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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 312)

Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is ‘unhappy, bigoted’

Westlake Legal Group stuart-varney-donald-trump-FOX-AP Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is 'unhappy, bigoted' Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ddedfd4-7a4c-51b1-b02a-a6be82dec5fc

Fox Business host Stuart Varney argued that a narrative from “Democrats and the media” that Americans are “unhappy, bigoted, stupid and bad” has been destroyed by a new survey showing that the vast majority of folks are satisfied with their lives and believe that the country is improving on multiple fronts.

“Step away from politics for a moment. Ignore the media. How do we really feel about our lives, our society?” said Varney on Fox Nation’s “My Take.”

“Well, well, well, contrary to all the negativity splashed across our screens every day, Gallup found 84 percent of us are satisfied with the overall quality of our lives,” he continued.

The Gallup survey, conducted from Jan. 2 to 15, also found since Trump’s inauguration there has been double-digit increases in public satisfaction with the nation’s economy, security from terrorism and military strength.

THE CHART THE TRUMP CAMPAIGN SHOULD BE PLASTERING ABSOLUTELY EVERYWHERE: DEIRDRE BOLTON

Feelings of satisfaction also increased with issues that some the president’s critics accuse him of exacerbating, including race relations, income distribution and opportunities to get ahead.

“This is the exact opposite of what we’ve been told by the Democrats and the media. Truth is, the elites have been carried away by their hatred of President Trump,” said Varney.

Gallup noted that “average satisfaction is roughly on par with the level of the early 2000s” at a time when Americans generally expressed feelings of patriotism following the September 11th attacks.

“The jig is up,” Varney contended. “President Trump has won on virtually all fronts.”

“Impeachment has become an embarrassment for the Democrats. The economy is a triumph of tax and red tape reform… And with nine months to the election, the president’s opponents are bitterly divided and frankly misguided,” concluded Varney. “276 days to the election, President Trump is riding high.”

To see Stuart Varney’s full remarks on  “My Take”, and for more episodes of his daily commentary, visit Fox Nation and join today.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR A FOX NATION FREE TRIAL

Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Ainsley Earhardt, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group stuart-varney-donald-trump-FOX-AP Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is 'unhappy, bigoted' Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ddedfd4-7a4c-51b1-b02a-a6be82dec5fc   Westlake Legal Group stuart-varney-donald-trump-FOX-AP Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is 'unhappy, bigoted' Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ddedfd4-7a4c-51b1-b02a-a6be82dec5fc

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Why It’s So Hard to Make an Endowment More Socially Responsible

Westlake Legal Group 31Money-Illo-facebookJumbo Why It’s So Hard to Make an Endowment More Socially Responsible Sewanee: The University of the South Personal Finances Endowments Corporate Social Responsibility Colleges and Universities

SEWANEE, Tenn. — In 2013, the Board of Regents at the University of the South endorsed a sustainability plan. The school pledged, among many other things, to disclose its endowment holdings and initiate a communitywide discussion about whether those investments matched its values and commitment to the environment.

That debate mostly didn’t happen, at least not to the students’ satisfaction.

So last year, a group of undergraduates began to press for change. They produced a detailed 20-page report and initiated student and faculty resolutions requesting that the school, which is commonly known as Sewanee, do what it had already said it wanted to do with its more than $400 million endowment.

What they told me about their experience should be a warning to any students or alumni who think that a wholesale shift in endowment investing strategy will be an easy thing to accomplish. Get ready for a slog — one that might include portfolio modeling assignments, distracted university leadership and maybe even some name-calling.

Over the past year, the school’s board has assigned the Sewanee students research tasks that professionals could handle much more quickly. The head of the Board of Regents said he had never seen a copy of the proposal that the students had labored over. And in one meeting last year, two of the undergraduates felt that the school’s treasurer — who called them “militant” — had threatened consequences for pursuing a faculty resolution on the issue.

Officials at the school said they never intended to silence or stonewall the undergraduates. So how did it come to pass that they felt nobody was taking them seriously enough?

Sewanee, a school with about 1,700 undergraduates that owns 13,000 acres of vistas and Tennessee forest known simply as the Domain, is a world away from the Connecticut field that climate activists stormed during the most recent Harvard-Yale football game. It is no University of California, either, where fossil-fuel divestment is already in progress.

But activism around socially responsible investing (and divesting) is not just a blue-state phenomenon. An organization called Divest Ed, which maps the movement, shows a double-digit number of colleges and universities where students have raised these issues in states that often (or almost always) vote Republican.

Even in more liberal environs, these discussions can take time. The debate at Middlebury College in Vermont went on at least as long as Sewanee’s before the school chose to begin divesting. In Washington State, the overseers at Whitman College moved a bit faster and did more than the students had asked, moving away not just from coal but from fossil fuels generally.

When Wilder McCoy, a senior, became involved with the Sewanee student group, it had the word “divest” in its name — which they worried could come off as combative. The students eventually renamed their group the Socially Conscious Investment Club, in hopes of signaling their desire for cooperation.

