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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 327)

Princess Anne, Queen Elizabeth’s daughter, was the hardest-working royal in 2019

How much work goes on in the British monarchy?

For at least the third year in a row, the member of the Royal family who seemingly gets the least attention in the public eye worked the hardest.

Princess Anne, the only daughter of  Queen Elizabeth, put in a total of 167 days, according to official records.

Westlake Legal Group Princess-Anne-2 Princess Anne, Queen Elizabeth's daughter, was the hardest-working royal in 2019 Frank Miles fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a6790bb0-f82a-5717-a9a6-d15b917d8e59

In this Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2019 file photo, Britain’s Princess Anne talks to guests during a reception at Buckingham Palace, as NATO leaders gather to mark 70 years of the alliance, in London. (Yui Mok/Pool Photo via AP, File)

The 93-year-old queen herself (now in the 68th year of her reign) worked 67 days, four more than in 2018.

Heir to the throne Prince Charles came in second with 125 days of official duties.

The member of the royal family who is second in line to inherit the throne, Prince William, worked 74 days in the past 12 months. His wife, Kate Middleton, worked 58 days.

CHAOS REIGNS: BRITISH MONARCHY STAGGERS FROM ONE SCANDAL TO ANOTHER WITH NO END IN SIGHT

The family’s newest member, and the token American, Meghan Markle, worked the fewest days, 31. She spent time on maternity leave following the birth in May of her and Prince Harry’s first child, son Archie.

The amount of time senior royals spent working in 2019 may have been affected by this year being a little “bumpy” for the family, as the queen admitted in her televised Christmas day address to Britain.

This year was notably rough for the royal family between their rumored strained relationship with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and the scandal surrounding Prince Andrew‘s friendship with the late convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein and the accusations that Andrew had sex with trafficked underage victims.

Prince Andrew worked 90 days this year before he retired from public duties following overwhelming criticism of his role in the Epstein crimes.

The figures of the family’s public work were compiled and published Monday by Britain’s Press Association.

Details of the monarchy’s official public engagements are recorded in the Court Circular, a daily list of the events attended by the queen and her family.

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Prominent members of the royal family worked an average of 84.5 days this year, or about a third of the 253 working days in the U.K.

The nine most prominent members of the royal family (the queen, Charles, William, Kate, Anne, Prince Edward, Prince Andrew, Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan) worked 761 days put together.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Princess-Anne-2 Princess Anne, Queen Elizabeth's daughter, was the hardest-working royal in 2019 Frank Miles fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a6790bb0-f82a-5717-a9a6-d15b917d8e59   Westlake Legal Group Princess-Anne-2 Princess Anne, Queen Elizabeth's daughter, was the hardest-working royal in 2019 Frank Miles fox-news/world/personalities/british-royals fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article a6790bb0-f82a-5717-a9a6-d15b917d8e59

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Fled Japan for Lebanon

Westlake Legal Group 30ghosn3-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Fled Japan for Lebanon Securities and Commodities Violations Nissan Motor Co Ghosn, Carlos

Carlos Ghosn, the former chairman of Nissan who was facing charges of financial wrongdoing in Japan, has fled the country and taken refuge in Lebanon, where he is considered something of a folk hero, according to two people with knowledge of the matter.

His flight was a dramatic turn in an already unlikely story of the rise and fall of one of the automobile industry’s most prominent executives.

Mr. Ghosn, who has strongly maintained his innocence, was set to stand trial next year and the circumstances under which Mr. Ghosn left Japan were not immediately clear. He had posted bail of $9 million, had been required to surrender his passport and was under close watch by the authorities.

Still, he was able to get out of the country and, according to a Lebanese newspaper, Al-Joumhouriya, arrived in Lebanon on a private jet from Turkey. His wife, Carole Ghosn, is with him in Lebanon at a home with armed guards outside, one of the people with knowledge of the matter said.

Representatives for Nissan, the Japanese prosecutors and the Lebanese embassies in Tokyo and Washington did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Government offices and most businesses in Japan were closed ahead of New Year’s Day, the most important holiday on the Japanese calender.

Mr. Ghosn, 65, is a citizen of Lebanon, as well as France and Brazil, and enjoys widespread public support in Beirut, where he spent much of his youth. Lebanon does not extradite its citizens. A billboard in Beirut shortly after his arrest in November 2018 expressed solidarity with the imprisoned executive. “We are all Carlos Ghosn,” it said.

He was accused by Japanese authorities of underreporting his compensation and shifting personal financial losses to Nissan. He has denied the charges. Nissan had also been indicted on charges of improperly reporting Mr. Ghosn’s income — and had said it would cooperate with prosecutors.

Mr. Ghosn had been arrested along with Greg Kelly, a Nissan board member who is a United States citizen. Mr. Kelly had been released from jail a year ago because he was having health problems, and is still in Tokyo, his lawyer said.

“Greg Kelly knew absolutely nothing about this until informed by the media through his counsel and has lived at the foot of the cross in terms of Japanese prosecutors,” Mr. Kelly’s lawyer, Aubrey Harwell said. “He’s done precisely what has been required of him.”

Mr. Ghosn has been in and out of jail in Japan since his arrest, when he was initially held for more than 100 days. He was released after he posted bail and agreed to strict conditions: He could not leave Tokyo, and his movements would be monitored. He was arrested again in April 2019, just after he announced plans to hold a news conference and speak publicly about his case.

Prosecutors imposed another condition for his release after the April arrest: Mr. Ghosn was forbidden from communicating with his wife. For seven months, the two did not speak a word to each other.

