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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 327)

Kurt Volker, Trump’s Envoy for Ukraine, Resigns

Westlake Legal Group merlin_158531811_aaab7ac0-f029-4144-bda7-a7c374a1378c-facebookJumbo Kurt Volker, Trump’s Envoy for Ukraine, Resigns United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Kurt D. Volker Giuliani, Rudolph W

WASHINGTON — Kurt D. Volker, the State Department’s special envoy for Ukraine, who got caught in the middle of the pressure campaign by President Trump and his lawyer, Rudolph W. Giuliani, to find damaging information about Democrats, resigned his post on Friday.

Mr. Volker, a former ambassador who served in the part-time, unpaid position to help Ukraine resolve its armed confrontation with Russia-sponsored separatists, told Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Friday that he was stepping down.

His departure came just days after Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine’s president to investigate former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and other Democrats came to light and triggered a full-blown House impeachment inquiry. House leaders announced on Friday that they would interview Mr. Volker in a deposition next week.

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Biden rivals say they wouldn’t let child of their VP sit on a foreign company board

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6089851982001_6089833767001-vs Biden rivals say they wouldn’t let child of their VP sit on a foreign company board Paul Steinhauser Kelly Phares fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bennet fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox news fnc/politics fnc article 620760fd-fe09-55b0-aa86-589ed8fe9d58

Several Democrats running for president in 2020 say they wouldn’t allow the children of their vice president to sit on the board of a foreign company if elected to the White House. This, amid renewed scrutiny over the business dealings of Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter.

On Wednesday, one of Biden’s top rivals, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, quickly answered “no” when asked if she would allow her vice president’s child to serve on a foreign firm’s board. Others have followed suit.

Asked Thursday night at a campaign event in New Hampshire whether the son or daughter of a vice president should have business dealings abroad, businessman Andrew Yang said, “It certainly has a bad look to it.”

“In my mind they can wait until the term is over before serving that term. And that’s really the way it would be under my administration,” he added.

But Yang said Friday in an interview with Fox News that his comments the previous night were not an implicit criticism of Biden.

“If you look at when he was vice president, were there any rules against your family members being on the boards of foreign companies? I believe there were not. So nothing was amiss,” he said.

Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet – in a interview published Thursday by Politico – said, “I think it’d be better not to have that kind of arrangement.”

But Bennet said the issue of Biden and his son Hunter paled in comparison to what Trump did in a July phone call with Ukraine’s president.

“I think it is distracting us from where we should be focused, which is on Donald Trump’s calling up a foreign leader and tell him to investigate one of his political opponents. No matter what Hunter Biden did, it is hard for me to imagine that it’s not 1 million times more benign than that,” Bennet emphasized.

WARREN SAYS SHE WOULDN’T LET THE CHILD OF HER VP SIT ON A FOREIGN COMPANY’S BOARD

Still, to date, none of the Democratic presidential candidates have played into the president’s playbook of trying to turn the tables on Biden over his son’s work.

Hunter Biden served on the board of a Ukrainian energy company while his father was vice president. Questions have been raised by Republicans over how Biden pushed as vice president in 2016 for the dismissal of a Ukrainian prosecutor who was looking into corruption at the company. The prosecutor – as a matter of record, he had been widely accused of overlooking corruption in his own office by other nations – was later dismissed.

Trump’s reelection campaign on Friday launched a new TV and digital ad targeting Biden over his actions.

Meanwhile, the entire field of Democratic presidential candidates is now fully supporting the House Democrats’ move this week launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump over the Ukrainian scandal.

The final holdout in the record-setting roster of White House hopefuls – Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii – came on board on Friday.

GABBARD REVERSES COURSE, BACKS TRUMP IMPEACHMENT INQUIRY

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6089851982001_6089833767001-vs Biden rivals say they wouldn’t let child of their VP sit on a foreign company board Paul Steinhauser Kelly Phares fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bennet fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox news fnc/politics fnc article 620760fd-fe09-55b0-aa86-589ed8fe9d58   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6089851982001_6089833767001-vs Biden rivals say they wouldn’t let child of their VP sit on a foreign company board Paul Steinhauser Kelly Phares fox-news/world/conflicts/ukraine fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/michael-bennet fox-news/person/joe-biden fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/andrew-yang fox news fnc/politics fnc article 620760fd-fe09-55b0-aa86-589ed8fe9d58

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‘Suck it up!’: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ author blasts interviewer over Trump comparisons

Westlake Legal Group handmaids-tale-hulu 'Suck it up!': 'Handmaid's Tale' author blasts interviewer over Trump comparisons Sam Dorman fox-news/shows/the-handmaids-tale fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/media fnc ee1616b6-d297-51d2-a45e-f78dabb8a237 article

Margaret Atwood, the author of the dystopian novel “The Handmaid’s Tale,” blasted an interviewer who tried to compare Atwood’s fictional land of Gilead — where women are property and forced to bear children — to the United States under President Trump.

