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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 323)

Susan Rice blasts Trump over secure server, asked if Obama ever used similar system

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5733646899001_5733608298001-vs Susan Rice blasts Trump over secure server, asked if Obama ever used similar system fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 7e9aad2d-0bd1-55bd-97a5-afe53868f863

Susan Rice, who was one of President Obama‘s closest advisers during his time in office, blasted President Trump on Friday night for storing details about his July 25 call with Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky in a separate, highly secured computer system.

CONWAY SAYS PELOSI WAS PRESSURED BY MEN BEFORE IMPEACHMENT DECISION

Rice, who was a guest at the Texas Tribune Festival in Austin, addressed whistleblower allegations that the Trump administration worked to “lock down” these records to presumably hide his interaction with Zelensky where he dangled about $400 million in military aid to get Kiev to investigate the Bidens relationship too the country.

Both Trump and Zelensky denied the allegations. Trump insisted that the conversation was “perfect” and he was just making sure the country was making good on its promise to weed out corruption.

Obama’s former national security adviser said the “normal system” that holds information on similar calls is protected and classified. She said there was “no classified substance” in the Trump phone call and yet the administration “hid it on a very highly sensitive, highly compartmentalized server that very few people in the U.S. government have access to in order to bury it.”

She was asked by the moderator if the Obama administration ever kept calls on a separate server. She responded by saying only if “they were legitimately in their contents classified.”

“It’s rare that a presidential conversation would be classified to that highest level,” she said. “It’s not impossible. It’s very rare. Even when they are two leaders discussing classified information. Here’s a case where there was nothing classified and it was moved to the most secure, sensitive server.”

The Wall Street Journal reported on Saturday that the Trump administration—after sensing problematic leaks early in his presidency—worked to protect presidential phone calls. Politicians on both sides of the aisle understand the importance of a sitting president’s ability to engage with a foreign leader in a conversation that would not face public scrutiny.

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The Trump administration reportedly said the phone call with Ukraine’s leader was only added to the server after guidance from  National Security Counsel lawyer.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5733646899001_5733608298001-vs Susan Rice blasts Trump over secure server, asked if Obama ever used similar system fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 7e9aad2d-0bd1-55bd-97a5-afe53868f863   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_5733646899001_5733608298001-vs Susan Rice blasts Trump over secure server, asked if Obama ever used similar system fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/politics fnc Edmund DeMarche article 7e9aad2d-0bd1-55bd-97a5-afe53868f863

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Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062886128001_6062889935001-vs Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc article 28f54621-6e15-5199-9847-187ef4581d6b

The Trump administration was dealt a blow late Friday by a federal judge after she ruled to block its move that would allow immigration officers to deport people who entered the U.S. illegally before they appear before judges.

The policy, which was announced in July but hasn’t yet been enforced, would allow fast-track deportations to apply to anyone in the country illegally for less than two years. Now, they are largely limited to people arrested almost immediately after crossing the Mexican border.

U.S. District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, an appointee of President Barack Obama, said the administration’s expansion of “expedited removal” authority violated procedural requirements to first seek public comment and ignored flaws in how it has been used on a smaller scale at the border.

The shortcomings, which were not challenged by government lawyers, include allegations that some people entitled to be in the country were targeted for deportation, translators weren’t provided, and authorities made “egregious errors” recording statements of migrants who said they feared persecution or torture if sent back to their homelands.

A spokesman from the Justice Department told the Washington Post that “Congress expressly authorized the Secretary of Homeland Security to act with dispatch to remove from the country aliens who have no right to be here. The district court’s decision squarely conflicts with that express grant of authority and vastly exceeds the district court’s own authority.”

Jackson did not rule on the merits of the case, but the ruling prevents the administration from expanding fast-track authority nationwide while the lawsuit proceeds.

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The fast-track deportation powers were created under a 1996 law but didn’t become a major piece of border enforcement until 2004, when Homeland Security said it would be enforced for people who are arrested within two weeks of entering the U.S. by land and caught within 100 miles of the border. Defenders say it relieves burdens on immigration judges — their backlog of cases recently topped 1 million — while critics say it grants too much power to Border Patrol agents and other immigration enforcement officials and jeopardizes rights to fair treatment.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062886128001_6062889935001-vs Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc article 28f54621-6e15-5199-9847-187ef4581d6b   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062886128001_6062889935001-vs Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc article 28f54621-6e15-5199-9847-187ef4581d6b

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Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062886128001_6062889935001-vs Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc article 28f54621-6e15-5199-9847-187ef4581d6b

The Trump administration was dealt a blow late Friday by a federal judge after she ruled to block its move that would allow immigration officers to deport people who entered the U.S. illegally before they appear before judges.

The policy, which was announced in July but hasn’t yet been enforced, would allow fast-track deportations to apply to anyone in the country illegally for less than two years. Now, they are largely limited to people arrested almost immediately after crossing the Mexican border.

