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These are the all-time greatest voices from television and radio as NFL celebrates 100th season

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close These are the all-time greatest voices from television and radio as NFL celebrates 100th season

SportsPulse: The voices that have narrated the NFL in its first 100 years have had almost as much impact as those who played it. Our panel discuss who the top voice is in the NFL and if Tony Romo is the next great one. USA TODAY

Some of you hung on their every word. Others might have thrown a beer can toward the television at the sound of their voice. And still others saw the action they described only in your mind’s eye as you listened to the radio.

These are the men and women who make the games or the highlights come alive through their descriptions and enthusiasm. They can be outlandish, understated or poetic, and for many of us they are indispensable parts of the NFL experience.

As the NFL celebrates its 100th season, USA TODAY selects the top 50 broadcasters in league history. They are chosen by accomplishment, reputation, longevity, significance and, admittedly, personal preference. Some you might never have heard of; others are as familiar as members of your family. 

1. John Facenda: Known as the “Voice of God,” he voiced over the greatest of the NFL Films productions. And we do mean voice – his was unmistakable. While he was a news anchor on Philadelphia TV from 1948 to 1973, he will forever be associated with the NFL. “He had a voice that could make a laundry list sound dramatic,” Steve Sabol of NFL Films once said. The story goes that Ed Sabol, Steve’s father, discovered Facenda at a bar in 1965 when he overheard him describing NFL Films footage that was airing on TV.

2. Pat Summerall: Started doing NFL games for CBS in 1962 after retiring from a nine-year NFL career as a kicker primarily for the Chicago Cardinals and New York Giants. He eventually became network sports’ play-by-play voice of the NFL, first with analyst, close friend and former defensive back Tom Brookshire and then most famously with John Madden for 22 seasons, on CBS and then on Fox. He called a record 16 Super Bowls on TV, was named the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Pete Rozelle Radio and Television Award winner in 1994 and was CBS’ lead announcer on its PGA Tour coverage.

3.John Madden: The Hall of Famer won a Super Bowl as coach of the Raiders, where he had a 75.9% winning percentage over 10 seasons, and then went into broadcasting, having his greatest success and impact with Pat Summerall. Aside from his trademark “Boom!” call, he is known for coming up with the term “turducken” for his turkey/duck/chicken extravaganza awarded to the winning team on whichever Thanksgiving Day game telecast he was working. Early in his broadcast career he was known for his Miller Lite commercials and then appealed to the younger set with his introduction of the “Madden NFL” video game series.

4. Howard Cosell: He called his autobiography “I Never Played the Game,” but that did not stop him from pontificating on sports from football to boxing. He helped turn the NFL from pure sports to a combination of sports and entertainment when he signed on for the debut of “Monday Night Football” in 1970 and stayed over an entertaining but controversial career until 1983. He was the third man in the booth, unheard of at the time, alongside former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Don Meredith and Hall of Famer Frank Gifford (the latter joining after a brief stay by original play-by-play announcer Keith Jackson). Cosell brought a more critical eye to the game and the players than viewers were accustomed to hearing. 

5. Don Meredith: The former Dallas Cowboys quarterback helped revolutionize coverage of the league when he teamed with Cosell and Gifford on “Monday Night Football” by injecting a folksy sense of humor that overshadowed a keen sense of the game — when he focused on the game. His interaction with Cosell could take the telecast off the rails, which sometimes saved the night when their byplay proved more entertaining than the game action. You knew the game was done when he started singing, “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.”

More: NFL’s 100 greatest teams of all time: Which squad is best in league history?

More: Opinion: Greatest NFL players by uniform number: From No. 00 Jim Otto to No. 99 J.J. Watt

6. Curt Gowdy: The big-game baseball and football announcer, he called nine Super Bowls, including the first and Joe Namath’s “guarantee” win for the Jets over the Colts in Super Bowl III. His was the call on the Immaculate Reception, with longtime boothmate Al DeRogatis, when Franco Harris made a deflected catch that helped the Steelers beat the Raiders in a 1972 AFC playoff game. Gowdy was the Pete Rozelle Radio and Television Award winner in 1993.

7. Al Michaels: Perhaps best known for his “Do you believe in miracles?” call when the USA upset Russia in hockey at the 1980 Winter Olympics, he steadied the ship on “Monday Night Football” after the Cosell era, then teamed with Madden and later Cris Collinsworth on “Sunday Night Football” for NBC starting in 2009. “Since the 1970s, Al has been at or near the peak of all network play-by-play men,” Bob Costas told USA TODAY Sports last season. “And I think now, for a sustained period of time, he has been the standard of maybe two generations.” He won the Rozelle Award in 2013.

8. Dick Enberg: On NBC, he and  Pro Football Hall of Famer Merlin Olsen offered a more sophisticated counterpoint to the “Boom!” bluster of Madden and Summerall. Enberg was the master craftsman of words, indicative of his background in teaching and higher education. He called 10 Super Bowls but also was legendary for announcing NCAA men’s basketball games with Al McGuire and Billy Packer, and before that was the famed announcer during UCLA’s basketball championship run under John Wooden. He won 13 Sports Emmys and was given the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Rozelle Award in 1999. He is the only person to win an Emmy as a sportscaster, a writer and a producer.

9. Ray Scott:  The voice of the Green Bay Packers in their dynasty years of the 1960s, then became synonymous as the voice of the NFL when the sport exploded into popular culture late in that decade. He broadcast four Super Bowls, including the first, and was the voice during the infamous Ice Bowl playoff game won by the Packers against the Dallas Cowboys in wind chills of -35 degrees. He was the 2000 Rozelle winner.

10: Brent Musburger, Phyllis George, Irv Cross, Jimmy “The Greek” Snyder on “The NFL Today”: This was mandatory appointment TV on Sunday afternoons ahead of the NFL slate of games, filling in notes from around the league in the pre-internet days with up-to-the-minute sideline reports and lengthy taped interviews. This crew kicked off in 1975 (Jimmy The Greek joined the next season). The show dominated its time slot for 18 years. George left in 1978 but returned in 1980 for a few years.  Snyder was fired in 1988, according to The Washington Post, for telling a Washington, D.C., TV station that many blacks were superior athletes because of breeding from the time of slavery and that the only area in sports left for whites was coaching. Cross won the Rozelle Award in 2009.

11. Frank Gifford: A Hall of Fame player and broadcaster,  he joined “Monday Night Football” in its second season (1971) through 1997, the calming voice in the early years of the telecast, when Cosell and Meredith would stray far afield. He was a dashing player on the New York football scene for the Giants in the heydays of the 1950s and parlayed that into an NFL broadcasting career that first began at CBS. He was the color man on coverage of the first Super Bowl, working the CBS telecast of the game versus the NBC telecast that had Curt Gowdy, Paul Christman and Charlie Jones.

12. Jim Nantz: Known as much for golf and college basketball, he also has called five Super Bowls for CBS and has been the mainstay of the network’s NFL coverage since becoming its lead play-by-play voice on Sundays since 2004. He is a three-time Emmy winner and five-time National Sportscaster of the Year who has been with CBS since 1985. His time of year is in the early months of the calendar, when he can be seen announcing the Super Bowl, the NCAA men’s basketball tournament and The Masters. He won the Rozelle Award in 2011.

13. Charlie Jones: He called football games throughout a 38-year career, mostly with NBC. An Emmy winner, he was called “one of the great pioneers of NBC Sports,” by Dick Ebersol, chairman of NBC Sports, according to the Los Angeles Times. He was the 1997 Rozelle winner.

14. Tom Brookshier: An all-pro defensive back with the Eagles, Brookshier teamed with Pat Summerall as CBS’ No. 1 crew for many years on NFL games. In 1981, he left for another assignment, and John Madden became Summerall’s partner. 

***

TEAM BY TEAM: The best players in the history of each NFL franchise

***

15. Chris Schenkel: A 40-year career included New York Giants games starting in 1952, which put him in the booth for the famous Colts-Giants 1958 NFL championship game. He also did voice-over for the first NFL Films production and the 1962 NFL title game between the Packers and the Giants. “Chris was an unbelievable gentleman,” said legendary TV producer  Don Ohlmeyer, according to the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame.  “He had one of the most important qualities people can have on television: They are instantly likable.” He won the Rozelle Award in 1992.