“We really bought into the ethos of trying to make change from inside rather than outside, or taking more of a rah-rah approach,” Mr. McCoy said.

Nevertheless, some school officials didn’t look kindly on their call for campus votes.

E. Douglas Williams, the school’s treasurer, asked to meet Mr. McCoy and another student, Jackson Campbell, early last year. In that meeting, according to the pair, Mr. Williams said that bringing a faculty resolution was “militant.” They said Mr. Williams, who is also an economics professor, had also made pointed remarks about how much they gained from being at the university and how their actions reflected back on them.

Mr. McCoy, who had a scholarship pending, said he had taken Mr. Williams’s words as a veiled threat about their status on campus. It worried him enough that he took his concerns to a dean.

When I asked Mr. Williams about that meeting, he told me that he would never threaten a student and that he had reached out to the pair afterward to apologize for the way they felt about the encounter. He also denied using the term “militant” — then called me back within an hour to say he had, in fact, used the word.

That was just one of several exchanges with Mr. Williams and other people associated with the university that signaled that they weren’t quite taking the students’ arguments seriously. And given the lack of progress so far, the students have started to wonder whether the school is running out the clock.

“They are very aware that we are here for four years, and there are maybe three where people are active enough to be able to fight for change,” Mr. McCoy said. “So I think they are very invested in a strategy of waiting for some people to graduate.”

A strategy, but maybe not a winning one: Demographic trends suggest that Sewanee may soon be fighting for a share of a smaller pool of American applicants, many of whom are interested in how schools conduct themselves as citizens of the planet.

“They are trying to attract the same students as Middlebury and Whitman,” said Nellie Boyd-Owens, another member of the student group. “It looks good to have a sustainability master plan, but it looks better to actually do something.”

Many members of the Socially Conscious Investment Club thought the regents might be more worried about alumni donors. They mentioned one in particular: Gregg Robertson, a shale entrepreneur who helped pay for the renovation of a building where many of them attend class.

Mr. Robertson, who has also helped pay for solar panels around campus, laughed when I asked whether the school should fear his taking offense at any future change in investment strategy. “Wow, what a story you’re telling me!” he said, noting that his name was indeed “all over” the building that “these tree-huggers” frequent.

“I wish the university made endowment investment decisions based on its feelings about me, but I don’t think they do,” he said. “And realistically, the love of that university from alumni transcends anything of a nature like that.”

When I asked the chairman of the Board of Regents, Reid T. Funston, why he thought the students’ proposal hadn’t gotten much traction, it turned out he had never seen it. He missed the meeting where the students presented it — and did not know of its existence until I told him about it.

He did know the board’s investment committee had asked the students to create a mock portfolio. They have been preparing to present it but are now second-guessing themselves. Couldn’t the board dismiss their mere months of data as short-termism? And besides, reams of research in recent years have already proved that so-called Environmental, Social and Governance (E.S.G.) investing rarely harms — and often helps — a portfolio.

The current head of the school’s investment committee, Montague Boyd, did not respond to the messages I left for him. But Mr. Funston, the board chairman, said any requests to the undergraduates were not designed to drown them in busywork. “I hate to hear that they felt like they were being stonewalled,” he said.

He was also contrite about Sewanee’s performance against some of the goals it set for itself in the 2013 sustainability plan. “Have we been able to do everything we wanted, strategically, in terms of following all these principles? Honestly, probably not,” he said.

It is entirely likely that what we have here is a failure to communicate — certainly it’s a failure to communicate well. Mr. Funston is a volunteer; the students are making their case as an extracurricular activity. All are trying their best. And some undergraduates, including Mr. Campbell and Mr. McCoy, have been able to put a tiny slug of the Sewanee endowment to work in impact investments via a different club.

There is also no disagreement about wanting to do what’s best for the institution. Every person I talked to seemed to cherish the place more than the last.

“We love Sewanee,” said Annabel Forward, another member of the student group. “We see this as an opportunity to push the place we love to be the best version of itself it can possibly be.”

But the students can’t help but wonder: Was their politeness a tactical error?

I put this last question to Mr. Campbell and Mr. McCoy, and I could sense their hesitancy. To answer yes would be to edge toward the very militancy that Mr. Williams had accused them of before he tried to take it back.

But here’s what they do know. Questions about how institutions with large pools of money should steward those funds are not going away. To cite just one example, Mr. McCoy pointed to the investment giant BlackRock’s recent announcement that it would consider climate risk in much more of its portfolio.

“Nothing here is groundbreaking,” he said. “It’s really a matter of time until Sewanee has to make a decision, and it’s beneficial to do it sooner rather than later.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is ‘unhappy, bigoted’

Westlake Legal Group stuart-varney-donald-trump-FOX-AP Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is 'unhappy, bigoted' Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ddedfd4-7a4c-51b1-b02a-a6be82dec5fc

Fox Business host Stuart Varney argued that a narrative from “Democrats and the media” that Americans are “unhappy, bigoted, stupid and bad” has been destroyed by a new survey showing that the vast majority of folks are satisfied with their lives and believe that the country is improving on multiple fronts.