U.S. District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, an appointee of President Barack Obama, said the administration’s expansion of “expedited removal” authority violated procedural requirements to first seek public comment and ignored flaws in how it has been used on a smaller scale at the border.

The shortcomings, which were not challenged by government lawyers, include allegations that some people entitled to be in the country were targeted for deportation, translators weren’t provided, and authorities made “egregious errors” recording statements of migrants who said they feared persecution or torture if sent back to their homelands.

A spokesman from the Justice Department told the Washington Post that “Congress expressly authorized the Secretary of Homeland Security to act with dispatch to remove from the country aliens who have no right to be here. The district court’s decision squarely conflicts with that express grant of authority and vastly exceeds the district court’s own authority.”

Jackson did not rule on the merits of the case, but the ruling prevents the administration from expanding fast-track authority nationwide while the lawsuit proceeds.

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The fast-track deportation powers were created under a 1996 law but didn’t become a major piece of border enforcement until 2004, when Homeland Security said it would be enforced for people who are arrested within two weeks of entering the U.S. by land and caught within 100 miles of the border. Defenders say it relieves burdens on immigration judges — their backlog of cases recently topped 1 million — while critics say it grants too much power to Border Patrol agents and other immigration enforcement officials and jeopardizes rights to fair treatment.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062886128001_6062889935001-vs Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc article 28f54621-6e15-5199-9847-187ef4581d6b   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6062886128001_6062889935001-vs Federal judge rules against Trump administration on fast-track deportation policy fox-news/us/immigration fox-news/politics/judiciary/federal-courts fox news fnc/politics fnc article 28f54621-6e15-5199-9847-187ef4581d6b

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Preying on Children: The Emerging Psychology of Pedophiles

Westlake Legal Group 29pedophile-facebookJumbo Preying on Children: The Emerging Psychology of Pedophiles Sex Crimes Psychology and Psychologists Cyberharassment Children and Childhood Child Abuse and Neglect

Images of child sex abuse have reached a crisis point on the internet, spreading at unprecedented rates in part because tech platforms and law enforcement agencies have failed to keep pace with the problem. But less is understood about the issue underlying it all: What drives people to sexually abuse children?

Science in recent years has begun to provide some answers. One thing most pedophiles have in common: They discover, usually as teenagers, that their sexual preferences have not matured like everyone else’s. Most get stuck on the same-age boys or girls who first attracted them at the start of puberty, though some retain interest in far younger children.

“People don’t choose what arouses them — they discover it,” said Dr. Fred Berlin, director of the Johns Hopkins Sex and Gender Clinic. “No one grows up wanting to be a pedophile.”

[Read The New York Times’s investigation into the spread of online child sex abuse.]

Over the past generation, psychologists, forensic specialists and others have studied pedophilia, a disorder characterized by “recurrent, intense arousing fantasies, urges or behaviors involving sexual activity with a prepubescent child,” according to psychiatry’s diagnostic manual. These experts have interviewed patients in depth, piecing together life histories and performing a variety of psychological and anatomical measures.

While no study offers a complete picture, a portrait is emerging — one that helps elucidate the mental dynamic behind the surge in abuse images and the deepening depravity they depict. These findings also defy common stereotypes about what pedophilia is, and what the risks are for engaging in physical abuse.

A majority of convicted offenders are men who prey on children ages 6 to 17. But women also commit hands-on offenses; rough estimates put the rate of pedophilic attraction at 1 to 4 percent in both men and women. Studies suggest that a small subset of male and female pedophiles have an interest in toddlers, or even infants.

As scientists seek to understand how the disorder develops, there is growing consensus that the origin is largely biological. This view is based in part on studies pointing to subtle physical traits that have a higher incidence among pedophiles.

“The biological clues attached to pedophilia demonstrate that its roots are prenatal,” said James Cantor, director of the Toronto Sexuality Center. “These are not genetic; they can be traced to specific periods of development in the womb.”

Psychological and environmental factors may also contribute, though it is not yet clear what those are or how they interact with developmental conditions.

By contrast, the common presumption that pedophiles were themselves abused as children now has less support. Child victims are at far greater risk of future substance abuse, depression, persistent traumatic stress or criminal aggression than of becoming molesters. The vast majority of offenders deny any sex abuse in their childhood, even though they could garner sympathy in court by doing so, experts say. “A chaotic childhood increases the likelihood of a chaotic adulthood, of any kind,” Dr. Cantor said.

The relationship between viewing or collecting images and committing hands-on abuse is a matter of continuing debate among some experts, and one that is critical to evaluating the risk an offender poses. Until recently, the prevailing view was that only a minority of people caught viewing such images, between 5 and 20 percent, also committed physical abuse.

That perception began to change in 2007, when a pair of psychologists at the Federal Bureau of Prisons reported that 85 percent of convicted online offenders acknowledged in therapy that they had raped or otherwise sexually abused children.

