maniac’

Westlake Legal Group 21a02a91-ron-howard Ron Howard trashes Trump on Twitter, calls him a 'morally bankrupt ego maniac' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a6c7fa7c-ac26-56cd-934d-8637f97b346c

“Opie” dominated social media on Wednesday after Hollywood filmmaker Ron Howard slammed President Trump on Twitter, calling him a “morally bankrupt ego maniac.”

Howard, whose career began as Opie Taylor on the classic television sitcom “The Andy Griffith Show” and who later became the director of iconic films like “Apollo 13,” “A Beautiful Mind,” and “Frost/Nixon,” was responding to a critic who said it’s “only negativity from Hollywood & Democrats” when it comes to President Trump after the Oscar winner had downplayed the successes of the president’s economy.

“In the entertainment industry many who have known/worked w/ Trump think that while his reality show was fun and ran a long time, he’s a self-serving, dishonest, morally bankrupt ego maniac who doesn’t care about anything or anyone but his Fame & bank account & is hustling the US,” Howard wrote in a New Year’s Day tweet.

LINDA RONSTADT COMPARES TRUMP TO HITLER, SAYS MEXICANS ‘ARE THE NEW JEWS’

Howard went on to defend the entertainment industry after another Twitter user accused Hollywood of being “amoral elitists who hate average Americans.”

“Honestly not what I’ve seen or felt throughout my lifetime from the vast majority of people in the entertainment business,” Howard responded. “In fact, I gotta say it’s the opposite. Most are not from LA or NY to begin with. Now Trump is both an elite and a reality show star.”

The “Happy Days” star isn’t the only entertainer to slam Trump. In a recent interview, music icon Linda Ronstadt compared the president to Adolf Hitler and said Mexicans “are the new Jews.”

The Grammy-winning artist spoke about the “great parallels” she saw between the rise of Trump and Nazi Germany and how both leaders, according to her, were “uncontrollable.”

“By the time he got established, he put his own people in place and stacked the courts and did what he had to do to consolidate his power,” Ronstadt elaborated. “And, we got Hitler and he destroyed Germany, he destroyed centuries of intellectual history forward and backward.”

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CNN anchor Anderson Cooper replied, “I think a lot of people, though, would be surprised to hear comparisons between what happened then and now.”

“If you read the history, you won’t be surprised. It’s exactly the same,” Ronstadt doubled down. “Find a common enemy for everybody to hate. I was sure that Trump was going to get elected the day he announced, and I said it’s gonna be like Hitler, and the Mexicans are the new Jews. And, sure enough, that’s what he delivered, you know.”

Westlake Legal Group 21a02a91-ron-howard Ron Howard trashes Trump on Twitter, calls him a 'morally bankrupt ego maniac' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a6c7fa7c-ac26-56cd-934d-8637f97b346c   Westlake Legal Group 21a02a91-ron-howard Ron Howard trashes Trump on Twitter, calls him a 'morally bankrupt ego maniac' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a6c7fa7c-ac26-56cd-934d-8637f97b346c

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‘Gut Feelings’ Are Driving the Markets

Westlake Legal Group 02View-illo-facebookJumbo ‘Gut Feelings’ Are Driving the Markets United States Economy Trump, Donald J Stocks and Bonds Keynes, John Maynard

The United States stock market is trading at a very high level today. The data show where the market stands, but don’t tell us how it got there. For an explanation of that, we need to take into account a factor that sound very unscientific: “animal spirits,” sometimes called “gut feelings.”

First, let’s look at some of the numbers. More than 30 years ago, the economist John Campbell and I developed what we have called the Cyclically Adjusted Price Earnings (C.A.P.E.) ratio, a measure that enables the comparison of stock market valuations from different eras by averaging the earnings over ten years, thus reducing some of the short-term fluctuations of each market cycle. C.A.P.E. reached 33 in January 2018 and is almost as high now, at 31. That number might seem meaningless in itself, but it is significant when you consider that it has been as high or higher on only two occasions: 1929, just before the 85 percent stock market crash ending in 1932, and in 1999, just before the 50 percent drop at the beginning of the new millennium.