16. Lindsey Nelson: While best known for announcing baseball and college football (particularly Notre Dame), he did the NFL on CBS from 1966 to 1981 and did some Monday night games on radio. Aside from his great storytelling and Tennessee twang — Bob Costas called him “a cheerful chronicler” — Nelson could be recognized from afar by his sartorial splendor. If a jacket wasn’t garish, it wasn’t on Nelson. He was named the Rozelle winner in 1990. Appropriately, he would have been 100 this year.

17. Lesley Visser:  Originally a newspaper reporter, she came to prominence with her personal player stories for “The NFL Today,” and then her dogged sideline work. She won the Rozelle Award in 2006, and, according to her website, she was “the only woman to have presented the Lombardi Championship Trophy at the Super Bowl (1992, CBS); the first woman on ABC’s ‘Monday Night Football’ (1998); voted the No. 1 Female Sportscaster of All-Time by the American Sportscasters Association; voted to both the Sportscasters Hall of Fame and the Sportswriters Hall of Fame.” 

18. Marty Glickman: Did play-by-play for the New York Giants from 1948 to 1971 and for the Jets from 1971 to 1979 and 1987 to 1989. The website jewishsports.net called him “one of America’s premier sports broadcasters for five decades.” He also made the 1936 Olympic track team but was withheld from competition by the U.S. for the Games in Hitler’s Germany. He was named to four Halls of Fame, including the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. 

19. Jack Whitaker: His network career began in 1961 at CBS, where he did play-by-play for the Eagles and hosted other shows. He also was a studio host for the CBS pregame show. Known for his golf “essays,” he won three Emmy Awards and is in the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame.20

20. Al DeRogatis: The former NFL player was known mainly for his sharp analysis covering the NFL with Curt Gowdy.  “In 10 years, I never had a bad moment with Curt,” he once told the Chicago Tribune. “We were just two guys trying to tell the true story of what was happening.” They were the broadcasters for the famous “Heidi” game in 1968, Super Bowl III when the Jets upset the Colts and the 1971 AFC championship game in Kansas City that went to double overtime.

21. James Brown: A former basketball player at Harvard, he has been an even-keel studio host for more than 30 years, mostly with CBS. The multiple Emmy winner was named Best Studio Host of the Decade by Sports Illustrated in 2010. He won the Rozelle Award in 2016.

22. Merlin Olsen: A legendary defensive lineman for the Rams’ “Fearsome Foursome.” According to the Pro Football Hall of Fame site, he earned a master’s in economics in the offseasons. He partnered with Dick Enberg as NBC’s No. 1 team for AFC games. He also was an actor, best known for “Little House on the Prairie.” 

23. Harry Kalas: A mainstay narrator for NFL Films (while mostly known as the Phillies’ play-by-play man) and the primary voice after John Facenda. “(Facenda) was the ‘Voice of God’ and Kalas the ‘Voice of the People,’” then-NFL Films president Steve Sabol said upon Kalas’ death.

24. Andrea Kremer: A multiple Emmy winner who works for NFL Network and HBO’s “Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel” and has covered more than 25 Super Bowls. Won the Rozelle Award in 2018, joining Lesley Visser as the only female winners.

25. Jack Buck: Known mainly for baseball and as the voice of the St. Louis Cardinals. He  called the 1962 AFL championship game and 17 Super Bowls on radio. He began announcing the NFL on TV for CBS in 1963, and in 1967 called the Ice Bowl with Ray Scott. Buck was named the Rozelle winner in 1996.

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26. Bill King: The longtime voice of the Raiders, known for his catchphrase of “Holy Toledo!” According to ESPN, Raiders owner Al Davis once said, “I say this with

great admiration and love that Bill becomes one of the people that

I give the cloak of immortality. Time never stops for the great

ones.” Also known as the voice of the Oakland Athletics and the Golden State Warriors.

27.Chris Berman: One of the early prominent personalities with ESPN, “Boomer” became most associated with the NFL through the network’s “countdown” show. He won the Rozelle Award in 2010.

28. Dan Dierdorf: A Hall of Fame offensive lineman, he worked with among others Greg Gumbel and Dick Enberg. He is still doing color commentary for his alma mater Michigan’s radio network. Was the 2008 Rozelle winner.

29. Paul Christman: A college and pro quarterback, he worked AFL games and did Super Bowl I with Curt Gowdy. He also worked with Ray Scott on CBS.

30. Michelle Tafoya: The Emmy winner is a reporter for NBC Sports and the primary “Sunday Night Football” sideline reporter since 2011. The San Francisco Chronicle described her as “widely recognized as the best sideline reporter in sports.”

31. Dick Stockton: Very versatile, doing multiple sports for more than 40 years. He spent 17 years with CBS and joined Fox in 1994. According to Fox, his analyst partners have included Roger Staubach, Hank Stram, Dan Fouts, Terry Bradshaw and Dan Dierdorf.

32. Cris Collinsworth: The NFL wide receiver has worked for HBO and NBC and partners with Al Michaels and Michelle Tafoya currently on “Sunday Night Football.” 

33. Suzy Kolber: Has been in multiple roles at ESPN since 1999. In 2017, she was named host of “Monday Night Countdown,” ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” pregame show. She also anchors the network’s halftime and postgame coverage.

34. Joe Buck: Started calling NFL games for Fox Sports in 1994 (at age 25). His calls included the Patriots’ Super Bowl comeback win over Atlanta and David Tyree’s Super Bowl helmet catch. The son of broadcast legend Jack Buck, he for some reason polarizes viewers. 

35. Pam Oliver: Started working for NFL on Fox in 1995 and has been a sideline reporter for 24 seasons.

36. Vern Lundquist: Known mostly for college football and golf (the 16th hole at Augusta is his canvass), he worked for NFL Films and called games for CBS.

37. Myron Cope: Voice of the Steelers for 35 years and credited with creating the Terrible Towel. He won the Rozelle Award in 2005.

38. Don Criqui: Called network NFL games for 47 consecutive years (1967-2013) for CBS and NBC. He also called games on the radio for his alma mater, Notre Dame, from 2006 until 2017.  And he won the Rozelle Award in 2003

39. Terry Bradshaw: Began as a color analyst, famously with Vern Lundquist. The Hall of Fame quarterback is an entertaining part of the Fox pregame show.

40. Vin Scully: Known for baseball, mostly the Los Angeles Dodgers, he did call football from 1975 to 1982 on CBS, and because of that voice and style, he belongs on a greatest list of any sport he worked. His final call in an NFL game was “The Catch” from Joe Montana to Dwight Clark to win the NFC championship. He later told the San Jose Mercury News: “When I got home, I told my family, ‘That’s a great game on which to call it a football career.’ And that was that.”

41. Phil Simms: A former Giants quarterback, he works for CBS after stints as an analyst with NBC and ESPN.

42. Beth Mowins: Became the first woman to do play-by-play for a nationally televised NFL game when she worked half of a “Monday Night Football” doubleheader in 2017. Also was the first woman to do play-by-play of an NFL game for CBS.

43. Brad Sham: “The Voice of the Cowboys.” Need anymore be said?

44. Marv Albert: Because that unmistakable voice is entertaining to listen to no matter what the sport. It seems even better on radio than on TV.

45. Tony Romo: The former Cowboys’ quarterback has a small sample size but already has gained rave reviews for his insight and ability to predict plays. Talk to us for the second 100 season celebration.

46. Sam Huff, Sonny Jurgensen and Frank Herzog: Two Hall of Famers and a genial play-by-play man, the team of “Sonny, Sam and Frank” called the Redskins’ Super Bowl glory years. 

47. Merrill Reese: He is in his 43rd season as play-by-play voice of the Philadelphia Eagles. 

48. Gayle Sierens: The first woman to do play-by-play on network television, handling a Chiefs-Seahawks game in 1987.

49. Bob Sheppard: Also of the Yankees, he was the PA announcer for decades for the New York football Giants. 

50. Mel Kiper Jr.: Love him or hate him, you cannot ignore that he basically created the cottage industry of draft analysis. And he does have an unmistakable voice and rapid-fire delivery. 

