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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 339)

Yale psychiatrist urges Pelosi: Request 72-hour mental health hold on Trump after Iran attack

Westlake Legal Group v3ekvYyxRXo_rKLiWZmjX31hpDtIvU3NTNXCpHM7D9M Yale psychiatrist urges Pelosi: Request 72-hour mental health hold on Trump after Iran attack r/politics

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Yale psychiatrist urges Pelosi: Request 72-hour mental health hold on Trump after Iran attack

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Cries of ‘Revenge Is Coming’ at Funerals for Slain Commanders in Iraq

Westlake Legal Group merlin_166630452_8c55bda2-170b-4834-8f8f-be29113eed61-facebookJumbo Cries of ‘Revenge Is Coming’ at Funerals for Slain Commanders in Iraq Suleimani, Qassim Iraq Iran International Relations Funerals and Memorials Drones (Pilotless Planes) Defense and Military Forces Baghdad (Iraq)

BAGHDAD — As Iraq held joint funeral services on Saturday for two revered military leaders killed in an American drone strike near the Baghdad airport this past week, tens of thousands of pro-Iranian fighters marched down the streets of Baghdad, waving flags and chanting, “Revenge is coming” to the United States.

The surprise killing on Friday of Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the leader of Iran’s elite Quds Force and one of the most powerful figures in the region, and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the Iraqi-Iranian deputy head of the Popular Mobilization Forces, the armed groups that are part of the Iraqi security forces, sent shock waves across the Middle East.

It also raised fears that the shadow war that had been building in the region between the United States and Iran could suddenly escalate into a major conflict.

The extent of that network added to uncertainty about how Iran might respond to his killing. Tehran could do so from any of those places by targeting United States forces, or their allies such as Israel, Saudi Arabia or other countries in the Persian Gulf.

But even as Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, promised “forceful revenge” for the killing of General Suleimani, experts said it remained unclear whether Iran would make good on its threats. They noted that the country had to balance its need to show resolve against a staunch enemy and its reluctance to thrust itself into a full-scale war with the United States, a much stronger power.

The funerals were held against a backdrop of extreme regional tension as Iran and the United States signaled they could be on the brink of a potentially catastrophic war. Since the killing of General Suleimani and Mr. al-Muhandis, neither side has made another move — although both have made threats.

At the joint funerals, as close to a state ceremony as any since the fall of Saddam Hussein, a key pillar of Iran’s regional reach was on display in Baghdad. The mobilization fighters, faces somber and almost all dressed in black, carried a vast array of flags representing their different groups.

They chanted: “The blood of Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis will not be spilled in vain. Revenge is coming.”

Precisely what kind of revenge was planned was not clear. But without giving details, a senior Revolutionary Guards commander was quoted on Saturday by the Tasnim news agency as saying that Iran would punish Americans wherever they are within reach of the Islamic Republic in retaliation for the killing of General Suleimani.

Gen. Gholamali Abuhamzeh, the commander of the Guards in the southern province of Kerman, raised the prospect of possible attacks on ships in the Gulf.

Iran reserved the right to take revenge against the United States for the death of Soleimani, he said in comments made late on Friday and reported on Saturday by Tasnim.

“The Strait of Hormuz is a vital point for the West, and a large number of American destroyers and warships cross there,” he said. “Vital American targets in the region have been identified by Iran since long time ago, some 35 U.S. targets in the region as well as Tel Aviv are within our reach.”

The loss of Mr. al-Muhandis was a profound one for the Iraqi fighters who saw him not just as a militia leader close to Iran, but also as someone who had helped rally the armed groups when they first formed in 2014 to fight the Islamic State. The extremists were then threatening to sweep from the north to Baghdad, the Iraqi capital.

Many proclaimed during his funeral: “Our men do not fear America; each man dies on his day. Your voice, Abu Mahdi, remains the loudest one.”

General Suleimani’s body will be taken to Najaf, Iraq, a prominent Shiite burial place, then flown to Mashhad, Iran, on Sunday for a funeral service. A large state service is expected in Tehran on Monday, and the general is expected to be buried in his hometown, Kerman, on Tuesday, Iran’s Tasnim news agency reported.

Amid the tensions, the United States has called on its citizens to leave Iraq, shuttered its embassy in Baghdad, sent additional Marines and on Thursday deployed 700 members of the 82nd Airborne Division to the region.

After the strike, President Trump said the attack had been intended “to stop a war” and warned Iran that the United States military had already identified targets for further strikes “if Americans anywhere are threatened.”