Mrs. Ghosn has publicly decried what she called the mistreatment of her husband by Japanese authorities. In an interview with The New York Times after the April arrest, she said authorities had burst into their apartment and took her phones, passport, diary and letters she had written to her husband while he was in jail. Mrs. Ghosn said a woman from the prosecutors’ office followed her into the bathroom. When she stepped out of the shower, the woman handed her a towel. “They didn’t push me around, but they wanted to humiliate me and my husband,” Mrs. Ghosn said. “I was treated like a terrorist,” she said, “like I had a bomb on me.”

The case against Mr. Ghosn has garnered international attention and raised questions about the fairness of Japan’s justice system. Lawyers for the former executive say they have been unable to see reams of information Japanese prosecutors gathered from Nissan to build their case against Mr. Ghosn. Prosecutors, in turn, have argued that they are prevented from sharing some of the material the company gave them because it is “too sensitive.”

Mr. Ghosn’s rise in the auto industry was as storied as his recent fall. He joined the French automaker Renault in 1996 as executive vice president overseeing manufacturing, purchasing, research and development, after spending 18 years at Michelin, the tire maker.

After Renault acquired a large stake in Nissan in 1999, Mr. Ghosn was sent to help turn the Japanese company around — an assignment that was seen as impossible for a foreign executive. Though he closed factories and laid off some 21,000 workers, Mr. Ghosn succeeded in reviving the Japanese carmaker, earning himself the nickname “Le Cost Killer.”

He was also the architect of Nissan’s alliance with Renault and Mitsubishi Motors of Japan, a partnership that allowed the two automakers to share the cost of developing new models and buying components together. He became the first person to simultaneously serve as chief executive of two major companies.

But some at Nissan were concerned that he was pushing for a merger, and he had blamed his arrest on “plot and treason” by executives at Nissan.

Since his arrest, he has been removed as chairman of all three companies, and Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi have struggled to reboot their alliance. Last month, they announced a new structure, appointing a general secretary at the top of their partnership, hoping to accelerate business and make a sharp break from the way Mr. Ghosn ruled over the alliance.

The restructuring comes as Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi, which together sold more cars than any other company in 2018, struggle to improve profitability in the face of sweeping changes transforming the industry, including the rush to electric vehicles. All three companies have reported a steep decline in sales worldwide, and face fresh challenges as other automakers join forces to generate efficiencies in an increasingly tough global market.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Fled Japan for Lebanon

Westlake Legal Group 30ghosn3-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Fled Japan for Lebanon Securities and Commodities Violations Nissan Motor Co Ghosn, Carlos

Carlos Ghosn, the former chairman of Nissan who was facing charges of financial wrongdoing in Japan, has fled the country and taken refuge in Lebanon, where he is considered something of a folk hero, according to two people with knowledge of the matter.

His flight was a dramatic turn in an already unlikely story of the rise and fall of one of the automobile industry’s most prominent executives.

Mr. Ghosn, who has strongly maintained his innocence, was set to stand trial next year and the circumstances under which Mr. Ghosn left Japan were not immediately clear. He had posted bail of $9 million, had been required to surrender his passport and was under close watch by the authorities.

Still, he was able to get out of the country and, according to a Lebanese newspaper, Al-Joumhouriya, arrived in Lebanon on a private jet from Turkey. His wife, Carole Ghosn, is with him in Lebanon at a home with armed guards outside, one of the people with knowledge of the matter said.

Representatives for Nissan, the Japanese prosecutors and the Lebanese embassies in Tokyo and Washington did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Government offices and most businesses in Japan were closed ahead of New Year’s Day, the most important holiday on the Japanese calender.

Mr. Ghosn, 65, is a citizen of Lebanon, as well as France and Brazil, and enjoys widespread public support in Beirut, where he spent much of his youth. Lebanon does not extradite its citizens. A billboard in Beirut shortly after his arrest in November 2018 expressed solidarity with the imprisoned executive. “We are all Carlos Ghosn,” it said.

He was accused by Japanese authorities of underreporting his compensation and shifting personal financial losses to Nissan. He has denied the charges. Nissan had also been indicted on charges of improperly reporting Mr. Ghosn’s income — and had said it would cooperate with prosecutors.

Mr. Ghosn had been arrested along with Greg Kelly, a Nissan board member who is a United States citizen. Mr. Kelly had been released from jail a year ago because he was having health problems, and is still in Tokyo, his lawyer said.

“Greg Kelly knew absolutely nothing about this until informed by the media through his counsel and has lived at the foot of the cross in terms of Japanese prosecutors,” Mr. Kelly’s lawyer, Aubrey Harwell said. “He’s done precisely what has been required of him.”

Mr. Ghosn has been in and out of jail in Japan since his arrest, when he was initially held for more than 100 days. He was released after he posted bail and agreed to strict conditions: He could not leave Tokyo, and his movements would be monitored. He was arrested again in April 2019, just after he announced plans to hold a news conference and speak publicly about his case.

Prosecutors imposed another condition for his release after the April arrest: Mr. Ghosn was forbidden from communicating with his wife. For seven months, the two did not speak a word to each other.

Mrs. Ghosn has publicly decried what she called the mistreatment of her husband by Japanese authorities. In an interview with The New York Times after the April arrest, she said authorities had burst into their apartment and took her phones, passport, diary and letters she had written to her husband while he was in jail. Mrs. Ghosn said a woman from the prosecutors’ office followed her into the bathroom. When she stepped out of the shower, the woman handed her a towel. “They didn’t push me around, but they wanted to humiliate me and my husband,” Mrs. Ghosn said. “I was treated like a terrorist,” she said, “like I had a bomb on me.”

The case against Mr. Ghosn has garnered international attention and raised questions about the fairness of Japan’s justice system. Lawyers for the former executive say they have been unable to see reams of information Japanese prosecutors gathered from Nissan to build their case against Mr. Ghosn. Prosecutors, in turn, have argued that they are prevented from sharing some of the material the company gave them because it is “too sensitive.”