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Airstrike kills 17 ISIS terrorists in Libya: US military

Westlake Legal Group Mideast-Libya_Hers5 Airstrike kills 17 ISIS terrorists in Libya: US military Melissa Leon Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article a05476c6-aaa2-54ae-aef4-064abda173b2

The U.S. military says it killed 17 Islamic State (ISIS) fighters in an airstrike on Thursday outside Murzuq, in southwest Libya.

This was the first American airstrike in Libya since Nov. 29, 2018, according to U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM).

“This ongoing campaign against ISIS-Libya demonstrates that U.S. Africa Command persistently targets terrorist networks that seek to harm innocent Libyans,” said Navy Rear Adm. Heidi Berg, AFRICOM director of intelligence. “We continue to pursue ISIS-Libya and other terrorists in the region, denying them safe haven to coordinate and plan operations in Libya.”

No civilians were injured or killed in the airstrike, AFRICOM said.

The U.S. conducted almost 500 airstrikes against ISIS in 2016 in the coastal city of Surt.

ISIS LEADER CALLS FOR ‘CALIPHATE SOLDIERS’ TO FREE DETAINEES FROM CAMPS, CONTINUE ATTACKS

Earlier this month, the American military bombed an “ISIS-infested” island in northern Iraq.

American jets dropped more than 80,000 pounds of laser-guided bombs there, on Qanus Island. F-15 and F-35 jets dropped GBU-31 munitions, officials told Fox News.

The campaign was meant to destroy an area being used by ISIS for operations in the region, officials had said.

MISSOURI MAN PLEADS GUILTY TO ROLE IN PLOTTING ISIS ATTACK

New U.S. Air Force strike data shows jets have doubled the number of airstrikes targeting ISIS in the past month. American jets have dropped 28 percent more bombs on the Taliban and an ISIS affiliate in August than they did in the previous month.

In August, 800 bombs were dropped against targets in Afghanistan – the most since November 2018.

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Westlake Legal Group Mideast-Libya_Hers5 Airstrike kills 17 ISIS terrorists in Libya: US military Melissa Leon Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article a05476c6-aaa2-54ae-aef4-064abda173b2   Westlake Legal Group Mideast-Libya_Hers5 Airstrike kills 17 ISIS terrorists in Libya: US military Melissa Leon Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/africa fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/us/military fox news fnc/us fnc article a05476c6-aaa2-54ae-aef4-064abda173b2

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Clinton’s White House Faced Impeachment With Discipline. Trump’s Approach Is Different.

WASHINGTON — The last time Congress tried to impeach a president, the White House chief of staff had one rule: No one who wasn’t working directly on impeachment, including the president himself, was ever allowed to talk about it.

John D. Podesta, President Bill Clinton’s wiry, uber-disciplined chief of staff, delivered the message during a senior staff meeting. White House staffers were supposed to stay in their lanes, doing their jobs, or risk being fired. Any water cooler discussion about the Monica Lewinsky scandal, or the impeachment proceedings, and “I will break your neck,” Mr. Podesta recalled telling his staffers, using an expletive. And that especially applied to Mr. Clinton.

Mr. Clinton’s aides had studied Watergate, and their takeaway was that the public believed President Richard M. Nixon was being buried by the scandal, in part, because he talked about it endlessly. So their approach was that the only way to survive and to keep his job approval rating up was to demonstrate that the White House was still working, and that Mr. Clinton was still doing the job he was elected to do for the people.

The strategy of controlling and disciplining Mr. Clinton worked. While a Republican-led House impeached him in December 1998, Democrats picked up five House seats the month before, his approval rating soared to 73 percent in the days afterward, and he was acquitted of the charges by the Republican-led Senate in February 1999.

But the approach is unlikely to succeed with President Trump, someone less concerned with policy than he is with how things play in distinct, daily news cycles. He heads into what appears to be a rapidly unfurling impeachment inquiry unprepared temperamentally, and with a depleted staff, many of whom are shrugging off the seriousness of what the president faces.

The White House communications and press operations have seen their roles subsumed by Mr. Trump, who thinks he is his own best spokesman and sees little need to to control his anger at his accusers. And the West Wing, under the leadership of an acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, has reverted to an unstructured work space governed by Mr. Trump’s moods, with aides often dismissed or marginalized if they tell the president things he doesn’t want to hear.

Mr. Mulvaney is often described as a figurehead, with Mr. Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, serving as the de facto chief of staff. The White House Counsel’s Office is also understaffed; Emmet T. Flood, who was part of Mr. Clinton’s impeachment legal team and then oversaw the Trump administration’s legal response to the special counsel investigation into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia, stepped down in June, as Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation wrapped up.

A White House official said there had been “no need” for a replacement, and that there were no impeachment preparations underway in the White House because so far there was no actual impeachment inquiry to prepare for.

If anything, Mr. Trump and some of his advisers have grown convinced since the Mueller investigation that the tight discipline that worked 20 years ago may not be necessary.

Having a formal war room, or rapid response operation, “would be overreaction on our part,” said Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president. “It would be playing on the Democrats’ turf.” And if impeachment succeeds, Trump officials are anticipating a Republican-held Senate that would not permit witnesses to testify at length and would not convict him.

Mr. Trump, aides said, shares that view, and on Thursday he expressed no interest in building a war room to respond to what he views as an effort by congressional Democrats to harass him. In contrast to the Mueller investigation, which required the White House to turn over millions of documents, his aides feel there is little for them to do at the moment.

Also complicating matters, the White House Counsel’s Office and the National Security Council are implicated in the whistle blower’s complaint, which details how White House lawyers “directed” people to remove an electronic transcript of Mr. Trump’s phone call with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine from the computer system where such transcripts are typically stored. The White House on Friday said lawyers from the National Security Council actually decided how to store the transcript.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_160918452_411a0e8b-dc53-4b91-8291-f1a2ff1aded5-articleLarge Clinton’s White House Faced Impeachment With Discipline. Trump’s Approach Is Different. United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Mulvaney, Mick Maguire, Joseph (1952- ) impeachment Conway, Kellyanne Clinton, Bill

Under the leadership of an acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, the West Wing has reverted to an unstructured workspace governed by President Trump’s moods.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Another complication: Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, has served as Mr. Trump’s main television surrogate in charge of rapid response, but he appears likely to be called as a witness and a key player in the proceedings.

That hasn’t stopped the former New York mayor from continuing to speak to the media, appearances the president has praised. “It is impossible that the whistle-blower is a hero and I’m not,” Mr. Giuliani said in an interview with The Atlantic on Thursday. “I will be the hero! These morons — when this is over, I will be the hero.”

In theory, Mr. Trump’s White House could have been more prepared than Mr. Clinton was for the formal impeachment inquiry that Speaker Nancy Pelosi set in motion on Tuesday.

In January 1998, when news of the investigation into Mr. Clinton’s relationship with Ms. Lewinsky first broke, the White House was blindsided and had to build a rapid-response operation and legal team from scratch. Mr. Trump, in contrast, spent almost two years fighting the special counsel’s investigation and lived with the threat of impeachment hovering over him since the early days of his administration.

But so far, there is little in terms of structure, and nothing in terms of discipline, emanating from the president.

“It’s very, very difficult, not because the White House counsel isn’t capable of that, but because Trump forces people out of their lane and into defending him,” Mr. Podesta said. “That’s the wrong strategy. The only way to survive is to keep focused on trying to act like you’re still the president of the United States.”

On Thursday, two days after Ms. Pelosi began a formal impeachment inquiry, Mr. Trump appeared to be letting the story overwhelm everything else. While Joseph Maguire, the acting director of National Intelligence, defended the rights of the whistle-blower while testifying in front of the House Intelligence Committee, Mr. Trump was comparing him to a spy.

“You know what we used to do in the old days when we were smart with spies and treason, right?” Mr. Trump told a stunned group of staffers from the United States Mission to the United Nations on Thursday and their family members “We used to handle it a little differently than we do now.”