That finding circulated widely before the study was formally published, creating an uproar among therapists, researchers and law enforcement specialists. The prisons bureau balked at publishing it at all, and withdrew it from a peer-reviewed journal close to its release date.

Many cited concerns that the study sample was biased: It was based on the confessions of 155 convicts who had sought out therapy in prison, not on a representative sample of pedophiles, a much broader group with diverse habits.

“It was what we call a convenience sample — that was a legitimate criticism,” said Michael L. Bourke, a co-author of the study with Andres E. Hernandez, in a telephone interview. Dr. Bourke is now chief of the behavioral analysis unit of the United States Marshals.

Since then, several other studies have supported the prison finding, if not precisely the 85 percent number. In one, inspectors from an array of government agencies interviewed 127 online offenders shortly after their arrests. Less than 5 percent admitted to previously molesting at least one child.

When agents followed up with more in-depth, polygraph-assisted methods, another 53 percent admitted to hands-on offenses, for a total of nearly 60 percent.

“This was not a convenience sample; these were offenders, some of whom had downloaded just a single image, with no known history, from all over the country, interviewed by people from different agencies,” Dr. Bourke said. “They had zero incentive to admit to a previous offense — very much the opposite.”

The high rate of previous, hands-on offending undermines another common assumption about pedophiles. “We shouldn’t assume that viewing online images leads to abuse of a child victim in person,” said Joe Sullivan, a specialist in sex crimes against children in Ireland and Britain. “In my clinical experience, it’s the other way around. Most of these men have already committed hands-on offenses.”

From this point of view, downloading abuse images — and especially connecting with groups of like-minded pedophiles online — does not awaken latent desires. The desires are very much awake and, in many cases, have already been acted on. But the images and online communities can help erode inhibitions further, drawing pedophiles into more frequent or more aggressive acts, Dr. Bourke said.

“What you see, in their search histories,” he said, “is that they learn how to evade law enforcement, they become more confident and they begin to use cognitive distortions to overcome their moral inhibitions.”

Some therapists and researchers say these findings from law enforcement threaten to unfairly tar people who never act on their desires. This group certainly exists — they’re sometimes called “virtuous pedophiles” — but in an era of increasing alarm over the proliferation of online abuse, they are going only further underground.

“That is a shame, a tragedy,” Dr. Cantor said. “That is the group we need to learn about. That’s the kind of person we’d like our clients to become, a person who’s aware of the urges and learns to effectively manage them.”

Learning to manage a drive as visceral, and often consuming, as sexual desire is possible, therapists say, but it cannot be shut off; nor can it be replaced, the way heroin can be swapped for methadone. Treatment can require drugs that reduce circulating testosterone and software that limits online browsing habits.

Often, therapy addresses substance abuse as well. Studies suggest that at least 40 percent of sex offenders were using drugs or alcohol when they committed their crimes.

“The important thing, I think, is that people know that treatment is possible,” Dr. Berlin said. “There’s a subgroup out there, they refer themselves here, and they are quite convinced that they do not want real-life sex with children.”

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‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin returns as Trump concerned about impeachment; ‘Kanye’ ends friendship

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close 'SNL': Alec Baldwin returns as Trump concerned about impeachment; 'Kanye' ends friendship

Leslie Jones will not return for Season 45 of NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.” Jones was on “SNL” for five seasons. USA TODAY

President Donald Trump was present to kick off Season 45 of “Saturday Night Live” — well, the sketch show’s president anyway.

Alec Baldwin resumed his Trump persona, who was seeking advice for how to handle a possible impeachment.

Trump’s Baldwin vented to Rudy Giuliani, played by Kate McKinnon on the phone.

“I’m being impeached. It’s the greatest presidential harassment of all time,” Baldwin complained. “I’m like the president of harassment.”

Unconcerned and confident, Giuliani advised the president to “relax.”

“Trump” turned to “the perfect stooge,”  Vice President Mike Pence (Beck Bennett) to try to convince him to take a hit on the “Ukraine whistleblower thing.”

The “SNL” president also turned to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (newcomer Bowen Yang) for advice on dealing with a whistleblower.

“That’s easy. You have a big ocean in your country?” he inquired. “Send whistleblower to the bottom of there.” 

“I wish my country was as cool as your country,” Baldwin’s Trump said.

‘Saturday Night Live’: The 5 worst musical performances ever, including Ashlee Simpson and Kanye West

Shane Gillis jokes about ‘SNL’ firing, Asians and ‘funny’ Trump assassination at NYC show

The president stayed on the phone during the cold open, even chatting with Kanye West (Chris Redd).

“Actually, you remember those pills I was supposed to take,” “West” began. “It turns out I’m supposed to take ’em every day? Can you believe that?” 

