web analytics
a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2015 Libero Themes.
All Rights Reserved.

8:30 - 6:00

Our Office Hours Mon. - Fri.

703-406-7616

Call For Free 15/M Consultation

Facebook

Twitter

Search
Menu
Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 346)

Chick-Fil-A Says It Will End Donations To Anti-LGBTQ Organizations

Westlake Legal Group 5dd2dece210000a76d34d4d2 Chick-Fil-A Says It Will End Donations To Anti-LGBTQ Organizations

Chick-fil-A said it would end contributions to organizations known to oppose same-sex marriage and other LGBTQ rights, but the fast food chain’s announcement is being met with skepticism from a leading advocacy group. 

The Georgia-based company told Reuters Monday it was refocusing its philanthropic efforts on “education, homelessness and hunger.” As such, the company will no longer make donations to the Salvation Army and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, both of which have a checkered history with regard to LGBTQ issues. 

“There’s no question we know that, as we go into new markets, we need to be clear about who we are,” the company’s president and chief operating officer Tim Tassopoulos said in a Bisnow interview published Monday. “There are lots of articles and newscasts about Chick-fil-A, and we thought we needed to be clear about our message.”

In 2020, Chick-fil-A will shift its donations to Junior Achievement USA to support education, and Covenant House International to fight homelessness, according to the report. Meanwhile, a $25,000 donation will be made to a local food bank each time the chain opens a new restaurant. 

“We think this is going to be helpful, It’s just the right thing to do: to be clear, caring and supportive, and do it in the community,” Tassopoulos added

The announcement follows previous Chick-fil-A attempts to stem ongoing backlash over its acknowledged support of anti-LGBTQ organizations. At one point, Exodus International and the Family Research Council were reportedly among the recipients of the chain’s contributions. 

The company’s billionaire CEO, Dan Cathy, further stoked the controversy when he confirmed the company’s support of “the biblical definition of the family unit” in a pair of 2012 interviews

“I pray God’s mercy on our generation that has such a prideful, arrogant attitude to think that we have the audacity to try to redefine what marriage is about,” Cathy said at the time. 

Since then, the company has tried to distance itself from Cathy’s comments, pledging publicly not to “have a political or social agenda.” Chick-fil-A’s 2017 tax documents ― obtained by ThinkProgress in March ― told a different story, showing the company had donated $1.8 million to groups known to discriminate against LGBTQ people. 

Given that history, Drew Anderson, GLAAD’s director of campaigns and rapid response, remained skeptical of the company’s latest pledge. 

“Chick-fil-A investors, employees, and customers can greet today’s announcement with cautious optimism,” Anderson said in an emailed statement, “but should remember that similar press statements were previously proven to be empty.”

He continued: “In addition to refraining from financially supporting anti-LGBTQ organizations, Chick-fil-A still lacks policies to ensure safe workplaces for LGBTQ employees and should unequivocally speak out against the anti-LGBTQ reputation that their brand represents.” 

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump’s Made-for-TV Trade War Has Few Entertained

Westlake Legal Group merlin_164275284_1ba88126-ff22-41f4-a606-d6c65fb638b4-facebookJumbo Trump’s Made-for-TV Trade War Has Few Entertained United States International Relations United States Economy United States Politics and Government International Trade and World Market Economic Conditions and Trends Customs (Tariff) China Agriculture and Farming

When President Trump’s advisers suggested that Beijing resume buying around $20 billion in American farm products as part of a trade deal, Mr. Trump wasn’t satisfied. In a dramatic public retelling in the Cabinet Room, he said he pressed his team to more than triple that figure, then trimmed that a little and asked for up to $50 billion in annual purchases.

“My people had $20 billion done,” Mr. Trump recounted in an Oct. 21 cabinet meeting. “And I said, ‘I want more.’ They said, ‘The farmers can’t handle it.’ I said, ‘Tell them to buy larger tractors. It’s very simple.’” The cabinet members gathered around Mr. Trump laughed.

Mr. Trump has brought his characteristic love of show business to trade talks with China, injecting public drama into typically staid proceedings. He has alternated displays of anger and warmth toward Beijing and assumed the role of the insatiable negotiator, pairing ambitious goals for a trade pact with even bigger threats should China not accede to his terms.