In an article published this week, Esquire’s literary editor, Amy Grace Lloyd, suggested the Trump administration has purged people like the totalitarian regime in “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

“Different. For the moment you and I are not in danger of getting arrested by the NKVD,” said Atwood, referring to the Soviet police force that carried out mass arrests and executions under dictator Josef Stalin.

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“You think Gilead is bad or that the TV series is too violent? Look up the NKVD,” Atwood added. “It’s important to have that perspective. People are saying Trump is re-creating Gilead. That’s not true. If it were, we’d not be having this conversation. He’s not even a particularly Gileadean figure, more like a [Babylonian king] Nebuchadnezzar of the right. That guy went mad.”

ELISABETH MOSS SAYS IT’S ‘APT’ TO COMPARE ANTI-ABORTION LAWS TO ‘HANDMAID’S TALE’S’ DYSTOPIAN SOCIETY

When Lloyd responded by complaining about “divisiveness being promoted” in the U.S., Atwood told her to “suck it up!”

“Why are you so afraid?” Atwood asked. “No one is going to kill you right now. Anybody banging down your door? What you should be doing is figuring out who to vote for in the next election. Which candidate is going to take you the farthest he or she can from Gilead? Panic isn’t helpful.”

Since the Hulu show based on Atwood’s novel premiered in April 2017, liberals have repeatedly compared Republicans and their policies to those of the villains in the story. At the 2018 White House Correspondents’ Dinner, for example, comedienne Michelle Wolf compared then-White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to Aunt Lydia, the brutal overseer of Gilead’s female captives. A CNN documentary similarly drew comparisons to Atwood’s story — as did Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., when she spoke out against Alabama’s restrictive abortion law.

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A group of women also dressed up in the characteristic “Handmaid’s Tale” uniform — a red cloak with a white hood — while protesting abortion restrictions and during Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings.

Both Atwood and Elisabeth Moss, who plays the main character in Hulu’s adaptation, have suggested the story bore a resemblance to events in the United States.

Westlake Legal Group handmaids-tale-hulu 'Suck it up!': 'Handmaid's Tale' author blasts interviewer over Trump comparisons Sam Dorman fox-news/shows/the-handmaids-tale fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/media fnc ee1616b6-d297-51d2-a45e-f78dabb8a237 article   Westlake Legal Group handmaids-tale-hulu 'Suck it up!': 'Handmaid's Tale' author blasts interviewer over Trump comparisons Sam Dorman fox-news/shows/the-handmaids-tale fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/genres/books fox news fnc/media fnc ee1616b6-d297-51d2-a45e-f78dabb8a237 article

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Fiat Chrysler to pay $40 million to settle SEC charges that it misled investors

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Fiat Chrysler to pay $40 million to settle SEC charges that it misled investors

DETROIT – Fiat Chrysler Automobiles has agreed to pay $40 million to settle charges by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it misled “investors about the number of new vehicles sold each month to customers in the United States” for several years ending in 2016.

The company “issued monthly press releases falsely reporting new vehicle sales and falsely touting a ‘streak’ of uninterrupted monthly year-over-year sales growth, when in fact, the growth streak had been broken in September 2013,” the SEC said, noting that the news releases were included in the company’s SEC filings.

The company, actually FCA US and its parent FCA, agreed to pay the $40 million civil penalty but did not admit or deny the SEC’s findings.

In a news release Friday, the SEC said the Italian-American automaker with its U.S. headquarters in Auburn Hills, north of Detroit, also “inflated new vehicle sales results by paying dealers to report fake vehicle sales and maintaining a database of actual but unreported sales.”

GM strike: GM, UAW aren’t close — agreement might take another week of talks

The database was often referred to as a “cookie jar,” the SEC said.

