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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 33)

Fox News Poll Shows Trump Losing to Biden, Warren, Sanders and Harris

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Sen. McSally blasts Omar, Tlaib’s ‘dangerous’ rhetoric and actions, calls on US to stand with Israel

Westlake Legal Group Omar-McSally-Tlaib-1 Sen. McSally blasts Omar, Tlaib's 'dangerous' rhetoric and actions, calls on US to stand with Israel Sam Dorman fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc db95e1ae-e72c-5cfa-ac76-962bb0670bd4 article

Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., accused Reps. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., and Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., of pushing “dangerous” ideas about Israel Thursday and called on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to push back against their rhetoric.

“Their actions and their words have been dangerous and their anti-Semitism, their support to the BDS movement — I mean they personally led an effort to ensure the House of Representatives couldn’t pass a bill to condemn anti-Semitism,” McSally told guest host Charles Payne on “Your World.”

PELOSI CALLS DECISION TO BAN ‘SQUAD’ MEMBERS ‘BENEATH THE DIGNITY’ OF ISRAEL

“This is the wrong direction,” McSally added. “We need to stand closely with Israel and not allow their dangerous ideas to be fueling any of the rhetoric that is against the Jewish people against Israel and supporting the economic BDS [Boycott, Divest, Sanction] movement and others.”

Pelosi said Thursday that both President Trump and the Israeli government debased their offices when they pushed back on plans by the two freshman congresswomen to visit the Middle Eastern ally.

More from Media

“Israel’s denial of entry to Congresswomen Tlaib and Omar is a sign of weakness, and beneath the dignity of the great state of Israel,” Pelosi said.

McSally told Payne that she hoped Pelosi would stand up against Omar and Tlaib, call out their “dangerous rhetoric,” and support Israel.

McSally also discussed her proposed legislation that would make “domestic terrorism” a federal crime.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“This bill would actually make it a crime — just like international terrorism –and allow us to bring full justice and give more tools to our law enforcement for people who take these acts of violence,” she said.

Her comments followed a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas earlier this month carried out by a gunman who reportedly expressed racist and white supremacist views.

Westlake Legal Group Omar-McSally-Tlaib-1 Sen. McSally blasts Omar, Tlaib's 'dangerous' rhetoric and actions, calls on US to stand with Israel Sam Dorman fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc db95e1ae-e72c-5cfa-ac76-962bb0670bd4 article   Westlake Legal Group Omar-McSally-Tlaib-1 Sen. McSally blasts Omar, Tlaib's 'dangerous' rhetoric and actions, calls on US to stand with Israel Sam Dorman fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/nancy-pelosi fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc db95e1ae-e72c-5cfa-ac76-962bb0670bd4 article

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What can a tiny bone tell us about Jeffrey Epstein's death?

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close What can a tiny bone tell us about Jeffrey Epstein's death?

Jeffrey Epstein pleaded not guilty to charges of drug trafficking and allegedly sexually abusing dozens of underage girls in New York and Florida. USA TODAY

The investigation into disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein’s death could hinge on a minute bone in his neck that in the past has shed light on whether a cause of death is a suicide or a murder.

Epstein’s autopsy reportedly showed multiple broken neck bones, the Washington Post wrote Thursday, citing anonymous sources. But the curiosity surrounds one of the broken bones: The hyoid

Though the bone is small, it’s been critical in several high-profile cases. The reason: The hyoid can break when a person dies by hanging, particularly when a person is older. But it can also provide tell-tale clues that a person was strangled. 

Barbara Sampson, New York City’s chief medical examiner who is handling Epstein’s autopsy, said that the discovery of the broken hyoid doesn’t determine anything. The cause of the financier’s death is still pending.

“In all forensic investigations, all information must be synthesized to determine the cause and manner of death,” Sampson said in a statement to USA TODAY. “Everything must be consistent; no single finding can be evaluated in a vacuum.”

Epstein, 66, was found early Saturday in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan. He had a bedsheet around his neck. According to the New York Post, he had tied the bedsheet to the bunk and leaned toward the floor to kill himself.

I’ve treated suicidal prisoners: Jeffrey Epstein’s death is a medical, security disgrace

What’s a hyoid?

The hyoid is a bone instrumental in tongue movement, swallowing, chewing and other functions. During respiration, the hyoid is what keeps the airway open.

In men, it’s located near the Adam’s apple. It anchors the larynx during vocal and respiratory movement, and its structure consists of a body and two pairs of horns, one larger and one smaller. 

The hyoid bone is not the Adam’s apple itself. The Adam’s apple is outwardly protruding thyroid cartilage surrounding the larynx. Instead, the hyoid is located just above the lump-like area.

The hyoid in murder cases:

This isn’t the first time the hyoid has been used to help determine a cause of death.

