web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 312)

Trump Administration Reviving Investigation Into Hillary Clinton’s Emails: Reports

Westlake Legal Group 5d909b102200005a00df6e96 Trump Administration Reviving Investigation Into Hillary Clinton’s Emails: Reports

The Trump administration is reportedly amping up its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private emails — reviving a controversial topic that dominated headlines during the 2016 presidential election and one that President Donald Trump continues to mention

The Washington Post reported on Saturday that the State Department is investigating the email records of dozens of current and former officials who sent messages to Clinton’s private email account when she was secretary of state. The New York Times confirmed the continuation of the investigation on Sunday.

State Department investigators began contacting officials about the emails some 18 months ago, the Post reported. But the effort was apparently dropped before being revived in August.

“As many as 130” officials have been contacted by the Trump administration since then, the paper said, adding that “those targeted were notified that emails they sent years ago have been retroactively classified and now constitute potential security violations.”

The emails were largely sent between 2009 and 2013, when Clinton was secretary of state under former President Barack Obama.

State Department officials denied to the Post that the probe was politically motivated. But one former senior U.S. official familiar with the investigation described it as a way for Republicans “to keep the Clinton email issue alive.” 

Trump, for one, has not dropped the matter. 

Just Wednesday, Trump ― who’s facing an impeachment inquiry following a series of troubling revelations related to a phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky ― touted a baseless conspiracy theory about Clinton’s emails. 

“I think one of the great crimes committed is Hillary Clinton deleting 33,000 emails after Congress sends her a subpoena,” Trump told reporters in New York while sitting alongside Zelensky ahead of a bilateral meeting, referring to a cache of emails that was deleted by a Clinton aide in 2014.

Trump suggested those emails “could very well” be in Ukraine. 

Clinton came under scrutiny during the 2016 presidential election for her use of a private email server to conduct State Department business ― and her choice to delete emails that she’d deemed personal rather than turning them over to investigators. 

Then-FBI Director James Comey said Clinton and her aides had been “extremely careless” in their handling of classified information but ultimately recommended the case be closed with no charges.

Comey also said the FBI had found no evidence that the 33,000 deleted emails had been “intentionally deleted in an effort to conceal them.” Some of the emails were recovered by intelligence officials, NBC News noted.

Clinton, the 2016 Democratic nominee for president, has said she believes Comey’s decision to send a letter to Congress about the email controversy mere days before the presidential election was a major factor contributing to her loss.

“Absent that, I believe the evidence shows I would have won,” Clinton said in 2017.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Administration Reviving Investigation Into Hillary Clinton’s Emails: Reports

Westlake Legal Group 5d909b102200005a00df6e96 Trump Administration Reviving Investigation Into Hillary Clinton’s Emails: Reports

The Trump administration is reportedly amping up its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private emails — reviving a controversial topic that dominated headlines during the 2016 presidential election and one that President Donald Trump continues to mention

The Washington Post reported on Saturday that the State Department is investigating the email records of dozens of current and former officials who sent messages to Clinton’s private email account when she was secretary of state. The New York Times confirmed the continuation of the investigation on Sunday.

State Department investigators began contacting officials about the emails some 18 months ago, the Post reported. But the effort was apparently dropped before being revived in August.

“As many as 130” officials have been contacted by the Trump administration since then, the paper said, adding that “those targeted were notified that emails they sent years ago have been retroactively classified and now constitute potential security violations.”

The emails were largely sent between 2009 and 2013, when Clinton was secretary of state under former President Barack Obama.

State Department officials denied to the Post that the probe was politically motivated. But one former senior U.S. official familiar with the investigation described it as a way for Republicans “to keep the Clinton email issue alive.” 

Trump, for one, has not dropped the matter. 

Just Wednesday, Trump ― who’s facing an impeachment inquiry following a series of troubling revelations related to a phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky ― touted a baseless conspiracy theory about Clinton’s emails. 

“I think one of the great crimes committed is Hillary Clinton deleting 33,000 emails after Congress sends her a subpoena,” Trump told reporters in New York while sitting alongside Zelensky ahead of a bilateral meeting, referring to a cache of emails that was deleted by a Clinton aide in 2014.

Trump suggested those emails “could very well” be in Ukraine. 

Clinton came under scrutiny during the 2016 presidential election for her use of a private email server to conduct State Department business ― and her choice to delete emails that she’d deemed personal rather than turning them over to investigators. 

Then-FBI Director James Comey said Clinton and her aides had been “extremely careless” in their handling of classified information but ultimately recommended the case be closed with no charges.

Comey also said the FBI had found no evidence that the 33,000 deleted emails had been “intentionally deleted in an effort to conceal them.” Some of the emails were recovered by intelligence officials, NBC News noted.

Clinton, the 2016 Democratic nominee for president, has said she believes Comey’s decision to send a letter to Congress about the email controversy mere days before the presidential election was a major factor contributing to her loss.

“Absent that, I believe the evidence shows I would have won,” Clinton said in 2017.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

California woman, 19, who livestreamed DUI crash that killed sister is released on parole after 26 months

A 19-year-old California woman who livestreamed her drunken-driving crash that killed her 14-year-old sister has been released on parole after serving 26 months in prison.

Obdulia Sanchez was sentenced in February 2018 to six years and four months in prison after being convicted of gross vehicular manslaughter, DUI and child endangerment.

She was released on parole on Sept. 21 after receiving credit for completing “approved rehabilitative or educational programs,” a spokesman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation told the Merced Sun-Star on Saturday.

Westlake Legal Group obdulia-sanchez California woman, 19, who livestreamed DUI crash that killed sister is released on parole after 26 months Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc dec0ba2f-2b9e-52bb-ae56-5b8acebda1b1 article

Sanchez was released Sept. 21 after serving 26 months in prison. She was sentenced to serve six years and four months in February 2018. (AP Photo/Scott Smith, File)

PENNSYLVANIA WOMAN ARRESTED FOR DRUNK DRIVING AFTER GOING TO PICK UP BOYFRIEND ARRESTED ON DUI CHARGE

Sanchez, who was 18 at the time of the July 2017 crash, had been livestreaming herself on Instagram as she drove drunk.