But more than a year and a half into the biggest trade war in modern history, Mr. Trump’s approach has not yet produced the grand finale he hoped for. Instead, the president’s cliffhanger tactics appear to have made it even harder to bring complex trade talks to a close and exacerbated economic uncertainty across the globe.

Despite Mr. Trump’s Oct. 11 announcement that the United States and China had reached a “historic” Phase 1 trade agreement, actually signing a deal has proved elusive. The two sides continue to negotiate and a final agreement could be reached in the next few weeks, if negotiators decide to compromise. But Mr. Trump continues to give mixed signals about whether he actually wants a deal and if any of his tariffs on $360 billion worth of Chinese goods will ever be removed.

“We’re taking in billions of dollars in tariff money from China,” Mr. Trump said on Nov. 8. “I like our situation very much. They want to make a deal much more than I do, but we could have a deal.”

A prolonged trade war offers Mr. Trump some political advantages: It allows him to maintain a tough public stance toward China and avoid Democratic criticism that he is caving to Beijing.

But businesses are not entertained. The unrelenting trade fight has prolonged financial pain for American farmers, companies and consumers, paralyzing firms that rely on robust trade flows between the world’s two largest economies.

Executives across the world say they have no choice but to postpone some hiring and investment, make sure any new expansions are not crippled by unforeseen policies, and conserve cash.

The uncertainty is weighing on the United States economy, particularly manufacturing, which has slumped over the past several months. Chinese economic growth has slowed to its lowest rate in nearly three decades, while Germany has barely avoided falling into recession.

“It’s striking that in almost every corner of the world geopolitical tensions are threatening to put the brakes on growth,” John Williams, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, said in a speech last week. “The uncertainty created by current events is no doubt having a lasting effect on the economic conditions we’re experiencing today.”

Mr. Trump’s theatrical embrace is not limited to China. He has injected similar drama into trade talks with other partners, including Europe, Japan, Canada and Mexico, publicly threatening them with tariffs and suggesting he might leave some trading partners behind.

The president says his approach has created leverage — and in some cases, he is right. The threat of tariffs has prompted officials from Mexico, Canada, Japan and elsewhere to make concessions they might not otherwise have agreed to. It has also brought China, which is heavily reliant on exports to the United States, to the negotiating table.

But that strategy may now be discouraging China from bringing the talks to a close. Mr. Trump’s tendency to waver and increase his demands have made China wary of offering concessions, for fear that he will only demand more, people familiar with Chinese trade policy said.

Eswar Prasad, a trade professor at Cornell, said the president’s “mercurial temperament and predilection to undercutting his own negotiating team” had complicated the already challenging task of striking a deal. “By hyping up expectations and setting unrealistic goals for the trade talks, Trump makes the prospects for any sort of trade deal with China more uncertain and volatile,” he said.

The two sides have been unable to reschedule a meeting between Mr. Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, in Chile that was canceled because of domestic protests. Mr. Trump has since said that a deal signing would take place in United States “farm country,” but the Chinese have been reluctant to commit to a meeting until a deal that includes tariff reductions is finalized.

Without a set deadline, the two sides have lost a source of external pressure to get the deal done. Beijing is also concerned about the president’s unpredictable behavior — as demonstrated by his abrupt departure from a high-profile meeting last February in Hanoi with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un. They fear that Mr. Trump may end up giving fewer concessions than they anticipate, resulting in an embarrassing trip for Mr. Xi, according to people familiar with their thinking.

Mr. Trump continues to insist his tactics will be worth it, saying he is the only president tough enough to take on China without fear of repercussions and that the United States will be better off. Many businesses agree that China has long taken advantage of the United States and support Mr. Trump’s efforts to remove trade barriers and end coercive practices that have disadvantaged American firms operating in China.

But they have struggled with his approach, which has repeatedly escalated tensions, prolonging the trade fight far longer than most expected. The lack of resolution has been discouraging, given that many analysts believe that the administration is tackling only the easiest issues in its Phase 1 deal, and leaving more contentious topics, like the subsidies that China gives to its industry, for later talks.

The roller-coaster ride has been exasperating for businesses that thrive on certainty and cannot easily shift supply chains or adjust shipments of products that need weeks to cross oceans. The most recent twists in the China trade talks have left firms uncertain whether a 15 percent tariff that the Trump administration had planned to impose Dec. 15 on another $160 billion of goods, including smartphones, laptops and footwear, would go into effect — or whether a 15 percent tariff imposed on consumer goods in September would remain.