He then informed the president he didn’t feel they could be “fam anymore.”

Don King (Kenan Thompson) then hopped on the phone to tell “Trump” that “this whole impeachment thing is hurting our brand.”

A disheartened “Trump” said: “Don’t bail on me now, I need my urbans,” offering to get someone out of jail. 

Grasping at perhaps his last hope, Trump’s Baldwin called actor Liev Schreiber, mistaking him for his character, fixer Ray Donovan from the Showtime series of the same name.

“Uh, I told you, Mr. President, Ray Donovan’s a fictional character. I’m Liev Schreiber, the actor.”

“Of course, right, I knew that, but if you can’t do it, can you connect me with John Wick?”

After learning Wick is also fictional, Baldwin’s Trump requested Liam Neeson.

“Actually (he) might do it,” Schreiber said, in perhaps a reference to the “Taken” actor’s revelation that he sought to kill a black person to — in his mind — right the rape of his friend.

“I’ll get him. Problem solved,” Baldwin said.

Orlando Bloom reveals why he turned down ‘Saturday Night Live’ hosting gig

Leslie Jones breaks silence on leaving ‘Saturday Night Live,’ teases ‘amazing projects’

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Nancy Pelosi Says Public Opinion Shifting In Support Of Impeachment Inquiry

Westlake Legal Group 5d9024382100003700fd4064 Nancy Pelosi Says Public Opinion Shifting In Support Of Impeachment Inquiry

AUSTIN, TX, Sept 28 (Reuters) – U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Saturday that public opinion is now on the side of an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump following the release of new information about his conversations with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Pelosi this week announced her support for an investigation after the surfacing of a whistleblower complaint that said Trump appeared to solicit a political favor from Ukraine’s president aimed at helping him be re-elected next year.

Pelosi for months took a cautious approach in weighing the calls of other Democratic House members to launch impeachment proceedings against Trump, which grew louder after former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testified on July 24 about his probe of Trump and Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“In the public, the tide has completely changed; it could change now – who knows – but right now after seeing the complaint and the IG (Inspector General) report and the cavalier attitude the administration had towards it, the American peopleare coming to a different decision,” Pelosi said at a journalism event hosted by the Texas Tribune news website.

She added that her resistance to holding an impeachment inquiry quickly evolved from urging that fellow Democrats remain cautious of the political fallout ahead of next year’s elections to full steam ahead as details emerged of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine’s leader.

“A president of the United States would withhold military assistance paid for by taxpayers to shake down the leader ofanother country unless he did him a political favor – that is so, so clear,” Pelso said.

In a July 25 telephone call between Trump and Zelenskiy, the U.S. leader asked his counterpart to launch an investigation of Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, who had served on the board of a Ukrainian energy company.

Both Bidens have denied any wrongdoing.

Trump has blasted the impeachment inquiry, arguing that he did nothing wrong and accusing Democrats of launching apolitically motivated “witch hunt.”

Lawmakers in the Democratic-led House of Representatives are investigating concerns that Trump’s actions have jeopardized national security and the integrity of U.S. elections.

The impeachment inquiry has cast a new pall over Trump’s presidency just months after he emerged from the shadow cast by Mueller’s investigation.

“If the facts are persuasive to the American people, they may be to some Republicans,” Pelosi said during the event.

Pelosi would not forecast how long it may take for the House to complete any possible impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“It will take as long as the Intelligence Committee needs to follow all the facts,” she said.

Several Democratic presidential candidates attended the three-day event in Austin, including Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Representative Beto O’Rourke, Senator Amy Klobuchar and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, all of whom agreed with Pelosi that the campaign to push Trump from office must focus on policies and not impeachment.

While some polls have shown Americans are split on supporting impeachment, Castro, who served under former President Barack Obama, said he thinks the public will increasingly back the inquiry.

“Like in Watergate, after more evidence gets out there …you’ll see more people of different political stripes start to support it,” Castro said at the event, referring to moves in 1974 to impeach former President Richard Nixon.

Nixon resigned before impeachment proceedings were launched.

(Reporting by Brad Brooks in Austin, Tx; Additional reporting by Christopher Bing, in Washington, DC; Editing by Dan Grebler and Stephen Coates)

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Nancy Pelosi Says Public Opinion Shifting In Support Of Impeachment Inquiry

Westlake Legal Group 5d9024382100003700fd4064 Nancy Pelosi Says Public Opinion Shifting In Support Of Impeachment Inquiry

AUSTIN, TX, Sept 28 (Reuters) – U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Saturday that public opinion is now on the side of an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump following the release of new information about his conversations with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Pelosi this week announced her support for an investigation after the surfacing of a whistleblower complaint that said Trump appeared to solicit a political favor from Ukraine’s president aimed at helping him be re-elected next year.