“In months when the growth streak would have ended or when FCA US fell short of other targets, FCA US dipped into the ‘cookie jar’ and reported old sales as if they had just occurred,” the SEC said.

The sales reporting case is also the subject of a whistleblower lawsuit filed by Reid Bigland, a 22-year company veteran who heads U.S. sales and the Ram truck brand for FCA. Bigland said the company had retaliated against him because he was cooperating with the government investigation into FCA’s sales reporting. Bigland claimed FCA withheld most of his 2018 compensation as punishment and intended to use it to pay fines.

The SEC said accurately reporting sales figures is important.

“New vehicle sales figures provide investors insight into the demand for an automaker’s products, a key factor in assessing the company’s performance,” said Antonia Chion, associate director in the SEC Division of Enforcement. “This case underscores the need for companies to truthfully disclose their key performance indicators.”

FCA released a statement noting its cooperation.

“FCA US cooperated fully in the process to resolve this matter. The company has reviewed and refined its policies and procedures and is committed to maintaining strong controls regarding its sales reporting. The settlement requires a payment of $40 million which will not have a material impact on the financial statements of the company,” the company said.

The sales issue came to light in 2016. The Free Press reported at the time that FCA was under scrutiny by the Justice Department and the SEC and that its “impressive sales streak of 75 months of consecutive sales gains actually ended in September 2013.”

In his lawsuit, Bigland said he had inherited the sales reporting methodology, which had been in place since the late 1980s, and it was widely known, including by former CEO Sergio Marchionne, who died last year; and Chief Financial Officer Richard Palmer, from whom he had taken direction.

FCA announced in 2016 that it was revising its sales reporting practices, but the company also said that news media reports at the time “mistakenly suggested that potential inaccuracies in the monthly data somehow impact the integrity of FCA’s reported revenues in its financial statements.”

Follow Eric D. Lawrence on Twitter: @_ericdlawrence.

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US Department of Justice supports Indianapolis Archdiocese in firing of gay teacher

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close US Department of Justice supports Indianapolis Archdiocese in firing of gay teacher

The Justice Department on Friday issued a Statement of Interest in support of the Archdiocese of Indianapolis in its ongoing dispute with a former Catholic school teacher who alleges he was wrongfully terminated because he was in a same-sex marriage. The United States has a “substantial interest in religious liberty,” the Justice Department says.

Joshua Payne-Elliott is currently suing the archdiocese, alleging that it illegally interfered with his contractual and employment relationship with Cathedral High School, causing Cathedral to terminate him.

But in it’s statement, the DOJ said that the First Amendment protects the right of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Indianapolis to interpret and apply Catholic doctrine. 

It was not immediately clear how binding the DOJ’s statement is, or what impact it will have on Payne-Elliott’s suit.

“If the First Amendment’s Religion Clauses stand for anything, it is that secular courts cannot entangle themselves in questions of religious law,” United States Attorney Josh Minkler said.

Background: Vatican pauses decree revoking school’s Catholic status for refusing to fire a gay teacher

From July: An Indiana Catholic school fired a gay teacher for same-sex marriage. Now, a settlement

Payne-Elliott filed his suit in Marion County in July, saying in a news release that he hoped “this case will put a stop to the targeting of LGBTQ employees and their families.” He was one of the three gay, married Catholic school employees fired at the direction of the archdiocese. 

Two guidance counselors were fired from Roncalli High School. Payne-Elliott’s husband, Layton Payne-Elliott, is a teacher at Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School. Also a Catholic school, the archdiocese stripped Brebeuf of its Catholic identity after it refused to fire Payne-Elliott, though the Vatican recently suspended that ruling pending an appeal from the school. 

Officials with Cathedral said the archdiocese threatened to do the same if Joshua Payne-Elliott’s employment continued.

But Indianapolis Archbishop Charles C. Thompson has maintained that the church is not targeting anyone.

Rather, Thompson said, the archdiocese has a right to set whatever rules it wants for its schools and employees, like that they must live according to Catholic church doctrine. The archdiocese began requiring a morality clause in teacher, administrator and counselor contracts at some of its schools four years ago, and at all Catholic schools two years ago.

“Religious liberty, which is a hallmark of the U.S. constitution and has been tested in the U.S. Supreme Court, acknowledges that religious organizations may define what conduct is acceptable and contrary to the teachings of its religion, for its school leaders, guidance counselors, teachers and other ministers of faith,” the archdiocese said.