A fractured hyoid is present in approximately one-third of strangulation homicides, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

A broken hyoid is often used in evidence to determine whether a victim was strangled:

  • A woman in Maine, Roxanne Jeskey, was found guilty in 2014 for killing her husband by strangling him, and the strangulation was proven by a broken hyoid
  • In 2011, Rebecca Zahau died in California. She reportedly was found hanging from a balcony in a beachside mansion. Years later, investigators looked to the hyoid bone to theorize whether she might have been a homicide victim.  
  • Earlier this year, in Georgia, a man, Shanard D. Rease, murdered an older woman by strangling her. Reports cited that her hyoid bone was fractured.

An unbroken hyoid is also occasionally cited as a reason to prove that an accused party is not guilty of strangulation. 

In a widely followed case in the New York City borough of Staten Island in 2014, Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo was accused with fatally choking Eric Garner. Pantaleo and other officers approached Garner, who they suspected was selling cigarettes without tax stamps. The officers attempted to arrest Garner and Pantaleo put him in a chokehold; Garner died after going into cardiac arrest.

But in a December 2018, release, the Police Benevolent Association said that their president, Patrick J. Lynch, called for charges against Pantaleo to be dropped since the hyoid was intact.

Garner “did not die of strangulation of the neck from a chokehold which would have caused a crushed larynx (windpipe) and a fractured hyoid bone,” said the release. 

Pantaleo was found guilty of using an improper choke-hold but not of intentionally restricting Garner’s breathing. 

Sampson, the chief medical examiner of New York City, oversaw Garner’s autopsy as well. She concluded that strangulation was the cause of Garner’s death.

Officer in Eric Garner’s death: Daniel Pantaleo, should be fired, NYPD judge says

The hyoid in death by suicide:

Guards found Epstein unconscious after he had been taken off of a prison suicide watch. His death was called an “apparent suicide” by federal authorities. 

Cyril Wecht, a forensic pathologist, told USA TODAY that he’s skeptical.

“Fractures of the hyoid bone are almost always associated with manual strangulation,” Wecht said. “Because a hand gets up high underneath the chin of the victim.”

Wecht said that multiple breaks or fractures in neck bones are rare to find in suicidal hangings. 

A fractured hyoid is possible from any blunt trauma to the neck. However, it is more common in a strangling than in a hanging, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information

“Fractures of the hyoid bone in suicide hangings are rare and when you further keep in mind this was not a suicide hanging from stepping off a high ladder,” said Wecht.

According to reports, Epstein had tied a bed-sheet to the bunk and kneeled on the ground and then leaned forward to kill himself.

That maneuver, Wecht said, is not conducive to breaking bones.

“In majority of those you don’t see fractures because there is no great amount of force,” said Wecht. “It’s basic physics.”

Death would likely come from pressure applied to the neck and cut off circulation of nerves, particularly the vagus nerve, which is the tenth cranial nerve and longest nerve in the body, Wecht said.

Questions surrounding Epstein’s death, and any outstanding circumstances, such as his guards sleeping through checks, still fester.

And the bottom line, Wecht said, is that multiple fractures in suicide hangings are rare.

“This case right now has very strong odor to it,” said Wecht.

Follow Morgan Hines on Twitter: @MorganEmHines.

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Rush Limbaugh supports Israel’s decision to block Omar and Tlaib, calls them ‘anti-Semites’

Westlake Legal Group Omar-Rush-Tlaib Rush Limbaugh supports Israel's decision to block Omar and Tlaib, calls them 'anti-Semites' Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc b8e49d86-fe9e-54fd-86ef-eb377b13b878 article

Conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh supported Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s decision to block Reps. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., from entering his country, calling the congresswomen “anti-Semites.”

“You have two women who are out of control in their hatred for Israel and Jewish people. It’s their lifeblood. Before they became elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, these women grew up hating Jews. They grew up as anti-Semites,” Limbaugh said on his radio show Thursday.

ISRAEL BLOCKS OMAR, TLAIB FROM ENTERING COUNTRY AMID PRESSURE FROM TRUMP

Israeli officials Thursday blocked the congresswomen from entering the country as part of a planned visit, a reversal that came amid concerns about their support for boycotts of Israel.

Democratic lawmakers in Washington spoke out against the decision, with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi calling it a “sign of weakness” and Omar accusing Israel of implementing “Trump’s Muslim ban.”

More from Fox News Media

Limbaugh argued that “no good” could come from the visit and that Israel had a right to determine who is allowed to cross its borders.

“What good could possibly come of these people showing up to showboat in Israel with a duly sycophantic media in tow? What possible good could it have done?” Limbaugh asked.  “Israel is making a decision in its own best interests here and they are entitled to this.  Just as we are in charge of who gets into our country, so is Israel and every other country in charge of who gets in.”

HOUSE OVERWHELMINGLY OKS RESOLUTION OPPOSING ISRAEL BOYCOTT IN RARE BIPARTISAN VOTE

The radio host blasted the congresswomen for supporting Palestinians.