“Step away from politics for a moment. Ignore the media. How do we really feel about our lives, our society?” said Varney on Fox Nation’s “My Take.”

“Well, well, well, contrary to all the negativity splashed across our screens every day, Gallup found 84 percent of us are satisfied with the overall quality of our lives,” he continued.

The Gallup survey, conducted from Jan. 2 to 15, also found since Trump’s inauguration there has been double-digit increases in public satisfaction with the nation’s economy, security from terrorism and military strength.

THE CHART THE TRUMP CAMPAIGN SHOULD BE PLASTERING ABSOLUTELY EVERYWHERE: DEIRDRE BOLTON

Feelings of satisfaction also increased with issues that some the president’s critics accuse him of exacerbating, including race relations, income distribution and opportunities to get ahead.

“This is the exact opposite of what we’ve been told by the Democrats and the media. Truth is, the elites have been carried away by their hatred of President Trump,” said Varney.

Gallup noted that “average satisfaction is roughly on par with the level of the early 2000s” at a time when Americans generally expressed feelings of patriotism following the September 11th attacks.

“The jig is up,” Varney contended. “President Trump has won on virtually all fronts.”

“Impeachment has become an embarrassment for the Democrats. The economy is a triumph of tax and red tape reform… And with nine months to the election, the president’s opponents are bitterly divided and frankly misguided,” concluded Varney. “276 days to the election, President Trump is riding high.”

To see Stuart Varney’s full remarks on  “My Take”, and for more episodes of his daily commentary, visit Fox Nation and join today.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR A FOX NATION FREE TRIAL

Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Ainsley Earhardt, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group stuart-varney-donald-trump-FOX-AP Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is 'unhappy, bigoted' Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ddedfd4-7a4c-51b1-b02a-a6be82dec5fc   Westlake Legal Group stuart-varney-donald-trump-FOX-AP Stuart Varney: Poll trashes narrative that America under President Trump is 'unhappy, bigoted' Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 7ddedfd4-7a4c-51b1-b02a-a6be82dec5fc

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Lamar Alexander Says Convicting Trump Would ‘Pour Gasoline on Cultural Fires’

Westlake Legal Group 31dc-alexander1-facebookJumbo Lamar Alexander Says Convicting Trump Would ‘Pour Gasoline on Cultural Fires’ United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Senate Schumer, Charles E Republican Party Presidential Election of 2020 Murkowski, Lisa impeachment Democratic Party Constitution (US) Alexander, Lamar

WASHINGTON — As he weighed the evidence against President Trump, Senator Lamar Alexander reached an unavoidable conclusion: Mr. Trump had done what he was accused of, pressuring a foreign power to investigate his political rival. But however inappropriate his conduct, another conviction overrode the first: Americans would not tolerate the Senate stepping in to substitute its own judgment for that of the voters fewer than 10 months before the next election.

“The Senate reflects the country, and the country is as divided as it has been for a long time,” Mr. Alexander said Friday during an interview in his Capitol office. “For the Senate to tear up the ballots in this election and say President Trump couldn’t be on it, the country probably wouldn’t accept that. It would just pour gasoline on cultural fires that are burning out there.”

With that logic, Mr. Alexander delivered a victory to Mr. Trump — and to Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, with whom Mr. Alexander has been friends for more than a half-century. In announcing he would vote to block witnesses at Mr. Trump’s impeachment trial, he set Mr. Trump on a quick course to his inevitable acquittal.

Many Republicans appeared to be following Mr. Alexander’s lead on Friday, saying the Tennessee senator had echoed the feelings of their caucus — and the country.

“Long story short, @SenatorAlexander most likely expressed the sentiments of the country as a whole as well as any single Senator possibly could,” Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina and a close ally of Mr. Trump’s, wrote on Twitter. “Those who hate Trump and wish to take the voters choice away in an unfounded manner, Sen. Alexander rightly rejected their arguments.”

Senator Ben Sasse, Republican of Nebraska, put it this way: “Lamar speaks for lots and lots of us.”

Mr. Alexander could easily have gone the other way. He is retiring from the Senate and free to vote as he pleases without political consequences. And he said in the interview that Mr. Trump had done exactly what Democrats had accused him of doing: He withheld military aid from Ukraine to pressure the country to investigate his political rival — a move he could not condone.

“I think he did something that was clearly inappropriate,” Mr. Alexander said. “I think it is inappropriate for the president to ask the leader of a foreign nation to investigate a leading political rival, which the president says he did. I think it is inappropriate at least in part to withhold aid to encourage that investigation.”

“But that is not treason, that is not bribery, that is not a high crime and misdemeanor,” he added, listing the criteria enumerated in the Constitution for impeachable offenses.