Pelosi for months took a cautious approach in weighing the calls of other Democratic House members to launch impeachment proceedings against Trump, which grew louder after former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testified on July 24 about his probe of Trump and Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“In the public, the tide has completely changed; it could change now – who knows – but right now after seeing the complaint and the IG (Inspector General) report and the cavalier attitude the administration had towards it, the American peopleare coming to a different decision,” Pelosi said at a journalism event hosted by the Texas Tribune news website.

She added that her resistance to holding an impeachment inquiry quickly evolved from urging that fellow Democrats remain cautious of the political fallout ahead of next year’s elections to full steam ahead as details emerged of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine’s leader.

“A president of the United States would withhold military assistance paid for by taxpayers to shake down the leader ofanother country unless he did him a political favor – that is so, so clear,” Pelso said.

In a July 25 telephone call between Trump and Zelenskiy, the U.S. leader asked his counterpart to launch an investigation of Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, who had served on the board of a Ukrainian energy company.

Both Bidens have denied any wrongdoing.

Trump has blasted the impeachment inquiry, arguing that he did nothing wrong and accusing Democrats of launching apolitically motivated “witch hunt.”

Lawmakers in the Democratic-led House of Representatives are investigating concerns that Trump’s actions have jeopardized national security and the integrity of U.S. elections.

The impeachment inquiry has cast a new pall over Trump’s presidency just months after he emerged from the shadow cast by Mueller’s investigation.

“If the facts are persuasive to the American people, they may be to some Republicans,” Pelosi said during the event.

Pelosi would not forecast how long it may take for the House to complete any possible impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“It will take as long as the Intelligence Committee needs to follow all the facts,” she said.

Several Democratic presidential candidates attended the three-day event in Austin, including Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Representative Beto O’Rourke, Senator Amy Klobuchar and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, all of whom agreed with Pelosi that the campaign to push Trump from office must focus on policies and not impeachment.

While some polls have shown Americans are split on supporting impeachment, Castro, who served under former President Barack Obama, said he thinks the public will increasingly back the inquiry.

“Like in Watergate, after more evidence gets out there …you’ll see more people of different political stripes start to support it,” Castro said at the event, referring to moves in 1974 to impeach former President Richard Nixon.

Nixon resigned before impeachment proceedings were launched.

(Reporting by Brad Brooks in Austin, Tx; Additional reporting by Christopher Bing, in Washington, DC; Editing by Dan Grebler and Stephen Coates)

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Aaron Carter shows off huge face tattoo amid family drama

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6087792154001_6087778731001-vs Aaron Carter shows off huge face tattoo amid family drama New York Post fox-news/person/aaron-carter fnc/entertainment fnc article afd0697c-b1f8-522f-b0b9-c135da0f7da8

Despite major family controversy, Aaron Carter debuted a massive face tattoo on Saturday.

In one of two pics of the tat, Carter, 31, admired his new facial ink in the mirror while sporting some new bling.

ADAM LEVINE STUNS FANS WITH NEW LOOK

“@johnnydangandco you’re the greatest in the game everyone needs to know and they will after THIS PIECE,” he wrote, thanking the jeweler.

In another photo, Carter removed his shirt while declaring himself, “THE BIGGEST THING IN MUSIC RIGHT NOW. I CANT BE DENIED. FACT CHECK ME.”

The new ink and bling come amid family drama for the performer, as he recently claimed his deceased sister molested him as a child. His older brother, Nick Carter, 39, and twin sister Angel have also taken a restraining order out against him after claiming the “Sooner Or Later” artist confessed to harboring intentions of killing his pregnant wife and unborn child.

On Friday, Aaron tweeted, “I WILL be showing up to court for my sister, Angel’s case against me. But I will not be going for my brother, Nick. I don’t care if he has a restraining order against me, I will never see or speak to him again or the rest of my family.”

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On a lighter note for the Carter family, the Backstreet Boy shared an adorable photo with son Oden on Saturday, hinting that his wife, Lauren Kitt, may have given birth to their second child.

Click for more from The New York Post

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6087792154001_6087778731001-vs Aaron Carter shows off huge face tattoo amid family drama New York Post fox-news/person/aaron-carter fnc/entertainment fnc article afd0697c-b1f8-522f-b0b9-c135da0f7da8   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6087792154001_6087778731001-vs Aaron Carter shows off huge face tattoo amid family drama New York Post fox-news/person/aaron-carter fnc/entertainment fnc article afd0697c-b1f8-522f-b0b9-c135da0f7da8

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Nancy Pelosi Says Public Opinion Shifting In Support Of Impeachment Inquiry

Westlake Legal Group 5d9024382100003700fd4064 Nancy Pelosi Says Public Opinion Shifting In Support Of Impeachment Inquiry

AUSTIN, TX, Sept 28 (Reuters) – U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Saturday that public opinion is now on the side of an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump following the release of new information about his conversations with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Pelosi this week announced her support for an investigation after the surfacing of a whistleblower complaint that said Trump appeared to solicit a political favor from Ukraine’s president aimed at helping him be re-elected next year.