“They openly support the Palestinians who want there to be no Israel. Omar and Tlaib openly support whatever will happen to replace Israel with Palestine, Palestinians, and Israelis with nowhere to go but the Mediterranean Sea,” Limbaugh said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fox News’ Brie Stimson and Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Omar-Rush-Tlaib Rush Limbaugh supports Israel's decision to block Omar and Tlaib, calls them 'anti-Semites' Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc b8e49d86-fe9e-54fd-86ef-eb377b13b878 article   Westlake Legal Group Omar-Rush-Tlaib Rush Limbaugh supports Israel's decision to block Omar and Tlaib, calls them 'anti-Semites' Victor Garcia fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc b8e49d86-fe9e-54fd-86ef-eb377b13b878 article

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N.Y.P.D. Detectives Gave a Boy, 12, a Soda. He Landed in a DNA Database.

New York City detectives questioning a boy facing a felony charge last year offered him a McDonald’s soda. When the boy left, they took the straw and tested it for his DNA.

Although it did not match evidence found at a crime scene, his DNA was entered into the city’s genetic database. To have it removed, the child’s family had to petition a court and file an appeal, a process that took more than a year. The boy was 12.

The city’s DNA database has grown by nearly 29 percent over the last two years, and now has 82,473 genetic profiles, becoming a potentially potent tool for law enforcement but one that operates with little if any oversight.

The New York Police Department has taken DNA samples from people convicted of crimes, as well as from people who are only arrested or sometimes simply questioned. The practice has exposed the Police Department to scrutiny over how the genetic material is collected and whether privacy rights are being violated, civil liberties lawyers said.

A growing number of law enforcement agencies throughout the country — including police departments in Connecticut, California and Maryland — have amassed genetic databases that operate by their own rules, outside of state and federal guidelines, which tend to be far more strict.

According to a 2013 survey, 30 states and the federal government permitted the analysis of DNA samples collected from individuals who are arrested or charged, but not convicted, of certain crimes. These databases generally did not include low-level offenders.

New York State law requires a conviction before someone’s DNA can be included in the state-operated DNA databank. But databases built by local authorities are not subject to the state rules.

The rapidly expanding DNA database in New York, which the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner has maintained since it was established in 2009, provides another striking example of the Police Department’s ability to adopt advancing technology with little scrutiny. The department also has built a giant facial recognition database and has been loading thousands of arrest photographs of children and teenagers into it.

The Police Department’s chief of detectives, Dermot F. Shea, said in an interview that officers were engaging in legally permitted law enforcement tactics in building the database.

“We are not indiscriminately collecting DNA,” he said. “If we did, it would be a database of millions and millions.”

Police officials also point out the database has been used to capture scores of violent criminals and to exonerate the wrongly accused. About half of the profiles in the database are from evidence collected from crime scenes. “We use DNA as a truth-finding mechanism,” Deputy Chief Emanuel J. Katranakis said. “It’s unbiased.”

Still, the DNA database, known as the Local DNA Index System, has grown with the addition of DNA from cigarettes, coffee cups, water bottles and other objects touched by people during interviews, even if they are never arrested or the charges are later dismissed.

About 31,400 of the DNA profiles in the city’s database came from people who were arrested or merely questioned in connection with a crime, but may not have been convicted, according to the Legal Aid Society, which obtained details about the database through a Freedom of Information Act request.

One of those was the 12-year-old whose DNA was collected from a straw he used while talking to the police in March 2018. The felony charge against him was eventually dropped, but his DNA remained in the database for more than a year, his lawyer, Christine Bella, said.

The legal ordeal of getting it expunged has left his mother distraught with worry about how her son will view the police going forward. The boy himself has “moved on with his young life,” Ms. Bella said.

Some civil liberties lawyers assert that the methods used to add to the database can violate the Fourth Amendment’s ban on “unreasonable searches and seizures,” a core constitutional principle. They contend the police should not be allowed to take someone’s DNA without probable cause to suspect that they did something illegal.

“It’s essentially saying, ‘Give us your entire genome, even though we don’t have any reason to believe you have committed a crime,’” said Erin E. Murphy, a New York University law professor who has written about DNA databases and DNA profiling.

Terri Rosenblatt, a staff lawyer with the Legal Aid Society, said the practice of taking DNA from water bottles and cigarettes that are offered during interviews, and then loading them into the database, also has undermined public confidence in the police.

“We talk about community policing and the idea that communities should trust their police departments, but all of these kinds of actions erode that trust,” she said.

Defense lawyers have said that the database’s rapid expansion stems, in part, from an aggressive push by the Police Department to collect DNA from every firearm police recover in order to strengthen prosecutions.

The role of the DNA database in investigations became a flash point in the trial of Chanel Lewis, a Brooklyn man convicted in April of murdering Karina Vetrano, a jogger in Queens.