People will point this year to low interest rates to justify the high C.A.P.E. ratio. But interest rate levels historically have not correlated well at all with the C.A.P.E. For example, low long-term rates did not explain the high C.A.P.E. ratios in 1929 and 1999, nor did rising long-term interest rates explain subsequent market crashes.

That brings us to another factor, which John Maynard Keynes called “animal spirits.” It is a sense of optimism and ready energy to be entrepreneurial and take risks, and it has been adjudged to contribute to high stock market levels. Animal spirits are not adequately measured by business consumer confidence indexes, because the surveyors do not probe for such deep feelings.

High animal spirits in the stock market are often associated with the disparagement of traditional authority and expert opinion. This popular narrative often advocates relying on your “gut feelings” to try what experts say is doomed to failure.

President Trump uses this kind of language. Recently, for example, he said “I have a gut, and my gut tells me more sometimes than anybody else’s brain can ever tell me.”

Make America Great Again (MAGA), Mr. Trump’s election slogan, remains on his supporters’ lips. The question for the market outlook hinges partly on how the Trump narrative — the notion that he and his followers are on the road to a triumphant future — will evolve.

Belief in the MAGA narrative would probably encourage people to buy into the stock market, even at elevated levels, thinking it will go up. It is more complicated to anticipate the actions of those who do not believe in Mr. Trump’s supposedly intelligent gut.

While skeptical themselves, they may well believe that enough other people believe, so the markets will thrive, at least in the short term. Investing for the short term — “speculating” is another word for this — tends to be influenced by thoughts that investors have about the thoughts of other investors.

The rise of an explicit belief in irrationality like this one is troubling on many levels. An essential element of a modern democracy is the wide dispersal of knowledge among a multitudes of experts. But there is reason to think that respect for science has been diminishing over the past decades. References to the “scientific method” peaked in news and newspapers in the 1940s, and are lower today. Instead, we have the phrases “gut feeling,” “visceral feeling,” and “trust your gut,” which are proliferating. None of these phrases had any currency before 1960, and they have been rising, going viral ever since.

This “gut feeling” narrative is not conterminous with the current bull market in its entirety, but seems to be an important factor permitting the United States economy and markets to move ahead amid widely reported fears of a coming global recession.

Long before the Trump presidency we saw milestones in public awareness of thinking that comes “from the gut.” For example, there is the 2001 best seller by Jack Welch, “Jack: Straight from the Gut,” (written with John A. Byrne) about his successes as chief executive of General Electric from 1981 to 2001. Mr. Welch described his management style as intuitive, and not relying on experts, whose analyses he viewed as often phony. Mr. Welch says, for example: “I crossed out the payback analysis on his last chart. I drew an “X” over the transparency and scrawled the word Infinite to make the point that the returns on our investment would last forever. I meant it.” Whether Mr. Welch’s supposed genius has been called into question by the sharp drop in share value of G.E. after he left the company is a matter of debate.

The 1997 book “Rich Dad Poor Dad, written by Robert Kiyosaki, with Sharon Lechter, described two fathers (one his own, the other a friend’s). The book’s publisher, Plata Publishing, reported that the book sold nearly 40 million copies as of 2017. His own, poor dad had college degrees, deferred to authority and told his son that many things were impossible. The uneducated but rich dad told him he should think about how he can make his dreams a reality. Donald Trump comes across to many many people rather like the rich dad. (Kiyosaki and Trump have co-authored two books, in 2006 and 2011.)

Then there is the 2011 book “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson, which described the co-founder of Apple this way: “Jobs was more intuitive and romantic and had a greater instinct for making technology usable, design delightful, and interfaces friendly.”

We are being saturated with these kinds of narratives today: describing inspired young people, some of whom drop out of college, who surpass overly polite conformists pursuing dull, bureaucratic work lives. For people who buy into this dream, one simple step is to avoid the mistake of missing out, by acting like a rich person and buying stocks.

This is obviously not an explanation for the level of the entire market, but it is surely part of it.

We have a stock market today that is less sensible and orderly than usual, because of the disconnect between dreams and expertise.