Mr. Ghosn’s rise in the auto industry was as storied as his recent fall. He joined the French automaker Renault in 1996 as executive vice president overseeing manufacturing, purchasing, research and development, after spending 18 years at Michelin, the tire maker.

After Renault acquired a large stake in Nissan in 1999, Mr. Ghosn was sent to help turn the Japanese company around — an assignment that was seen as impossible for a foreign executive. Though he closed factories and laid off some 21,000 workers, Mr. Ghosn succeeded in reviving the Japanese carmaker, earning himself the nickname “Le Cost Killer.”

He was also the architect of Nissan’s alliance with Renault and Mitsubishi Motors of Japan, a partnership that allowed the two automakers to share the cost of developing new models and buying components together. He became the first person to simultaneously serve as chief executive of two major companies.

But some at Nissan were concerned that he was pushing for a merger, and he had blamed his arrest on “plot and treason” by executives at Nissan.

Since his arrest, he has been removed as chairman of all three companies, and Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi have struggled to reboot their alliance. Last month, they announced a new structure, appointing a general secretary at the top of their partnership, hoping to accelerate business and make a sharp break from the way Mr. Ghosn ruled over the alliance.

The restructuring comes as Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi, which together sold more cars than any other company in 2018, struggle to improve profitability in the face of sweeping changes transforming the industry, including the rush to electric vehicles. All three companies have reported a steep decline in sales worldwide, and face fresh challenges as other automakers join forces to generate efficiencies in an increasingly tough global market.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Alex Trebek Talks About Pain And Depression In Candid Interview On Cancer Battle

Westlake Legal Group 5e0a91f82500004ebad31744 Alex Trebek Talks About Pain And Depression In Candid Interview On Cancer Battle

Alex Trebek and his wife, Jean Trebek, talked to ABC News about the everyday hardships they have been working through since the “Jeopardy!” host was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Trebek, who has hosted the game show since the 1980s, sent shockwaves through the country when he revealed his Stage 4 pancreatic cancer diagnosis in March via a YouTube video in which he vowed to “fight” the disease and continue working. He has been candid about both his mental health and physical pain throughout chemotherapy in the months since his announcement.

He and his wife of 29 years have now shared insight into living with the disease ― both as the patient and the caretaker ― in an ABC News TV special, which is set to air Thursday.

Jean Trebek said the hardest part is not being able to help her husband when he’s in pain. “And when he doesn’t eat right,” she added. “When he has too much diet soda.”

“It’s always tough for caretakers because she has to deal with her worrying about my well-being and also dealing with.… I’m not always the most pleasant person to be around when I’m experiencing severe pain or depression, and she has to tread lightly around me,” Alex Trebek said.

Following his announcement in March, Trebek was showered with love from people around the country, including one particularly touching scene on “Jeopardy!” when a contestant who was unable to answer a clue wrote “What is… We love you, Alex!” The moment caught Trebek off guard.

“I read it first and then I got choked up because it suddenly registered on me: ‘Oh, dear. OK. Yeah,’” Trebek said during the ABC News special.

 “I don’t mind getting choked up. My oncologist told me one of the symptoms, if you will, of pancreatic cancer is that you get these moments of depression, sadness.”

The one-hour special “What Is Jeopardy? Alex Trebek and America’s Most Popular Quiz Show” will air at 8 p.m. Thursday, Eastern time.  

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Fled Japan for Lebanon

Westlake Legal Group 30ghosn3-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn, Fallen Nissan Boss, Has Fled Japan for Lebanon Securities and Commodities Violations Nissan Motor Co Ghosn, Carlos

Carlos Ghosn, the former chairman of Nissan who was facing charges of financial wrongdoing in Japan, has fled the country and taken refuge in Lebanon, where he is considered something of a folk hero, according to two people with knowledge of the matter.

His flight was a dramatic turn in an already unlikely story of the rise and fall of one of the automobile industry’s most prominent executives.

Mr. Ghosn, who has strongly maintained his innocence, was set to stand trial next year and the circumstances under which Mr. Ghosn left Japan were not immediately clear. He had posted bail of $9 million, had been required to surrender his passport and was under close watch by the authorities.

Still, he was able to get out of the country and, according to a Lebanese newspaper, Al-Joumhouriya, arrived in Lebanon on a private jet from Turkey. His wife, Carole Ghosn, is with him in Lebanon at a home with armed guards outside, one of the people with knowledge of the matter said.

Representatives for Nissan, the Japanese prosecutors and the Lebanese embassies in Tokyo and Washington did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Government offices and most businesses in Japan were closed ahead of New Year’s Day, the most important holiday on the Japanese calender.

Mr. Ghosn, 65, is a citizen of Lebanon, as well as France and Brazil, and enjoys widespread public support in Beirut, where he spent much of his youth. Lebanon does not extradite its citizens. A billboard in Beirut shortly after his arrest in November 2018 expressed solidarity with the imprisoned executive. “We are all Carlos Ghosn,” it said.

He was accused by Japanese authorities of underreporting his compensation and shifting personal financial losses to Nissan. He has denied the charges. Nissan had also been indicted on charges of improperly reporting Mr. Ghosn’s income — and had said it would cooperate with prosecutors.

Mr. Ghosn had been arrested along with Greg Kelly, a Nissan board member who is a United States citizen. Mr. Kelly had been released from jail a year ago because he was having health problems, and is still in Tokyo, his lawyer said.

“Greg Kelly knew absolutely nothing about this until informed by the media through his counsel and has lived at the foot of the cross in terms of Japanese prosecutors,” Mr. Kelly’s lawyer, Aubrey Harwell said. “He’s done precisely what has been required of him.”