The video showed her taking her hands off the steering wheel, prosecutors said.

FLORIDA MAN LEADS COPS ON LOW-SPEED CHASE, GETS 5TH DUI: POLICE

Sanchez veered onto the shoulder of a road in Los Banos, about 100 miles south of San Francisco. Investigators said she overcorrected, causing the vehicle to swerve and overturn. Her 14-year-old sister, Jacqueline, was ejected and killed.

She also livestreamed her sister’s dead body, asking her to wake up, the paper reported. She then said she killed her sister and was “going to jail.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Sanchez’s blood-alcohol level measured 0.106 nearly two hours after the crash, the Sun-Star reported, citing court records.

Sanchez was approved for the state’s Custody to Community Transitional Reentry Program, which has allowed serious or violent offenders to serve their sentences in the community while undergoing provided rehabilitative services, the spokesman told the paper.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5730056019001_5730056848001-vs California woman, 19, who livestreamed DUI crash that killed sister is released on parole after 26 months Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc dec0ba2f-2b9e-52bb-ae56-5b8acebda1b1 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5730056019001_5730056848001-vs California woman, 19, who livestreamed DUI crash that killed sister is released on parole after 26 months Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc dec0ba2f-2b9e-52bb-ae56-5b8acebda1b1 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Gregg Jarrett: Ukraine is just the latest ploy in ‘witch hunt’ to drive Trump from White House

Westlake Legal Group jarrett Gregg Jarrett: Ukraine is just the latest ploy in 'witch hunt' to drive Trump from White House Gregg Jarrett fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/opinion fnc f3b92477-c789-51fc-94b8-85284d54ad3b article

It is ludicrous to argue that President Trump’s telephone conversation with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky was an impeachable offense

Trump had every right to ask Ukraine to cooperate or assist in an official Department of Justice investigation into the origins of the Russia “collusion” hoax. His request was pursuant to an official probe being conducted by U.S. Attorney John Durham and initiated by Attorney General William Barr. In fact, Ukraine is required to comply under a binding treaty with the U.S.

SCHIFF SAYS AGREEMENT IN PLACE FOR WHISTLEBLOWER TO TESTIFY BEFORE COMMITTEE

The Treaty on Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters obligates Ukraine to provide, upon request by the U.S., assistance “in connection with the investigation, prosecution, and prevention of offenses, and in proceedings related to criminal matters.” This treaty was negotiated by then-president Bill Clinton more than 20 years ago and approved by the U.S. Senate. Among other things, Ukraine agreed to furnish “documents, records, the taking of testimony or statements of persons” relevant to any U.S. investigation. 

READ THE PHONE CALL TRANSCRIPT

Unfortunately, Kiev has not always abided by this treaty. Beset by rampant corruption, past Ukrainian administrations have been less than cooperative with the U.S. Indeed, there is significant evidence that Ukraine actively meddled in the 2016 election by providing dirt on the Trump campaign at the behest of a Democratic National Committee subcontractor who wanted to help elect Hillary Clinton. This is detailed in my new book, “Witch Hunt.”

 What is driving the impeachment blather is an overwhelming desire by Democrats and the complicit media to destroy Trump’s presidency, undo the 2016 election, and evict him from office.

With the election of a new Ukrainian president who vowed to end the rampant corruption, President Trump saw an opportunity to reset relations and obtain assistance in the Durham investigation. As pointed out by columnist Marc Thiessen, the DOJ has disclosed that it is “exploring the extent to which a number of countries, including Ukraine, played a role in the counterintelligence investigation directed at the campaign during the 2016 election.” 

Despite media and Democrat misrepresentations of the conversation, the “do us a favor” remark by Trump was a request that Ukraine cooperate in the Durham probe. The president phrased it in a friendly manner to enlist Zelensky’s assistance, even though it is incumbent on Ukraine to do so under the terms of the treaty. It is not at all unusual for the U.S. government or its president to ask for help from a foreign nation in extant investigations conducted by the DOJ.

Trump’s reference to former Vice President Joe Biden and the suspicious activities of his son, Hunter Biden, comes later in the conversation:

“There’s a lot of talk about Biden’s son, that Biden stopped the prosecution and a lot of people want to find out about that so whatever you can do with the Attorney General would be great. Biden went around bragging that he stopped the prosecution so if you can look into it… It sounds horrible to me.” 

It is indisputable that Biden is seen and heard on videotape bragging that he engineered the firing of Ukrainian prosecutor, Viktor Shokin, by threatening to withhold $1 billion in U.S. aid to Ukraine. Shokin is on record telling the Washington Post that he was sacked because his investigators were “on his (Hunter Biden’s) tail” in a case of suspected corruption involving $3 million in fees that found their way into the pocket of the VP’s son. Joe Biden has dismissed this as nonsense and the mainstream media have accepted his explanation as gospel.  However, documents newly uncovered by The Hill’s John Solomon belie Biden’s claim. These records appear to show that that Shokin’s account, not Biden’s, was true.

Joe Biden’s boast about his “quid pro quo” with Ukraine is compelling evidence that he may have used his public office to confer a benefit ($1 billion) in exchange for something of value –shutting down an investigation to help his son. This is where the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act comes into play, as well as other federal felony statutes such as bribery, extortion, and honest services fraud. The Justice Department would be justified in investigating Biden to determine whether he took any official action involving taxpayer money as Vice President to benefit his son. 

Once again, President Trump had every right to ask Zelensky to assist the U.S. in any existing or prospective investigation. Biden doesn’t enjoy immunity simply because he is running in the Democratic primary for president. There is no amnesty for a prospective political opponent. Lest we forget, the Obama administration launched an investigation into the nominee of the opposing party during a presidential campaign.