It is hardly a surprise that Mr. Alexander is effectively coming down on both sides. Widely respected as a Senate “institutionalist” — a guardian of its traditions — he is a product of a bygone time in Republican politics: the pre-Trump era, when lawmakers worked across the political aisle to forge consensus on matters of national importance.

A former governor, university president and secretary of education, Mr. Alexander has modeled himself on Senator Howard R. Baker Jr., another Tennessee Republican, who turned against President Richard M. Nixon during Watergate. Mr. Baker, who died in 2014, introduced Mr. Alexander to Mr. McConnell in 1969, when Mr. Alexander was an aide in the Nixon White House and Mr. McConnell was a legislative assistant to a Kentucky senator.

Few friendships in the Capitol have been as enduring as theirs. Today Mr. McConnell calls Mr. Alexander “my best friend in the Senate.” But Mr. Alexander said he did not give Mr. McConnell — whom he described, aptly, as “a person of few words” — advance notice of his vote.

“I know what he thinks, and he knows that is not the way to influence my decisions,” Mr. Alexander said.

Yet Mr. McConnell did not really have to ask. Although Mr. Alexander was lumped in with three other Republicans — Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Mitt Romney of Utah — who had expressed openness to witnesses, it was clear early on that he was unlikely to vote to include them.

Those close to him say he does not relish shaking things up.

“I think that Lamar has been able to successfully navigate the ins and outs of the new administration because Lamar is very wise in how he shares, when he shares, any disagreement or policy difference he might have with the administration,” said Tom Griscom, a close friend of Mr. Alexander’s who worked as Mr. Baker’s press secretary. “He’s not looking to be out on the front edge of it.”

Another close friend, Tom Ingram, who ran Mr. Alexander’s Senate races and served as his chief of staff, said he was not surprised by Mr. Alexander’s decision. He said Mr. Alexander was troubled by what he regarded as a highly partisan impeachment process in the House, and wanted to assure that the Senate gave it thorough consideration, which was why he had expressed openness to witnesses.

“Knowing the reverence he holds for the presidency — the office, not the person — and for the Senate process and how seriously he takes impeachment, it was going to have to be very clear in his mind that the offense clearly fit the high bar set in the Constitution.”

With 47 Democratic votes (including those of two independents who caucus with them), Senate Democrats would need four Republicans to cross party lines in order to force the Senate to subpoena witnesses and fresh documents. In the end, it appears, they will fall short by two. Ms. Collins and Mr. Romney have said they will vote in favor of witnesses.

A little more than 12 hours after Mr. Alexander had declared his intentions, Ms. Murkowski said Friday that she, too, would vote against.

“Given the partisan nature of this impeachment from the very beginning and throughout, I have come to the conclusion that there will be no fair trial in the Senate,” she said in a statement. “I don’t believe the continuation of this process will change anything.”

“It is sad for me to admit that, as an institution, the Congress has failed,” Ms. Murkowski added.

Unlike Mr. Alexander, she did not pass judgment on Mr. Trump’s behavior. Mr. Alexander’s decision to do so gave Democrats a boost.

“He came to the wrong conclusions about hearing evidence in this trial, that’s clear,” Senator Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader, told reporters on Friday. “But Senator Alexander, a senior Senate Republican, a retiring member, said out loud what I think most Senate Republicans believe in private: That yes, the president did withhold military assistance to try to get Ukraine to help with his election.”

Even so, Mr. Alexander told NPR that he supported Mr. Trump’s re-election.

In the interview with The New York Times, he said voters should take the charges against Mr. Trump into account, but offered a pointed contrast between the president and his would-be Democratic challengers, specifically mentioning Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, an icon of the progressive left who is a leading contender in her party’s nominating contest.

“Whatever you think of his behavior,” Mr. Alexander said of Mr. Trump, “with the terrific economy, with conservative judges, with fewer regulations, you add in there an inappropriate call with the president of Ukraine, and you decide if your prefer him or Elizabeth Warren.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell says Super Bowl LIV will ‘easily’ generate $1B in revenue

Super Bowl LIV will “easily” generate $1 billion in revenue, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell told “Sunday Morning Futures” host Maria Bartiromo in an exclusive interview airing on Fox News Channel Sunday.

Goodell said that the Super Bowl becomes “bigger and bigger every year.”

“And, it becomes more complicated because of that. But, that’s also the fun of it. Because more people share in it. And, more people have an opportunity to be part of the Super Bowl,” he said.

SUPER BOWL LIV TIME, DATE AND EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE GAME

The Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers will go head-to-head Sunday for the NFL championship in Miami, Florida. Kickoff is at 6:30 p.m. ET, with coverage beginning at 2 p.m. ET on Fox.

Both teams were among the top seeds in the NFL Playoffs and won their conference championship games decisively.