A Statement of Interest is described in court documents as a statement that speaks to the interests of the United States in a pending suit. It is not a ruling.

“The First Amendment to the United States Constitution protects the right of religious institutions and people to decide what their beliefs are, to teach their faith, and to associate with others who share their faith,” Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband for the Civil Rights Division said in a statement. “The First Amendment rightly protects the free exercise of religion.” 

The Statement of Interest says the First Amendment prevents courts from impairing the constitutional rights of religious institutions. The former teacher’s lawsuit attempts to penalize the Archdiocese for determining that schools within its diocese cannot employ teachers in public, same-sex marriages, and simultaneously identify as Catholic, the statement says.

Supreme Court precedent holds that the First Amendment protects the Archdiocese’s right to this form of expressive association, and courts cannot interfere with that right, according to the news release.

The Statement of Interest also says that courts cannot second-guess how religious institutions interpret and apply their own religious laws. Supreme Court precedent explains that the First Amendment forbids courts from engaging in “quintessentially religious controversies.”

Instead, the Statement of Interest says, “the legitimacy of the Archdiocese’s decision as a matter of Catholic law” is committed exclusively “to the judgment of the Archdiocese.”   

Follow Justin L. Mack on Twitter: @justinlmack.

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3 monster black holes are going to collide

Three supermassive black holes are poised to collide.

These three monsters stand near one another in a system of merging galaxies that’s about a billion light-years from Earth, according to a new study published in The Astrophysical Journal.

“We were only looking for pairs of black holes at the time, and yet, through our selection technique, we stumbled upon this amazing system,” said Ryan Pfeifle of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, the first author of the new study, in a statement. “This is the strongest evidence yet found for such a triple system of actively feeding supermassive black holes.”

Researchers had to combine data from telescopes on the ground and in space in order to pinpoint this rare black hole trifecta, according to NASA.

SLEEPING OCTOPUS’ AMAZING COLOR SHIFTS REVEALED IN NEW FILM

Westlake Legal Group two-supermassive-black-holes-getty-images 3 monster black holes are going to collide fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone bc6bb1a5-edab-5fa9-a8a0-54f309490b2d article

This artistic interpretation shows two black holes on a collision course. In the newfound system, three supermassive black holes are going to merge. (MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images)

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One challenge in finding the three supermassive black holes, according to scientists, is that they are likely to be covered in gas and dust, which would block much of their light.

“Through the use of these major observatories, we have identified a new way of identifying triple supermassive black holes. Each telescope gives us a different clue about what’s going on in these systems,” said Pfeifle. “We hope to extend our work to find more triples using the same technique.”

If you’re keeping track: The system where the black holes are located is known as SDSS J084905.51+111447.2.

Westlake Legal Group two-supermassive-black-holes-getty-images 3 monster black holes are going to collide fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone bc6bb1a5-edab-5fa9-a8a0-54f309490b2d article   Westlake Legal Group two-supermassive-black-holes-getty-images 3 monster black holes are going to collide fox-news/science/air-and-space/astronomy fox-news/science/air-and-space fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone bc6bb1a5-edab-5fa9-a8a0-54f309490b2d article

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US Department of Justice supports Indianapolis Archdiocese in firing of gay teacher

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close US Department of Justice supports Indianapolis Archdiocese in firing of gay teacher

The Justice Department on Friday issued a Statement of Interest in support of the Archdiocese of Indianapolis in its ongoing dispute with a former Catholic school teacher who alleges he was wrongfully terminated because he was in a same-sex marriage. The United States has a “substantial interest in religious liberty,” the Justice Department says.

Joshua Payne-Elliott is currently suing the archdiocese, alleging that it illegally interfered with his contractual and employment relationship with Cathedral High School, causing Cathedral to terminate him.

But in it’s statement, the DOJ said that the First Amendment protects the right of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Indianapolis to interpret and apply Catholic doctrine. 

It was not immediately clear how binding the DOJ’s statement is, or what impact it will have on Payne-Elliott’s suit.

“If the First Amendment’s Religion Clauses stand for anything, it is that secular courts cannot entangle themselves in questions of religious law,” United States Attorney Josh Minkler said.