Robert J. Shiller is Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale. He is also a consultant to Barclays Bank on C.A.P.E. related indexes.

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A Knotty Problem Solved

Westlake Legal Group knot-2_wide-70a09abd8c446858b7f8e0f3300a688f13c58611-s1100-c15 A Knotty Problem Solved

Scientists are studying how some knots perform better than others, like this figure-eight knot tied using a special fiber that changes color under strain. Regions of high strain (green, yellow) can be easily distinguished from sections of the knot at low strain (red, orange). Joseph Sandt hide caption

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Joseph Sandt

Westlake Legal Group  A Knotty Problem Solved

Scientists are studying how some knots perform better than others, like this figure-eight knot tied using a special fiber that changes color under strain. Regions of high strain (green, yellow) can be easily distinguished from sections of the knot at low strain (red, orange).

Joseph Sandt

Special fibers that change color when they are under strain have helped scientists come up with some simple rules that can predict how a knot will perform in the real world.

There’s a whole field of mathematics that studies knots, to explore abstract properties of idealized curves. “But that’s not what you care about if you are, for example, a sailor or a climber and you need to tie something which holds,” says Vishal Patil, a graduate student at MIT whose new findings appear in the journal Science.

People have used knots since ancient times, notes Patil, and thousands of knots have been invented. Yet scientists struggle to explain why knots do what they do. Most of what’s known about them comes from long experience, rather than any theoretical understanding.

For example, take the granny knot and the reef knot — two simple knots that look very similar but behave very differently.

“It’s quite easy to see this, if you just take a shoelace or a bit of string and you tie it. If you pull on the reef knot it tends to hold. And if you pull on the granny knot it tends to slip quite easily,” says Patil. “The fact that they behave so differently suggests that there must be some story there, something you can say mathematically and physically about them.”

Recently, he and Jorn Dunkel of MIT heard about a special kind of new fiber. It was developed by their MIT colleague Mathias Kolle, and it changes color when it’s under strain.

Dunkel says this fiber seemed like a real opportunity “to actually study the stability of knots. Because before, obviously, nobody was really able to look into knots and see where the strain goes and how the forces are distributed.”

Joseph Sandt of MIT tied simple knots in this fiber, and the team observed the color changes to understand what was going on in the knots. Then they used this information to fine-tune some computer simulations.

After that, they took what they’d learned and came up with basic rules that would let them identify strong knots and weak knots without having to do a bunch of rigorous calculations. “You should be able to look at a knot and how it’s tied, and guess how stable it’s going to be,” says Patil.

Strain On A Figure-eight Knot

A figure-eight knot using a color-changing fiber shows patches of yellow, green, and blue to indicate regions of high strain. This particular fiber has been immersed in an oil bath to reduce the influence of fiber drag.

They learned that one key feature — and the thing that separates the reef knot from the granny knot — is twist.

“Twist is quite important in how knots behave,” says Patil, who explains that having lots of twists going in opposite directions along the knot can kind of lock it. “But if lots of twists are going in the same direction, then the whole thing can roll out.”

Other important factors include the amount of friction in the knot, and its overall complexity.

To see how well their rules could predict a knot’s behavior, the researchers took six different knots and ranked them in terms of how stable they thought they’d be. Then they tested the knots experimentally, by loading them with weights to see how much weight was needed to get the knots to slip.

Their predictions held up, the researchers say, and that means their new framework for understanding knots could someday be used to design new types of knots that are just right for specific jobs.

After all, even without this kind of sophisticated understanding, people have been designing new knots for ages.

“It seems like humans just lucked out and discovered some good knots,” says Patil, “but it’s kind of unclear how.”

He notes that inventing knots seems to be a uniquely human activity, and such complicated knots don’t appear in nature.

“The question of how did people even come up with these knots kind of baffles me,” says Patil. “I guess if you spend a long time at sea, maybe eventually you work out a good way of tying something to something else.”

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Marianne Williamson lays off her entire presidential campaign staff

Best-selling spiritual author and Democratic presidential primary candidate Marianne Williamson has laid off her entire campaign staff, both at her national headquarters and in the early voting states.