TRUMP DEMANDS SCHIFF RESIGN OVER ‘PARODY’ READING OF UKRAINE CALL

Nowhere in the Trump-Zelensky telephone call was there a threat (like Biden’s), pressure, condition, or demand by Trump.  Impeachment hysteria, if not insanity, has obscured the facts.  Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., said of Trump’s conversation with his counterpart, “What this shows is repeated, concerted, premeditated, criminal conduct.”  Columnist Michael Gerson wrote in the Washington Post, “For the first time in American history, the president has pleaded guilty to an impeachable offense.” This is effectively what happened…,” he added. 

It is easy to dismiss such obtuse pronouncements as partisan bloviating. In reality, it represents a fundamental misunderstanding of the law, international agreements, and federal investigations. The president’s words were neither a crime nor an impeachable offense. Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution imposes a duty on the president to “take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” If he is aware of potential evidence of lawlessness that resides in the hands of a foreign government, he is duty-bound to ask that such evidence be produced. 

What is driving the impeachment blather is an overwhelming desire by Democrats and the complicit media to destroy Trump’s presidency, undo the 2016 election, and evict him from office. Talk of impeaching Trump began before he was ever sworn in or unpacked his luggage at the White House.  Every act by the president has been branded “an impeachable offense.” 

At first, it was emoluments, then it was the firing of James Comey as FBI director, then it was the Trump-Russia “collusion” hoax, then it was Trump’s alleged remark about Gen. Michael Flynn, then it was obstruction of justice. Stormy Daniels was supposed to bring down Trump, then it white-nationalism and neo-Nazism, then it was Michael Cohen’s testimony, then it was Trump’s finances. The list extends ad nauseam.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

At every turn and with every perceived slight, howls of impeachment have reverberated through the halls of Congress and in liberal newsrooms across America. Trump’s demise is always just around the corner, they insist. Except it isn’t. Not if you consider those pesky things called facts. 

And so, here we are again. Trump-Ukraine “collusion” is just the latest incantation in the never-ending “witch hunt.”

Westlake Legal Group jarrett Gregg Jarrett: Ukraine is just the latest ploy in 'witch hunt' to drive Trump from White House Gregg Jarrett fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/opinion fnc f3b92477-c789-51fc-94b8-85284d54ad3b article   Westlake Legal Group jarrett Gregg Jarrett: Ukraine is just the latest ploy in 'witch hunt' to drive Trump from White House Gregg Jarrett fox-news/politics/justice-department fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox-news/news-events/russia-investigation fox news fnc/opinion fnc f3b92477-c789-51fc-94b8-85284d54ad3b article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump Was Repeatedly Warned That Ukraine Conspiracy Theory Was ‘Completely Debunked’

WASHINGTON — President Trump was repeatedly warned by his own staff that the Ukraine conspiracy theory that he and his lawyer were pursuing was “completely debunked” long before the president pressed Ukraine this summer to investigate his Democratic rivals, a former top adviser said on Sunday.

Thomas P. Bossert, who served as Mr. Trump’s first homeland security adviser, said he told the president there was no basis to the theory that Ukraine, not Russia, intervened in the 2016 election and did so on behalf of the Democrats. Speaking out for the first time, Mr. Bossert said he was “deeply disturbed” that Mr. Trump nonetheless tried to get Ukraine’s president to produce damaging information about Democrats.

Mr. Bossert’s comments, on the ABC program “This Week” and in a subsequent telephone interview, underscored the danger to the president as the House moves ahead with an inquiry into whether he abused his power for political gain. Other former aides to Mr. Trump said Sunday that he refused to accept reassurances about Ukraine no matter how many times it was explained to him, instead subscribing to an unsubstantiated narrative that has now brought him to the brink of impeachment.

The latest revelations came as the impeachment inquiry rushed ahead at a brisk pace. The House chairman taking the lead said that the whistle-blower who first brought the matter to light will testify soon and that a subpoena for documents will be issued early this week to Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer who spearheaded the effort to find dirt on Democrats in Ukraine.

As Democrats pressed forward, a new poll showed that a majority of Americans support an impeachment inquiry for the first time, a worrying development for a White House that until now has been able to make the argument that the public opposed impeaching Mr. Trump. A senior White House aide tried to turn the tables by arguing that Mr. Trump was the real whistle-blower because he was uncovering Democratic corruption.

As Republicans struggled to defend the president on Sunday, Mr. Bossert’s remarks offered a hint of cracks in the Republicans’ armor. While Mr. Bossert was forced out in 2018 when John R. Bolton became national security adviser, he has remained publicly loyal until now to a president who prizes fealty above all else.

“It is completely debunked,” Mr. Bossert said of the Ukraine theory on ABC. Speaking with George Stephanopoulos, Mr. Bossert blamed Mr. Giuliani for filling the president’s head with misinformation. “I am deeply frustrated with what he and the legal team is doing and repeating that debunked theory to the president. It sticks in his mind when he hears it over and over again and for clarity here, George, let me just again repeat that it has no validity.”

He added that pressing Ukraine’s president was disturbing, but noted that it remained unproven whether Mr. Trump’s decision to withhold aid to Ukraine was tied to the demand for investigations into former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and other Democrats.

“It is a bad day and a bad week for this president and for this country if he is asking for political dirt on an opponent,” Mr. Bossert said. “But it looks to me like the other matter that’s far from proven is whether he was doing anything to abuse his power and withhold aid in order to solicit such a thing.”

Other former aides said separately on Sunday that the president had a particular weakness for conspiracy theories involving Ukraine, which in the past three years has become the focus of far-right media outlets and political figures. Mr. Trump was more willing to listen to outside advisers like Mr. Giuliani than his own national security team.

Mr. Trump has known Mr. Giuliani, the former New York mayor, for years and likes his pugnacious approach and the fact that he never pushes back, said one former aide, who like others asked not to be identified discussing internal matters. Mr. Giuliani would “feed Trump all kinds of garbage” that created “a real problem for all of us,” said the former aide.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 29dc-bossert2-articleLarge Trump Was Repeatedly Warned That Ukraine Conspiracy Theory Was ‘Completely Debunked’ Zelensky, Volodymyr Whistle-Blowers United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Republican Party Presidential Election of 2016 impeachment House Committee on Intelligence Ethics and Official Misconduct Democratic Party Bossert, Thomas P Biden, Joseph R Jr

Representative Adam B. Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said a whistle-blower whose complaint rocked Washington last week would testify “very soon.”CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

House Democrats may try to explore that as they move expeditiously in their inquiry. Representative Adam B. Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said on Sunday that the whistle-blower whose complaint rocked Washington last week would testify “very soon” and that Mr. Giuliani would be ordered to turn over documents.