Background: Vatican pauses decree revoking school’s Catholic status for refusing to fire a gay teacher

From July: An Indiana Catholic school fired a gay teacher for same-sex marriage. Now, a settlement

Payne-Elliott filed his suit in Marion County in July, saying in a news release that he hoped “this case will put a stop to the targeting of LGBTQ employees and their families.” He was one of the three gay, married Catholic school employees fired at the direction of the archdiocese. 

Two guidance counselors were fired from Roncalli High School. Payne-Elliott’s husband, Layton Payne-Elliott, is a teacher at Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School. Also a Catholic school, the archdiocese stripped Brebeuf of its Catholic identity after it refused to fire Payne-Elliott, though the Vatican recently suspended that ruling pending an appeal from the school. 

Officials with Cathedral said the archdiocese threatened to do the same if Joshua Payne-Elliott’s employment continued.

But Indianapolis Archbishop Charles C. Thompson has maintained that the church is not targeting anyone.

Rather, Thompson said, the archdiocese has a right to set whatever rules it wants for its schools and employees, like that they must live according to Catholic church doctrine. The archdiocese began requiring a morality clause in teacher, administrator and counselor contracts at some of its schools four years ago, and at all Catholic schools two years ago.

“Religious liberty, which is a hallmark of the U.S. constitution and has been tested in the U.S. Supreme Court, acknowledges that religious organizations may define what conduct is acceptable and contrary to the teachings of its religion, for its school leaders, guidance counselors, teachers and other ministers of faith,” the archdiocese said.

A Statement of Interest is described in court documents as a statement that speaks to the interests of the United States in a pending suit. It is not a ruling.

“The First Amendment to the United States Constitution protects the right of religious institutions and people to decide what their beliefs are, to teach their faith, and to associate with others who share their faith,” Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband for the Civil Rights Division said in a statement. “The First Amendment rightly protects the free exercise of religion.” 

The Statement of Interest says the First Amendment prevents courts from impairing the constitutional rights of religious institutions. The former teacher’s lawsuit attempts to penalize the Archdiocese for determining that schools within its diocese cannot employ teachers in public, same-sex marriages, and simultaneously identify as Catholic, the statement says.

Supreme Court precedent holds that the First Amendment protects the Archdiocese’s right to this form of expressive association, and courts cannot interfere with that right, according to the news release.

The Statement of Interest also says that courts cannot second-guess how religious institutions interpret and apply their own religious laws. Supreme Court precedent explains that the First Amendment forbids courts from engaging in “quintessentially religious controversies.”

Instead, the Statement of Interest says, “the legitimacy of the Archdiocese’s decision as a matter of Catholic law” is committed exclusively “to the judgment of the Archdiocese.”   

Follow Justin L. Mack on Twitter: @justinlmack.

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Brad Parscale: Dem impeachment push causing Americans to ‘vote with their wallet,’ back Trump reelection

Westlake Legal Group Parscale11 Brad Parscale: Dem impeachment push causing Americans to 'vote with their wallet,' back Trump reelection fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 9d83ce72-b76e-5a5a-bb31-5be6e4b94c0e

President Trump’s 2020 reelection campaign manager reacted Friday to what he called “amazing” fundraising numbers since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s announcement of a formal impeachment inquiry.

Brad Parscale told Brian Kilmeade on “The Brian Kilmeade Show” that the moment Democrats made their intentions official, Americans began “voting with their wallet.”

“I think one of the most amazing things is just the fundraising we’ve had in the last 48 hours,” he said. “As soon as they started this attack, I think Americans and Republicans and supporters of the president all over the country — they started voting with their wallet. And, this is the one thing they can do right now — they can donate.”

MARK LEVIN SLAMS ‘ROGUE’ CIA WHISTLEBLOWER, CLAIMS NO FIRST-HAND SOURCE FILED A COMPLAINT

On Wednesday, Parscale reported that the Trump 2020 campaign and the Republican National Committee had raised a total of $5 million within 24 hours of Pelosi’s impeachment inquiry announcement, with donations coming from all 50 states. On Friday, Parscale trumpeted that 50,000 new donors had given to the campaign over the previous two days.

In addition, the president’s son Eric Trump tweeted Thursday night that his father’s reelection campaign had raised $8.5 million “in small dollar donations” over the previous 48 hours.

“A big thank-you to Speaker Pelosi and the Democrats,” Eric remarked.