Mr. Lewis’s defense lawyers had argued that DNA evidence collected from the crime scene was tainted and that detectives had conducted “a race-biased dragnet.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 00policedna2-articleLarge N.Y.P.D. Detectives Gave a Boy, 12, a Soda. He Landed in a DNA Database. Vetrano, Karina (1986-2016) Search and Seizure Sampson, Barbara A racial profiling Privacy Prisons and Prisoners Police Department (NYC) Ozone Park (Queens, NY) Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York New York Civil Liberties Union New York City Lewis, Chanel Legal Aid Society Innocence Project Howard Beach (Queens, NY) Forensic Science False Arrests, Convictions and Imprisonments DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Civil Rights and Liberties Brooklyn Defender Services

Chanel Lewis, right, was convicted of killing Karina Vetrano in 2016.CreditUli Seit for The New York Times

Mr. Lewis was asked to give a DNA sample, based largely on a police lieutenant’s hunch. He was charged with murder after his profile matched DNA found on the victim’s body and cellphone.

But before his arrest, detectives had sought saliva samples from more than 360 black men who had been previously arrested or questioned in parts of Queens and Brooklyn.

‘Race-Biased Dragnet’: DNA From 360 Black Men Was Collected to Solve Vetrano Murder, Defense Lawyers Say

Mar 31, 2019

Westlake Legal Group 31JOGGER-threeByTwoSmallAt2X N.Y.P.D. Detectives Gave a Boy, 12, a Soda. He Landed in a DNA Database. Vetrano, Karina (1986-2016) Search and Seizure Sampson, Barbara A racial profiling Privacy Prisons and Prisoners Police Department (NYC) Ozone Park (Queens, NY) Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York New York Civil Liberties Union New York City Lewis, Chanel Legal Aid Society Innocence Project Howard Beach (Queens, NY) Forensic Science False Arrests, Convictions and Imprisonments DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Civil Rights and Liberties Brooklyn Defender Services

Though the DNA of those men did not match a sample found on Ms. Vetrano’s body, it was still entered into the city’s database and can now be tested, indefinitely, against evidence found at crime scenes throughout the city, defense lawyers said.

The police said that, in most cases, they gained consent before taking DNA samples. But in interviews, several men contacted by the police during the Vetrano investigation said that detectives tried to cajole, bully and threaten them into giving a DNA sample. Some gave in.

Luis Ortiz, a public defender who represented one of the men, said the police arrested his client on a marijuana-related offense and kept him jailed for a day in a Queens precinct until he agreed to a saliva sample. The man, who requested that his name not be published to protect his privacy, said one detective told him, “We know it wasn’t you, but we want to make sure.”

“He felt powerless and like he didn’t have any choice,” Mr. Ortiz said.

Eric Bellamy, 39, said four detectives arrived unannounced at his home in Brooklyn in late 2016 and explained that they wanted a sample of his DNA to eliminate him as a suspect in a murder investigation. Stunned, he refused because the detectives did not have a warrant.

Mr. Bellamy recalled one of the detectives said, “If you’re innocent, what’s the problem?”

Maurice Sylla, 55, said detectives came to his home in Brooklyn in August 2016 seeking his DNA. He was not home, but he said the police asked his niece intimidating questions about the family’s immigration status. The investigators “had no reason to invade my privacy,” he said.

Others questioned during the Vetrano investigation included Amaral Bordenave, 26, who agreed to give a urine sample after the police arrested him on an unrelated gun possession charge, and Justen Henderson, who consented to have his cheek swabbed for DNA after being arrested on a misdemeanor assault charge.

Mr. Henderson said he initially declined to provide the sample, but an officer threatened to lose the paperwork on his case so that he would be in custody longer and might be sent to Rikers Island.

“I didn’t feel like fighting,” Mr. Henderson said. “I wanted to go home.”

A portrait of Ms. Vetrano in the home she shared with her parents.  As detectives were looking for her killer, they collected DNA from 360 men, and those profiles ended up in a city database. CreditSam Hodgson for The New York Times

Law enforcement officials say the database has turned out to be a powerful tool. The Brooklyn district attorney’s office, for instance, said it had solved more than 270 cases using DNA from the database, including 10 homicides, 36 sexual assaults and 77 weapons offenses.

One example is the case of a 68-year-old woman who was raped and robbed at knife point in her home in 2016. DNA left by the woman’s attacker was uploaded to the city’s database, where it matched Willie Weathers, who had been convicted of a robbery. Mr. Weathers was convicted of the rape and sentenced to 25 years in prison in 2017.

In 2014, the database also helped Brooklyn prosecutors convict another accused rapist, Avery Bovell. Two years after the attack, Mr. Bovell was arrested and questioned in connection with a commercial burglary. The police obtained a sample of his DNA from an object he touched, and it matched the DNA of one of two men the victim said had raped her. In June, Mr. Bovell pleaded guilty to first-degree criminal sexual act.