Among those attending the funeral on Saturday were Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi of Iraq and a number of senior Shiite leaders, including Ammar al-Hakim; Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, a former prime minister; Falih Al Fayad, the national security adviser; and Hadi al-Amiri, the leader of the Badr Organization, which is both a political party and has one of the largest and oldest militias.

Missing from the cortege were Qais al-Khazali, the leader of one of the most notorious pro-Iran militias in Iraq, Asaib al-Haq; and Hamid al-Jazaeri, who leads the Khorasani Brigades, a pro-Iran militia.

Mr. Abdul Mahdi looked visibly upset as he walked surrounded by security officers in a sea of militia fighters. As Iraq’s leader, he has been caught between Iran, its neighbor, and the United States as the two have ratcheted up their confrontations.

The latest conflict started with a rocket attack a week ago that killed an American contractor working at an Iraqi military base in the north of the country. That was followed by an American attack on five Popular Mobilization militia bases in western Iraq and Syria that killed more than 24 people and set in motion the events that led to a nearly two-day siege of the United States Embassy in Baghdad.

After the funerals on Saturday, some mourners tried to again enter the Green Zone, the seat of the Iraqi government and many embassies. But they were pushed back, in contrast to a violent attack on Tuesday, when pro-Iranian protesters pushed past guards and laid siege to the American Embassy, effectively imprisoning diplomats inside, burning and looting the reception area and climbing inside the compound.

In Iran, the news media flooded its broadcasts and front pages with coverage of General Suleimani’s death, and even news outlets perceived to be more moderate called for revenge.

When President Hassan Rouhani of Iran paid his condolences on Saturday during a visit to General Suleimani’s home, he, too, spoke of revenge — but with an open-ended timeline.

“The Americans did not realize what a great mistake they made,” Mr. Rouhani said. “They will see the effects of this criminal act, not only today, but for years to come.”

Alissa J. Rubin and Falih Hassan reported from Baghdad, and Ben Hubbard from Beirut.

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United Methodist Church announces proposal to split over LGBTQ rights

Leaders from the United Methodist Church reportedly announced a tentative plan Friday to split the church over differences on same-sex marriage and the inclusion of gay clergy.

The new conservative “Traditionalist Methodist” denomination wouldn’t allow gay marriage or gay clergy members, The New York Times reported.

The proposal was first signed in December after the “fundamental differences” within the church became irreconcilable.

“I’m actually really sad that we couldn’t build a bridge that could have provided a witness to the world of what unity amid diversity and disagreement could look like,” Methodist Bishop Karen Oliveto, the denomination’s first openly gay bishop, said.

UNITED METHODISTS EDGE TOWARD BREAKUP OVER LGBT POLICIES

In 2017, the Judicial Council, the church’s highest court, declared Oliveto’s consecration “was incompatible with church law.” She was, however, allowed to remain as the resident bishop of the Mountain Sky Conference, which covers churches in Colorado, Montana, Utah, Wyoming and part of Idaho.

There are roughly 13 million church members around the world and about half of them are in the United States, according to The Times.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-91e70aae69f5433681773df374ed3e27 United Methodist Church announces proposal to split over LGBTQ rights fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 3ad80a86-5741-5606-b304-378b3f917039

In this April 19, 2019 file photo, a gay pride rainbow flag flies along with the U.S. flag in front of the Asbury United Methodist Church in Prairie Village, Kan. A new Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll shows age, education level and religious affiliation matter greatly when it comes to Americans’ opinions on a prospective clergy member’s sexual orientation, gender, marital status or views on issues such as same-sex marriage or abortion  (AP)

UNITED METHODIST DELEGATES REJECT RECOGNIZING GAY MARRIAGE, THREATENING SPLIT IN CHURCH

The division, which has been brewing for years, came to an impasse last May when delegates in St. Louis voted 438-384 to ban gay marriage and the inclusion of gay clergy.

A majority of U.S.-based churches opposed the “Traditional Plan” but were outvoted by conservatives in the U.S., Africa and the Philippines.

Soon after, 16 church representatives determined breaking up the church was “the best means to resolve our differences, allowing each part of the church to remain true to its theological understanding,” Bishop Cynthia Fierro Harvey of Louisiana said, according to the Times.

“There is a degree of heartbreak within me because I never thought we would reach this point,” New York Bishop Thomas Bickerton said. “However, we are at this point. The differences are irreconcilable. This is inevitable.”

Texas Bishop Scott J. Jones said the proposal has not yet been adopted.