Mr. Ghosn has been in and out of jail in Japan since his arrest, when he was initially held for more than 100 days. He was released after he posted bail and agreed to strict conditions: He could not leave Tokyo, and his movements would be monitored. He was arrested again in April 2019, just after he announced plans to hold a news conference and speak publicly about his case.

Prosecutors imposed another condition for his release after the April arrest: Mr. Ghosn was forbidden from communicating with his wife. For seven months, the two did not speak a word to each other.

Mrs. Ghosn has publicly decried what she called the mistreatment of her husband by Japanese authorities. In an interview with The New York Times after the April arrest, she said authorities had burst into their apartment and took her phones, passport, diary and letters she had written to her husband while he was in jail. Mrs. Ghosn said a woman from the prosecutors’ office followed her into the bathroom. When she stepped out of the shower, the woman handed her a towel. “They didn’t push me around, but they wanted to humiliate me and my husband,” Mrs. Ghosn said. “I was treated like a terrorist,” she said, “like I had a bomb on me.”

The case against Mr. Ghosn has garnered international attention and raised questions about the fairness of Japan’s justice system. Lawyers for the former executive say they have been unable to see reams of information Japanese prosecutors gathered from Nissan to build their case against Mr. Ghosn. Prosecutors, in turn, have argued that they are prevented from sharing some of the material the company gave them because it is “too sensitive.”

Mr. Ghosn’s rise in the auto industry was as storied as his recent fall. He joined the French automaker Renault in 1996 as executive vice president overseeing manufacturing, purchasing, research and development, after spending 18 years at Michelin, the tire maker.

After Renault acquired a large stake in Nissan in 1999, Mr. Ghosn was sent to help turn the Japanese company around — an assignment that was seen as impossible for a foreign executive. Though he closed factories and laid off some 21,000 workers, Mr. Ghosn succeeded in reviving the Japanese carmaker, earning himself the nickname “Le Cost Killer.”

He was also the architect of Nissan’s alliance with Renault and Mitsubishi Motors of Japan, a partnership that allowed the two automakers to share the cost of developing new models and buying components together. He became the first person to simultaneously serve as chief executive of two major companies.

But some at Nissan were concerned that he was pushing for a merger, and he had blamed his arrest on “plot and treason” by executives at Nissan.

Since his arrest, he has been removed as chairman of all three companies, and Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi have struggled to reboot their alliance. Last month, they announced a new structure, appointing a general secretary at the top of their partnership, hoping to accelerate business and make a sharp break from the way Mr. Ghosn ruled over the alliance.

The restructuring comes as Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi, which together sold more cars than any other company in 2018, struggle to improve profitability in the face of sweeping changes transforming the industry, including the rush to electric vehicles. All three companies have reported a steep decline in sales worldwide, and face fresh challenges as other automakers join forces to generate efficiencies in an increasingly tough global market.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Elizabeth Pipko: American Jews are under attack – How much worse will anti-Semitism get?

Westlake Legal Group Hanukkah-Stabbings Elizabeth Pipko: American Jews are under attack – How much worse will anti-Semitism get? fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/crime/hate-crime fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Elizabeth Pipko article 44527925-6fa1-5942-ae42-9c7738474a1a

I am typing with tears in my eyes, thinking about the anti-Semitic stabbing attack that wounded five Jews at a Hasidic rabbi’s home Saturday night during a Hanukkah party. The vicious assault in a heavily Jewish New York City suburb is unmistakable evidence of a painful new reality: the Jewish people – my people – are under attack in America.

So many Jewish holidays and other days are spent in sadness, with news of fresh new attacks here in the land where so many Jews – my family among them – came to escape religious persecution.

Hanukkah is a joyous holiday. There is nothing that I look forward to more each year than the eight days of Hanukkah and the festivities that come with it.

HANUKKAH STABBING SUSPECT CHARGED WITH HATE CRIMES AS FBI FIND JOURNALS IN HOME THAT APPEAR TO ‘EXPRESS ANTI-SEMITIC SENTIMENTS’

I’ve told the story of the “miracle of light” to my non-Jewish friends more times than I can count, usually while serving my brother’s favorite jelly donuts and my famous homemade latkes (potato pancakes). Hanukkah is a holiday I imagine myself celebrating with my future children, and a favorite time of year in many Jewish households around the world.

Unfortunately, this year our “festival of lights” was anything but.

In the New York City metropolitan area, where I live along with an estimated 1.5 million fellow Jews, we faced an anti-Semitic attack almost every day of Hanukkah.

More from Opinion

The attacks included a 65-year-old man being punched and kicked by a man who yelled “f— you, Jew,” a woman attacking a 34-year-old Jewish mother in front of her 3-year-old child, and the stabbing attack that injured five in Monsey, N.Y.

As New York City Councilman Chaim Deutsch put it: “It seems like it’s open season on Jews in New York City.”

Anyone who knows me knows how often I speak about my love for the United States of America. But this love did not start with me. It began two generations ago, with my grandparents back in the Soviet Union.

Growing up, I was told stories about my grandfather. Back in Russia, he would listen in secret to his favorite radio station – Voice of America – while muffling the radio with pillowcases to avoid getting caught in the forbidden activity.

My father often tells me how he sat with his friends in Russia and watched the 1980 Winter Olympics, cheering silently for the U.S. hockey team as it famously defeated the Soviets.

The United States was a beacon of light and hope for so many Jews around the world, including my family, long before they ever even made it here. The idea that one day they could feel free and safe to be proud Jews was one that my ancestors could only dream about.

One of the clear measures of the development of democracy in any country is the extent to which it protects its Jewish population.