Westlake Legal Group SuperBowlLIVSignageJan20 NFL commissioner Roger Goodell says Super Bowl LIV will 'easily' generate $1B in revenue Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/miami fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/atlanta fox-news/sports/nfl/san-francisco-49ers fox-news/sports/nfl/minnesota-vikings fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl/baltimore-ravens fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/sports fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/shows/sunday-morning-futures fox-news/person/kobe-bryant fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox-news/news-events/super-bowl fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 19a8d6d1-9bf7-5bb0-9412-0814a0964980

Signage is displayed near the FOX Sports South Beach studio compound prior to Super Bowl LIV on January 25, 2020 in Miami Beach, Florida. The San Francisco 49ers will face the Kansas City Chiefs in the 54th playing of the Super Bowl, Sunday February 2nd. (Photo by Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images)

The NFL celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2019, with last year’s Super Bowl in Atlanta marking the beginning of the league’s “NFL 100” initiatives, events, and programs.

“We are proud of our 100-year anniversary. It’s been a wonderful celebration for us, so that’s great,” said Goodell, who noted that both teams in Super Bowl LIV have storied histories.

The Chiefs are appearing in the Super Bowl for the first time since 1970, when they defeated the Minnesota Vikings 23-7 in Super Bowl IV. San Francisco has won five Super Bowls, but have not lifted the Lombardi trophy since 1995. Colin Kaepernick led the 49ers to their most recent Super Bowl appearance in 2013, but San Francisco fell 34-31 to the Baltimore Ravens in Super Bowl XLVII.

SUPER BOWL LIV: JENNIFER LOPEZ, SHAKIRA TO PAY TRIBUTE TO KOBE BRYANT DURING HALFTIME SHOW

“We’re excited about the game, of course,” Goodell said, ” but the event is more than a football game.”

“It’s something very special that people look forward to and plan around. It’s essentially become its own holiday,” he stated.

The buildup to the big game has been overshadowed in some respects by the sudden loss of NBA superstar Kobe Bryant, who died alongside his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others in a helicopter crash in Southern California.

Goodell said that crash was a terrible “tragedy.”

“I think it’s hard for all of us to fathom that kind of sadness,” he told Bartiromo.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“And, it unfolded pretty much during the middle of our Pro Bowl last week,” Goodell continued. “So, we began [tributes] immediately. His picture was up in the stadium making our fans aware of the sad news — paying tribute to him. A moment of silence. We did it again on Monday night,”

“So, we’ve continued to keep him, his family, everybody, in our thoughts and prayers. And, obviously, had opportunities for our players to express their sadness about the entire circumstance,” he added.

Watch Maria Bartiromo’s exclusive interview with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell on ‘Sunday Morning Futures’ at 10 a.m. ET on Sunday, February 2.

Fox News’ Ryan Gaydos contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6128683861001_6128685250001-vs NFL commissioner Roger Goodell says Super Bowl LIV will 'easily' generate $1B in revenue Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/miami fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/atlanta fox-news/sports/nfl/san-francisco-49ers fox-news/sports/nfl/minnesota-vikings fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl/baltimore-ravens fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/sports fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/shows/sunday-morning-futures fox-news/person/kobe-bryant fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox-news/news-events/super-bowl fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 19a8d6d1-9bf7-5bb0-9412-0814a0964980   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6128683861001_6128685250001-vs NFL commissioner Roger Goodell says Super Bowl LIV will 'easily' generate $1B in revenue Julia Musto fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/miami fox-news/travel/vacation-destinations/atlanta fox-news/sports/nfl/san-francisco-49ers fox-news/sports/nfl/minnesota-vikings fox-news/sports/nfl/kansas-city-chiefs fox-news/sports/nfl/baltimore-ravens fox-news/sports/nfl fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/sports fox-news/special/occasions/holiday fox-news/shows/sunday-morning-futures fox-news/person/kobe-bryant fox-news/person/colin-kaepernick fox-news/news-events/super-bowl fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 19a8d6d1-9bf7-5bb0-9412-0814a0964980

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Chuck Schumer scolds Kamala Harris for laughing with Sherrod Brown at impeachment presser, goes viral

Westlake Legal Group Schumer-scolds-Harris Chuck Schumer scolds Kamala Harris for laughing with Sherrod Brown at impeachment presser, goes viral Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 1c30b033-10f5-573f-a76d-df546dd0e3ab

An awkward exchange between Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., became a viral sensation on Friday amid the ongoing Senate impeachment trial of President Trump.

Schumer, joined by Harris, Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., held a press conference on Friday as Democrats continued to pressure Senate Republicans to allow additional witnesses to give their testimony. But as a reporter began asking a question to the lawmakers, Harris was seen having a good chuckle with her Ohio colleague, prompting the minority leader to halt Harris’ laughter.

Harris responded with a facial expression of her own.

NADLER APPEARS TO STEAL PODIUM FROM SCHIFF IN VIRAL IMPEACHMENT MOMENT

The moment was shared on social media, and immediately sparked criticism and mockery against the Senate Democrats.