“The Protocol itself says it was developed in service to the General Conference delegates who will decide on its adoption or amendment,” he said. “Other plans may well be considered as alternatives. Significant questions remain to be answered about the Protocol’s implementation. The Judicial Council will need to rule on its constitutionality.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He added that financial feasibility will also need to be considered before any split.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-b3111444492a49b4b1330a3fe4926748 United Methodist Church announces proposal to split over LGBTQ rights fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 3ad80a86-5741-5606-b304-378b3f917039   Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-b3111444492a49b4b1330a3fe4926748 United Methodist Church announces proposal to split over LGBTQ rights fox-news/us/religion/christianity fox-news/us/religion fox-news/faith-values fox news fnc/us fnc Brie Stimson article 3ad80a86-5741-5606-b304-378b3f917039

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Was It Legal For The U.S. To Kill A Top Iranian Military Leader?

Westlake Legal Group ap_20003121173306-a62f059f99d35d8ecc2542688c8f3924734db915-s1100-c15 Was It Legal For The U.S. To Kill A Top Iranian Military Leader?

A vehicle hit by a missile burns outside the Baghdad International Airport, where U.S. airstrikes killed Qassem Soleimani, the head of Iran’s elite Quds Force, at the direction of President Trump. AP hide caption

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AP

Westlake Legal Group  Was It Legal For The U.S. To Kill A Top Iranian Military Leader?

A vehicle hit by a missile burns outside the Baghdad International Airport, where U.S. airstrikes killed Qassem Soleimani, the head of Iran’s elite Quds Force, at the direction of President Trump.

AP

The U.S. killing of a top Iranian military leader, Qassem Soleimani, in an airstrike in Baghdad this week has raised thorny legal questions. Experts disagree over whether the U.S. had the legal authority to launch the deadly strike.

President Trump stated that Soleimani was plotting “imminent and sinister attacks on American diplomats and American personnel, but we caught him in the act and terminated him.”

The powerful Iranian commander led a shadowy elite military organization called the Quds Force. In recent months, the U.S. says the group has backed an Iraqi militia that has launched numerous attacks on U.S. personnel, including Tuesday’s attempt to storm the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

Experts disagree on how to characterize this killing. “I think the best definition would be either one of assassination or murder,” Gary Solis, a retired Marine who taught on the laws of war at West Point, tells NPR. He says what happened is comparable to Iran killing a high-ranking U.S. military official with a bomb on U.S. soil.

Assassination is prohibited by a U.S. executive order, says Ashley Deeks, a University of Virginia law professor who focuses on the laws of war.

She thinks it is unlikely this meets the definition of an assassination: “A lawful killing during an armed conflict does not constitute an assassination,” Deeks says. “As a legal matter, if he were intimately involved in planning and blessing these attacks, then that doesn’t seem to render it as assassination.”

A State Department official agrees. He was asked by NPR’s Michele Kelemen whether this constituted an assassination.

“Assassinations are not allowed in the law,” the official said, and offered two criteria that authorities weighed. “Do you have overwhelming evidence that somebody is going to launch a military or terrorist attack against you?” the State Department official said. “Check that box.”

The official added that the administration also explored whether there was another way to stop Soleimani, such as having him arrested, and determined there was “no way.”

Was killing Soleimani legal under U.S. domestic law? “It’s clearly lawful,” says John Bellinger, a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and former legal adviser to the Department of State under the George W. Bush administration. “It’s clearly an exercise of the president’s constitutional authority as commander in chief and chief executive to use force in the national interest.”

The answer is less straightforward for Scott Anderson, a fellow at the Brookings Institution who served as the legal adviser for the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad during the Obama administration. He notes that in the U.S., “the legal views as to what is permitted by the law in terms of the use of military force really is pretty well-defined by the executive branch itself.”

That’s because Congress has not imposed substantive limits on the executive’s use of force and federal courts have appeared reluctant to intervene, he says.

In recent years, some members of Congress have occasionally criticized the fact that complicated wars grinding on in the Middle East have been justified by legislation passed nearly two decades ago.

U.S. officials did not state a specific legal basis for the strike until Friday evening, when Trump’s national security adviser, Robert O’Brien, cited the 2002 Authorization for Use of Military Force, which ushered in the war against Saddam Hussein’s regime in Iraq. O’Brien also said that the authorization was consistent with the president’s constitutional authorities as commander in chief to defend the nation and forces against attacks.

O’Brien did not elaborate on the nature of the threat. The strike against Soleimani was carried out without officially notifying Congress ahead of time.

Anderson says that the Trump administration’s legal justifications are “adopting a stance that pushes a little beyond what it and prior presidential administrations have been have done in the past.”

He says it’s hard to argue that the action against Soleimani is completely unlawful under U.S. law – but said that justifications may rely on interpretations of law that are controversial or antiquated.