The Jewish homeland of Israel was conquered by foreign powers in ancient times and most Jews were expelled from Israel by the Romans nearly 2,000 years ago. Since then and until the establishment of the modern state of Israel in 1948 they’ve been a minority group scattered and often persecuted in nations around the world.

Space doesn’t permit listing all the persecutions of the Jews, which include the expulsion of Jews from England in 1290; the Spanish Inquisition followed by the expulsion of Jews from that county in 1492; pogroms in Russia; and of course the Holocaust, in which 6 million Jews were murdered by the Nazis who ruled Germany from 1933 to 1945 and conquered much of Europe during World War II.

For centuries, even when Jews weren’t being killed or expelled they were denied the same civil rights as other minority groups. And even when they were officially granted those rights, their rights often weren’t honored.

There is a reason to believe that some of the Pilgrims who first set sail on their journey to what is now the United States looked to the story of the Israelites for inspiration. They were setting their sights on a haven where they could be safe to practice their religion free of persecution.

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My grandfather used to attend synagogue services with his father in the Soviet Union, leaving his mother and my grandmother at home out of fear they would be attacked. It was those walks to the synagogue, praying to be kept safe and out of harm, where my grandfather would imagine a life in the United States.

A life without fears or worries about being attacked simply for being a Jew. A fear that many now must live with, decades later, here in the United States.

In the last year alone, Jewish Americans have been attacked in our places of worship, our kosher supermarkets, on the streets, and even at home. The America that my ancestors spoke about is crumbling in front of my very eyes.

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The way that the United States has treated Jewish people should be a sense of pride not just for Jews, but for all Americans. The feeling of safety and security that America grants its citizens is the reason we are the greatest country in the world.

I wonder how much worse it can get in the country my parents once risked their lives to escape to, probably never imagining that one day their daughter would have to sit in the United States and worry about her safety.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE BY ELIZABETH PIPKO

Westlake Legal Group Hanukkah-Stabbings Elizabeth Pipko: American Jews are under attack – How much worse will anti-Semitism get? fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/crime/hate-crime fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Elizabeth Pipko article 44527925-6fa1-5942-ae42-9c7738474a1a   Westlake Legal Group Hanukkah-Stabbings Elizabeth Pipko: American Jews are under attack – How much worse will anti-Semitism get? fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-york fox-news/us/religion/judaism fox-news/us/crime/hate-crime fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc Elizabeth Pipko article 44527925-6fa1-5942-ae42-9c7738474a1a

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Gonzaga stays No. 1 in men’s AP Top 25; Oregon into top 5

Westlake Legal Group Corey-Kispert Gonzaga stays No. 1 in men's AP Top 25; Oregon into top 5 fox-news/sports/ncaa/oregon-ducks fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/kansas-jayhawks fox-news/sports/ncaa/duke-blue-devils fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article a9befd20-7ed9-578c-88b5-cb694e99dfa0

A light holiday schedule led to a rare quiet week atop The Associated Press men’s college basketball poll.

Gonzaga remained at No. 1 for a second straight week, receiving 63 first-place votes from a 65-member panel in the poll released Monday. No. 2 Duke and No. 3 Kansas each had one first-place vote, with Oregon and Ohio State rounding out the top five.

The AP Top 25 had been filled with tumult during a 2019-20 season of parity, with six different teams moving to No. 1 before Christmas. That’s one short of the all-time record of seven, set in 1982-83.

The quiet time between Christmas and New Year’s Day offered a bit of stability.

The Zags (13-1) did not play last week during a Top 25 schedule filled with lopsided games and just two matchups between ranked teams.

Ohio State dropped three places after losing 67-59 to West Virginia, which climbed six places to No. 16.

Louisville was down four places to No. 7 following a 78-70 loss to Kentucky. The Wildcats climbed two places to No. 19.

Nearly every other game involving Top 25 teams was decided by double digits.

Gonzaga, which has not played since beating Eastern Washington 112-77 on Dec. 21, has games against Detroit Mercy and Portland this week.

SOARING DUCKS

Oregon entered the season loaded with expectations behind do-everything guard Payton Pritchard and another stellar recruiting class landed by coach Dana Altman.

The Ducks (11-2) have lived up to the hype, their only losses coming in back-to-back games against Oregon and North Carolina at the Battle 4 Atlantis in the Bahamas.

Oregon has wins over three ranked teams and blew out Alabama State 98-59 on Sunday to move into the top five for the first time since reaching No. 4 in 2016-17, when the Ducks went to the Final Four.

Oregon also got a huge boost earlier this month when 6-foot-11 freshman N’Faly Dante became eligible after reclassifying as a 2019 signee.

STILL UNDEFEATED

The number of undefeated Division I teams is down to two following Liberty’s 74-57 loss to LSU.

No. 8 Auburn has continued to play well following its run to last year’s Final Four, improving to 12-0 after rolling over Lipscomb 86-59 last week. The Tigers have had two close games this season, beating South Alabama by one and outlasting Furman in overtime.

No. 13 San Diego State improved to 13-0 and moved up two spots this week following a 73-57 win over Cal Poly. The Aztecs have wins over Utah, Brigham Young and Creighton this season and moved atop the NCAA’s NET rankings last week.

San Diego State is off to its best start in nine seasons.

RISING

West Virginia had the biggest jump in this week’s poll with its six-spot climb. No other team climbed more than two places.

FALLING

No. 7 Louisville had the biggest fall this week, losing four spots. No. 19 Virginia lost three spots after beating Navy by nine on Sunday.

MOVING IN/OUT

Wichita State was the only team to move into the poll this week, debuting at No. 24. The Shockers, who beat Abilene Christian 84-66 on Sunday, are ranked for the first time since climbing to No. 3 in 2017-18.