Mr. Schiff, a former prosecutor who is the de facto chief of the inquiry, also issued a pointed warning to Mr. Trump and the White House, who have a history of blocking congressional requests for witnesses and records. “If they’re going to obstruct, then they are going to increase the likelihood that Congress may feel it necessary to move forward with an article of obstruction,” he said on “This Week.”

Mr. Trump continued his bellicose attacks on his accusers. “I want Schiff questioned at the highest level for Fraud & Treason,” he wrote on Twitter. And he threatened the whistle-blower, who is protected by law from retribution. “Was this person SPYING on the U.S. President? Big Consequences!”

Republicans have had a tough time defending Mr. Trump and have mostly tried to redirect the conversation to suggest that Mr. Biden engaged in wrongdoing. Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana, the No. 2 Republican in the House, repeatedly changed the subject on Sunday when Chuck Todd, the moderator of NBC’s “Meet the Press,” pressed him on whether he believed a summary transcript of the Ukraine call merited further investigation.

“Well, they’ve been investigating President Trump for two years, making way for baseless allegations,” Mr. Scalise finally said. “They’re investigating everything.”

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, suggested that Mr. Trump appoint a special prosecutor to look into Mr. Biden’s role in the firing of a former prosecutor in Ukraine, and said he had no problem with the president’s phone call.

“I’m openly telling everybody in the country I have the president’s back because I think this is a setup,” he said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

One of the few Republicans to express concern over the allegations was Representative Will Hurd, Republican of Texas and a former C.I.A. officer who is not seeking re-election. “There are troubling issues within the whistle-blower’s report,” he said on “Face the Nation” on CBS. “But they are allegations. And I think that’s why we should explore these allegations through hearings.”

The White House put out Stephen Miller, the president’s senior adviser, to offer his defense on the Sunday talk show circuit. Appearing on “Fox News Sunday,” Mr. Miller denounced the whistle-blower as a “deep-state operative” who is part of a cabal of “unelected bureaucrats who think they need to take down this president.”

Mr. Trump, he added, was the one searching for wrongdoing by pursuing corruption allegations against Mr. Biden and Democrats. “The president is the whistle-blower here,” Mr. Miller said. “The president of the United States is the whistle-blower. And this individual is a saboteur trying to undermine a democratically elected government.”

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, suggested that President Trump appoint a special prosecutor to look into Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s role in the firing of a former prosecutor in Ukraine.CreditGabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

Central to the complaint by the whistle-blower was a July 25 telephone call in which Mr. Trump pressed President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to “do us a favor” and investigate Democrats at a time when the president had just ordered $391 million in aid to Ukraine frozen.

While his focus on Mr. Biden has drawn the most attention, Mr. Trump also urged Mr. Zelensky to look into a theory about the 2016 election that holds that Ukraine hacked the Democratic National Committee and then framed Moscow, possibly at the behest of Democratic operatives.

He specifically cited an American cybersecurity firm, CrowdStrike, which he seemed to believe was a Ukrainian company, and brought up a Democratic National Committee computer server, which he suggested might be in Ukraine.

While serving Mr. Trump, Mr. Bossert repeatedly told him that his questions about the D.N.C. server were without merit, according to a former senior administration official. In fact, the main server for the committee was located in the party’s headquarters in Washington, and was later displayed there, next to a file cabinet that was broken into by the Watergate burglars in nearly a half-century ago.

The first time Mr. Bossert and other aides refuted the D.N.C. server theory came before the inauguration when intelligence agency directors briefed him on Russia’s election interference operation. Mr. Trump may not have absorbed it because he was thrown off guard when told about a Democratic-financed dossier that included unproven allegations about his ties to Russia.

Shortly before Valentine’s Day in 2017, Mr. Bossert brought in Mike Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, to brief Mr. Trump not only on the summary about the conclusion that it was Russia, but with the technical mechanics that led to the conclusion. At that point, Trump appeared to register that it was Russia. But periodically after that, he would say at rallies that he wondered about the server. Mr. Bossert would not re-educate him each time.

Another former senior official said it was a constant struggle to convince Mr. Trump that Russia, not Ukraine, had interfered in the election. The president would accept it after speaking with his more grounded aides, this official said, but then revert to believing it was a plot by Democrats or Ukrainians or others after speaking with associates outside the administration like Mr. Giuliani.

But even as his role in the controversy was debated over the weekend, Mr. Giuliani had the endorsement of Mr. Trump to continue appearing on television on Sunday defending himself and the president, according to two Trump advisers.

“I am defending my client the best way I know how,” Mr. Giuliani said on “This Week,” appearing shortly after Mr. Bossert did.

In a brief telephone interview after his ABC appearance, Mr. Bossert allowed for the possibility that it was someone other than Mr. Giuliani who had gotten in Mr. Trump’s head.

“In fairness, I don’t know that it was Rudy Giuliani that put that conspiracy theory into the president’s head,” he said. “I know somebody did and I was under the impression it was Mayor Giuliani. If Mayor Giuliani wasn’t promoting the D.N.C. server conspiracy theory, then I apologize.”

But in his television interview, Mr. Bossert made clear how serious the issue was, suggesting it could end Mr. Trump’s presidency. “The D.N.C. server and that conspiracy theory has got to go; they have to stop with that,” he said. He noted that the president “has not gotten his pound of flesh yet” from the investigation into his own ties to Russia. “But George, if he continues to focus on that white whale, it’s going to bring him down.”