Jack Goldsmith, a professor at Harvard Law School, notes that presidential war powers have been steadily expanding for years – and that Congress has largely gone along with it. “Our country has, quite self-consciously, given one person, the President, an enormous sprawling military and enormous discretion to use it in ways that can easily lead to a massive war,” he said on Twitter. “That is our system: one person decides.”

The legality of this killing under international law, rather than domestic, appears harder to assess. Bellinger says that hinges on the nature of the threat that Soleimani posed. “The administration needs to put out more facts as to why they believe that Soleimani presented an imminent threat to the United States and U.S. forces,” he says.

Deeks says the U.S. appears to be arguing that the strike was an act of anticipatory self-defense.

“The idea there is that you have a right of self-defense against armed attacks,” Deeks says. “And many people think you have a right to act before the armed attack has actually hit you, if you have very good reason to think the attack is imminent.”

Agnes Callamard, the U.N. special rapporteur on extrajudicial executions, questions whether this strike would meet the standard needed to justify its legality on those grounds. “The test for so-called anticipatory self-defense is very narrow: It must be a necessity that is ‘instant, overwhelming, and leaving no choice of means, and no moment of deliberation’. This test is unlikely to be met in these particular cases,” she tweeted.

“I hope the U.S. has rock-solid, written evidence of a continuing or an ongoing or a planned attack on the United States or its interests,” says Solis. “You’ve got to have more than an assertion that plans were underway.”

Another complicated legal aspect of this attack is the fact that it occurred within Iraq.

“Generally speaking, international law says that states are not supposed to use military force on each other’s territories without the consent of the host state,” Anderson notes, though he says that the U.S. has argued previously that when a host government is unable or unwilling to address a threat, the state affected by the threat can take action without the host’s consent. That’s a controversial argument, he says.

Iraqi leaders are responding angrily at the attack, which also killed an Iraqi official. “The assassination of an Iraqi military commander who holds an official position is considered aggression on Iraq … and the liquidation of leading Iraqi figures or those from a brotherly country on Iraqi soil is a massive breach of sovereignty,” Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi said, as NPR reported.

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The Brazilian Guitarist Beloved By Musicians Around The World

Westlake Legal Group guinga-2-by-manfred-pollert_wide-a33a9da9264fdfa50f83288d5853aaf55d73c7d0-s1100-c15 The Brazilian Guitarist Beloved By Musicians Around The World

The Brazilian musician Sergio Mendes says that Guinga’s melodies are incredible. “They’re unique; they’re different,” he says. Manfred Pollert/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Manfred Pollert/Courtesy of the artist

Westlake Legal Group  The Brazilian Guitarist Beloved By Musicians Around The World

The Brazilian musician Sergio Mendes says that Guinga’s melodies are incredible. “They’re unique; they’re different,” he says.

Manfred Pollert/Courtesy of the artist

Guitarist and composer Guinga is a popular songwriter in Brazil: his songs have been recorded by the likes of superstar Elis Regina and he’s a favorite of musicians around the world like Michel Legrand and Sergio Mendes. But Guinga is less well-known in the U.S. (he rarely comes here to perform), and considering his successful five-decade career, he’s an unusually modest musician.

“I met so many virtuoso players in Brazil and had the opportunity to interact with so many virtuoso guitarists, including one called Hélio Delmiro,” he says. “Everything that I tried to do in life is to play like him. And since I could never achieve it, I ended up playing like Guinga. It was better for me.”

Guinga’s full name is Carlos Althier de Souza Lemos Escobar. He got the name “Guinga” after his aunt took to calling him “Gringo” as a toddler, because he had pale skin. The youngster pronounced it “Guinga,” and the nickname stuck.

He grew-up in a working-class suburb of Rio de Janeiro and his uncle taught him how to play the guitar when he was 11. At home, he heard Italian Bel canto, Brazilian and American music on his parents’ Victrola.

“I listened to everything I could,” Guinga says. “I knew who Leonard Bernstein was. I knew ‘Somewhere’ when I was 11-years-old; I didn’t know how to play it, but when I listened to ‘Somewhere,’ I cried.

“American music is inside of me as much as Brazilian music,” he finishes.

Guinga combined both styles of music when he started composing as a teenager. Then, in the 1970s, when he was in his twenties, Guinga accompanied some of Brazil’s biggest Samba stars and wrote the music for a hit by Elis Regina.

[embedded content]

YouTube

Guinga started studying classical guitar when he was 26 and got really good, says JohnPaul Trotter, a Los Angeles-based classical guitarist. He first heard about Guinga’s music 10 years ago, when he traveled to Rio.