Washington dropped out of the AP Top 25 from No. 21 following a 75-71 loss to Houston in the Diamond Head Classic title game in Honolulu on Christmas Day.

Westlake Legal Group Corey-Kispert Gonzaga stays No. 1 in men's AP Top 25; Oregon into top 5 fox-news/sports/ncaa/oregon-ducks fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/kansas-jayhawks fox-news/sports/ncaa/duke-blue-devils fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article a9befd20-7ed9-578c-88b5-cb694e99dfa0   Westlake Legal Group Corey-Kispert Gonzaga stays No. 1 in men's AP Top 25; Oregon into top 5 fox-news/sports/ncaa/oregon-ducks fox-news/sports/ncaa/ohio-state-buckeyes fox-news/sports/ncaa/kansas-jayhawks fox-news/sports/ncaa/duke-blue-devils fox-news/sports/ncaa-bk fox-news/sports/ncaa fnc/sports fnc Associated Press article a9befd20-7ed9-578c-88b5-cb694e99dfa0

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‘The Five’ hits NYC Mayor De Blasio for ‘failed policies’ amid city’s homeless crisis

Westlake Legal Group Homeless-Sue-NYC 'The Five' hits NYC Mayor De Blasio for 'failed policies' amid city's homeless crisis Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dca229f7-ddb3-5570-b97a-2ffcd0c81fb7 article

The Five” addressed New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio after he blamed President Trump for the homeless crisis in America’s cities this weekend.

“[Trump’s] not being heartless. He’s teasing mayors like Bill de Blasio, who have failed policies. This thing about Section 8 housing,” co-host Tim Shillue said Monday. “Most of America, most Americans hear that and they say, ‘What is this guy governing of America’s biggest city? How do we have these leaders who have these failed policies?'”

TRUMP WARNS NEWSOM: IF CALIFORNIA HOMELESS CRISIS PERSISTS, FEDS ‘WILL GET INVOLVED’

“Everyone knows that Section 8 talk is old school. It’s bad. It’s failed … It doesn’t work,” Shillue added.

During a Sunday interview on “America’s News Headquarters,” de Blasio told host Ed Henry Sunday that he wants the federal government to issue more housing vouchers to let people staying in shelters move into rental homes as part of his bid to eliminate long-term homelessness in the city over the next five years.

“The problem ultimately is Donald Trump has not shown any willingness to give us the tools we need, most especially Section 8 vouchers, which allow people to live in rental housing,” de Blasio said. “That’s the single strongest piece we need from Washington that we are not getting right now.”

Trump on Saturday called on New York and California to tackle what he described as their “tremendous homeless problems” — suggesting they should ask the White House “politely” for help if they can’t sort it out by themselves.

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Co-host Lawrence Jones agreed with Shillue that the issue wasn’t Trump’s fault and put the blame on the liberal cities.

“It’s a big epidemic going on in those towns. And I’m sorry. These cities were rejected before Donald Trump,” Jones said. “And they’re probably going to be jacked up after them because the city, they won’t take matters into their own hand.”

Fox News Adam Shaw and Fox Business’s James Leggate contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Homeless-Sue-NYC 'The Five' hits NYC Mayor De Blasio for 'failed policies' amid city's homeless crisis Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dca229f7-ddb3-5570-b97a-2ffcd0c81fb7 article   Westlake Legal Group Homeless-Sue-NYC 'The Five' hits NYC Mayor De Blasio for 'failed policies' amid city's homeless crisis Victor Garcia fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc dca229f7-ddb3-5570-b97a-2ffcd0c81fb7 article

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American Airstrikes Rally Iraqis Against U.S.

Westlake Legal Group 30iraq-facebookJumbo American Airstrikes Rally Iraqis Against U.S. United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Syria Sistani, Ali Al- Sadr, Moktada Al- Military Bases and Installations Mahdi, Adel Abdul Kataib Hezbollah Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iraq Iran Doha (Qatar) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Defense and Military Forces

Iraq has been caught for years in a tug of war between its two most powerful patrons, the United States and Iran. In recent months, public opinion began to tilt against Iran, with street protests demanding an end to Tehran’s pervasive influence.

But American airstrikes that killed two dozen members of an Iranian-backed militia over the weekend have now made Washington the focus of public hostility, reducing the heat on Tehran and its proxies.

Iraqi leaders accused the United States on Monday of violating Iraq’s sovereignty and expressed fear that increasing tensions between the United States and Iran could escalate into a proxy war on Iraqi soil.

Even the tenor of the street protests has shifted, as anti-Iranian slogans have given way to anti-American ones. Demonstrators and others attacked what they deemed to be America’s disproportionate response — the killing of 24 militiamen on Sunday in retaliation for the death of an American contractor on Friday.

By day’s end there were calls to end the “American occupation” and demands for the American military to leave Iraq.

For Iran, the reversal comes at an opportune moment, as it has faced pushback around the region and unrest and economic distress at home.

The American airstrikes on the militia’s bases in Iraq and Syria on Sunday wounded 50 people in addition to those killed, the militia, Kataib Hezbollah, said Monday.

The United States said the strikes were a reprisal for the more than 30 rockets Kataib Hezbollah launched against an Iraqi military base near Kirkuk on Friday, killing the American contractor and wounding four American and two Iraqi servicemen.

“What we did is take a decisive response that makes clear what President Trump has said for months and months and months,” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday, “which is that we will not stand for the Islamic Republic of Iran to take actions that put American men and women in jeopardy.”

Despite the American justification, Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi called the airstrikes “a violation of Iraqi sovereignty and a dangerous escalation and threat to the security of Iraq and the region.”