For now, the White House is planning to allow Mr. Trump to run his own show. It hopes the president’s ability to use the internet to amplify a message means Mr. Trump won’t need the same kind of structure that helped the White House respond to a slow-moving impeachment inquiry in the 1990s. And with sympathetic Fox News hosts, as well as conservative news outlets like Breitbart amplifying attacks on Democrats and support for Mr. Trump, the White House today has what is essentially an independent rapid response team working that they don’t even need to direct or bankroll.

Mr. Mulvaney briefly floated the idea of bringing in Corey Lewandowski, Mr. Trump’s former campaign manager who has been mulling a run for Senate in his home state of New Hampshire, to help lead some of the White House’s anti-impeachment messaging from the outside, according to two people familiar with what took place. But others close to Mr. Trump said that Mr. Lewandowski’s combative turn as a witness before the House Judiciary Committee recently could complicate that kind of role, and the idea was quickly sidelined.

West Wing officials said they viewed the Democrats as the ones fighting from a weak position. “Nancy Pelosi in a matter of moments washed away careful, deliberative restraint,” Ms. Conway said. “For months, she said it had to be bipartisan and accepted by the public. Neither is true.”

Inside the West Wing, aides who have been numbed since the release of the Access Hollywood tape by normally career-ending scandals that did not stop Mr. Trump’s climb are shrugging off the latest scandal. That view is shared Trump loyalists in the administration.

“It’s silly to bring an impeachment proceeding based on an anonymous whistle-blower who is not directly involved and whose complaint no one had seen,” Wilbur Ross, the commerce secretary, said in an interview scheduled to air Friday on Fox Business Network, after the complaint had been made public. “What I think is really disgraceful is that anonymous whistle-blowers are given total credibility.”

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Lawmakers Head Home For 2 Weeks, But Impeachment Inquiry Rolls On

Westlake Legal Group ap_19262650546159_custom-c7569bbd5f1db97ad12a687309a4f4d167fc3302-s1100-c15 Lawmakers Head Home For 2 Weeks, But Impeachment Inquiry Rolls On

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., is leading the impeachment inquiry. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  Lawmakers Head Home For 2 Weeks, But Impeachment Inquiry Rolls On

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., is leading the impeachment inquiry.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, now the lead lawmaker in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, says his panel will be working through the scheduled upcoming two-week congressional recess.

“I can tell you it’s going to be a very busy couple of weeks ahead,” Schiff told reporters Friday. The chairman said the committee is trying to schedule hearings and witness interviews, as well as working on document requests and possible subpoenas.

Asked how Congress will respond if the White House stonewalls congressional requests — as it has on virtually all other lines of inquiry — he responded: “They’ll just strengthen the case of obstruction.”

Sen. Jim Himes, D-Conn., a senior member of the intelligence committee, said he will spend part of the recess on a codel — a trip abroad for lawmakers — but he declined to identify the locale, or whether it included Ukraine. “For security reasons we don’t like to talk about destinations,” Himes said, but he echoed Schiff that the panel would be working throughout the recess and that panel members may return to Washington.

“The speaker has made it very clear that we are not to let momentum drop in this two weeks,” he said.

Himes said the committee would like to hear from Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, who is a figure in the July 25 call that sparked a whistleblower complaint that has led to the impeachment inquiry. Giuliani has met with Ukrainian officials in regard to the president’s request to investigate the Biden family, but he has forcefully denied any wrongdoing in a number of dramatic media interviews in recent days.

In a spiral of accusations, Giuliani alleges a conspiracy involving the Obama administration, the Clinton Foundation, the Biden family, the Ukrainian government and Ukrainian business interests. Giuliani told Fox News on Thursday that he had to investigate it because the Justice Department would not. “I got this because the FBI wouldn’t take it,” he told Fox.

“I think we need to understand who [Giuliani] talked to and what he said,” Himes said. “My hope would be that we could do that without creating the kind of public spectacle that seems to be his reason for being.”

Himes said the committee wants to know why a private citizen was conducting foreign policy and talking to foreign leaders on behalf of the president. “I do think we’re going to need to understand what he said, and to whom he said it,” he said.

Schiff has been assuring rank-and-file lawmakers that he will keep them up to speed on the committee’s progress. “This is very fast-moving. Every single day information is coming out and we want to be able to explain to our constituents what’s going on,” said Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., who said Schiff met with a faction of progressive lawmakers and told them he will make sure “the caucus is updated regularly.”

Generally, party leaders will convene conference calls during recess weeks if a need arises. “I have a feeling those conference calls will be packed,” Jayapal said of the next two weeks.

Democrats so far have largely shrugged off whether the impeachment inquiry will derail the party’s ability to talk about anything else. “I’m not concerned about us slowing down our business in the House,” said Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., noting the House has sent many bills over to the Senate.

“If the Senate was actually being productive and being worth their weight then I’d be concerned, but they haven’t done a damn thing all year,” she said. “There’s no leverage there in terms of their productivity; they haven’t been doing anything.”

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., who sits on the Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees, says this recess will allow lawmakers to let constituents know the gravity of the impeachment probe.

“Don’t we want to go home and talk with our constituents about this momentous decision that has been made?” he said. “We have a legislative agenda we’ve been pushing. I think going home and talking about those other things, too, is the surest way to reassure people that we are capable of doing more than one thing at one time.”

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‘Dancing with the Stars’ judge Carrie Ann Inaba says doctor ‘forgot’ to tell her about lupus diagnosis

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6008924538001_6008919029001-vs 'Dancing with the Stars' judge Carrie Ann Inaba says doctor 'forgot' to tell her about lupus diagnosis Madeline Farber fox-news/health fox-news/entertainment/dancing-with-the-stars fox news fnc/health fnc d07f749f-6084-5886-a55e-ae33ee58978e article

Dancing with the Stars” judge Carrie Ann Inaba was candid this week when describing her life with the autoimmune disease lupus.

During Thursday’s episode of “Live with Kelly and Ryan,” Inaba said she only recently learned she has lupus, maintaining that her doctor “forgot” to tell her.

‘DANCING WITH THE STARS’ CARRIE ANN INABA OPENS UP ABOUT SERIOUS HEALTH CONDITION

“It’s so weird,” she said. “I was diagnosed with autoimmune six years ago, but my doctor didn’t tell me I had lupus,” she continued. “I was having a colonoscopy and I saw my chart [read] lupus and I was like, ‘This is not my chart,’ and they were like, ‘You have lupus.’”

“So my doctor had forgotten to tell me,” she added.

The Mayo Clinic defines lupus as a “systemic autoimmune disease that occurs when your body’s immune system attacks your own tissues and organs.” Lupus likely results from a combination of genetics and environment, it notes. Sunlight, infections and medications can trigger the disease. Common symptoms include fatigue, fever, joint pain, a butterfly-shaped rash on the face, skin lesions and headaches.

Inaba said she’s made various lifestyle changes since learning she has lupus.

“I quit Diet Coke. I also stopped going in the sun because when you have lupus you’re allergic to UV light, which I didn’t know, so I was causing my own flare-ups.”

Staying out of the sun has been a difficult change because of where Inaba is from, she said.

“I’m from Hawaii, that’s what we do,” she said.

INDIANA MOM WARNS OTHERS OF COMMON VIRUS AFTER SON, 3, HOSPITALIZED 

In the past, Inaba has discussed being diagnosed as having Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA), a condition in which the blood “lacks adequate healthy red blood cells,” per the Mayo Clinic.

“I was going through a time where I was very fatigued. I had body aches I had a little bit of anxiety, heart palpitations and a lot of brain fog,” Inaba told Fox News in March. “And we couldn’t figure out what it was until my doctors gave me the correct test.”

“Once I was diagnosed, it’s like I got my life back,” she once told People. “I am so grateful.”