“I started taking guitar lessons with a teacher down there,” Trotter explains, “and one of the first things he did was he put a Guinga piece in front of me and said, ‘This is what you really need to look at, and there’s a lot of meat on this. So learn this well, come back to me next week and we go from there.’ “

In addition to mastering his instrument and composing popular songs, Guinga also got a college degree — in dentistry. He says he did it for his dad, and because he knew he couldn’t make a living as a musician.

“I did not want to struggle financially. I didn’t want to live the misery I lived as an adolescent and the first part of my adult life,” Guinga says. “I did quite well as a dentist. At age 27, I earned 8,000 dollars a month. In Brazil, that’s a lot of money.”

Reflecting on the hardships his parents experienced when he was growing up, Guinga couldn’t help but get emotional.

“Everything that I tried to be in life was to try to redeem what my father and mother could not be. That’s why I think I make music,” he says.

So, at the age of 56, Guinga stepped out of the dentist’s office and into his music studio full time.

[embedded content]

YouTube

Sergio Mendes met Guinga in the early 1980s in Rio when Mendes was recording a new album. He included two of Guinga’s co-compositions on it and invited the guitarist to record with him.

“I sent the album to Henry Mancini, one of the greatest melodists [and] writers of the century, and he heard the Guinga song and he said, ‘Who’s that? Who wrote that?’ ” Mendes recalls. “I said, “Oh, a friend of mine.’ He told me, ‘We don’t write music like that anymore in the United States.’ “

[embedded content]

YouTube

Guinga says that, in the end, his instrument is not only the guitar, but also the songs it sings. That’s something he learned from the great Brazilian songwriters.

“I saw the way in which the synchronicity of the hand of those composers — their thoughts over the guitar is impressive,” he says. “They are the creators, the true creators. Someone like João Gilberto: with that minimalist guitar, he transformed the world.”

Guinga may not be transforming the world with his guitar, but he definitely makes it a better place to live.

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Yale psychiatrist urges Pelosi: Request 72-hour mental health hold on Trump after Iran attack

Westlake Legal Group v3ekvYyxRXo_rKLiWZmjX31hpDtIvU3NTNXCpHM7D9M Yale psychiatrist urges Pelosi: Request 72-hour mental health hold on Trump after Iran attack r/politics

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Mumbai Takes Its Vintage Padmini Taxis Off The Road For Good

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-695754008-1-_custom-bf5c8610a499ea874f65ade40dd80d3f99f98503-s1100-c15 Mumbai Takes Its Vintage Padmini Taxis Off The Road For Good

An Indian taxi driver drives his Premier Padmini past the iconic building Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus railway station in Mumbai, India. Indranil Mukherjee/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Indranil Mukherjee/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  Mumbai Takes Its Vintage Padmini Taxis Off The Road For Good

An Indian taxi driver drives his Premier Padmini past the iconic building Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus railway station in Mumbai, India.

Indranil Mukherjee/AFP via Getty Images

At the edge of a tree-lined lane in Mumbai, India, Abdul Kareem opens the hood of his taxi and pours water into the radiator. The car is black with a yellow roof, like all Mumbai cabs. But it stands out in a line of cars.

It’s antique-looking and kind of boxy, with bulbous headlights. It has a metal luggage rack on its roof that proclaims “Mumbai” in bright orange lettering. On the streets, Kareem says, people point out the taxi to their kids.

A generation ago, India’s financial capital Bombay became Mumbai. Its cotton mills were redeveloped into swanky malls and offices. Hipster bars replaced the city’s historical Irani cafes. Now another Mumbai icon is riding off into the sunset: the vintage black and yellow taxi.

Westlake Legal Group pathak_taxi8_custom-e2074099067f8e68286ec169432eea2c2a56c5b4-s1100-c15 Mumbai Takes Its Vintage Padmini Taxis Off The Road For Good

Abdul Kareem sits behind the wheel of his Premier Padmini taxi — which will go off Mumbai’s streets by the summer. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Mumbai Takes Its Vintage Padmini Taxis Off The Road For Good

Abdul Kareem sits behind the wheel of his Premier Padmini taxi — which will go off Mumbai’s streets by the summer.

Sushmita Pathak/NPR

The car — an Indian version of the Italian model Fiat 1100 — made a debut on India’s streets in the 1960s. It was manufactured in India by a local company, Premier Automobiles Ltd. The car was named Premier Padmini, after a legendary Indian royal. Early posters advertise the car as “a beautiful princess of your own,” with a picture of an Indian woman decked in gold jewelry.

In the 1980s and 1990s, Premier Padmini became synonymous with Mumbai taxis. In its heyday, some 60,000 Padmini taxis plied the city’s streets, according to Anthony Lawrence Quadros, general secretary of the Mumbai taxi drivers’ union.