Now ex-campaign manager Patricia Ewing — who confirmed the development to Fox News on Thursday — said: “Marianne Williamson has run an extraordinary campaign. We are all proud to have worked for her.”

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON LEADS MEDITATION SESSION ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL

Former Rep. Paul Hodes of New Hampshire, who served as a top adviser for Williamson and as her state director in the first primary state, told Fox News: “I wish Marianne well going forward.”

A source close to the campaign said the writing was on the wall and that “it wasn’t a big surprise.”

Westlake Legal Group MarianneWilliamson-Concord Marianne Williamson lays off her entire presidential campaign staff Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/marianne-williamson fox news fnc/politics fnc bb30d3f5-b35d-5144-8b84-e9ce96956dee article

Democratic presidential candidate and best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson files to place her name on the New Hampshire primary ballot, in Concord, NH on Nov. 4, 2019

At her height, Williamson had about 45 staffers nationwide. But that number has been dwindling for some time and she had just two staffers left in New Hampshire.

The long shot contender had struggled with fundraising and failed to qualify for the most recent Democratic presidential debates.

Williamson has been an unconventional candidate who preaches the politics of love. She has emphasized “six pillars for a season of moral repair,” including economic justice. She proposed creating a Department of Children and Youths and Department of Peace, and has pushed for reparations for the descendants of African-American slaves.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

Williamson also led a meditation session on the campaign trail a couple of months ago. Williamson told Fox News in September that “politics should be where we express our collective wisdom and that is all that finding your heart is about.”

“Politics has become too separate from too much of normal life and this is just normal life today,” she said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6073787995001_6073784171001-vs Marianne Williamson lays off her entire presidential campaign staff Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/marianne-williamson fox news fnc/politics fnc bb30d3f5-b35d-5144-8b84-e9ce96956dee article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6073787995001_6073784171001-vs Marianne Williamson lays off her entire presidential campaign staff Paul Steinhauser fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/marianne-williamson fox news fnc/politics fnc bb30d3f5-b35d-5144-8b84-e9ce96956dee article

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Bride doesn’t want sister as maid of honor because she’ll be wearing arm sling

A soon-to-be bride has confessed that she does not want her sister in her bridal party because she will be wearing an arm sling after having surgery.

The woman, who posted her bridal dilemma on Reddit, said she had asked her younger sister to be her maid of honor when she got engaged 14 months ago.

Her sister, 20, had a torn ligament in her elbow from playing sports as a teenager. But instead of getting surgery to repair it, she said, the sister kept putting it off and continued to play sports.

BRIDESMAID ASKS INTERNET TO EDIT GUEST OUT OF PHOTOS AFTR SHE STEALS BEER, LEAVES RACIAL SLUR IN GUESTBOOK

Westlake Legal Group Bridal-Party-iStock Bride doesn't want sister as maid of honor because she'll be wearing arm sling Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/relationships fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 975809d9-b5f7-5c3b-8dfd-6b47cf7ad13f

A soon-to-be bride has confessed that she does not want her sister in her bridal party because she will be wearing an arm sling after having surgery. (Photo: iStock)

“Almost immediately upon me asking my sister to be my maid of honor, she jumped into action on finally getting her elbow surgery,” the future bride wrote.

The bride said she thought her sister would schedule her surgery in advance of the wedding to avoid wearing a sling, however, she instead chose a date just a week before the wedding.

Now she’s concerned her sister’s arm accessory will ruin her wedding.

“Obviously, I want my sister to be pain-free and finally get her surgery. But, like any human being, there is a selfish side of me,” she said.

COUPLE WHO GOT ENGAGED AT KFC IN SOUTH AFRICA JUST CELEBRATED ‘THE WEDDING OF OUR DREAMS’

Westlake Legal Group Bride-istock Bride doesn't want sister as maid of honor because she'll be wearing arm sling Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/relationships fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 975809d9-b5f7-5c3b-8dfd-6b47cf7ad13f

“Obviously, I want my sister to be pain free and finally get her surgery. But, like any human being, there is a selfish side of me,” the future bride writes. (Photo: iStock)

“I don’t want her to be the maid of honor in my wedding because she’ll be wearing a sling in all of the photos and videos from the wedding.”