“Remember: Democrats said that #impeachment was ‘sad’ and ‘somber.’ Did Senator Harris not get the memo?” the House Oversight Committee Republicans official Twitter account wrote.

“Schumer: ‘You have the right to remain silent,'” Washington Examiner writer Siraj Hashmi said.

“When you worked really hard on the presentation but the rest of the team that didn’t do any work won’t stop giggling behind you,” filmmaker Anang Mittal reacted.

“Chuck Schumer, quite literally, wants Kamala Harris to curb her enthusiasm,” The Daily Wire wrote on Twitter, sharing an edited version of the clip that included the theme music from Larry David’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm.”

The moment had already inspired a gif.

On Thursday night, Democrats had sparked another viral moment when Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., appeared to steal the podium from leading House impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., at the end of the second day of questioning by the Senate jurors.

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After Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts read the last question for the House managers, Nadler was seen jumping out of his chair and rushing to the center podium, quickly getting the attention of Schiff, who also leaped from his seat.

“Jerry. Jerry. Jerry,” Schiff is heard saying as he took a few steps towards Nadler, but failed to stop him from speaking.

The moment also sparked plenty of laughs on social media.

Westlake Legal Group Schumer-scolds-Harris Chuck Schumer scolds Kamala Harris for laughing with Sherrod Brown at impeachment presser, goes viral Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 1c30b033-10f5-573f-a76d-df546dd0e3ab   Westlake Legal Group Schumer-scolds-Harris Chuck Schumer scolds Kamala Harris for laughing with Sherrod Brown at impeachment presser, goes viral Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/tech/companies/twitter fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/kamala-harris fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 1c30b033-10f5-573f-a76d-df546dd0e3ab

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Missouri mom who looks like Meghan Markle stuns the Internet

Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-GETTY-crop Missouri mom who looks like Meghan Markle stuns the Internet Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/topic/royals fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 76d2eed7-0d7c-5935-ab90-548589c7eb7b

A Missouri mom resembling Meghan Markle has the internet doing double-takes after a photo with her daughter on Instagram went viral.

Akeisha Land, who runs her daughter Greyson’s Instagram account, posted an “usie” on Monday to show off their matching sweatshirts with “LOVE” written on them.

PLUS-SIZE BLOGGER RE-CREATES MEGHAN MARKLE FASHIONS

Instagram users, however, were much more interested in the uncanny likeness between Land and the Duchess of Sussex, who is arguably the most talked-about woman in the world at the moment.

In the photo, the mom slightly smirks, showing no teeth. Her rosy cheeks and brown eyes undoubtedly resemble those of the famous royal.

The comments section was flooded with messages from Instagram users pointing out the obvious doppelganger vibes.

“For a moment I thought you were Meghan Markle,” one user commented, as did hundreds of others.

“Do people tell you all the time that you look like @hrhofsussex?! Both gorgeous!” another person wrote.

MEGHAN MARKLE’S MOTHER WON’T RELOCATE TO CANADA SINCE THEIR RELATIONSHIP ISN’T THAT CLOSE: REPORT

Because the Instagram account is used to primarily post pictures of her daughter, Land said she was shocked and overwhelmed by the fanfare.

“Literally every comment is about me. Normally it’s like, ‘Oh, she’s so cute,’ and that sort of thing but it’s all about me this time. It’s very different!” Land told E! News.

The mother of two said that despite her striking resemblance to Markle, she doesn’t keep up much with the happenings of the American actress-turned-British royal. She does, however, take the comparisons as a “huge compliment.”

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“I think she’s gorgeous so to be mistaken for a royal is definitely quite a compliment,” Land said.

Thanks to the overnight success, Land said she’s now considering using her Meghan Markle looks to land professional gigs.

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“If they want me to go to a party as her, I’m your girl,” she said.

“I am going to start to try to be more in front of the camera,” she added. “I definitely want to put myself out there more and not just my kiddos.”

Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-GETTY-crop Missouri mom who looks like Meghan Markle stuns the Internet Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/topic/royals fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 76d2eed7-0d7c-5935-ab90-548589c7eb7b   Westlake Legal Group Meghan-Markle-GETTY-crop Missouri mom who looks like Meghan Markle stuns the Internet Gerren Keith Gaynor fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/topic/royals fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news/meghan-markle fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 76d2eed7-0d7c-5935-ab90-548589c7eb7b

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Dems work to draw out impeachment finale, potentially pushing final vote into next week

Westlake Legal Group blumenthal_richard_hill Dems work to draw out impeachment finale, potentially pushing final vote into next week Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox news fnc/politics fnc fe8fa125-b994-5d5e-9a9c-1be163946ecc article

The Senate impeachment trial is increasingly expected to drag out until next week — and potentially through President Trump‘s planned State of the Union address on Tuesday night — despite the widespread expectation of acquittal in the end.