“It’s an iconic car which has served millions of people,” Quadros says.

In 1991, when India’s government passed reforms allowing more private competition in the economy, global companies started flooding the Indian market. The Padmini, which hadn’t had an update in years, had to compete with modern, foreign cars equipped with the latest technology. Premier Automobiles suffered huge losses and stopped production in 2000.

Westlake Legal Group pathak_taxi13_custom-31559edd27a7f2fcc1778ce007ab6b6c3d6294de-s1100-c15 Mumbai Takes Its Vintage Padmini Taxis Off The Road For Good

Cabbie Abdul Kareem poses with his Premier Padmini taxi — one of only about 50 that were still on Mumbai’s streets as of December. Once ubiquitous, the Padmini is being replaced by modern cars. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Mumbai Takes Its Vintage Padmini Taxis Off The Road For Good

Cabbie Abdul Kareem poses with his Premier Padmini taxi — one of only about 50 that were still on Mumbai’s streets as of December. Once ubiquitous, the Padmini is being replaced by modern cars.

Sushmita Pathak/NPR

Then, in 2008, the government of the state of Maharashtra, whose capital is Mumbai, started to phase out older cars to reduce pollution. They banned all taxis that were older than 25 years. In 2013, they revised the rule and made the age limit 20.

A lot of taxi drivers and owners became unemployed, says Quadros. Some had taken out loans for their vehicles and their lives were ruined, he says.

Thousands of Padmini taxis suddenly vanished from Mumbai’s streets. Sixty-year-old Ram Vilas Maurya’s cab was one of them.

“I miss Padmini,” Maurya says. “She was a tough car.”

The modern car he now drives gets a dent even at the slightest collision, he says. Padmini wasn’t like that, he adds.

Maurya smiles as he reminisces about his Padmini, which was also his first vehicle when he started driving taxis in Mumbai some 30 years ago. “I used to take my kids to the beach on weekends in that car,” he says.

This year, even the youngest Padminis will have to go. It’s already very hard to spot one. Only about 50 were left as of December, according to Quadros.

And Mumbai residents have started noticing their absence.

“When you’re trying to get to the airport and you have all these suitcases, you realize the new taxis that run on compressed natural gas have cylinders in the back and there’s not a lot of space,” says 37-year-old Rachel Lopez, a lifelong Mumbai resident. The Padmini, on the contrary, had a huge trunk space as well as an overhead carrier.

What else was different about riding in a Padmini cab? For one, Lopez says, you needed good upper-body strength to travel.

“They wouldn’t close with a polite little click,” she says. “You had to really kind of bash them in and then you hear a metallic thud and you knew the door had closed.”

Even though she misses them, Lopez says she’s not sad to see the Padminis go. They deserve a little rest now, she says. It also symbolizes how Mumbai operates.

“Something old has to go to make room for something new,” says Lopez.

But before it disappears, it needs to be chronicled, says Lopez. A few years ago, she took it upon herself to document one classic feature of Mumbai’s taxis: their funky, vibrant ceilings. Her Instagram page @thegreaterbombay has hundreds of photos of weird designs and patterns that adorn Mumbai’s black-yellow taxi ceilings.

The humble Padmini taxi that served commuters for decades has now become a muse for artists and photographers. Finnish photographer Markku Lahdesmaki is one of them.

In the spring of 2011, when Lahdesmaki came to Mumbai for work, the scene that greeted him outside the airport surprised him.

“I saw these hundreds of very cool looking vintage taxi cars and I was like, wow,” Lahdesmaki says.

Over the next three days, he traveled across the city to take pictures of these cabs in interesting scenarios. What struck him the most, he says, was that all the cabbies were very proud of their taxis.

“When I was riding in this Padmini taxi, I felt like I was in a movie,” says Lahdesmaki.

Some of Lahdesmaki’s photos from the project have been adapted for T-shirts and caps.

When he heard that the government was phasing out the Padmini taxis, Lahdesmaki says he decided to buy one himself. He’s trying to get it shipped to Los Angeles, where he now lives.

They may not be sleek and powerful like their modern counterparts but Padmini taxis still have their fans.

Recently, Kareem picked up a man in his still-legal Padmini near a railway station. The passenger had a high-end chauffeur-driven car waiting for him. But he got into the cab instead and asked Kareem to follow his car. The man just wanted to take a Padmini taxi, for old times’ sake.