“It makes for better theater to hold this to the last minute,” said Phil Levy, the chief economist at Flexport, which coordinates international shipments for companies. “It really doesn’t fit well with the world of global supply chains. And we’re talking to a lot of businesses who are having difficulty with that.

Even Mr. Trump’s supporters have trouble at times disguising their frustration with his focus on showmanship over substance and a nagging feeling that the president doesn’t want the show to end.

In a letter to the president in May, Zippy Duvall, the president of the American Farm Bureau, said farmers faced “near-unprecedented economic uncertainty and hardship” stemming from the escalation of tariffs in China and other key markets. He urged Mr. Trump to make a deal as soon as possible, saying “time is running out for many in agriculture.”

But Mr. Trump’s approach has complicated his ability to get a final deal, including securing the big farm commitments that he showcased last month. American negotiators are now left with the difficult task of translating the massive purchases Mr. Trump requested — larger purchases “than any time in our history, by far” — into the actual text of a trade agreement.

While China needs and wants to buy agricultural goods like soybeans and pork, it has balked on terms that would leave it exposed to accusations that it favors American products over other countries’, as well as agreements that could result in more American tariffs if its purchases do not come through.

Even if American negotiators secure better market access for beef, pork, dairy and genetically modified products, Washington-based analysts who have done the calculations say they have difficulty figuring out how the United States could increase its agricultural exports to China to much more than $30 billion a year, without diverting trade from elsewhere.

Mr. Trump’s tariffs also remain a source of uncertainty, with his administration sending mixed signals about whether any of the existing levies will be removed if a deal is reached.

The president announced the Phase 1 trade deal during a meeting in the Oval Office with Liu He, China’s top trade negotiator. While Mr. Trump canceled an increase in tariffs planned for Oct. 15, he made no mention of rolling back any levies. That has not gone over well with the Chinese, who have since been under pressure domestically for seemingly giving away too much to the United States.

“Without rolling back some of the tariffs, or reducing the uncertainty of not raising additional tariffs, then I would ask what is the additional incentive of implementing this deal on the Chinese part?” He Jianxiong, the former executive director for China at the International Monetary Fund, said at a Nov. 6 event at the Peterson Institute in Washington.

Keith Bradsher contributed reporting from Hong Kong.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Mysterious ‘humanoid’ figures discovered in Peru

Over 140 mysterious new geoglyphs have been discovered in Nazca, Peru, including strange ‘humanoid’ figures.

Researchers from Japan’s Yamagata University discovered 142 new glyphs. An additional new geoglyph was discovered using artificial intelligence from IBM Japan and the tech giant’s Watson supercomputer, which helped researchers reveal the location of the humanoid figure, who appears to be brandishing some form of club.

MYSTERIOUS NAZCA LINES REVEAL THEIR SECRETS

Westlake Legal Group NazcaLineHumanoid2 Mysterious 'humanoid' figures discovered in Peru James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc d7bfea4d-f2c9-5f7e-8316-4d1ac66a253a article

A processed picture of a newly-discovered Nazca humanoid figure. (Yamagata University)

Other new glyphs show a two-headed snake that appears to be devouring two people, a bird, a fish and another humanoid.

The new geoglyphs date from the Initial Nazca period between 100 B.C. and 100 A.D. and the Early Nazca Period from 100 A.D. to 300 A.D.

VISIBLE ONLY FROM ABOVE, MYSTIFYING ‘NAZCA LINES’ DISCOVERED IN MIDEAST

Westlake Legal Group NazcaLineHumanoid Mysterious 'humanoid' figures discovered in Peru James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc d7bfea4d-f2c9-5f7e-8316-4d1ac66a253a article

The geoglyph discovered using AI technology from IBM Japan and the tech giant’s Watson supercomputer. (Yamagata University/IBM Japan)

A UNESCO World Heritage Site located about 249 miles south of Lima, the Lines are regarded as one of archaeology’s great mysteries. The lines are scratched into the dark ground to reveal the lighter-colored earth underneath and are best viewed from the air. They depict a range of animals, plants, imaginary beings and geometric figures.