The bride-to-be said her family thinks she’s a “horrible person” for considering asking her sister not to be in the wedding.

“I feel as though she could’ve waited after the wedding to get the surgery,” she added. “Considering she’s waited 3 years already, or had enough time to get the surgery in advance of the wedding.”

Redditors had plenty of thoughts on the wedding dilemma, and most sided with the sister.

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“She had to get her arm fixed. Why don’t YOU change your wedding if it’s such a big deal?” one Redditor commented.

“The presence of a sling in your photos bothers you more than the absence of your sister would,” another Reddit user wrote. “This is some textbook bridezilla behavior.”

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Another person said, “I pray if you have kids they never have a bad hair or skin day before picture day at school.

“We all know how you’ll handle that. Photos over family is a sucky way to go through life.”

Westlake Legal Group Bridal-Party-iStock Bride doesn't want sister as maid of honor because she'll be wearing arm sling Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/relationships fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 975809d9-b5f7-5c3b-8dfd-6b47cf7ad13f   Westlake Legal Group Bridal-Party-iStock Bride doesn't want sister as maid of honor because she'll be wearing arm sling Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/lifestyle/weddings fox-news/lifestyle/relationships fox-news/lifestyle/bridezillas fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 975809d9-b5f7-5c3b-8dfd-6b47cf7ad13f

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Beyoncé shares never-before-seen photos of twins Sir and Rumi in new video

Beyoncé gave her fans a little peek into her family life in a new video she posted on social media.

The multitalented entertainer, 38, recapped 2019 and shared her biggest moments from the past 12 months which included everything from headling Coachella to the birthdays of her three kids: eldest daughter Blue Ivy, 7, and 2-year-old twins, daughter Rumi and son Sir.

In the “2019 Bey-Cap!!” she shared a few shots of the twins’ birthday party, which featured them sitting in front of large letters that spelled out “Two” and Sir walking around in an adorable outfit.

BEYONCÉ REVEALS NEW VIDEO DETAILING HER WEIGHT LOSS JOURNEY AHEAD OF COACHELLA

Blue Ivy’s seventh birthday party appeared to be a dress-up costume event with multiple outfit changes for the young star in the making.

Queen Bey also showed off some PDA with her husband, Jay Z. She shared a snap of them kissing at the Roc Nation brunch in February.

She concluded with a few images from the family’s holiday photoshoot in which Jay and Sir are wearing matching tuxedos while Beyonce, Blue, and Rumi are in coordinating white dresses. “Cheers to 2020,” the message read.

BEYONCÉ SAYS MISCARRIAGES CHANGED HER IDEA OF SUCCESS

Beyonce previously opened up about becoming a mother in Elle’s January issue.

Westlake Legal Group BeyonceLionKing Beyoncé shares never-before-seen photos of twins Sir and Rumi in new video Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/genres/family fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7c2f4f64-613f-5c0c-b91f-5039ae33200e

Beyonce recapped 2019 and shared her biggest moments from the past 12 months on social media Tuesday.  (AP)

“I had Blue, and the quest for my purpose became so much deeper. I died and was reborn in my relationship, and the quest for self became even stronger,” explained the 23-time Grammy winner. “It’s difficult for me to go backwards. Being ‘number one’ was no longer my priority. My true win is creating art and a legacy that will live far beyond me. That’s fulfilling.”

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She also spoke about one of the most difficult lessons she learned after suffering several miscarriages.

“I began to search for deeper meaning when life began to teach me lessons I didn’t know I needed. Success looks different to me now,” she explained in the candid “Ask me anything” interview. “I learned that all pain and loss is in fact a gift. Having miscarriages taught me that I had to mother myself before I could be a mother to someone else.”