“Without having that resource, we would never have been able to identify one of the attackers in that case,” said Rachel Singer, the chief of the forensic science unit in the Brooklyn district attorney’s office.

Once a person’s genetic information has been put in the database, it can be struggle to get it removed, lawyers said. Last year, the medical examiner’s office removed only seven DNA profiles from the database.

Take, for example, the case a Bronx man, Lamar, who asked that his last name be withheld to protect his privacy. In April 2018, detectives questioned him about a firearm they believed he had discarded and surreptitiously collected his DNA from a cigarette they had offered him, video of the interrogation shows.

When the charges against him were later dismissed, Lamar petitioned a judge to expunge his DNA from city records. He said he did not learn that detectives had collected his DNA from the cigarette until it was revealed at a court hearing. “I didn’t expect nothing like that,” he said.

Genealogy Sites Have Helped Identify Suspects. Now They’ve Helped Convict One.

Jul 1, 2019

She Was Arrested at 14. Then Her Photo Went to a Facial Recognition Database.

Aug 1, 2019

Police Agencies Are Assembling Records of DNA

Jun 12, 2013

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Ben Shapiro: Israel made a ‘big mistake’ barring Omar and Tlaib from visiting

Westlake Legal Group Omar-Shapiro-Tlaib Ben Shapiro: Israel made a 'big mistake' barring Omar and Tlaib from visiting Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/shows/the-ben-shapiro-show fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/ben-shapiro fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bbf9f525-bbed-5f3f-91b6-20f4ba4c7ec2 article

Daily Wire Editor-in-Chief Ben Shapiro claimed Thursday that Israel made an error in judgment by barring Rep. Ilhan Omar D-Minn., and Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., from visiting the Jewish state and said the Israeli government played right into the lawmakers’ hands.

“Is this a smart move by Israel? No. It is a very not smart move by Israel,” Shapiro said on his eponymous radio program Thursday.

“If Omar and Tlaib had just gone to Israel and then they had done their little propaganda tour about how Israel is evil and shouldn’t exist — then their ten fans would cheer and everybody else would sigh and roll their eyes,” Shapiro said. “This is actually giving Omar and Tlaib what they want in terms of PR so they can falsely claim that Israel doesn’t tolerate dissent.”

KATIE PAVLICH SAYS TLAIB AND OMAR PURPOSELY TIMED ISRAEL TRIP TO CAUSE CONTROVERSY

Israel announced earlier Thursday they would be barring Omar and Tlaib from entering the country, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu saying the lawmakers’ itinerary “reveals that the sole purpose of their visit is to harm Israel and increase incitement against it.”

President Trump expressed his dismay over the potential visit on Twitter shortly before the decision was announced and urged the lawmakers’ constituents to vote the two women out of office.

“It would show great weakness if Israel allowed Rep. Omar and Rep.Tlaib to visit. They hate Israel & all Jewish people, & there is nothing that can be said or done to change their minds. Minnesota and Michigan will have a hard time putting them back in office. They are a disgrace!” wrote Trump, who added, “Representatives Omar and Tlaib are the face of the Democrat Party, and they HATE Israel!”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Shapiro claimed Israel had given Omar and Tlaib the press coverage they wanted by rejecting their request and said it allows the Democrats and their supporters to paint Israel as being close-minded and intolerant.

“On an intellectual and moral level, they have no duty to bring in Omar and Tlaib. On a PR level, it’s a big mistake,” he said. “It’s a PR blunder for them to give Omar and Tlaib what they want, which is to make the state of Israel look intolerant.”

Westlake Legal Group Omar-Shapiro-Tlaib Ben Shapiro: Israel made a 'big mistake' barring Omar and Tlaib from visiting Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/shows/the-ben-shapiro-show fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/ben-shapiro fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bbf9f525-bbed-5f3f-91b6-20f4ba4c7ec2 article   Westlake Legal Group Omar-Shapiro-Tlaib Ben Shapiro: Israel made a 'big mistake' barring Omar and Tlaib from visiting Nick Givas fox-news/world/world-regions/israel fox-news/shows/the-ben-shapiro-show fox-news/person/rashida-tlaib fox-news/person/ilhan-omar fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/ben-shapiro fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc bbf9f525-bbed-5f3f-91b6-20f4ba4c7ec2 article

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Oregon Gov. Kate Brown On The GOP Trying To Recall Her: ‘Crazy’

WASHINGTON ― She’s pushing for bold action on climate change. She signed a law allowing undocumented immigrants to get driver’s licenses. And as the Democratic governor of Oregon, Kate Brown has the authority to take executive action on those fronts and many more.

In response, the GOP is trying to remove her from office.

The chair of the Oregon Republican Party is leading an effort to recall Brown because, simply put, she and Democratic legislators are advancing policies the GOP doesn’t like.

“The people of Oregon deserve and expect a Governor that honors the will of the voters and works for the good of all citizens, not just special interests and politically-motivated agendas,” party chair Bill Currier says in his recall petition, which he filed last month.