JON VOIGHT: DRIVE TO IMPEACH TRUMP A ‘CRIME,’ A ‘DISGRACE’

In his interview with Parscale, Kilmeade asked whether he has any concern about the impeachment inquiry.

The campaign manager rejected the idea.

“I’m pretty confident,” Parscale said, pointing to a statement the campaign previously released Wednesday after a memorandum of a phone conversation between Trump and the president of Ukraine was made public.

“Because of their pure hatred for President Trump, desperate Democrats and the salivating media already had determined their mission: take out the President,” the statement read. “The fact is that the President wants to fight the corruption in Washington, where the Bidens, the Clintons, and other career politicians have abused their power for personal gain for decades. The facts prove the President did nothing wrong.”

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“This is just another hoax from Democrats and the media, contributing to the landslide re-election of President Trump in 2020.”

Parscale told Kilmeade that Trump should continue to perform his duties as usual.

“He’s doing exactly what the people sent him there to do,” he said. “The Democrats just know they can’t beat him in 2020, so they want to try to use anything they can and lie and cheat to defeat [him].”

Westlake Legal Group Parscale11 Brad Parscale: Dem impeachment push causing Americans to 'vote with their wallet,' back Trump reelection fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 9d83ce72-b76e-5a5a-bb31-5be6e4b94c0e   Westlake Legal Group Parscale11 Brad Parscale: Dem impeachment push causing Americans to 'vote with their wallet,' back Trump reelection fox-news/topic/fox-news-radio fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/politics/executive/white-house fox-news/politics/elections/republicans fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 9d83ce72-b76e-5a5a-bb31-5be6e4b94c0e

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A visual timeline of the events that led up to Trump’s fateful phone call

In the whistleblower complaint that triggered the impeachment inquiry, the author describes a series of events – partly public and partly described by other officials – that culminated in a call between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

We’ve arranged those alleged events in chronological order – providing a clearer context to the call in which Trump pressed Zelensky to investigate 2016 election interference and the Biden family’s Ukrainian business dealings.

December 2018: Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani speaks with Viktor Shokin, Ukraine’s former prosecutor general.

January: Giuliani meets with Yuriy Lutsenko, Ukraine’s prosecutor general under President Petro Poroshenko, in New York.

February: Giuliani meets with Lutsenko a second time in Warsaw, Poland.

March: In a series of articles in The Hill, Lutsenko and other Ukrainian officials make claims about: 

  • Ukrainian involvement in the 2016 election, allegedly in collaboration with the Democratic National Committee.
  • U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch obstructing Ukrainian investigation of such involvement.
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden trying to protect his son’s business with Ukraine.

April 21:  Zelensky defeats Poroshenko in Ukrainian presidential elections. Trump makes a brief congratulatory call to Zelensky.

April 25: In a Fox News interview, Trump describes Lutsenko’s claims as “big” and “incredible” and says the attorney general “would want to see this.”

April 29: U.S. Ambassador Yovanovitch is recalled to Washington for “consultations.”

May 6: The State Department announces Yovanovitch will end her assignment in Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital.

May 9: The New York Times reports that Giuliani plans to travel to Ukraine to press the government to pursue investigations into election interference in 2016 and alleged wrongdoing by the Biden family.

May 10: Trump saysin an interview with Politico that he “plans to speak with Giuliani about the trip.” Hours later, Giuliani cancels his trip because Zelensky was “surrounded by enemies of the [U.S.] president … and of the United States.”

May 11: Lutsenko meets with President-elect Zelensky and expresses his wish to remain prosecutor general in the new government.

May 14: Giuliani says in an interview with a Ukrainian journalist that the U.S. ambassador was “removed … because she was part of the efforts against the president.”

Around May 14:  Trump instructs Vice President Mike Pence to cancel his trip to Ukraine to attend Zelensky’s inauguration.

June 13: Trump tells ABC’s George Stephanopoulos that he “would accept damaging information on his political rivals from a foreign government.”

June 21: Giuliani tweets, “New Pres. of Ukraine still silent on investigation of Ukrainian interference in 2016 election and alleged Biden bribery of Pres Poroshenko. Time for leadership and investigate both if you want to purge how Ukraine was abused by Hillary and Obama people.”

July 18: An Office of Management and Budget official says Trump issued instructions to suspend U.S. aid to Ukraine.