Fox News’ Julius Young contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Beyonce-THUMB Beyoncé shares never-before-seen photos of twins Sir and Rumi in new video Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/genres/family fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7c2f4f64-613f-5c0c-b91f-5039ae33200e   Westlake Legal Group Beyonce-THUMB Beyoncé shares never-before-seen photos of twins Sir and Rumi in new video Jessica Napoli fox-news/person/beyonce fox-news/entertainment/genres/family fox-news/entertainment/events/babies fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 7c2f4f64-613f-5c0c-b91f-5039ae33200e

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Here Comes YouTube: ‘Billboard’ To Change How It Calculates Top Albums

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1193634273_wide-4782675b238335d5a64497e0c3e1ee0461fdd1df-s1100-c15 Here Comes YouTube: 'Billboard' To Change How It Calculates Top Albums

Billboard chart analyst Chris Molanphy cites Taylor Swift as an artist who effectively differentiates between albums with the help of her video aesthetics. Emma McIntyre/Getty Images hide caption

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Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Here Comes YouTube: 'Billboard' To Change How It Calculates Top Albums

Billboard chart analyst Chris Molanphy cites Taylor Swift as an artist who effectively differentiates between albums with the help of her video aesthetics.

Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

The question of how Billboard determines the most popular music in the country has gotten a lot harder in the digital age. It used to be a simple question of which album sold the most physical copies, but now Billboard needs to consider things like Spotify plays and mp3 downloads. Starting Jan. 3, it will also include YouTube streams.

NPR’s Ailsa Chang talks to Chris Molanphy, a chart analyst and pop critic at Slate, about the significance of this change. Listen at the audio link and read on for an edited version of their conversation.

Why is Billboard making this change?

It’s part of a long-term evolution of the album chart away from pure sales to a consumption model. Now, rather than simple tracking you at the moment you buy an album, they’re tracking how much you’re consuming an album in the weeks to come.

How big of a deal is YouTube in the music industry?

Depending on the audience, it may account for up to half of the consumption of any given genre … hip-hop is very strong on YouTube, Latin music is very strong on YouTube. If you’re going to get a full and accurate representation of the way music is being consumed — not just at the song level, but at the full-artist level, which is what the album chart aims to measure — you kind of eventually need to bake YouTube into the album chart.

If YouTube is going to be such an important component of measuring where you’re going to land on the Billboard charts, how might this reshape the way music is marketed?

I can see as scenario where an artist might want to do multiple versions — official versions — of a video: just when an album is starting to flag a little on the chart, you put out a new version of a video and that gives it a new boost of life.

Albums are not so much totemic objects anymore, they’re kind of like marketing campaigns. When an artist moves from period to period in their career, they are moving from — say, if you’re Taylor Swift, the Reputation period to the Lover period — you are trying to aggregate as much attention for that project while it’s your current album project.

This YouTube rule just sort of aggregates one more stream of data to add to Spotify, to add to Apple Music, to add to the download that tells people “This album is being consumed and commanding the culture.”

So it seems like, in a lot of ways, this Billboard rule change is just a reflection of how differently people are consuming music these days.

Most folks are not walking into physical record stores anymore, many people are not even downloading the iTunes way anymore. Streaming is the future –it has been the future for a long time. YouTube an important component of that and this is just Billboard doing what it’s always done: it reflects the way people are actually consuming music, dating back to the era of 45 rpm singles all the way to the present day.

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Maroulis back on track in bid to go for more gold in Tokyo

Westlake Legal Group Helen-Louise-Maroulis Maroulis back on track in bid to go for more gold in Tokyo fox-news/sports/olympics fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 039f0799-ae33-5733-a10b-096d0de48332

Helen Maroulis was one of the most celebrated Olympians in 2016 when she became the first American woman to win a gold medal in wrestling. She was expected to be one of the faces of the sport in Tokyo this year.

She still might be if she can qualify. That’s far from a certainty after a tumultuous two years in which she has had at least two concussions, a severe shoulder injury and treatment for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.

The 28-year-old Maroulis said she briefly retired from the sport after suffering yet another injury in August. Not long after that, she felt much better and had a change of heart.

“I had a really impactful conversation with my mom, and the thing for me was I don’t want to retire, but I also don’t want to risk my health,” Maroulis said. “I don’t feel I’m past my prime. I feel I still have years left of wrestling in me.”

Maroulis, who hasn’t competed in a year and a half, said she plans to wrestle at an event in Canada in March before going to the Olympic trials in April.