Fox News’ Lindsay Carlton contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6008924538001_6008919029001-vs 'Dancing with the Stars' judge Carrie Ann Inaba says doctor 'forgot' to tell her about lupus diagnosis Madeline Farber fox-news/health fox-news/entertainment/dancing-with-the-stars fox news fnc/health fnc d07f749f-6084-5886-a55e-ae33ee58978e article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6008924538001_6008919029001-vs 'Dancing with the Stars' judge Carrie Ann Inaba says doctor 'forgot' to tell her about lupus diagnosis Madeline Farber fox-news/health fox-news/entertainment/dancing-with-the-stars fox news fnc/health fnc d07f749f-6084-5886-a55e-ae33ee58978e article

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Schiff gets rave review from Sunny Hostin, other ‘View’ hosts pan ‘parody’ of Ukraine transcript

Westlake Legal Group hostin-schiff-mccain-ABC-AP Schiff gets rave review from Sunny Hostin, other 'View' hosts pan 'parody' of Ukraine transcript Sam Dorman fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/person/joy-behar fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc bb8cc43b-a9f8-59d8-8a3a-ae468086c232 article

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., got conflicting reviews from “The View” after he interrogated Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire during a Thursday hearing.

In the hearing’s aftermath, Schiff faced a wave of backlash for parodying the transcript of the intensely scrutinized conversation between President Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in July.

“I have a favor I want from you,” Schiff said while appearing to read from a piece of paper during the hearing. “And I’m going to say this only seven times, so you better listen good. I want you to make up dirt on my political opponent, understand? Lots of it, on this and on that.”

Schiff later said his comments were a parody and suggested that it wasn’t his fault that critics failed to recognize that.

TRUMP DEMANDS SCHIFF RESIGN OVER ‘PARODY’ READING OF UKRAINE CALL: ‘HE GOT CAUGHT’

Co-host Sunny Hostin came to Schiff’s defense on Friday, saying it was “one small parody” and suggesting it was an appropriate way of portraying Trump as a mafia don.

“I didn’t read it as a joke at all, actually, because when I read the transcript, it sounded a lot like some of the wiretaps that I listened to when I was a federal prosecutor. And remember that Adam Schiff was a federal prosecutor — and I think what he was likening it to was when a mafia don says, ‘I’m asking you for a favor, I’m going to give you an offer you can’t refuse,'” she said.

She also praised Schiff as “cogent,” “concise,” and “fantastic.” “Adam Schiff is the man!” she exclaimed. “View” co-host Meghan McCain had a radically different take and described Schiff’s comments as incredibly inappropriate given the situation.

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“I think if you have to clarify it’s a parody, you’ve done it wrong,” she said. “I also think, tonally, when you’re opening up the investigation into impeaching our president about possible trades for information for money, this is not a time for parody at all.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

McCain went on to say she couldn’t “stand” Schiff and thought someone else should be spearheading the House’s investigation into Trump.

“I think he’s the worst kind of partisan in Washington,” she said.

“The View” co-host Joy Behar suggested on Friday that Schiff’s stunt wasn’t funny, stating that sometimes people should leave joking for comedians.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group hostin-schiff-mccain-ABC-AP Schiff gets rave review from Sunny Hostin, other 'View' hosts pan 'parody' of Ukraine transcript Sam Dorman fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/person/joy-behar fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc bb8cc43b-a9f8-59d8-8a3a-ae468086c232 article   Westlake Legal Group hostin-schiff-mccain-ABC-AP Schiff gets rave review from Sunny Hostin, other 'View' hosts pan 'parody' of Ukraine transcript Sam Dorman fox-news/person/meghan-mccain fox-news/person/joy-behar fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/the-view fox news fnc/media fnc bb8cc43b-a9f8-59d8-8a3a-ae468086c232 article

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Joaquin Castro Shades MSNBC For Confusing Him With Twin Brother Julián Castro

Westlake Legal Group 5d8e4e4221000034005fdf54 Joaquin Castro Shades MSNBC For Confusing Him With Twin Brother Julián Castro

Twins Are Multiplying

Nope, you don’t need an eye exam — you really are seeing double. According to a recent CDC report, the birth rate for twins has increased a whopping 76 per cent since 1980. In fact, one in every 30 babies born in 2009 was a twin (compared to 1980, when the rate was one baby in every 53). What’s with the binary-baby boom? One factor contributing to the upsurge: The age of mothers has trended up over the years, and a woman in her thirties is more likely to have twins than someone in her twenties, according to the study’s lead author, epidemiologist Joyce Martin, MPH. However, while age is an independent risk factor for twins, it also tends to correlate with increased use of fertility treatments, which was likely the biggest contributor to the spike in twin births.

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5 Ways You’re Oversharing About Your Relationship (And How To Stop)

When you’re in a relationship, it’s normal to want to keep your friends and family in the loop about what’s happening with your partner. This person is a big part of your life, after all.

But how do you strike a balance between being open with the people you care about, while not disrespecting your partner and the relationship at the same time?

It’s a fine line, and one that differs person to person, relationship to relationship. We’re not here to make sweeping generalizations about which topics absolutely should or shouldn’t be discussed with others. (The exception would be a partner’s abusive behavior, which you should absolutely disclose to a trusted friend, relative or mental health professional.)

But it might be worth pausing to consider the consequences of sharing sensitive information with your friends and family without your partner’s consent. That’s why we asked relationship experts to weigh in on the details you should think twice before divulging, and why. Here’s what they had to say:

The Pitfalls Of Oversharing

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“Once details of your relationship see the light of day among your family or friends, that information can’t be put back in the bottle,” Portland, Oregon-based relationship coach Jonathan Robert told HuffPost.

You could be breaking your partner’s trust

Unless you’ve received your partner’s permission, it’s best not to assume they would comfortable with others knowing private information about them.

“What you may think is a cute or funny story about your partner’s life could be very embarrassing for them if you share it with others,” said Samantha Rodman, a psychologist in Rockville, Maryland.

It could make your friends biased against your partner

It’s common to vent to close friends about some of the ups and downs in your relationship. Maybe you just want to get something off your chest or, perhaps, you’re seeking another point of view on a certain issue. Just know that ― even though you and your partner may be able to patch things up ― your friends may still harbor negative feelings toward them long after.

“When the conflict is resolved and you’re wanting your people to support your relationship, you could find that they’re still angry and biased against them,”
said Ryan Howes, a psychologist in Pasadena, California.

Your family and friends might get sick of hearing about it

“If you overshare constantly, your friends and family may become irritated,” Rodman said. “They may be feigning interest when, in reality, you are dominating the conversation with details that nobody needs or wants to know.”

Details Your Friends Don’t Need To Know

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Telling your buddies all about your sex life? It’s highly doubtful your partner would appreciate that.

Unless your partner gave you the OK, exercise caution before disclosing the details below to your circle of friends.

In certain cases, you may thoughtfully decide to open up to one or two of your closest confidantes about some of these topics. But that’s a lot different than blabbing to a bunch of friends over brunch or talking about it with anyone who will listen.

1. Specifics about your sex life

What happens behind bedroom doors should stay between you and your partner. Talking about your partner’s kinks or sharing commentary about their sexual performance could be breaking confidence.

“Without consent, discussing the specifics of your sex life should be a no-no,” Howes said. “This information is so personal and potentially loaded with shame that it’s best kept between you, your partner and potentially a therapist.”

2. Your partner’s financial info

Your friends really don’t need to know precise numbers when it comes to your partner’s salary, a bad investment they made or the amount of student loan debt they’re trying to pay off.

“With consent from your partner, you may be able to speak in generalities — like, ‘We’re having financial trouble,’ as opposed to dollar-amount specifics,” Howes said.

Same goes if your significant other is fired or laid off from their job: “Your partner should control who they feel should hear that information,” Robert said.

3. Your partner’s history of trauma

You may be tempted to tell your friends and family about abuse or other trauma your partner has endured, perhaps to help them better understand your s.o.’s behavior or because you’re looking for an outlet to talk about it. But remember: This is a very sensitive subject and revealing this information could be a violation of your partner’s trust.

“Your partner’s trauma stories are not yours to share,” Robert said. “This can be difficult because those trauma stories also have a burden on you. Perhaps they have a troubled past or childhood that weighs on you. Find a suitable person to discuss these details with, such as a therapist or coach.”

4. The status of your partner’s physical or mental health

Your s.o.’s health struggles, whether they’re about infertility, depression or anything else, are nothing to be ashamed of. That said, it’s ultimately their choice, not yours, whether to share those details with others and when.

“This is private information and unless your partner is open about these things, you owe it to them to keep these things confidential,” Rodman said.