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Former Bengahzi team member: Susan Rice comments on Soleimani ‘typical tactics’ from Dems

Westlake Legal Group MARK-1 Former Bengahzi team member: Susan Rice comments on Soleimani 'typical tactics' from Dems Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 43ade7c5-d1ae-5e64-b739-9c89c98fefb7

Former National Security Adviser Susan Rice’s comments accusing the Trump administration of “misrepresenting the facts” about the death of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani are “typical tactics” from Democrats, former U.S. Marine and Benghazi Annex Security team member Mark Geist said Saturday.

Appearing on “Fox & Friends: Weekend” with host Pete Hegseth, Geist said that Rice “pretty much has zero integrity in my book.”

Rice told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer Friday that she couldn’t trust the Trump administration to tell the truth.

“This administration sadly, tragically, has a record of almost-daily misrepresenting the facts — telling falsehoods about issues big and very small. So, it’s hard to have confidence on the face at their representation,” she said.

SUSAN RICE SAYS OBAMA ADMINISTRATION ‘DIDN’T HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY’ TO KILL SOLEIMANI

Soleimani, commander of Iran’s elite Quds Force, was killed by a targeted drone strike at Baghdad International Airport in an operation ordered by President Trump. The strike came slightly more than two months after another U.S.-led strike resulted in the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

“It’s typical tactics from the Democrats,” Geist said. “They’re going to bring out their standard bearer, just like they did in Benghazi.”

Geist said that Blitzer was “letting her skate” one more time talking about “integrity.”

In a separate interview with MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow, Rice said that had the Obama administration “been presented such an opportunity, what we would have done is weigh very carefully and very deliberately the risks versus the potential rewards.”

“So, if in fact the administration can be believed that there was indeed strong intelligence of an imminent threat against the United States that’s being carried out by Soleimani and related militia then the question becomes [was] there more than one way to address that threat?” she asked Maddow. “Was the only way to deal with it to kill Soleimani? Certainly, given his history and track record, he deserves his just rewards but the question is does that serve our interests? Does that make us more secure?”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“First off, I mean, when has a protest ever occurred at night and, I mean, most protests they don’t typically bring AK-47s, bell-fed machine guns, and RPGs. That’s somebody planning an attack and they knew it,” Geist told Hegseth.

“They knew it when she went out on the speaking circuit on Sunday,” he continued. “But, instead of telling the truth she wanted to tell lies because she had to say what the administration — at the time — wanted.”

“If President Trump had been in office during Benghazi, we wouldn’t have lost four Americans,” he concluded.

Fox News’ Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group MARK-1 Former Bengahzi team member: Susan Rice comments on Soleimani 'typical tactics' from Dems Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 43ade7c5-d1ae-5e64-b739-9c89c98fefb7   Westlake Legal Group MARK-1 Former Bengahzi team member: Susan Rice comments on Soleimani 'typical tactics' from Dems Julia Musto fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/terror fox-news/shows/fox-friends-weekend fox-news/politics/elections/democrats fox-news/person/barack-obama fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 43ade7c5-d1ae-5e64-b739-9c89c98fefb7

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Timeline: How The U.S. Came To Strike And Kill A Top Iranian General

Westlake Legal Group ap_20003121228776_wide-8ca53fec3f93688f522033f160edfe70345ce74a-s1100-c15 Timeline: How The U.S. Came To Strike And Kill A Top Iranian General

This photo released by the Iraqi Prime Minister Press Office shows a burning vehicle at the Baghdad International Airport following the airstrike, in Baghdad, Iraq, early Friday, Jan. 3, 2020. AP hide caption

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AP

Westlake Legal Group  Timeline: How The U.S. Came To Strike And Kill A Top Iranian General

This photo released by the Iraqi Prime Minister Press Office shows a burning vehicle at the Baghdad International Airport following the airstrike, in Baghdad, Iraq, early Friday, Jan. 3, 2020.

AP

President Trump ordered an airstrike on Thursday evening that killed the Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad, a man he said was “plotting imminent and sinister attacks” against Americans in the region.

Soleimani was the leader of the Quds Force, a covert section of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. The White House says he was the mastermind behind attacks on Americans during the past two decades — including two recent attacks.

Trump said Friday he was not seeking regime change, but ordered the attack to protect Americans. “Under my leadership, America’s policy is unambiguous: To terrorists who harm or intend to harm any American, we will find you; we will eliminate you,” he said.

The White House has kept a close hold on many details of what led up to the decision to kill Soleimani. Here’s what is known from public accounts.

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Friday, Dec. 27: Attack near Kirkuk

Militia group Kataib Hezbollah attacks the K1 military base near the Iraqi city of Kirkuk with rockets, killing an American contractor and wounding several American and Iraqi personnel. Kataib Hezbollah has ties to Iran. It has denied orchestrating the attack.