Pelosi for months took a cautious approach in weighing the calls of other Democratic House members to launch impeachment proceedings against Trump, which grew louder after former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testified on July 24 about his probe of Trump and Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“In the public, the tide has completely changed; it could change now – who knows – but right now after seeing the complaint and the IG (Inspector General) report and the cavalier attitude the administration had towards it, the American peopleare coming to a different decision,” Pelosi said at a journalism event hosted by the Texas Tribune news website.

She added that her resistance to holding an impeachment inquiry quickly evolved from urging that fellow Democrats remain cautious of the political fallout ahead of next year’s elections to full steam ahead as details emerged of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine’s leader.

“A president of the United States would withhold military assistance paid for by taxpayers to shake down the leader ofanother country unless he did him a political favor – that is so, so clear,” Pelso said.

In a July 25 telephone call between Trump and Zelenskiy, the U.S. leader asked his counterpart to launch an investigation of Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, who had served on the board of a Ukrainian energy company.

Both Bidens have denied any wrongdoing.

Trump has blasted the impeachment inquiry, arguing that he did nothing wrong and accusing Democrats of launching apolitically motivated “witch hunt.”

Lawmakers in the Democratic-led House of Representatives are investigating concerns that Trump’s actions have jeopardized national security and the integrity of U.S. elections.

The impeachment inquiry has cast a new pall over Trump’s presidency just months after he emerged from the shadow cast by Mueller’s investigation.

“If the facts are persuasive to the American people, they may be to some Republicans,” Pelosi said during the event.

Pelosi would not forecast how long it may take for the House to complete any possible impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“It will take as long as the Intelligence Committee needs to follow all the facts,” she said.

Several Democratic presidential candidates attended the three-day event in Austin, including Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Representative Beto O’Rourke, Senator Amy Klobuchar and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, all of whom agreed with Pelosi that the campaign to push Trump from office must focus on policies and not impeachment.

While some polls have shown Americans are split on supporting impeachment, Castro, who served under former President Barack Obama, said he thinks the public will increasingly back the inquiry.

“Like in Watergate, after more evidence gets out there …you’ll see more people of different political stripes start to support it,” Castro said at the event, referring to moves in 1974 to impeach former President Richard Nixon.

Nixon resigned before impeachment proceedings were launched.

(Reporting by Brad Brooks in Austin, Tx; Additional reporting by Christopher Bing, in Washington, DC; Editing by Dan Grebler and Stephen Coates)

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Week 5 observations: Clemson is ranked No. 1 but it isn’t the best college football team

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Week 5 observations: Clemson is ranked No. 1 but it isn't the best college football team

SportsPulse: USA TODAY Sports’ Paul Myerberg provides his opinion of the top three programs in the history of college football. USA TODAY

Clemson is the defending national champion and the No. 1 team in the Amway Coaches Poll, but the Tigers aren’t the best team in the country right now and probably shouldn’t be ranked that way.  

The Tigers are 5-0 after holding off North Carolina, 21-20, but there are issues.  

First, a caveat: Clemson has kind of pulled this underwhelming act before early in the year, revved up the engines by November and then blasted off in the College Football Playoff for a pair of national titles. Based on that track record and nothing else, you probably shouldn’t worry too much about how the Tigers look right now. 

But, boy, they sure don’t look like they’d be ready to compete today with the likes of Ohio State and Georgia, much less Alabama. And the reason is, oddly, because of the Clemson offense, which is laboring to move the football despite bringing back most of the key pieces that boat-raced Alabama in January. 

More: Clemson barely survives wake-up call from North Carolina

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Quarterback Trevor Lawrence has moments where he looks like the No. 1 draft pick in 2021, but he follows them with too many moments where he makes questionable decisions or his mechanics break down in ways they didn’t last season. (What’s up with all the throws off his back foot?) Running back Travis Etienne had just 67 yards on 14 carries against the Tar Heels, and generally Clemson just isn’t getting enough done with the running game. 

What’s really carrying Clemson right now is its defense, which was a question mark coming into the season because of the losses up front but has held up well with new personnel. North Carolina gained just 290 yards but still had a two-point conversion try to take the lead with 1:17 remaining. For some reason, the Tar Heels called an option play and Clemson read it the entire way for a rather routine stop. 

After the game, coach Dabo Swinney acknowledged that Clemson had been outplayed and outcoached and was fortunate to win. It’s certainly not the first time, as Clemson has survived a few of these close calls over the years against teams that appear overmatched on paper. 

You have to think that Clemson’s offensive talent is eventually going to play to its level and this will look like the No. 1 team in the country by the end. But for now, the Tigers have given plenty of justification to be moved down in the polls. 