5. Certain relationship problems or infidelities can be a gray area

At your discretion, you may choose to talk through some relationship struggles with a few people in your inner circle. But is it fodder for the entire group chat? Probably not.

“These instances should be carefully discussed with only those you trust most,” Robert said. “Seeking professional advice or help is often key to coming out the other side.”

If The Relationship Is Abusive, Confide In A Trusted Loved One

When any type of abuse or toxic behavior is exhibited in the relationship, opening up to friends or family may be difficult but could be vital to your physical safety and emotional wellbeing.

“If you’re being abused, if your kids are being abused, or if your relationship is causing you considerable mental or emotional distress, please share these details with someone else, preferably a mental health professional,” Howes said.

While physical abuse is more obvious, emotional abuse can be difficult to detect. The tactics emotional abusers use can distort your perception of events and their behavior. For example, they may blame you for things that aren’t your fault until you start believing they are, they may attempt to isolate you from your friends and family and they may criticize and belittle you to the point where you doubt your worthiness.

Talking to a loved one may provide you with some much-needed clarity. Plus, this person can assist you in getting help that will allow you to safely leave the relationship.

How To Talk About Your Relationship Without Hurting Your Partner

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It really comes down to having some honest conversations with your partner in which you talk specifically about which elements of their life they’re OK with you sharing and with whom.

“The idea that you’d like support outside the relationship is very normal and healthy,” Howes said. “If your partner forbids you from speaking about any part of your relationship with others, this is a red flag. You should be able to talk about some things, and having this discussion to clarify what and with whom will go a long way.”

And when problems in the relationship do arise, you can usually find tactful ways to talk with others about what’s going on without getting into specifics that might betray your partner’s trust.

“Talk about how you are feeling, not about your partner’s actions or details,” Robert said. “For example, if your partner just got a large pay cut, talk to family about the pressures of your financial burden instead of blaming or outing your partner’s loss of income.”

Need help? In the U.S., call 1-866-331-9474 or text “loveis” to 22522 for the National Dating Abuse Helpline.

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These are the all-time greatest voices from television and radio as NFL celebrates 100th season

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close These are the all-time greatest voices from television and radio as NFL celebrates 100th season

SportsPulse: The voices that have narrated the NFL in its first 100 years have had almost as much impact as those who played it. Our panel discuss who the top voice is in the NFL and if Tony Romo is the next great one. USA TODAY

Some of you hung on their every word. Others might have thrown a beer can toward the television at the sound of their voice. And still others saw the action they described only in your mind’s eye as you listened to the radio.

These are the men and women who make the games or the highlights come alive through their descriptions and enthusiasm. They can be outlandish, understated or poetic, and for many of us they are indispensable parts of the NFL experience.

As the NFL celebrates its 100th season, USA TODAY selects the top 50 broadcasters in league history. They are chosen by accomplishment, reputation, longevity, significance and, admittedly, personal preference. Some you might never have heard of; others are as familiar as members of your family. 

1. John Facenda: Known as the “Voice of God,” he voiced over the greatest of the NFL Films productions. And we do mean voice – his was unmistakable. While he was a news anchor on Philadelphia TV from 1948 to 1973, he will forever be associated with the NFL. “He had a voice that could make a laundry list sound dramatic,” Steve Sabol of NFL Films once said. The story goes that Ed Sabol, Steve’s father, discovered Facenda at a bar in 1965 when he overheard him describing NFL Films footage that was airing on TV.

2. Pat Summerall: Started doing NFL games for CBS in 1962 after retiring from a nine-year NFL career as a kicker primarily for the Chicago Cardinals and New York Giants. He eventually became network sports’ play-by-play voice of the NFL, first with analyst, close friend and former defensive back Tom Brookshire and then most famously with John Madden for 22 seasons, on CBS and then on Fox. He called a record 16 Super Bowls on TV, was named the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Pete Rozelle Radio and Television Award winner in 1994 and was CBS’ lead announcer on its PGA Tour coverage.

3.John Madden: The Hall of Famer won a Super Bowl as coach of the Raiders, where he had a 75.9% winning percentage over 10 seasons, and then went into broadcasting, having his greatest success and impact with Pat Summerall. Aside from his trademark “Boom!” call, he is known for coming up with the term “turducken” for his turkey/duck/chicken extravaganza awarded to the winning team on whichever Thanksgiving Day game telecast he was working. Early in his broadcast career he was known for his Miller Lite commercials and then appealed to the younger set with his introduction of the “Madden NFL” video game series.

4. Howard Cosell: He called his autobiography “I Never Played the Game,” but that did not stop him from pontificating on sports from football to boxing. He helped turn the NFL from pure sports to a combination of sports and entertainment when he signed on for the debut of “Monday Night Football” in 1970 and stayed over an entertaining but controversial career until 1983. He was the third man in the booth, unheard of at the time, alongside former Dallas Cowboys quarterback Don Meredith and Hall of Famer Frank Gifford (the latter joining after a brief stay by original play-by-play announcer Keith Jackson). Cosell brought a more critical eye to the game and the players than viewers were accustomed to hearing. 

5. Don Meredith: The former Dallas Cowboys quarterback helped revolutionize coverage of the league when he teamed with Cosell and Gifford on “Monday Night Football” by injecting a folksy sense of humor that overshadowed a keen sense of the game — when he focused on the game. His interaction with Cosell could take the telecast off the rails, which sometimes saved the night when their byplay proved more entertaining than the game action. You knew the game was done when he started singing, “Turn out the lights, the party’s over.”

More: NFL’s 100 greatest teams of all time: Which squad is best in league history?

More: Opinion: Greatest NFL players by uniform number: From No. 00 Jim Otto to No. 99 J.J. Watt

6. Curt Gowdy: The big-game baseball and football announcer, he called nine Super Bowls, including the first and Joe Namath’s “guarantee” win for the Jets over the Colts in Super Bowl III. His was the call on the Immaculate Reception, with longtime boothmate Al DeRogatis, when Franco Harris made a deflected catch that helped the Steelers beat the Raiders in a 1972 AFC playoff game. Gowdy was the Pete Rozelle Radio and Television Award winner in 1993.

7. Al Michaels: Perhaps best known for his “Do you believe in miracles?” call when the USA upset Russia in hockey at the 1980 Winter Olympics, he steadied the ship on “Monday Night Football” after the Cosell era, then teamed with Madden and later Cris Collinsworth on “Sunday Night Football” for NBC starting in 2009. “Since the 1970s, Al has been at or near the peak of all network play-by-play men,” Bob Costas told USA TODAY Sports last season. “And I think now, for a sustained period of time, he has been the standard of maybe two generations.” He won the Rozelle Award in 2013.

8. Dick Enberg: On NBC, he and  Pro Football Hall of Famer Merlin Olsen offered a more sophisticated counterpoint to the “Boom!” bluster of Madden and Summerall. Enberg was the master craftsman of words, indicative of his background in teaching and higher education. He called 10 Super Bowls but also was legendary for announcing NCAA men’s basketball games with Al McGuire and Billy Packer, and before that was the famed announcer during UCLA’s basketball championship run under John Wooden. He won 13 Sports Emmys and was given the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Rozelle Award in 1999. He is the only person to win an Emmy as a sportscaster, a writer and a producer.

9. Ray Scott:  The voice of the Green Bay Packers in their dynasty years of the 1960s, then became synonymous as the voice of the NFL when the sport exploded into popular culture late in that decade. He broadcast four Super Bowls, including the first, and was the voice during the infamous Ice Bowl playoff game won by the Packers against the Dallas Cowboys in wind chills of -35 degrees. He was the 2000 Rozelle winner.

10: Brent Musburger, Phyllis George, Irv Cross, Jimmy “The Greek” Snyder on “The NFL Today”: This was mandatory appointment TV on Sunday afternoons ahead of the NFL slate of games, filling in notes from around the league in the pre-internet days with up-to-the-minute sideline reports and lengthy taped interviews. This crew kicked off in 1975 (Jimmy The Greek joined the next season). The show dominated its time slot for 18 years. George left in 1978 but returned in 1980 for a few years.  Snyder was fired in 1988, according to The Washington Post, for telling a Washington, D.C., TV station that many blacks were superior athletes because of breeding from the time of slavery and that the only area in sports left for whites was coaching. Cross won the Rozelle Award in 2009.