Sources familiar with negotiations tell Fox News the trial cannot end on Friday and will continue into next week — possibly Wednesday — as senators must contend with motions and potential debate by senators on the floor or in closed session.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer have not yet hammered out a proposal on how to move forward, Schumer said Friday afternoon, but signaled Democrats may try to force a debate and put senators in a position where they’d have to defend their votes.

DEM LEADERS SIGNAL THEY WON’T ACCEPT TRUMP ACQUITTAL AS LEGITIMATE

“We are going to use whatever power we have… to prevent it from being rushed through, but right now there is no agreement,” Schumer said during a break in the trial.

The timing is especially fluid since the resolution senators passed to open the impeachment trial does not prescribe how to end it. That means the length of motions and timing for procedures are being developed on the fly.

One portion of the trial did come into focus Friday: Republicans have the votes to shut down any new witnesses from testifying in the trial after Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, announced they won’t defect.

MURKOWSKI COMES OUT AGAINST IMPEACHMENT WITNESSES, PUTTING TRUMP ON PATH TO ACQUITTAL

While they won’t get the witnesses, Democrats want to ensure senators take the time to debate the issue anyway — and in public.

“Mitch McConnell wants this over as fast as possible with as little attention as possible,” Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said Friday. “That’s why today I’m going to fight to ensure the American people can hear our deliberations.”

Brown has teamed up with Sens. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill., on two motions to prevent closed-door deliberations and force senators to explain their votes in public.

Unlike typical Senate votes, the rules for impeachment require that any debate among senators take place in secret. Each senator can speak for 10 minutes apiece on a vote on witnesses and 15 minutes each on the final question of whether or not to acquit the president.

Democratic senators will put forth two motions that will force a debate on the two big looming votes — witnesses and the articles of impeachment — which would automatically extend the time of the trial. They propose that the debate be out in the open, rather than in a closed session.

The motions would need the support of 51 senators to pass.

SEN. RAND PAUL FUMES AFTER CHIEF JUSTICE ROBERTS REFUSES HIS WHISTLEBLOWER QUESTION

Blumenthal rejected any criticism that Democrats are trying to extend the trial until past the Iowa caucuses, which would keep four 2020 White House hopefuls away from the campaign trail and past Trump’s planned State of the Union address on Tuesday.

He said the timing of these events “are totally irrelevant.”

“Pardon me for seeming somewhat cavalier about it, but we’re talking about an impeachment trial. Nothing we do as senators will be more important,” Blumenthal said.

Democrats making the case for more witnesses in the trial were dumbfounded that Republicans wouldn’t sign on, especially as new information kept leaking out in real-time.

Shortly before the trial resumed on Friday, The New York Times broke another story on ex-national security adviser John Bolton’s manuscript. In it, Bolton claims Trump directed him to help with his pressure campaign to get damaging information on Democrats from Ukraine.

Trump gave the orders during a May Oval Office meeting that included White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, the president’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and White House counsel Pat Cipollone, who is spearheading Trump’s defense in the impeachment trial, the report said.

“How absolutely outrageous that The New York Times should be doing the investigative work that the Senate is too cowardly to do?” Blumenthal said. “You know we should be thankful we have a free press that is uncovering the truth… They are doing the job that the United States Senate should be doing, but it has abdicated its responsibility.”

Trump has denied Bolton’s claims and dismissed him as a disgruntled ex-employee trying to sell a book.

“I never instructed John Bolton to set up a meeting for Rudy Giuliani, one of the greatest corruption fighters in America and by far the greatest mayor in the history of N.Y.C., to meet with President [Volodymyr] Zelensky. That meeting never happened,” Trump said in a statement.

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Several GOP senators grumbled at the prospect of the trial continuing past Friday. Many expressed frustration that Trump got impeached on what they believe is a flimsy case and they want the trial to end as soon as possible.

“Let’s go and get this over with for the sake of the American people,” Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said.

Sen. Mike Braun, R-Ind., said Trump will be able to give a State of the Union address on Tuesday successfully even if he hasn’t been acquitted just yet.

“He would be able to do almost anything most other individuals couldn’t,” Braun said.

Fox News’ Chad Pergram and Jason Donner contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group blumenthal_richard_hill Dems work to draw out impeachment finale, potentially pushing final vote into next week Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox news fnc/politics fnc fe8fa125-b994-5d5e-9a9c-1be163946ecc article   Westlake Legal Group blumenthal_richard_hill Dems work to draw out impeachment finale, potentially pushing final vote into next week Marisa Schultz fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/senate fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/mitch-mcconnell fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/chuck-schumer fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox news fnc/politics fnc fe8fa125-b994-5d5e-9a9c-1be163946ecc article

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Trump Administration Loosens Obama-Era Restrictions On Land Mine Use

Westlake Legal Group ap_02100902470_wide-3d227443446f350ca9a48b8f6a29dcacbfc769e0-s1100-c15 Trump Administration Loosens Obama-Era Restrictions On Land Mine Use

Smoke rises after South Korean soldiers set a blast to remove land mines in the Demilitarized Zone in 2002. The Korean Peninsula had been the last region the U.S. military was allowed to use the weapon — until Friday, when the Trump administration lifted the Obama-era restriction. Yun Jai-Hyoung/AP hide caption

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Yun Jai-Hyoung/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Administration Loosens Obama-Era Restrictions On Land Mine Use

Smoke rises after South Korean soldiers set a blast to remove land mines in the Demilitarized Zone in 2002. The Korean Peninsula had been the last region the U.S. military was allowed to use the weapon — until Friday, when the Trump administration lifted the Obama-era restriction.