July 25: Trump phones Zelensky to request that Ukraine investigate 2016 election interference and alleged corruption by the Biden family. Trump asks Zelensky to meet with Giuliani and Attorney General Barr for further discussions.

July 25 evening: A post on the Ukrainian president’s website mentions the call: “Trump expressed his conviction that the new Ukrainian Government will be able to … complete the investigation of corruption cases that have held back cooperation between Ukraine and the U.S.”

July 26: Senior White House officials intervene to “lock down” all records of the phone call and load the transcript into a separate electronic server, according to the whistleblower’s complaint.

July 26: Kurt Volker, U.S. representative for Ukraine, and Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, meet with Zelensky to provide advice.

August 2: Giuliani travels to Madrid to meet with a Zelensky adviser as a “follow-up” to the call.

Aug. 9: Trump says he thinks Zelensky “will be invited to the White House.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

A visual timeline of the events that led up to Trump’s fateful phone call

In the whistleblower complaint that triggered the impeachment inquiry, the author describes a series of events – partly public and partly described by other officials – that culminated in a call between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

We’ve arranged those alleged events in chronological order – providing a clearer context to the call in which Trump pressed Zelensky to investigate 2016 election interference and the Biden family’s Ukrainian business dealings.

December 2018: Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani speaks with Viktor Shokin, Ukraine’s former prosecutor general.

January: Giuliani meets with Yuriy Lutsenko, Ukraine’s prosecutor general under President Petro Poroshenko, in New York.

February: Giuliani meets with Lutsenko a second time in Warsaw, Poland.

March: In a series of articles in The Hill, Lutsenko and other Ukrainian officials make claims about: 

  • Ukrainian involvement in the 2016 election, allegedly in collaboration with the Democratic National Committee.
  • U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch obstructing Ukrainian investigation of such involvement.
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden trying to protect his son’s business with Ukraine.

April 21:  Zelensky defeats Poroshenko in Ukrainian presidential elections. Trump makes a brief congratulatory call to Zelensky.

April 25: In a Fox News interview, Trump describes Lutsenko’s claims as “big” and “incredible” and says the attorney general “would want to see this.”

April 29: U.S. Ambassador Yovanovitch is recalled to Washington for “consultations.”

May 6: The State Department announces Yovanovitch will end her assignment in Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital.

May 9: The New York Times reports that Giuliani plans to travel to Ukraine to press the government to pursue investigations into election interference in 2016 and alleged wrongdoing by the Biden family.

May 10: Trump saysin an interview with Politico that he “plans to speak with Giuliani about the trip.” Hours later, Giuliani cancels his trip because Zelensky was “surrounded by enemies of the [U.S.] president … and of the United States.”

May 11: Lutsenko meets with President-elect Zelensky and expresses his wish to remain prosecutor general in the new government.

May 14: Giuliani says in an interview with a Ukrainian journalist that the U.S. ambassador was “removed … because she was part of the efforts against the president.”

Around May 14:  Trump instructs Vice President Mike Pence to cancel his trip to Ukraine to attend Zelensky’s inauguration.

June 13: Trump tells ABC’s George Stephanopoulos that he “would accept damaging information on his political rivals from a foreign government.”

June 21: Giuliani tweets, “New Pres. of Ukraine still silent on investigation of Ukrainian interference in 2016 election and alleged Biden bribery of Pres Poroshenko. Time for leadership and investigate both if you want to purge how Ukraine was abused by Hillary and Obama people.”

July 18: An Office of Management and Budget official says Trump issued instructions to suspend U.S. aid to Ukraine.

July 25: Trump phones Zelensky to request that Ukraine investigate 2016 election interference and alleged corruption by the Biden family. Trump asks Zelensky to meet with Giuliani and Attorney General Barr for further discussions.

July 25 evening: A post on the Ukrainian president’s website mentions the call: “Trump expressed his conviction that the new Ukrainian Government will be able to … complete the investigation of corruption cases that have held back cooperation between Ukraine and the U.S.”

July 26: Senior White House officials intervene to “lock down” all records of the phone call and load the transcript into a separate electronic server, according to the whistleblower’s complaint.

July 26: Kurt Volker, U.S. representative for Ukraine, and Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, meet with Zelensky to provide advice.

August 2: Giuliani travels to Madrid to meet with a Zelensky adviser as a “follow-up” to the call.

Aug. 9: Trump says he thinks Zelensky “will be invited to the White House.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com