11. Frank Gifford: A Hall of Fame player and broadcaster,  he joined “Monday Night Football” in its second season (1971) through 1997, the calming voice in the early years of the telecast, when Cosell and Meredith would stray far afield. He was a dashing player on the New York football scene for the Giants in the heydays of the 1950s and parlayed that into an NFL broadcasting career that first began at CBS. He was the color man on coverage of the first Super Bowl, working the CBS telecast of the game versus the NBC telecast that had Curt Gowdy, Paul Christman and Charlie Jones.

12. Jim Nantz: Known as much for golf and college basketball, he also has called five Super Bowls for CBS and has been the mainstay of the network’s NFL coverage since becoming its lead play-by-play voice on Sundays since 2004. He is a three-time Emmy winner and five-time National Sportscaster of the Year who has been with CBS since 1985. His time of year is in the early months of the calendar, when he can be seen announcing the Super Bowl, the NCAA men’s basketball tournament and The Masters. He won the Rozelle Award in 2011.

13. Charlie Jones: He called football games throughout a 38-year career, mostly with NBC. An Emmy winner, he was called “one of the great pioneers of NBC Sports,” by Dick Ebersol, chairman of NBC Sports, according to the Los Angeles Times. He was the 1997 Rozelle winner.

14. Tom Brookshier: An all-pro defensive back with the Eagles, Brookshier teamed with Pat Summerall as CBS’ No. 1 crew for many years on NFL games. In 1981, he left for another assignment, and John Madden became Summerall’s partner. 

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TEAM BY TEAM: The best players in the history of each NFL franchise

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15. Chris Schenkel: A 40-year career included New York Giants games starting in 1952, which put him in the booth for the famous Colts-Giants 1958 NFL championship game. He also did voice-over for the first NFL Films production and the 1962 NFL title game between the Packers and the Giants. “Chris was an unbelievable gentleman,” said legendary TV producer  Don Ohlmeyer, according to the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame.  “He had one of the most important qualities people can have on television: They are instantly likable.” He won the Rozelle Award in 1992.

16. Lindsey Nelson: While best known for announcing baseball and college football (particularly Notre Dame), he did the NFL on CBS from 1966 to 1981 and did some Monday night games on radio. Aside from his great storytelling and Tennessee twang — Bob Costas called him “a cheerful chronicler” — Nelson could be recognized from afar by his sartorial splendor. If a jacket wasn’t garish, it wasn’t on Nelson. He was named the Rozelle winner in 1990. Appropriately, he would have been 100 this year.

17. Lesley Visser:  Originally a newspaper reporter, she came to prominence with her personal player stories for “The NFL Today,” and then her dogged sideline work. She won the Rozelle Award in 2006, and, according to her website, she was “the only woman to have presented the Lombardi Championship Trophy at the Super Bowl (1992, CBS); the first woman on ABC’s ‘Monday Night Football’ (1998); voted the No. 1 Female Sportscaster of All-Time by the American Sportscasters Association; voted to both the Sportscasters Hall of Fame and the Sportswriters Hall of Fame.” 

18. Marty Glickman: Did play-by-play for the New York Giants from 1948 to 1971 and for the Jets from 1971 to 1979 and 1987 to 1989. The website jewishsports.net called him “one of America’s premier sports broadcasters for five decades.” He also made the 1936 Olympic track team but was withheld from competition by the U.S. for the Games in Hitler’s Germany. He was named to four Halls of Fame, including the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. 

19. Jack Whitaker: His network career began in 1961 at CBS, where he did play-by-play for the Eagles and hosted other shows. He also was a studio host for the CBS pregame show. Known for his golf “essays,” he won three Emmy Awards and is in the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame.20

20. Al DeRogatis: The former NFL player was known mainly for his sharp analysis covering the NFL with Curt Gowdy.  “In 10 years, I never had a bad moment with Curt,” he once told the Chicago Tribune. “We were just two guys trying to tell the true story of what was happening.” They were the broadcasters for the famous “Heidi” game in 1968, Super Bowl III when the Jets upset the Colts and the 1971 AFC championship game in Kansas City that went to double overtime.

21. James Brown: A former basketball player at Harvard, he has been an even-keel studio host for more than 30 years, mostly with CBS. The multiple Emmy winner was named Best Studio Host of the Decade by Sports Illustrated in 2010. He won the Rozelle Award in 2016.

22. Merlin Olsen: A legendary defensive lineman for the Rams’ “Fearsome Foursome.” According to the Pro Football Hall of Fame site, he earned a master’s in economics in the offseasons. He partnered with Dick Enberg as NBC’s No. 1 team for AFC games. He also was an actor, best known for “Little House on the Prairie.” 

23. Harry Kalas: A mainstay narrator for NFL Films (while mostly known as the Phillies’ play-by-play man) and the primary voice after John Facenda. “(Facenda) was the ‘Voice of God’ and Kalas the ‘Voice of the People,’” then-NFL Films president Steve Sabol said upon Kalas’ death.

24. Andrea Kremer: A multiple Emmy winner who works for NFL Network and HBO’s “Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel” and has covered more than 25 Super Bowls. Won the Rozelle Award in 2018, joining Lesley Visser as the only female winners.

25. Jack Buck: Known mainly for baseball and as the voice of the St. Louis Cardinals. He  called the 1962 AFL championship game and 17 Super Bowls on radio. He began announcing the NFL on TV for CBS in 1963, and in 1967 called the Ice Bowl with Ray Scott. Buck was named the Rozelle winner in 1996.

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26. Bill King: The longtime voice of the Raiders, known for his catchphrase of “Holy Toledo!” According to ESPN, Raiders owner Al Davis once said, “I say this with

great admiration and love that Bill becomes one of the people that

I give the cloak of immortality. Time never stops for the great

ones.” Also known as the voice of the Oakland Athletics and the Golden State Warriors.

27.Chris Berman: One of the early prominent personalities with ESPN, “Boomer” became most associated with the NFL through the network’s “countdown” show. He won the Rozelle Award in 2010.

28. Dan Dierdorf: A Hall of Fame offensive lineman, he worked with among others Greg Gumbel and Dick Enberg. He is still doing color commentary for his alma mater Michigan’s radio network. Was the 2008 Rozelle winner.

29. Paul Christman: A college and pro quarterback, he worked AFL games and did Super Bowl I with Curt Gowdy. He also worked with Ray Scott on CBS.

30. Michelle Tafoya: The Emmy winner is a reporter for NBC Sports and the primary “Sunday Night Football” sideline reporter since 2011. The San Francisco Chronicle described her as “widely recognized as the best sideline reporter in sports.”

31. Dick Stockton: Very versatile, doing multiple sports for more than 40 years. He spent 17 years with CBS and joined Fox in 1994. According to Fox, his analyst partners have included Roger Staubach, Hank Stram, Dan Fouts, Terry Bradshaw and Dan Dierdorf.

32. Cris Collinsworth: The NFL wide receiver has worked for HBO and NBC and partners with Al Michaels and Michelle Tafoya currently on “Sunday Night Football.” 

33. Suzy Kolber: Has been in multiple roles at ESPN since 1999. In 2017, she was named host of “Monday Night Countdown,” ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” pregame show. She also anchors the network’s halftime and postgame coverage.

34. Joe Buck: Started calling NFL games for Fox Sports in 1994 (at age 25). His calls included the Patriots’ Super Bowl comeback win over Atlanta and David Tyree’s Super Bowl helmet catch. The son of broadcast legend Jack Buck, he for some reason polarizes viewers. 

35. Pam Oliver: Started working for NFL on Fox in 1995 and has been a sideline reporter for 24 seasons.

36. Vern Lundquist: Known mostly for college football and golf (the 16th hole at Augusta is his canvass), he worked for NFL Films and called games for CBS.

37. Myron Cope: Voice of the Steelers for 35 years and credited with creating the Terrible Towel. He won the Rozelle Award in 2005.