He lists Brown’s support for a cap-and-trade climate bill and granting undocumented immigrants driving privileges among his reasons for launching the recall effort. Currier also complains about Brown’s willingness to use executive powers to advance her policies, saying she has “threatened to usurp legislative power with executive orders to implement her failed legislation, deciding single-handedly what is best for Oregon.”

If this sounds bizarre, that’s because it is. Brown has another word for it.

“Crazy,” she said in a recent sit-down with HuffPost.

“Not only have I had one election in the last three years, I’ve had two. And I won both of them handily,” Brown said. “So what part of the will of the voters are they ignoring?”

A spokesperson for the Oregon Republican Party did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment.

To be sure, it’s very unlikely the GOP’s recall effort will work; organizers would have to collect 280,000 valid signatures by mid-October, and Brown just won reelection in November with more than 50% of the vote. If anything, it’s more of a stunt to boost Republican engagement and fundraising.

There’s a similar recall effort underway in Colorado aimed another Democratic governor, Jared Polis. As one Colorado GOP strategist put it to The Associated Press, it’s “recall seasonfor Republicans seeking a do-over of election results.

But it’s just the latest tactic Republicans in Oregon are using to try to undermine the Democratic stronghold in their state’s government. In June, GOP state senators fled the state to prevent a vote on a cap-and-trade climate bill that would have dramatically reduced carbon emissions by 2050. Brown dispatched the state police to round them up, which triggered safety threats from a far-right militia group that forced Democrats to cancel a Saturday Senate session. The climate bill died as a result.

Brown called the GOP senators’ actions “a subversion of democracy.”

“They are in the minority, way in the minority. It’s like, ‘You lost,’” she said. “They didn’t have any other tool, so they left. They literally shut down the legislative branch.”

Westlake Legal Group 5d55b8fd3b0000df16dc3b58 Oregon Gov. Kate Brown On The GOP Trying To Recall Her: ‘Crazy’

ASSOCIATED PRESS Here’s Oregon state Sen. Brian Boquist (R), who said state police should “send bachelors and come heavily armed” if they tried to apprehend him after he left the state to prevent a vote on a climate change bill. Egads!

The drama over the climate bill came at the end of an otherwise productive legislative session for Democrats. They passed two criminal justice reform bills, one that reduces the number of crimes eligible for the death penalty and another that gives juveniles the chance to be tried in juvenile court if charged with a major crime. They passed a sweeping paid family leave bill that Brown called “the best policy in the country right now.” They passed a $2 billion school spending bill. And Brown signed a law that prepays postage on all mail ballots, which will make voting even more convenient in a state where most residents vote by mail.

Senate Republicans killed some of Brown’s other priority legislation, though. They threatened to leave town again if Democrats brought up a gun safety bill and a bill boosting student vaccinations, so neither got a vote.

“It was unfortunate. I saw the Republicans leaving as D.C. politics coming to Oregon,” said the governor. “But by the same token, we were able to actually get shit done.”

Brown isn’t done trying to push through a climate change bill. The legislature comes back into session in February and she’s already focused on preparing a bill for then. She said she prefers passing legislation to taking executive action to get it done, but hinted that if that won’t work, she’s prepared to use her authority to act unilaterally.

“We are focused on all of our options right now,” she said.

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Trump Administration Asks Congress to Reauthorize N.S.A.’s Deactivated Call Records Program

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-nsa-facebookJumbo Trump Administration Asks Congress to Reauthorize N.S.A.’s Deactivated Call Records Program Wiretapping and Other Eavesdropping Devices and Methods USA PATRIOT Act USA Freedom Act United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Terrorism Surveillance of Citizens by Government Snowden, Edward J September 11 (2001) National Security Agency Coats, Dan Classified Information and State Secrets Civil Rights and Liberties

WASHINGTON — Breaking a long silence about a high-profile National Security Agency program that sifts records of Americans’ telephone calls and text messages in search of terrorists, the Trump administration on Thursday acknowledged for the first time that the system has been indefinitely shut down — but asked Congress to extend its legal basis anyway.

In a letter to Congress delivered on Thursday and obtained by The New York Times, the administration urged lawmakers to make permanent the legal authority for the National Security Agency to gain access to logs of Americans’ domestic communications, the USA Freedom Act. The law, enacted after the intelligence contractor Edward J. Snowden revealed the existence of the program in 2013, is set to expire in December, but the Trump administration wants it made permanent.

The unclassified letter, signed on Wednesday by Dan Coats in one of his last acts as the director of National Intelligence, also conceded that the N.S.A. has indefinitely shut down that program after recurring technical difficulties repeatedly caused it to collect more records than it had legal authority to gather. That fact has previously been reported, but the administration had refused to officially confirm its status.