Iraq’s chief Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, condemned the American attack and warned that the government must “ensure that Iraq does not become a field for settling regional and international scores.”

Even if the American attack was “retaliation for illegal actions,” he said, the Iraqi authorities should deal with them, not the Americans.

Iraq’s Iranian-backed militias have increasingly posed a problem for both Iraq and the United States.

The militias arose to help defeat the Islamic State, a battle they effectively fought on the same side as the Americans. They now represent a powerful faction in Iraq, both militarily and politically, controlling a large bloc in Parliament.

While they are technically under the supervision of the Iraqi security forces, some have strong ties to Iran and operate with significant independence. As the Trump administration has imposed crippling economic sanctions on Iran, the militias have increasingly struck at American targets.

An American official said Sunday that the militias had carried out 11 attacks over the past two months on Iraqi bases and facilities housing American contractors and service members.

The group the United States accused of carrying out the deadly attack on Friday, Kataib Hezbollah, denied responsibility for it, a spokesman, Mohammed Muhi, said Monday.

And while the militia is closely tied to Iran, many Iraqis see it primarily as an Iraqi force and were angered by an attack on it by an outside power.

“We are talking about a foreign force attacking an Iraqi force,” said Maria Fantappie, the senior adviser on Iraq for the International Crisis Group.

While there has been some criticism of the militias’ attacks on Iraqi bases where Americans are stationed, most objections are now being leveled at the United States. The populist cleric Moktada al-Sadr, for instance, urged the militias to abandon “irresponsible actions,” saying he would work with them to use legal and political means to kick out the Americans.

Analysts also said the scale of the American attack — on five sites in two countries with two dozen people killed — made it likely that Kataib Hezbollah would feel compelled to respond and could rally anti-Americanism.

“Is that deterrence, or is this really risking the whole of the U.S. presence in Iraq?” asked Emma Sky, a senior fellow at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs.

The United States may have been trying to send a message that killing Americans was a red line not to be crossed, said Ranj Alaaldin, director of the Proxy Wars Initiative at the Brookings Institution in Doha, Qatar. But the toll of its attack was likely to yield “more intense and expanded operations” against Americans.

“What the U.S. intended and what the U.S. will get could be two very different things,” he said.

The militia, Kataib Hezbollah, which is separate from the Hezbollah movement in Lebanon, vowed unspecified “retaliation,” and Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman, Seyed Abbas Mousavi, said the United States “must accept full responsibility for the consequences of this illegal action.”

How Iran may respond is difficult to predict. If it chooses to escalate, it or its proxies could strike an array of American targets in Iraq, where there are troops on the ground and other Americans living and working.

The United States accused Iran this month of exploiting the chaos in Iraq to build up a hidden arsenal of short-range ballistic missiles there.

Iran could also work with its partners to attack American allies elsewhere in the region as it has tried to do in the past. Such targets have included Saudi Arabia, Israel and ships crossing the Persian Gulf. Iran’s Revolutionary Guards seized a ship in the Persian Gulf on Monday, the official IRNA news agency reported. The report did not say which country the ship belonged to.

Over the last several months, Iranian-backed militias have repeatedly poked at the Americans in Iraq, firing rockets into the Green Zone that were apparently aimed at the United States Embassy. The militias have also hit several Iraqi bases where Americans were billeted, including in Gayara, just south of Mosul, and in western Iraq near Al Asad Air Base.

“I think Iran was reading that Trump really wants out of the region and is not willing to respond militarily,” Ms. Sky said. So the Iranians have been “trying to figure out how far they could go.”

Until Friday, the militias had never killed an American.

A senior administration official in Washington, speaking on condition of anonymity according to White House rules, said that the airstrikes were intended to restore deterrence. The official said that Iran’s policy has been to conduct deniable attacks, a fiction that the United States would no longer allow.

The Trump administration placed economic sanctions on three militia leaders this month, including the leader of Kataib Hezbollah. The United States accused those militias of participating in an unprovoked attack on anti-government protesters that killed 15 people.

The American strikes in Iraq hit near a town on the Syrian border. The strikes in Syria were in the country’s eastern desert, where Iran supports forces fighting on behalf of President Bashar al-Assad in Syria’s civil war.

Analysts said that the American message was clear, but that it may have been overshadowed by the high death toll.

“That puts the ball back in Iran’s court,” said Mr. Alaaldin of Brookings. “But make no mistake, that ball will, for now, be played in Iraq’s political arena, where the United States is much weaker. Iran has a strategic game plan on the ground in Iraq aimed at protecting and enhancing its influence in Iraq. The Americans do not.”

Farnaz Fassihi, Falih Hassan and Michael Crowley contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

American Airstrikes Rally Iraqis Against U.S.

Westlake Legal Group 30iraq-facebookJumbo American Airstrikes Rally Iraqis Against U.S. United States Politics and Government United States International Relations United States Defense and Military Forces United States Trump, Donald J Syria Sistani, Ali Al- Sadr, Moktada Al- Military Bases and Installations Mahdi, Adel Abdul Kataib Hezbollah Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Iraq Iran Doha (Qatar) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Defense and Military Forces

Iraq has been caught for years in a tug of war between its two most powerful patrons, the United States and Iran. In recent months, public opinion began to tilt against Iran, with street protests demanding an end to Tehran’s pervasive influence.

But American airstrikes that killed two dozen members of an Iranian-backed militia over the weekend have now made Washington the focus of public hostility, reducing the heat on Tehran and its proxies.

Iraqi leaders accused the United States on Monday of violating Iraq’s sovereignty and expressed fear that increasing tensions between the United States and Iran could escalate into a proxy war on Iraqi soil.