Chris Cameron, Matthew Rosenberg and David E. Sanger contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

New Jersey police searching for 3 bronze plaques stolen from 9/11 memorial

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6090423436001_6090425127001-vs New Jersey police searching for 3 bronze plaques stolen from 9/11 memorial Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/terror/september-11 fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 913e004a-3e6b-5543-8366-5e0659e03e3a

Three bronze plaques honoring the victims of Sept. 11 have been stolen from a memorial in New Jersey, just weeks after the world marked 18 years since the terror attacks, investigators said.

The plaques were stolen between Wednesday and Thursday from the Monmouth County memorial at Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook in Atlantic Highlands, police said.

“This is a place where people especially families come here to remember their loved ones,” Sierra Ortiz told Fox 5 New York. “It’s disgusting that someone would actually do that.”

TUNNEL TO TOWERS RUN HONORS FALLEN FDNY FIREFIGHTERS, US TROOPS WHO HAVE DIED SINCE 9/11

Each plaque detailed events in a three-hour time span that unfolded on the morning of September 11, 2001, according to the Monmouth County Parks website. Each plaque was set in a rock lining a walkway that led to a statue of an eagle overlooking the New York skyline.

“I constantly walk up that path and read what happened on that day and it’s just unbelievable that someone would take it away,” Cindy Sullivan told the outlet.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The memorial also honored the 147 Monmouth County residents who died in the attacks, according to the park’s website. Their names were carved in stone set beneath the eagle sculpture, which held a beam from one of the towers.

Police have offered a $5,000 reward for information leading to an arrest.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6090423436001_6090425127001-vs New Jersey police searching for 3 bronze plaques stolen from 9/11 memorial Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/terror/september-11 fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 913e004a-3e6b-5543-8366-5e0659e03e3a   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6090423436001_6090425127001-vs New Jersey police searching for 3 bronze plaques stolen from 9/11 memorial Stephen Sorace fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-jersey fox-news/us/terror/september-11 fox-news/us/crime/robbery-theft fox news fnc/us fnc article 913e004a-3e6b-5543-8366-5e0659e03e3a

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Whistleblower in Ukraine scandal under federal protection: report

Westlake Legal Group KPkbAF2scKcsQmj3jqEW2_RyDPnADbp0No4fTzNmy6A Whistleblower in Ukraine scandal under federal protection: report r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Hong Kong’s Status as Neutral Ground at Risk as China Asserts Power

In a part of the world familiar with conflict, dislocation and ruthless ideological extremism, Hong Kong has long beckoned as an oasis of stability.

It has prospered on the strength of its proximity to mainland China — close enough to be a base for investors capitalizing on China’s development, and still beyond reach of the authoritarian hand of the Chinese Communist Party.

It has served as a bridge between two rival powers nursing mutual suspicions, the United States and China. It is Chinese territory yet governed by a legal system inherited from the West, and intertwined with the global financial system.

But now Hong Kong’s status as neutral ground between mainland China and the outside world is being threatened by a pair of momentous confrontations. As President Trump increases tariffs on Chinese goods in his trade war, the value of Hong Kong as a hub for commerce is being diminished. And as protesters filling Hong Kong’s streets accuse China of breaching a deal that was supposed to protect the territory’s democratic norms, the endurance of its semiautonomous status appears in doubt.

With geopolitical and ideological friction between China and the United States intensifying, some say the space for a place like Hong Kong is disappearing.

“We will see a different Hong Kong,” said Lynette H. Ong, a China expert at the University of Toronto. “The very reason for Hong Kong’s existence — the rule of law, respect for the police, for public institutions, respect for the judiciary, the bureaucracy — everything has been eroded.”

On Sunday, three of Hong Kong’s main commercial districts were engulfed in thick clouds of tear gas as tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators battled the police in some of the territory’s worst unrest since the protests began. A few protesters threw firebombs at the police. Some chanted, “Expel the Communist Party, free Hong Kong!”

The protest was an open challenge to the party just two days before China celebrates 70 years of Communist rule on the mainland. Even larger demonstrations in Hong Kong aimed at upstaging the festivities in Beijing are expected on Tuesday, with fresh clashes with the police likely.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157239561_173662e2-cf50-4827-a25e-a98a02d00505-articleLarge Hong Kong’s Status as Neutral Ground at Risk as China Asserts Power Xi Jinping United States Shenzhen (China) Lam, Carrie (1957- ) International Trade and World Market Human Rights and Human Rights Violations Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Great Britain fitch ratings Economic Conditions and Trends Dealogic PLC Communist Party of China China

The People’s Liberation Army marching in a Hong Kong ceremony this year marking the 22nd anniversary of the end of British control.CreditKin Cheung/Associated Press

Twenty-two years ago, as Britain handed its erstwhile colony back to China, cautious optimism prevailed that Hong Kong’s special status would endure. Beijing pledged adherence to a doctrine known as “one country, two systems” and asserted that its “ultimate aim” was universal suffrage to elect the territory’s leader. It promised that Hong Kong’s traditional freedoms would be protected for the next half-century.

Surveys showed that a majority of Hong Kong residents were happy about the handover, which transpired on July 1, 1997. Business leaders exuded confidence that the territory’s rules-based regulation, independent courts and freewheeling press would persist. Hong Kong would return to China, yet retain its status as an open, global metropolis.

“There’s no lack of confidence,” Nellie Fong, a partner in the American accounting firm Arthur Andersen and a member of the incoming government’s cabinet, told The New York Times as the handover approached. “What Hong Kong people regain on July 1 is our own identity.”

Hong Kong’s port, once the world’s busiest, now handles less container shipping than four other Chinese cities.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

The British Empire had seized Hong Kong in 1841 as it pursued retribution for a lopsided balance of trade: Britain was purchasing vast quantities of tea and silk from China, but China was buying little in return. Britain deployed naval power to force China to accept opium shipped from colonial India, capturing the island of Hong Kong as a military and commercial outpost.

Over the next 150 years, Hong Kong was a refuge for Chinese dissidents and those fleeing upheaval in China, especially after the Communists took power in 1949. It became the linchpin of trade between China and the rest of the planet, swelling into the busiest port on earth.