“The National Security Agency has suspended the call detail records program that uses this authority and deleted the call detail records acquired under this authority,” Mr. Coats wrote. “This decision was made after balancing the program’s relative intelligence value, associated costs, and compliance and data integrity concerns caused by the unique complexities of using these company-generated business records for intelligence purposes.”

[Read the letter Dan Coats sent to Congress.]

Complicating matters, three other surveillance authorities primarily used by the F.B.I. are also set to expire in mid-December. They include provisions that let investigators get court orders to collect business records relevant to a national security investigation, wiretap “lone wolf” terrorists without links to a foreign power, and keep wiretapping someone suspected of being a spy or a terrorist who switches phone lines in an effort to evade surveillance.

Mr. Coats’s letter said the administration supported making those three provisions permanent as well, rather than merely subjecting them to another extension of several years, as Congress has previously done.

The executive branch had been internally divided over whether to push for an extension of the part of the Freedom Act that authorizes the phone records program. Months ago, the N.S.A. presented a bleak assessment of the program to the White House, saying it carried high costs and few benefits, but some officials argued that it made sense to keep the legal authority in case technical solutions emerged to make it work better, according to officials familiar with internal deliberations.

Mr. Coats’s letter adopted the latter argument, saying the administration supports permanently reauthorizing the provision even though the system was dysfunctional. He noted that “as technology changes, our adversaries’ tradecraft and communications habits will continue to evolve and adapt,” suggesting that such a system might become more useful.

While extending the three other provisions is less disputed, their fate will now be caught up in a broader debate about the phone records law. Privacy advocates, including Patrick Toomey of the American Civil Liberties Union, called for Congress to instead let the phone records program die.

“It’s long past time that this surveillance program was shuttered once and for all,” Mr. Toomey said. “The NSA has been vacuuming up hundreds of millions of Americans’ call records as part of a program that is hopelessly complex and lacks any discernible evidence of its value. We should not leave such a sweeping, unaccountable power in the hands of our spy agencies.”

The Times reported last month that the House Judiciary Committee has already started drafting a bill to extend the three expiring F.B.I. tools, but without extending the N.S.A. phone records program.

The N.S.A.’s ability to gain access to and analyze Americans’ domestic calling records traces back to the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, when the Bush administration set up its then-secret Stellarwind program. It was a basket of surveillance and bulk data collection activities that relied on a raw claim of executive power to bypass legal constraints.

One component of the program collected customer calling records from large telecoms like AT&T and MCI, which later became Verizon. The N.S.A. used the metadata — logs showing who contacted whom, but not what was said — as a social map, scrutinizing indirect links between people as it hunted for hidden associates of known terrorism suspects.

In 2006, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court began issuing secret orders requiring the companies to participate in the program.

The orders were based on a creative and disputed interpretation of Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which said the F.B.I. may obtain business records “relevant” to a terrorism investigation. The spy court decided that all records could be seen as “relevant” — a theory that a federal appeals court would later reject as stretching the law too far.

But the bulk phone records program clearly came into public view only in June 2013 when The Guardian published the first revelation from the trove of classified files leaked by Mr. Snowden, the former intelligence contractor. It was a top-secret surveillance court order to Verizon requiring it to give the N.S.A. a copy of all customer calling records.

In the ensuing debate, intelligence officials could not point to any specific attack the program had thwarted. But they defended it as a useful tool when new terrorism-linked phone numbers were identified, and suggested that had it been in place before Sept. 11, it might have helped uncover Al Qaeda’s plot. Critics rejected the Sept. 11 argument as exaggerated and portrayed the program as ripe for abuse and as a legally dubious invasion of privacy.

Eventually, the Obama administration and Congress agreed on a reform law that would end the N.S.A.’s bulk collection of domestic calling data, but preserve its ability to swiftly gain access to records held by telecoms when a judge agreed that a specific number had terrorism links. The idea was to reduce the risk of abuse while preserving the analytical capability.

That law — the USA Freedom Act of 2015 — permitted the N.S.A. to build a system linking up with the telecoms under which the agency could retrieve logs of phone calls and texts for a specific suspect, as well as the logs of communications by everyone who had ever been in contact with that suspect — even when they were customers of different phone companies.

Under the old program, the N.S.A. had been vacuuming up billions of logs about Americans’ communications every day. Under the replacement Freedom Act system, that number dropped significantly, although its scale remained large in absolute terms. In 2016, the agency obtained orders to target 42 suspects and collected 151 million records. In 2017, it obtained orders to target 40 suspects and collected 534 million records.

But public signs of trouble with the Freedom Act system began to emerge in June 2018, when the N.S.A. announced that it had discovered “technical irregularities” that caused it to collect more phone records than it had legal authority to gather.

The agency has been coy about the details, saying they are classified, but in broad strokes has said that for various reasons telecoms were returning both accurate and inaccurate numbers in the list of accounts a suspect had been in contact with. When the N.S.A. fed those numbers back into the system to get the “second hop” of calling data from the suspect’s contacts, it compounded the problem.