Sunday, Dec. 29: Trump orders some airstrikes

Westlake Legal Group ap_19364000352483_wide-02bac0c91744087765fd124bd0a96a0e60445361-s1100-c15 Timeline: How The U.S. Came To Strike And Kill A Top Iranian General

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, left, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley, right, listen as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivers a statement on Iraq and Syria, at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago property, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Timeline: How The U.S. Came To Strike And Kill A Top Iranian General

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, left, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley, right, listen as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivers a statement on Iraq and Syria, at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago property, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2019.

Evan Vucci/AP

From Florida, Trump responds with an order for airstrikes in sections of Iraq and Syria where members of the militia group were reportedly located.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Secretary of Defense Mark Esper and Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, surprise reporters with a short evening briefing at Trump’s Florida home, Mar-a-Lago.

  • Pompeo says he briefed the president on “activities that have taken place in the Middle East over the course of the last 72 hours” and that provocative actions had been happening for weeks.
  • Esper describes five targets in western Iraq and eastern Syria, and adds: “I would add that, in our discussion today with the president, we discussed with him other options that are available. And I would note also that we will take additional actions as necessary to ensure that we act in our own self-defense and we deter further bad behavior from militia groups or from Iran.”

Tuesday, Dec. 31: Embassy compound stormed

On Tuesday morning, Iraqi supporters of Kataib Hezbollah begin storming the U.S. embassy in Baghdad. The violence escalates, with militia members attempting to enter the embassy, starting fires and damaging the outside and a reception area of the embassy.

Trump has a meeting on the issue at his golf course, and speaks with the Iraqi prime minister. White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham says Trump is getting regular updates. “As the president said, Iran is orchestrating this attack and they will be held fully responsible,” she said. “It will be the president’s choice how and when we respond to their escalation.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said he met with Trump about the situation.

Later on Tuesday, Trump threatens Iran.

Esper announces the U.S. will deploy an infantry battalion from the 82nd Airborne Division to the U.S. Central Command area. The decision is described as a precaution; about 750 soldiers at first and additional troops over the next several days.

Later that night, Trump speaks to reporters before attending a New Year’s Eve gala and is asked if he foresees going to war with Iran. “Do I want to? No. I want to have peace. I like peace,” Trump told reporters. “And Iran should want peace more than anybody. So I don’t see that happening.”

Wednesday, Jan. 1: Pompeo cancels trip

The secretary of state cancels his planned trip to Ukraine and four additional countries. He speaks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, among other regional leaders.

Thursday, Jan. 2: Esper’s warning; Soleimani killed

Esper gives a statement emphasizing that the U.S. “will not accept continued attacks against our personnel & forces in the region.” He also sends a message to U.S. allies to “stand together” against Iran.

Esper and Milley hold a press gaggle. Esper says there are some signs Iran may be planning additional attacks and delivers a warning. “If that happens, then we will act, and by the way, if we get word of attacks or some type of indication, we will take preemptive action, as well to protect American forces, to protect American lives.”

“So the game has changed and we’re prepared to do what is necessary to defend our personnel, and our interests and our partners in the region.”

Later that night, there are reports of a strike near the Baghdad airport — and early reports Soleimani was killed.

Eventually, the Pentagon confirms the events, writing that Soleimani was “actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region.”

The statement also said Soleimani had orchestrated attacks on bases and approved the attack on the embassy, adding, “this strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans.”

Friday, Jan. 3: Trump defends decision; world reacts

Westlake Legal Group ap_20003436823496_wide-75389c10aa5946cc18c4978b7340eb49d4474062-s1100-c15 Timeline: How The U.S. Came To Strike And Kill A Top Iranian General

A boy in Tehran carries a portrait of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in the U.S. airstrike in Iraq. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Timeline: How The U.S. Came To Strike And Kill A Top Iranian General

A boy in Tehran carries a portrait of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in the U.S. airstrike in Iraq.

Vahid Salemi/AP

Trump first addresses Soleimani’s killing by tweet, saying the general had been “plotting to kill many more” Americans.

Later, he speaks to reporters, defending his decision to order the killing of Soleimani. “If Americans anywhere are threatened, we have all of those targets already fully identified, and I am ready and prepared to take whatever action is necessary. And that, in particular, refers to Iran.”

Meanwhile, leading figures in Iran vowed revenge and demonstrators in Iran, Iraq and elsewhere condemned the attack.

Big questions remain, including how Iran could retaliate and what Trump’s broader plan is in the Middle East. Read more on that here, from NPR’s Phil Ewing.

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