Here are nine other observations from the college football weekend: 

Ohio State looks scary

The schedule has not yet offered the Buckeyes a legitimate test in Ryan Day’s first season as head coach, but my goodness do they look like a machine right now. Ohio State’s string of blowouts to begin this season continued at Nebraska in a 48-7 win that looked laughably easy on every front. 

The biggest difference for the Buckeyes this year is the defense, which held Nebraska to 76 yards of offense in the first half (231 for the entire game) and created three turnovers. Even bad teams were able to score on Ohio State last season, but this year the Buckeyes have been air tight against teams with less talent, allowing just 10 points to Indiana, five to Miami of Ohio and none to Cincinnati.

But there’s also this: Quarterback Justin Fields looks absolutely phenomenal, to the point where you kind of have to wonder if Georgia will regret letting him go. 

Fields, who some believed was the nation’s top quarterback prospect in the recruiting class of 2018, made almost no impact as a freshman at Georgia last year playing behind Jake Fromm. Though Kirby Smart gave him some specialty packages to work with in almost exclusively running situations, the Georgia offense didn’t flatter his skillset and it was clear that he wasn’t going to supplant Fromm as the starter. 

So Fields transferred to Ohio State and has already proven he can throw the ball — he’s got 16 touchdown passes with no interceptions so far — while looking more comfortable every week. Though the level of competition will go up soon, Fields is looking like the player he was supposed to be coming out of high school, which means Ohio State has a real chance to win a national championship. 

Auburn might be the best team in the SEC

Don’t worry, that rumbling in your stomach isn’t a virus or motion sickness bubbling up. It’s the familiar feeling that this is one of those odd-numbered “Auburn years” where the Tigers not only get the breaks, but they’re good enough to take advantage of them. 

While Alabama and LSU look awesome on offense, Auburn looks like the most classic SEC team of the group. Not only are the Tigers predictably stout on defense, but they’re getting better every week with freshman Bo Nix at quarterback and had a lot of their game clicking Saturday in a blowout win over Mississippi State. Sure, it was just Mississippi State, but Auburn had control of it from the jump, pilling up 328 yards of offense and 42 points in the first half alone. And unlike Alabama, which hasn’t played anyone of consequence yet, the Tigers already have wins banked over Oregon and on the road at Texas A&M. 

Auburn has tough road tests remaining at Florida and LSU, but this is one of those years where the Tigers play Georgia and Alabama at home, which theoretically should give them a little margin for error in the SEC West and the playoff race. So far, Auburn has been as impressive as anyone in the SEC.  

The Pac-12 isn’t dead

You wouldn’t necessarily predict it as of today, but there’s still a chance for the Pac-12 to get into the College Football Playoff. The bottom line is this: The Oregon-Washington game in Seattle on Oct. 19 will eliminate the lower and give the winner a shot if they can go undefeated the rest of the way. That’s a narrow path, admittedly, but it’s a path — particularly for Oregon, whose 27-21 loss to Auburn in the season opener looks better by the day.

Washington still doesn’t inspire a ton of confidence in big games, but its 20-19 loss to Cal doesn’t seem quite as bad as it did at the time, and the Huskies have bounced back nicely, including Saturday’s 28-14 win over USC. If they can beat Oregon, that’s a signature win that should carry some weight with the selection committee if Clemson or a Big 12 team stumbles. 

Fans getting frustrated with Fuente

Of the 28 coaching changes that followed the 2015 season, none received more acclaim than Virginia Tech hiring Justin Fuente. And after a strong debut season that included a trip to the ACC championship game, it seemed like the transition out of the Frank Beamer era was going to be unusually smooth.

But the stability didn’t last long, and now Fuente finds himself embattled if not fully on the hot seat in Year 4. Friday’s 45-10 loss to Duke was ugly, the kind of game Virginia Tech fans aren’t used to seeing at Lane Stadium, which was once among the nation’s most difficult places to play. 

This is a delicate situation for athletics director Whit Babcock. After starting out 17-5 in Blacksburg, Fuente is just 10-12 since with a lot of roster churn that was supposed to reset the locker room culture this season. And of course, this is the problem with following a legend: Fans only remember the program at its best, even though Beamer’s last four years were decidedly average and the Hokies had already slipped out of the nation’s elite.  

Virginia Tech isn’t as easy a place to win as Beamer made it look, but Fuente hasn’t made enough recruiting inroads in the state and he hasn’t done a good job of developing a quarterback to run his system.

Fuente’s turnaround job at Memphis wasn’t a fluke. He took over a program that was arguably the worst in the country and made it into one of the best among the Group of Five largely through terrific evaluation of recruits and superior in-game coaching. But so far, that hasn’t translated and the Hokies’ streak of 26 straight bowl games is in serious jeopardy. Don’t expect Babcock to make any big moves, but the heat is definitely cranking up on a hire that seemed foolproof a few years ago. 