Unable to separate the good data from the bad, the agency deleted its entire collection of Americans’ phone records — hundreds of millions of communications logs — and started over. But in October 2018, it discovered that the problem was happening again, and, once again, had to purge the data, according to a recently declassified inspector general report.

The recurring headaches, including the inability of the N.S.A. to verify whether the data returned from the phone companies, was accurate, and the relatively low value of the intelligence that was being gleaned from it, contributed to an intelligence community decision in late 2018 to start winding the program down, officials familiar with the matter have said.

A slightly garbled sign of that move first came to light in March, when a senior Republican congressional aide said in a national security podcast interview, with what was apparently overstatement in terms of the timing, that the N.S.A. had not been using the program “for the past six months.” But for months, the government had refused to say what its status was.

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National Border Patrol Council official disgusted by attack on ICE facility

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6073300359001_6073303289001-vs National Border Patrol Council official disgusted by attack on ICE facility Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 9b766157-ce97-53d9-b07f-f0d6a354d8d5

Vice President of the National Border Patrol Council Art Del Cueto said Thursday a video of an attack on an ICE facility was incited by “lies” and “rhetoric” about what officers do.

“Disgusting. It’s disgusting to see something like that and I think it’s been triggered by way too many individuals that have had a platform to speak against the men and women that are trying to defend our nation’s borders, the law enforcement communities. I mean that’s where it comes from,” Del Cueto told “America’s Newsroom.”

The video, exclusively obtained by Fox News, shows a man armed with guns and explosives attacking an Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility in Tacoma, Wash. last month.

“There was a recent article that attacked various reporters from Fox. Attacked Fox News and named me on there as well, saying that we were responsible for some of these attacks that happened in El Paso,” Del Cueto said.

HOMAN SHARES NEW VIDEO ON ICE FACILITY ATTACK: RESULTS OF ‘HATEFUL RHETORIC’ FROM AOC’S ‘SQUAD; 2020 DEMS

“What was that based on? That was based on us talking about actual facts and the facts we spoke about is simple. When you have individuals in large quantities that enter another country by force or illegal, that is an invasion, I stand on these words.”

Del Cueto criticized some of the rhetoric about ICE, saying it was “lies” and the “infighting” needs to stop. Former ICE director Tom Homan said that the “hateful rhetoric” from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-NY, is having a negative impact on ICE employees.

Del Cueto explained his position further about the “lies” about border patrol agents he says are just “following the law.”

“They’ve been lying about it, calling them concentration camps, comparing the individuals that are out there wearing the uniform to defend our nation’s borders are Nazis. that’s where it comes from,” Cueto said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“If we’re going to be attacked for speaking the truth then we have to call it like it is and the individuals that are inciting these attacks need to be called out also and they’re doing it based on lies and that’s the problem,” he said.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6073300359001_6073303289001-vs National Border Patrol Council official disgusted by attack on ICE facility Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 9b766157-ce97-53d9-b07f-f0d6a354d8d5   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6073300359001_6073303289001-vs National Border Patrol Council official disgusted by attack on ICE facility Joshua Nelson fox-news/shows/fox-friends fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox news fnc/media fnc article 9b766157-ce97-53d9-b07f-f0d6a354d8d5

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‘To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before’ Sequel Finally Has A Release Date

Westlake Legal Group 5d55d123220000d002f64661 ‘To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before’ Sequel Finally Has A Release Date

Noah Centine-oh-my-god, Netflix has announced the release date for the “To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before” sequel.

The streaming service revealed that the follow-up to the hit teen romance film “To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before: P. S. I Still Love You,” based on the book of the same name by Jenny Han, will arrive just on February 12, 2020 ― just in time for Valentine’s Day. 

Stars and professional Instagram flirters Lana Condor and Noah Centineo revealed the news in a fittingly adorable video where they did their best “Love Actually” cosplay with some cue cards. 

The duo also announced that the third film “To All the Boys: Always and Forever, Lara Jean” is currently in production.

The first film in the series, which debuted on Netflix in August 2018, made stars out of its two leads and was one of Netflix’s “most viewed original films ever with strong repeat viewing,” according to the streaming service.

The sequel will reportedly explore the ongoing romantic adventures of Laura Jean (Condor). Past love John Ambrose McClaren, played by Broadway star Jordan Knight, enters the picture, possibly threatening her relationship with Peter Kavinsky (Centineo). 

“There’s so many things in the second book that I would love to see in a sequel,” author Jenny Han told Indiewire after the first film’s release. “The whole reason why I wrote a second book was for the character of John Ambrose McClaren, who is a fan favorite, and he’s a favorite of mine too. I would love to see that explored, and also there’s a character called Stormy that I love to write. I would love to see that.”

John Corbett, Janel Parrish and Anna Cathcart are all set to return in “P. S. I Still Love You,” alongside newcomers Holland Taylor and “13 Reasons Why” star Ross Butler. 

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