Yun Jai-Hyoung/AP

The Trump administration has lifted a ban on the U.S. military’s use of anti-personnel land mines outside of the Korean Peninsula. In a statement released Friday, the White House said the ban — implemented under the Obama administration — interfered with the president’s “steadfast commitment to ensuring our forces are able to defend against any and all threats.”

“The Department of Defense has determined that restrictions imposed on American forces by the Obama Administration’s policy could place them at a severe disadvantage during a conflict against our adversaries,” said press secretary Stephanie Grisham. “The President is unwilling to accept this risk to our troops.”

In its statement, the administration said a new Defense Department policy will lay out how and when, “in exceptional circumstances,” U.S. military commanders can deploy land mines equipped with self-destruct/self-deactivation mechanisms.

The announcement represents a break with the scores of countries around the world that have banned the weapon’s use. More than 160 countries, including NATO allies the U.K. and France, are party to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction — better known as the Mine Ban Treaty, agreed on in 1997 and implemented in 1999.

But the U.S. has never been among them. Despite President Clinton’s 1994 call for the weapon’s elimination, and despite the Obama administration’s 2014 decision to largely ban their use, Washington has been reluctant to attach itself to the agreement.

So have several dozen other countries, including fellow U.N. Security Council members China and Russia. And there’s the rub, according to Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges, a former commander of U.S. Army Europe.

“I’ve seen nothing in my study of Russian or Chinese history that gives me any confidence that they would respect international law. So this is about being able to protect allies and protect our own troops,” Hodges told NPR.

Critics are highly skeptical of the weapon’s capacity to act as advertised. Land mines cause thousands of reported casualties each year, the vast majority of which impact civilians, not military forces.

As the Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor noted in a report last year, 71% of the casualties caused by land mines in 2018 were civilians. That share actually represents a dip from previous years, when the percentage of civilian casualties climbed as high as 87%.

“This dreadful policy decision is another dangerous change for this administration that further withdraws the United States from the global norm,” Jeff Abramson, senior fellow at the Arms Control Association, said in a statement Thursday anticipating the move. “This follows earlier steps such as making it easier to use cluster munitions, contrary to the Convention on Cluster Munitions, and ending support for the Arms Trade Treaty — both treaties widely backed by US allies.”

“​The world has moved on from the use of landmines,” he added. “The United States should too.”

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., also registered his firm objection in a statement released Thursday.

“The current policy, limiting the use of this inherently indiscriminate weapon to the Korean Peninsula, is the culmination of nearly 30 years of incremental steps, taken by both Democratic and Republican administrations after extensive analysis and consultation, toward the growing global consensus that anti-personnel mines should be universally banned,” Leahy said.

“The Congress,” he added, “must be consulted before any decision that would reverse the gains we have made toward ending the carnage caused by landmines.”

Still, Defense Secretary Mark Esper, at a joint news conference Friday with his Italian counterpart, defended the move as the product of close consideration from the Pentagon.

“I think land mines are an important tool that our forces need to have available to them in order to ensure mission success and in order to reduce risk to forces,” he told journalists.

“That said, in everything we do, we also want to make sure that these instruments — in this case, land mines — also take into account both the safety of employment and the safety to civilians and others after a conflict.”

NPR’s Michele Kelemen contributed to this report.

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Attorney tells McConnell that Parnas has records ‘directly relevant’ to impeachment

Westlake Legal Group FF85K8ZYJ8YED3JUEcKf10cBeNslWOnmCbUiCj6elXI Attorney tells McConnell that Parnas has records 'directly relevant' to impeachment r/politics

No. McConnell knows and that’s why McConnell doesn’t want the public to know. He does care, he gives a massive shit about it, for the negative reason though.

SO MANY GOPers are caught up in this that the truth will upend the party (if it hasn’t already with the classic Republicans). Hell, the president’s council, Cipollone, was just implicated in the same crime he’s defending against. Let alone the more recent news of Jim Jordan, Devin Nunes, Mike Pompeo, Lindsay Graham, Rick Perry, Matt Gaetz, and William Barr. And that’s just the names I can think of off-hand.

This has been decades in the making, and Trump was the last puzzle piece to execute the plan and install the players that only POTUS is afforded to do.

Trump is being played as much as he is playing the GOP. They like him because he’ll push thru anything they want so long as they defend anything he wants. It’s a very reciprocated relationship.

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