38. Don Criqui: Called network NFL games for 47 consecutive years (1967-2013) for CBS and NBC. He also called games on the radio for his alma mater, Notre Dame, from 2006 until 2017.  And he won the Rozelle Award in 2003

39. Terry Bradshaw: Began as a color analyst, famously with Vern Lundquist. The Hall of Fame quarterback is an entertaining part of the Fox pregame show.

40. Vin Scully: Known for baseball, mostly the Los Angeles Dodgers, he did call football from 1975 to 1982 on CBS, and because of that voice and style, he belongs on a greatest list of any sport he worked. His final call in an NFL game was “The Catch” from Joe Montana to Dwight Clark to win the NFC championship. He later told the San Jose Mercury News: “When I got home, I told my family, ‘That’s a great game on which to call it a football career.’ And that was that.”

41. Phil Simms: A former Giants quarterback, he works for CBS after stints as an analyst with NBC and ESPN.

42. Beth Mowins: Became the first woman to do play-by-play for a nationally televised NFL game when she worked half of a “Monday Night Football” doubleheader in 2017. Also was the first woman to do play-by-play of an NFL game for CBS.

43. Brad Sham: “The Voice of the Cowboys.” Need anymore be said?

44. Marv Albert: Because that unmistakable voice is entertaining to listen to no matter what the sport. It seems even better on radio than on TV.

45. Tony Romo: The former Cowboys’ quarterback has a small sample size but already has gained rave reviews for his insight and ability to predict plays. Talk to us for the second 100 season celebration.

46. Sam Huff, Sonny Jurgensen and Frank Herzog: Two Hall of Famers and a genial play-by-play man, the team of “Sonny, Sam and Frank” called the Redskins’ Super Bowl glory years. 

47. Merrill Reese: He is in his 43rd season as play-by-play voice of the Philadelphia Eagles. 

48. Gayle Sierens: The first woman to do play-by-play on network television, handling a Chiefs-Seahawks game in 1987.

49. Bob Sheppard: Also of the Yankees, he was the PA announcer for decades for the New York football Giants. 

50. Mel Kiper Jr.: Love him or hate him, you cannot ignore that he basically created the cottage industry of draft analysis. And he does have an unmistakable voice and rapid-fire delivery. 

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House Democrats Plan Hearing as Early as Next Week in Impeachment Inquiry

WASHINGTON — House Democrats pushed ahead Friday with a rapidly unfurling impeachment inquiry into President Trump, planning subpoenas and plotting out a witness list for a proceeding that could yield its first hearing as early as next week.

“Everything is real time,” Representative Mike Quigley, Democrat of Illinois and a member of the Intelligence Committee. “You don’t sit back and contemplate the future when you are in the middle of it.”

With Congress now in a two-week recess and lawmakers headed back home to their districts, Democrats were working on two tracks, meticulously outlining a rapid-fire set of investigative steps while they honed their messaging for what promises to be a divisive and politically charged process.

House Democratic leaders instructed their rank-and-file on Friday to keep it simple when talking to voters, emphasizing that Mr. Trump had “engaged in serious wrongdoing” and had “abused the office of the president.” Investigators for Representative Adam Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, were assembling a plan of inquiry and sequence of witnesses the committee should call or subpoena for testimony.

Representative David Cicilline, Democrat of Rhode Island and head of the party’s messaging arm, circulated talking points for his colleagues, aimed especially at helping moderates — many of whom were against an impeachment inquiry only a week ago, but have now voiced their support — explain this past week’s dizzying turn of events to their constituents.

Headlined “No One Is Above The Law,” the talking points laid out three central messages for Democrats: that the president “engaged in serious wrongdoing, betrayed his oath of office and undermined national security,” that he “pressured a foreign government to target a political opponent to help in his re-election and tried to cover it up” and that they would follow the facts.

“We want to keep this simple,” said Mr. Cicilline, clutching the talking point cards in his hand. “This is not complicated. This is misconduct that the president has admitted to.”

Already, some Democrats were veering off that somber message, stoking progressive outrage about Mr. Trump’s conduct to call for his immediate removal. The re-election campaign of Representative Rashida Tlaib of Michigan began selling T-shirts emblazoned with the slogan “Impeach the MF,” using a two-letter abbreviation for an expletive the first-term congresswoman used for the president when she uttered that phrase in a speech to activists in January.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_161604357_9368a514-6113-40fa-ae14-58a5c189369e-articleLarge House Democrats Plan Hearing as Early as Next Week in Impeachment Inquiry Whistle-Blowers United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry tlaib, rashida Pelosi, Nancy impeachment Giuliani, Rudolph W Cicilline, David N Barr, William P

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said she wants the impeachment inquiry done expeditiously.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

The inquiry centers on Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure the president of Ukraine to launch a corruption investigation into Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., part of a whistle-blower’s complaint that charged the president with using his office to enlist foreign help to boost his own re-election in 2020. Speaker Nancy Pelosi has said she wants it done expeditiously, and Mr. Schiff’s committee is expected to march forward with the investigation in the coming days.

Mr. Trump, increasingly enraged by the airing of the allegations against him and Democrats’ move to consider impeaching him as a result, tried to defend himself in an irate series of tweets on Friday. He called his conversation with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine “perfect” and “appropriate” and lashed out at Mr. Schiff, demanding his resignation.

Ms. Pelosi, who has embarked on a media tour of sorts after embracing the impeachment push, said that William P. Barr, the attorney general, had “gone rogue,” given the role of the Justice Department in withholding the whistle-blower complaint from Congress. In his conversation with Mr. Zelensky that was a crucial element of the complaint, Mr. Trump instructed the Ukrainian president to follow up with Mr. Barr and Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, on launching the investigation of Mr. Biden.

“Since he was mentioned in all of this, it’s curious that he would be making decisions about how the complaint would be handled,” Ms. Pelosi said of Mr. Barr on CNN.

The committee has already stated publicly that it intends to meet with the whistle-blower in a secure setting as soon as possible, to try to identify other officials who witnessed the alleged events and who would be willing to cooperate with their work.

They also will speak again with the intelligence community inspector general, Michael Atkinson, who was restricted last week from sharing any details with Congress about the work his office did to initially corroborate the complaint. This time, Mr. Atkinson would be freer to discuss that work, which could give the committee a clearer sense of where it should start its work.

Mr. Quigley said he expected the committee would call Mr. Barr and Mr. Giuliani, as well as officials in the White House and elsewhere who appear to have brought their concerns to the whistle-blower.

Representative Adam B. Schiff, the chairman of the Intelligence Committee, will be working in Washington during the recess.CreditAnna Moneymaker/The New York Times

Committee staff could begin interviewing other potential witnesses in the coming days. Much of that work would likely take place out of view, lawmakers said, to speed up the fact-finding process and avoid the political implications of public hearings.

Democrats on the panel said they expected to spend at least a portion of the House’s two-week recess in Washington working. They are in the early stages of planning a thematic hearing for next week, potentially focused on Ukraine and American foreign policy, or on whistle-blowers, an officials familiar with the matter said.

“It’s the committee’s intention to pick up momentum, so I imagine a lot of work will get done in the next two weeks,” said Representative Jim Himes of Connecticut, the second-ranking Democrat on the panel.

For many Democrats, the past week has been a rat-a-tat series of jolts. On Monday, seven moderates, all with military or national security backgrounds — and most of whom had opposed impeachment — called for an inquiry, opening the floodgates for more moderates to join in.

Tuesday brought Ms. Pelosi’s announcement. On Wednesday, the White House released a transcript of Mr. Trump’s call with Mr. Zelensky. On Thursday, the whistle-blower’s complaint was made public, including the explosive allegation that the White House sought to “lock down” records of the call. Ms. Pelosi accused Mr. Trump of a “cover up”

By Friday, most Democrats seemed exhausted, grateful for a two-week break to gather their thoughts. Many said they intended to do more listening than talking. Liberals including Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota were beaming; they believe an impeachment inquiry should have begun a long time ago.

But moderates looked somber, burdened with the weight of the moment. Among them was Representative Angie Craig, a freshman who flipped a Republican seat in Minnesota. Ordinarily private about her Christian faith, she said she has turned to the Bible for solace.

“I’m going to tell my constituents that this is a decision I never wanted to have to make,” Ms. Craig said, “that the president left us no choice but to open an impeachment inquiry.”

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