As the handover approached, China was seeking entry to the World Trade Organization, a step it would achieve in 2001, gaining greater access to world markets. China was also preparing its largest state-owned companies to go global. Hong Kong’s impressive port offered a convenient pathway for trade. The banks and trading houses clustered in its gleaming skyscrapers provided a way to secure foreign money.

The optimism about Hong Kong’s future was premised on the notion that China had to respect its ways or risk undermining the value of the territory it was reclaiming.

Beijing also hoped that Hong Kong’s prosperity would validate China’s mode of governance, in which politics are a distraction to economic progress. The party would govern Hong Kong through a loyal elite, while tapping the territory’s capital markets and professional ranks to advance China’s ambitious development plans.

Success in Hong Kong would be leveraged to court reunification with Taiwan, the self-governing island that China claims as part of its territory.

Some local leaders fretted that their interests were subordinate to Britain’s determination to close the book on its colonial adventures.

“The British did not give Hong Kong people a choice,” said Anson Chan, who was Hong Kong’s chief secretary — the second-highest position in the territory’s government — during and after the handover. “There was a great deal of trepidation. Even among the business sector there was skepticism, because, essentially, you were turning over Hong Kong to a sovereign power whose philosophy, ideology and everything else was so totally different.”

Many Westerners expressed hope, however, that Hong Kong would help change China rather than the other way around, serving as a conduit for free enterprise and democratic ideas. Some maintained that global commerce would prove decisive. “Constructive engagement” would tether Chinese fortunes to world markets, and that would require liberty.

“There is no firewall between economic freedom and freedom in its many other dimensions,” Lawrence H. Summers, who was deputy Treasury secretary, declared in Hong Kong before the handover. “The free flow of information, the ability of people to remain free, to enter into transactions, to speak out: These are all the essential elements of free markets and a strong financial system.”

As Britain’s last governor of Hong Kong, Chris Patten, officially transferred power back to China, he asserted that the city’s principles were immutable.

“They are universal values,” Mr. Patten said. “They are the values of the future in Asia as elsewhere, a future in which the happiest and the richest communities, and the most confident and the most stable, too, will be those that best combine political liberty and economic freedom as we do today.”

For a time, these competing hopes — those of the party and the West — coexisted in a delicate tug-of-war, allowing Hong Kong to thrive.

The skyline of Shanghai, which the head of a Hong Kong hedge fund said “will become the pre-eminent financial center.”CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Xi Jinping had other ideas.

After he ascended in 2013, the new Chinese president delivered a profound change in his country’s engagement with the world. He used China’s growing economic clout as impetus for an increasingly muscular foreign policy.

Under his leadership, China has sought to dominate new markets, projected power around the globe and redoubled the Communist Party’s control of the political sphere. He has crushed dissent while presiding over the mass imprisonment of minority Uighurs in the western region of Xinjiang. He enshrined Xi Jinping Thought as party ideology, scorning democracy and liberalized economics as decadent Western exports.

Mr. Xi’s vigilance against threats to party authority also appears to have altered Beijing’s assessment of Hong Kong. Its commercial value was now discounted by its potential as a hotbed for dangerous free expression and a base of subversion against the party’s rule on the mainland.

“Xi Jinping has tightened his control over Hong Kong,” Sally Chan, 30, an investment bank clerk, said as she marched toward government offices during the demonstrations on Sunday. “The government overlooks the rule of law now. Police brutality is everywhere. We have to be careful not to reveal our identity to the police.”

Hong Kong’s worth also came in for re-examination after the global financial crisis of 2008. Western bankers — some based in Hong Kong — and officials from Washington had long lectured Beijing about the need for China to lift restrictions on the movement of money. But the crisis exposed the deficiencies of the Western system.

“The current leadership under Xi Jinping is far less interested in learning the lessons of capitalism from Hong Kong,” said Rana Mitter, director of Oxford University’s China Center. “Hong Kong is seen as a more anomalous and troublesome place that needs to be sorted out. It’s no longer seen as a golden goose.”

Part of the change reflected the reality that Hong Kong was no longer the primary gateway to China. China was building road and rail networks while modernizing its ports, eliminating the need to ship through Hong Kong. Today, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Ningbo and Guangzhou each handle more container traffic than Hong Kong, according to the World Shipping Council.

Shanghai’s stock market is now the leader for initial public offerings by state-owned Chinese companies, overtaking Hong Kong a decade ago.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

By 2009, the dollar value of initial public offerings for state-owned Chinese companies on Shanghai’s stock market was greater than those in Hong Kong, according to Dealogic, a financial data company. “Hong Kong is no longer critical,” said V-nee Yeh, chairman of Cheetah Investment Management. “Shanghai will become the pre-eminent financial center over Hong Kong.”

The trade war threatens to further diminish Hong Kong’s status as a center of commerce. Mr. Trump has exhorted American companies to abandon China and make their products elsewhere. Economists say such talk is overheated. The global economy revolves around two foundational forces — China’s unsurpassed capacity to make things, and Americans’ insatiable appetite for buying things. Yet even a marginal movement of factory production out of China challenges Hong Kong’s place as a financial and logistics center.

A Shanghai suitcase factory. President Trump’s calls for companies to move production outside China threaten to reduce Hong Kong’s clout as a commercial hub.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

Hong Kong’s economy is already contracting amid fears of a full-blown recession. Fitch Ratings downgraded Hong Kong’s credit this month out of concern over China’s increasing role in the city’s affairs. Moody’s followed, asserting that “the ongoing protests reveal an erosion in the strength of Hong Kong’s institutions” and “undermine Hong Kong’s credit fundamentals by damaging its attractiveness as a trade and financial hub.”

In Washington, Mr. Xi’s authoritarian proclivities and global ambitions have silenced talk of constructive engagement with China, replacing it with hawkish warnings of a new Cold War. That has narrowed the space for a neutral Hong Kong. The huge protests of the past three months have worsened the tension. American politicians from both major parties have voiced support for the protesters while Chinese officials have hit back, angrily accusing them of encouraging street violence to block China’s rise.