We should be talking more about Penn State

In a Big Ten where Ohio State’s dominance, Michigan’s struggles and Wisconsin’s efficiency have gotten all the attention, it feels like the Nittany Lions are a little too under-the-radar. To be fair, it’s hard to get a gauge on how good James Franklin’s team really is because the lineup of opponents it has faced so far might be as weak as anyone in the top 25. 

Still, Friday’s 59-0 win at Maryland was as thoroughly one-sided a game as you’ll see between two Power Five opponents. Penn State out-gained Maryland 619-128, created three turnovers and once again got good quarterback play from quarterback Sean Clifford, who was an unknown quantity coming into the year. Also of note: The Nittany Lions’ defense has yielded just 30 points total on the season.  

Penn State’s schedule really begins in two weeks when it travels to Iowa, and things will get tougher from there with Michigan coming to Happy Valley and a trip to Michigan State on successive Saturdays. But beating the bad teams by these impressive margins should definitely give the Nittany Lions a lot of confidence going forward. 

Baylor has redefined itself

Matt Rhule has been painfully close to some big wins since taking on the massive turnaround job at Baylor, but being able to come back and close out Iowa State on Saturday feels like a significant breakthrough. Baylor led the game 20-0, fell behind, lost the lead with 3:45 remaining, then came back and drove 54 yards in 14 plays to set up a game-winning 38-yard field goal by John Mayers.  

Baylor is now 4-0, and the trajectory is unmistakable after Rhule took over a scandal-ridden program in 2017 and went 1-11 in his first season. Though it probably feels like a long road to Rhule, it’s remarkable how quickly he’s changed the entire identity of the program from the Art Briles days when the Bears broke offensive records but couldn’t stop anyone in big games. Now, Baylor plays physical football and defensive coordinator Phil Snow is as good as anyone in the country at slowing down the spread. 

Many in the coaching industry questioned why Rhule took the Baylor job, given some of the options he would have had based on his success at Temple. Though he’s already on a faster timetable than anyone could have expected, it feels like Rhule is on the verge of making himself a true superstar this season. Though Baylor probably isn’t in the same weight class as Oklahoma and Texas, a win next week at Kansas State would give the Bears a claim as the third-best team in the Big 12. 

BYU schedule isn’t sustainable 

The Cougars have been part of two of the season’s most memorable wins, beating Tennessee in overtime after a near-miracle 64-yard pass and backing it up the next week with another overtime win over Southern Cal. But beating those two big name brands hasn’t mattered much in the big picture, as BYU now sits at just 2-3 after a 28-21 loss at Toledo.

This perfectly illustrates the problem BYU faces as an independent. The Cougars want to play as many high-profile teams as possible, but those programs only want to play in September for the most part, which means BYU’s schedule is annually as front-loaded as any team in the country. Who wouldn’t be spent and a bit nicked up after facing Utah, Tennessee, USC and Washington the first four weeks? Though BYU has no desire to join a conference if it’s not Power Five — none of which have shown reciprocal interest — you have to wonder if this is a sustainable model. BYU still has Idaho State, UMass and Liberty coming up so getting to a bowl game won’t be a problem, but the Cougars routinely bite off more than they can chew in September only to fall off the national radar by October. Even if they bank a big win or two, it feels rather meaningless 

Has Kellen Mond regressed? 

Texas A&M’s No. 11 preseason ranking was predicated largely on the theory that quarterback Kellen Mond would take a big step forward in his second year working with Jimbo Fisher. But Mond doesn’t look like the same player, and the Aggies’ inability to run the football may be to blame.  

Texas A&M had just 89 rushing yards Saturday in a game that would be more accurately described as bad loss avoidance rather than a win against Arkansas. The Aggies ran it for 56 yards against Auburn last week and 53 in their Week 2 loss at Clemson. That looks like a trend, and one that demands a reset of expectations in College Station. 

It’s fair to criticize Mond for throwing too many interceptions (four in five games), and even his best game of the year throwing for 335 yards against Auburn was misleading because much of his success came late when the Tigers had the game well in hand. But how much more can you really expect when teams know by now that Texas A&M isn’t going hurt them with the run? 

AAC West looks spicy 

Nov. 2 might be a day to mark on the calendar when SMU visits Memphis. The Mustangs have been one of the nation’s pleasant surprises at 5-0 with notable wins over North Texas and TCU while scoring more than 40 points in four straight games. Memphis has shown significant improvement defensively and looked really good in the second half Thursday against Navy.  

Memphis has a couple tough games coming up, traveling to Temple and hosting suddenly resurgent Tulane. SMU could very well be 8-0 when it visits the Liberty Bowl. 

Though Boise State may be the favorite from the Group of Five to make a New Year’s Six bowl, this looks like a really strong year in the AAC and particularly in the West and the winner may well come from that SMU-Memphis game. 

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