Even the tenor of the street protests has shifted, as anti-Iranian slogans have given way to anti-American ones. Demonstrators and others attacked what they deemed to be America’s disproportionate response — the killing of 24 militiamen on Sunday in retaliation for the death of an American contractor on Friday.

By day’s end there were calls to end the “American occupation” and demands for the American military to leave Iraq.

For Iran, the reversal comes at an opportune moment, as it has faced pushback around the region and unrest and economic distress at home.

The American airstrikes on the militia’s bases in Iraq and Syria on Sunday wounded 50 people in addition to those killed, the militia, Kataib Hezbollah, said Monday.

The United States said the strikes were a reprisal for the more than 30 rockets Kataib Hezbollah launched against an Iraqi military base near Kirkuk on Friday, killing the American contractor and wounding four American and two Iraqi servicemen.

“What we did is take a decisive response that makes clear what President Trump has said for months and months and months,” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday, “which is that we will not stand for the Islamic Republic of Iran to take actions that put American men and women in jeopardy.”

Despite the American justification, Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi called the airstrikes “a violation of Iraqi sovereignty and a dangerous escalation and threat to the security of Iraq and the region.”

Iraq’s chief Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, condemned the American attack and warned that the government must “ensure that Iraq does not become a field for settling regional and international scores.”

Even if the American attack was “retaliation for illegal actions,” he said, the Iraqi authorities should deal with them, not the Americans.

Iraq’s Iranian-backed militias have increasingly posed a problem for both Iraq and the United States.

The militias arose to help defeat the Islamic State, a battle they effectively fought on the same side as the Americans. They now represent a powerful faction in Iraq, both militarily and politically, controlling a large bloc in Parliament.

While they are technically under the supervision of the Iraqi security forces, some have strong ties to Iran and operate with significant independence. As the Trump administration has imposed crippling economic sanctions on Iran, the militias have increasingly struck at American targets.

An American official said Sunday that the militias had carried out 11 attacks over the past two months on Iraqi bases and facilities housing American contractors and service members.

The group the United States accused of carrying out the deadly attack on Friday, Kataib Hezbollah, denied responsibility for it, a spokesman, Mohammed Muhi, said Monday.

And while the militia is closely tied to Iran, many Iraqis see it primarily as an Iraqi force and were angered by an attack on it by an outside power.

“We are talking about a foreign force attacking an Iraqi force,” said Maria Fantappie, the senior adviser on Iraq for the International Crisis Group.

While there has been some criticism of the militias’ attacks on Iraqi bases where Americans are stationed, most objections are now being leveled at the United States. The populist cleric Moktada al-Sadr, for instance, urged the militias to abandon “irresponsible actions,” saying he would work with them to use legal and political means to kick out the Americans.

Analysts also said the scale of the American attack — on five sites in two countries with two dozen people killed — made it likely that Kataib Hezbollah would feel compelled to respond and could rally anti-Americanism.

“Is that deterrence, or is this really risking the whole of the U.S. presence in Iraq?” asked Emma Sky, a senior fellow at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs.

The United States may have been trying to send a message that killing Americans was a red line not to be crossed, said Ranj Alaaldin, director of the Proxy Wars Initiative at the Brookings Institution in Doha, Qatar. But the toll of its attack was likely to yield “more intense and expanded operations” against Americans.

“What the U.S. intended and what the U.S. will get could be two very different things,” he said.

The militia, Kataib Hezbollah, which is separate from the Hezbollah movement in Lebanon, vowed unspecified “retaliation,” and Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman, Seyed Abbas Mousavi, said the United States “must accept full responsibility for the consequences of this illegal action.”

How Iran may respond is difficult to predict. If it chooses to escalate, it or its proxies could strike an array of American targets in Iraq, where there are troops on the ground and other Americans living and working.

The United States accused Iran this month of exploiting the chaos in Iraq to build up a hidden arsenal of short-range ballistic missiles there.

Iran could also work with its partners to attack American allies elsewhere in the region as it has tried to do in the past. Such targets have included Saudi Arabia, Israel and ships crossing the Persian Gulf. Iran’s Revolutionary Guards seized a ship in the Persian Gulf on Monday, the official IRNA news agency reported. The report did not say which country the ship belonged to.

Over the last several months, Iranian-backed militias have repeatedly poked at the Americans in Iraq, firing rockets into the Green Zone that were apparently aimed at the United States Embassy. The militias have also hit several Iraqi bases where Americans were billeted, including in Gayara, just south of Mosul, and in western Iraq near Al Asad Air Base.

“I think Iran was reading that Trump really wants out of the region and is not willing to respond militarily,” Ms. Sky said. So the Iranians have been “trying to figure out how far they could go.”

Until Friday, the militias had never killed an American.

A senior administration official in Washington, speaking on condition of anonymity according to White House rules, said that the airstrikes were intended to restore deterrence. The official said that Iran’s policy has been to conduct deniable attacks, a fiction that the United States would no longer allow.

The Trump administration placed economic sanctions on three militia leaders this month, including the leader of Kataib Hezbollah. The United States accused those militias of participating in an unprovoked attack on anti-government protesters that killed 15 people.

The American strikes in Iraq hit near a town on the Syrian border. The strikes in Syria were in the country’s eastern desert, where Iran supports forces fighting on behalf of President Bashar al-Assad in Syria’s civil war.

Analysts said that the American message was clear, but that it may have been overshadowed by the high death toll.

“That puts the ball back in Iran’s court,” said Mr. Alaaldin of Brookings. “But make no mistake, that ball will, for now, be played in Iraq’s political arena, where the United States is much weaker. Iran has a strategic game plan on the ground in Iraq aimed at protecting and enhancing its influence in Iraq. The Americans do not.”

Farnaz Fassihi, Falih Hassan and Michael Crowley contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com