The demonstrations were initially spurred by anger over a proposed bill that would have enabled criminal suspects to be extradited to the mainland, where justice is opaque. But even after Hong Kong’s chief executive scrapped the bill, the protests endured with a broader goal of democratic representation.

Video footage of police officers attacking demonstrators has enraged the public, provoking accusations that local security forces are acting with no public accountability, like those on the mainland. The police actions have especially alienated younger people, many of whom view Hong Kong as a distinct place and sympathize with calls for independence.

“Everyone is very clear about what China’s system is like,” said Yoyo Chan, a 17-year-old student. “Cruel things can happen there, such as concentration camps, and it’s all frightening. Even before the extradition bill was drafted, a few booksellers in Hong Kong had disappeared into China. In a place like Hong Kong, where we have freedom of speech, we don’t want to lose things integral to us.”

Within the business world, the perception that Beijing has brazenly asserted itself is sowing fears that Hong Kong’s identity as a neutral ground is in danger.

“Hong Kong is a good place for business,” said Trevor Ma, 31, founder of Gethemall, an online clothing store. “But the most important thing is freedom. The atmosphere should not just be one where we’re getting enough money. We should be able to say anything without threat. That’s not the case in Hong Kong right now.”

Mostly, he is galled by the creeping sense that China is trying subsume Hong Kong.

“Most Hong Kong people don’t want to be integrated with China at all,” he said. “If Hong Kong is not different from China, why would I stay?”

A shopping mall in Beijing. “Most Hong Kong people don’t want to be integrated with China at all,” said Trevor Ma, the founder of an online clothing store.CreditLam Yik Fei for The New York Times

In recent weeks, Beijing has dialed up its propaganda channels, portraying the demonstrators as terrorists who are manipulated by foreigners while broadcasting footage of paramilitary exercises in Shenzhen, with the implication that those forces could be dispatched to Hong Kong.

Most experts assume that Beijing will avoid substantial bloodshed, lest it spook financial markets and worsen China’s economic slowdown. But China can stop well short of unleashing troops and still end Hong Kong’s status as a bridge to the West.

The leadership in Beijing and the demonstrators in Hong Kong are dug in, limiting room for compromise.

During Sunday’s protests in Hong Kong, many participants described a violation of trust, with the crackdown on the demonstrations prompting a basic reassessment of the legitimacy of local authority.

Geography seems to have been reconfigured, with mainland China now closer than ever.

“When we were children, our parents always told us to seek out the police when we are in trouble,” said Stephanie Chung, 21, a student at Open University of Hong Kong. “But having seen the police behave so brutishly has been traumatizing. You wonder if one day they will send us back to the mainland to be prosecuted.”

She was standing near the Bank of China tower in downtown Hong Kong. A Chinese flag fluttered in the sky, as wisps of tear gas drifted in the wind.

“Hong Kong has become more alien to me,” said Vincent Tong, 27, a trader at a local financial firm who was also marching on Sunday. “If we fail this time, Hong Kong will be doomed. I don’t want our way of living to become the same as those living in China.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump says he wants to meet whistleblower, warns of ‘big consequences’

Westlake Legal Group -5SeeC_wK-eaGYkdww2XbxplTtkeB1OH0e1QavSiuBI Trump says he wants to meet whistleblower, warns of 'big consequences' r/politics

As a reminder, this subreddit is for civil discussion.

In general, be courteous to others. Debate/discuss/argue the merits of ideas, don’t attack people. Personal insults, shill or troll accusations, hate speech, any advocating or wishing death/physical harm, and other rule violations can result in a permanent ban.

If you see comments in violation of our rules, please report them.


I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The New York Fed Chief Is Facing His Biggest Test. Here’s His Response.

Westlake Legal Group 29dc-nyfed-facebookJumbo The New York Fed Chief Is Facing His Biggest Test. Here’s His Response. United States Economy Money Market Accounts Interest Rates Government Bonds Economic Conditions and Trends Credit and Debt Banking and Financial Institutions

John C. Williams, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, has spent the past two weeks grappling with the regional bank’s most tumultuous period in years.

Since Sept. 16, a shortage of dollars in an obscure but crucial corner of short-term Wall Street funding, called the repo market, has forced the New York Fed to engage in an ongoing series of market interventions — a first since the Great Recession. The effort is an attempt to keep the central bank’s benchmark rate from accidentally creeping higher.

The situation is the biggest test so far for Mr. Williams — who took the helm of the New York Fed in June 2018 — and one that many market analysts say deserves a less-than-stellar grade.

While officials have succeeded in getting interest rates under control, some investors have criticized the Fed for moving too hesitantly when problems first arose, waiting until rates on repurchase, or repo, agreements had skyrocketed and briefly spilled over, pushing the Fed’s benchmark rate above its intended range.

Mr. Williams, a theoretician responsible for some of the most influential economic studies of the past two decades, was at the center of the disapproval. Before assuming his role as head of the New York Fed, he ran the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and made a practice of ignoring day-to-day market moves. But those moves are central to the New York branch’s mission as the Fed’s primary conduit to — and supervisor of — Wall Street.

His early tenure in New York had not been smooth sailing, even before the market hiccups this month. Mr. Williams ousted two top officials, Simon Potter and Richard Dzina, earlier this year because of differences in management style. Each had more than two decades of experience at the Fed, and Mr. Potter had overseen the markets group. Their dismissal unsettled some bank employees and raised eyebrows on Wall Street.

The shake-up also left another New York Fed official, Lorie Logan, temporarily in charge of the market portfolio — the Fed’s giant stash of bonds. Ms. Logan is well-respected and often pointed to as a natural fit for the permanent job, but former Fed officials worry that she is now essentially auditioning, which could hinder her ability to make tough or unpopular decisions.

In an interview on Friday, Mr. Williams batted back the critiques, defending the timing of the New York Fed’s recent responses and saying that the bank’s team was working effectively.