Maroulis was at the top of the sport between 2015-17, winning 78 of 79 matches and two world championships. Her breakthrough came at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro, where she ended Saori Yoshida’s 206-match winning streak with a stunning 4-1 decision in the 53-kilogram final. Yoshida, of Japan, had been a three-time Olympic gold medalist and 13-time world champion and had pinned Maroulis their previous two meetings.

The native of Rockville, Maryland, rode the high of that victory for more than a year. In January 2018, her life changed dramatically.

She was competing in a professional wrestling league in India when she and her opponent knocked heads. She didn’t feel right afterward. To her regret, she says, she allowed an American doctor to check her for concussion symptoms over Facetime. She was medically cleared and continued to compete.

In retrospect, she said, she was badly hurt and not thinking straight.

“I really could not tell left from right, pretty much,” she said. “In that situation, man, I just wish there was someone there who would have taken the reins or maybe seen that better. Maybe I just hid it so well. I had to tape cotton balls in my ears and I had to hide in the bathroom for two hours before my match, and then my coach would come get me. So if that didn’t alarm anyone that we shouldn’t wrestle under these circumstances, what does that say?”

Maroulis received concussion treatment when she returned to the United States and was given the go-ahead to resume training. In May 2018, she suffered another concussion sparring with a male partner she says became overly physical.

“I’ve always been tough my whole life and I’ve always had to prove myself with the guys,” she said. “I just realized you get to a point — especially with recent accolades — that grown men want to test themselves against me and see how they fare. When you’re trying to measure your ego against something, I think you’ll overlook hurting someone or being negligent, so that’s my take on that.”

In addition to a concussion, she injured her neck and had vertigo. She said she was also left with bouts of anxiety and PTSD, and she received a week of treatment..

She willed herself to compete in the world championships in Budapest in October 2018 and was pinned in the first round by Alyona Kolesnik of Azerbaijan. She not only lost, she injured a shoulder and required surgery that left her inactive for eight months.

“That was a real blessing in disguise because that also was time for me to heal, God saying, ‘Step away and heal and it’s OK to heal,’” she said. “I had to give myself permission to heal.”

However, she was hurt again this past August while training in Colorado Springs. She declined to discuss the nature of the injury other than to say she initially thought it was head-related: “It was hard for me to drive round-trip to Denver; it was hard for me to get groceries.”

Maroulis decided to give up wrestling, but felt better and talked to her mom about coming back as well as a mentor. They encouraged her. She also happened to watch an inspiring video about the Olympics.

“I started bawling and realized I love the Olympic movement,” Maroulis said. “I don’t want to be done yet. For me, that was my confirmation.”

Maroulis, now wrestling at 57 kg, said her health scares ultimately have made her stronger mentally. She doesn’t let a bad practice bother her as much. She loves the sport as much as ever, maybe even more.

“I’ve never had injuries that sat me on the sideline so long,” she said. “Even if it doesn’t look like you’re getting better right now, that doesn’t mean come August 2020 you’re not going to be in the best shape and feeling mentally and emotionally the best you ever felt in our life. That’s me practicing my faith and hope that the best is yet to come.”

Westlake Legal Group Helen-Louise-Maroulis Maroulis back on track in bid to go for more gold in Tokyo fox-news/sports/olympics fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 039f0799-ae33-5733-a10b-096d0de48332   Westlake Legal Group Helen-Louise-Maroulis Maroulis back on track in bid to go for more gold in Tokyo fox-news/sports/olympics fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article 039f0799-ae33-5733-a10b-096d0de48332

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‘Trump Money’ Is Buying Silence as Unprecedented Payments Go to Farmers. The amount sent to farmers tops the auto-industry bailout by billions, and was delivered without congressional approval.

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Cristobal’s new-look Oregon looks to build on Rose Bowl win

Westlake Legal Group Mario-Cristobal Cristobal's new-look Oregon looks to build on Rose Bowl win fox-news/sports/ncaa/oregon-ducks fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc c3831586-0662-56a6-9484-3cbfd86a7683 Associated Press article

The helmets are as shiny as ever, and the team still has an untold number of uniforms, but Oregon has reinvented itself as a physical and hard-nosed football team.