Mr. Williams also said he still supported the way the Fed has chosen to guide interest rates — what it calls an “ample reserves” framework. Instead of intervening in markets to push rates into place by balancing out supply and demand, as it did before the financial crisis, the Fed now announces how much interest it will pay on banks’ reserves, and that rate is passed through the financial system.

The approach requires the Fed to hang on to large holdings of government-backed bonds to keep reserves, essentially currency deposits at the Fed, plentiful. Central bankers had thought that they had a long way to go before reserves became scarce. So until last month, they were shrinking their balance sheet and drawing down that supply.

But Mr. Williams said the recent episode showed him that the approach might require higher reserves than he had realized. That is important, because it could hint that the Fed will start growing its balance sheet again soon, something several of Mr. Williams colleagues have signaled over the past week.

Mr. Williams, who has a constant vote on monetary policy decisions made by the Federal Open Market Committee, was mum on the other major question facing policymakers — whether the Fed will cut rates beyond the two moves it has already made. He declined to give any hint about his preferences, arguing that amid uncertainty, the Fed should keep its options open.

Here is a look at how he is addressing the biggest questions facing the New York Fed and the central bank, in a curated, and partly paraphrased, transcript.

New York Times: Some market participants have said the Fed was too slow to intervene amid the recent disruption in overnight repurchase agreements, or repos. Can you walk us through the decision-making process?

Mr. Williams emphasized that data on the Fed’s policy rate, the federal fund rate, comes in slowly and the official figure is released on a delay — it comes out at 9 a.m. the following morning. That figured into the timing, Mr. Williams said, because “we need to explain why we’re intervening — the desk directive is very clear,” he said, referring to the rules set out by the policymaking Fed committee for the New York Fed to follow.

The bank is meant “to conduct open market operations, to keep the federal funds rate in the range.”

He noted that the Fed took market participant feedback from the first intervention into account. Since Sept. 17, it has announced a day in advance that it would provide liquidity to markets and how much. It also -announced on Sept. 20 that it would continue intervening through Oct. 10.

There’s concern on Wall Street that you ousted Mr. Potter and Mr. Dzina, and, in doing so, set a tone at the New York Fed in which experts may not feel comfortable speaking up, especially about repo market issues. What is your response to that?

“It’s just completely wrong, in terms of what actually happened,” he said, noting that when rates started to spike in the market for repos earlier this month, he and Ms. Logan were both in Washington for the Federal Open Market Committee meeting.

“It was all hands on deck. Everyone was working tirelessly to understand what was happening,” he said. “The team operated magnificently, there was no delay, there was no hesitation — there was no, in any way, feeling that people weren’t sharing and discussing things very quickly. This is something that Lorie, Lorie Logan, and her colleagues have been preparing for, for years.”

“We have complete confidence in the teams’ analysis, and conclusions, and it played out exactly the way you would want it to,” he said.

When it comes to the recent repo market turmoil, what does a long-term solution to fixing that look like?

“We have learned something. Despite there being a lot of reserves in the system, they weren’t moving around. They’re lumpy.”

When it comes to the level of bank reserves needed going forward, “any view I had before, based on all the research, and the outreach, and the surveys, my view would be that — that level is probably higher,” Mr. Williams said.

“I think we are seeing that liquidity doesn’t move around as easily, in these situations, which means that if we want interest rates to stay kind of on their own in a narrow range, that we have to make sure we have that amount of reserves to support that.”

“As we think about permanent solutions, the big issues, I think, are: what is the right level of reserves,” he said, along with the possibility of some sort of standing facility to keep markets running smoothly.

Do you have a specific number for how much bigger reserves need to be?

He said he did not, but “I do have on my computer a picture of where reserves were in the summer, and where they were in September,” he said. Earlier this year, “we saw a period where these issues were not manifesting themselves in the way that we saw in the last couple of weeks.”

Is market functioning the primary thing keeping you up at night, or are other aspects of central banking in 2019 more worrying?

“This is very acute. This is very much an issue that arose very quickly,” he said of repo market disruption. But when it comes to monetary policy, “we still have a very interesting point where the economy remains in a very favorable place,” but “there’s a lot of uncertainty — the slowing in global growth continues. Uncertainty around trade and other issues, Brexit.”

You’ve been a big advocate of moving early to forestall risks, rather than waiting. Do you think that means lowering rates again before the end of the year?

“I don’t think that this issue — of the lower bound, and trying to risk manage around it — is pertinent to a specific issue, of what decision we should make at the coming meetings.”

“It’s really more about where the likely trajectories of the U.S. economy are right now,” he said. “The issue we’re grappling with, I’m grappling with, is managing these various uncertainties and some of these downside risks, that do seem more prominent now than normally.”

“I do think we’re in a very good place, on monetary policy, and obviously I supported the decisions we’ve made,” he said. “My view is just to continue doing that assessment.”

Did you forecast another cut when the entire Fed committee released its September economic projections?

“I am not going to answer what my projection, or my expectation is, because I think it’s really pretty uncertain,” he said.

He noted that policymakers’ projections fit a few different narratives. “Maybe the economy will do well, surprise to the upside,” or “the economy takes longer, or doesn’t do as well,” and “I don’t know which of those is going to happen.”

We tend to paint Fed officials a faceless technocrats. But you have obsessions outside of economics, including video games. What video games are you playing?

“I really enjoy playing the online games, so I have been playing this game Dark Souls for the last few months,” he said. “You learn about how teams work together, or don’t work together effectively.”

How do you try to bring your personality — the sneaker-wearing, book-loving, craft beer enthusiast — to your leadership role?

He said he encouraged people to be themselves at work, and, prodded, admitted that “we did change the dress code,” adding, “But people always want to know what the new dress code is. And I always say: It’s use good judgment.”

He seemed disappointed that the change in the dress code at the New York Fed, traditionally a jackets-and-heels institution, was not happening faster.

“People are changing. I’m not telling them what they should do, but people are coming in, dressed as they wish,” he said. Among men, “where you really see it — far fewer ties.”

“Like so many things, it’s a longer journey.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com