While their appearances in the “Granddaddy” of all bowl games in the previous decade were all about flashy offenses, these seventh-ranked Ducks used grit and timely domination at the lines of scrimmage to defeat No. 11 Wisconsin 28-27 in the Rose Bowl on Wednesday.

And so long as Mario Cristobal is coaching at Oregon, his players believe even greater success is possible.

“The best thing Oregon football has ever done is hire Coach Cristobal as their head coach because I feel like this football team embodies everything that he’s about,” senior left guard Shane Lemieux said. “And he’s bringing in these offensive and defensive linemen that are SEC-type and are physical football players, and I think he’s changing the Pac-12 with the way he coaches, the way he recruits, because we play a different way. And you’re seeing it.”

The changes at Oregon are a reflection of Cristobal’s personality, background and experience.

As an offensive lineman at Miami, he played on two national championship teams. After an up-and-down stint as head coach at Florida International, Cristobal worked as an assistant under Nick Saban at Alabama, where he was a key cog in a relentless recruiting machine.

In his two seasons at Oregon, Cristobal has stressed the need to dominate up front and has worked tirelessly to bring in the caliber of high school players to fulfill that goal.

The early results of that aim were on the Rose Bowl field in freshman defensive end Kayvon Thibodeaux and sophomore left tackle Penei Sewell. Thibodeaux, the top player in the 2019 recruiting cycle and a Los Angeles native, had one tackle against Wisconsin but pressured quarterback Jack Coan on several key third downs. Sewell anchored a line that did not allow a sack.

Wisconsin dominated the game statistically, including holding the ball for more than 38 minutes, but Oregon was able to assert itself up front in the critical moments.

Thibodeaux said the ability to execute when the game was on the line was a reflection of the atmosphere Cristobal has instilled.

“It’s different,” Thibodeaux said. “It’s different. It’s the mentality, the culture, everything is different.”

Wide receiver Juwan Johnson was new to Cristobal’s approach when he joined Oregon this season as a graduate transfer from Penn State. Already familiar with what a successful program looks like after playing in two New Year’s Six bowls with the Nittany Lions, including the 2017 Rose Bowl, Johnson praised the competitive environment Cristobal has created.

“The practices are even harder than the game, that’s the one thing about it,” Johnson said. “That’s the one thing people don’t get. Our practices are two times harder than what the game is, so we knew coming into it we had an advantage because our practices are hard, ‘cause Coach Cristobal orchestrated it like that, so we knew we were fine.”

Even with the loss of star quarterback Justin Herbert and four senior starters from one of the most experienced offensive lines in college football, Oregon is confident it will be able to continue its ascent under Cristobal next season.

The Ducks signed another touted recruiting class, including the top player in California for the second straight year in linebacker Justin Flowe. That influx of talent should keep even established veterans locked in during spring practice, summer workouts and training camp.

And if the combination of recruiting domination and relentless work seems familiar, it was the backbone of the Pac-12’s last national championship teams when Pete Carroll had Southern California at its peak in 2003-04. Cristobal wants Oregon to compete at that level and demands the sacrifice necessary to make a spot in the College Football Playoff not only a goal, but an expectation.

“What we do is not kind and cuddly, and it’s certainly not for everybody,” Cristobal said. “So we all stuck to a blueprint that is as demanding as it gets and will push you right to the edge until you get a breakthrough.”

Johnson thinks Cristobal’s Oregon will make it happen.

“Coach Cristobal, he definitely changed the culture here,” Johnson said. “We’re not flashy. Yes, we have nice uniforms, but that’s not what we’re about.”

Westlake Legal Group Mario-Cristobal Cristobal's new-look Oregon looks to build on Rose Bowl win fox-news/sports/ncaa/oregon-ducks fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc c3831586-0662-56a6-9484-3cbfd86a7683 Associated Press article   Westlake Legal Group Mario-Cristobal Cristobal's new-look Oregon looks to build on Rose Bowl win fox-news/sports/ncaa/oregon-ducks fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc c3831586-0662-56a6-9484-3cbfd86a7683 Associated Press article

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