Westlake Legal Group NazcaLineSnake Mysterious 'humanoid' figures discovered in Peru James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc d7bfea4d-f2c9-5f7e-8316-4d1ac66a253a article

A newly-discovered two-headed Nazca Line snake that appears to be devouring two people. (Yamagata University)

Etched into the ground by pre-Inca people, the Nazca Lines date from 400 B.C. to 1000 A.D. Mystery, however, still swirls around why they were created. Theories include that they are a primitive Sun calendar, an irrigation system or even an alien landing strip, according to LiveScience.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group NazcaLineHumanoid2 Mysterious 'humanoid' figures discovered in Peru James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc d7bfea4d-f2c9-5f7e-8316-4d1ac66a253a article   Westlake Legal Group NazcaLineHumanoid2 Mysterious 'humanoid' figures discovered in Peru James Rogers fox-news/science/archaeology/history fox-news/science/archaeology/culture fox-news/columns/digging-history fox news fnc/science fnc d7bfea4d-f2c9-5f7e-8316-4d1ac66a253a article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions

One Michigan youngster was more than ready for her close-up after she wasn’t allowed to take school pictures because of her red, braided hair extensions, which violated dress code policies.

Marian Scott, 8, was all smiles during a recent, personalized photoshoot with Jermaine Horton Photography, rocking some stylish outfits and the scarlet streaks in her tresses.

Back in October, the third-grader wasn’t allowed to pose for picture day at Paragon Charter Academy in Jackson because of the hair extensions, WLIX reported. The incident left the girl heartbroken, while her parents claimed they had no idea the colorful braids were not allowed, according to Today.

Westlake Legal Group Jermaine-Horton-Photography-2 Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 44eda769-8cc3-5177-a87f-8bed71bcffaa

Marian Scott, 8, was all smiles during a recent, personalized photoshoot with Jermaine Horton Photography. (Jermaine Horton Photography)

‘DEMONIC’ PHOTO FROM BABY MONITOR GOES VIRAL: ‘LIKE SOMETHING FROM A LOW-BUDGET HORROR MOVIE’

Westlake Legal Group Jermaine-Horton-Photography-3 Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 44eda769-8cc3-5177-a87f-8bed71bcffaa

The youngster rocked some stylish outfits and the scarlet streaks in her tresses. (Jermaine Horton Photography)

“Marian had to stand in the hallway while everyone was taking pictures,” the girl’s father, Doug Scott, told Today at the time.  “They said she couldn’t represent the school.”

“My daughter is always happy, so to see her crying, it breaks my heart,” he added.

Westlake Legal Group Jermaine-Horton-Photography-4 Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 44eda769-8cc3-5177-a87f-8bed71bcffaa

Back in October, the third grader wasn’t allowed to pose for picture day at Paragon Charter Academy in Jackson because of the hair extensions. (Jermaine Horton Photography)

Though the Paragon Charter Academy handbook states that students’ hair color “must be of natural tones,” there was no clear directive as to what would happen if a pupil arrived to picture day with bright tresses, per WLIX.

Marian was sent back to class without her photo taken and her parents ultimately pulled her out of the school in relation to the incident.

News of the plight quickly spread in the community, and “dozens” of photographers contacted the family, offering to host a special photoshoot for Marian to boost her confidence after the upsetting ordeal.

Earlier this month, Photographer Jermain Horton trekked all the way from Chicago for an upbeat portrait session in hopes of turning lemons to lemonade and bringing a smile back to the girl’s face. Joy Entertainment and Event Management and Rich Girl Candy CEO Mieka Joi also got involved in the big photo op, donating a wardrobe for the third grader to wear for the pictures.

Westlake Legal Group Jermaine-Horton-Photography-5 Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 44eda769-8cc3-5177-a87f-8bed71bcffaa

Marian was sent back to class without her photo taken and her parents ultimately pulled her out of the school in relation to the incident. (Jermaine Horton Photography)

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

“It was fun, you got to pose and change clothes and got to be yourself,” Marian told WLIX of the special occasion.

Horton, meanwhile, said that getting involved was simply the right thing to do.

Westlake Legal Group Jermaine-Horton-Photography Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 44eda769-8cc3-5177-a87f-8bed71bcffaa

“It was fun, you got to pose and change clothes and got to be yourself,” Marian said of the special photo shoot. (Jermaine Horton Photography)

“When I heard about this story I was furious as a parent because the first thing I thought about was the impact of what this would do to such a beautiful little girl,” he wrote on Facebook.

“I’m so blessed to have been a part of this to give her an amazing day that showed her that she truly is beautiful and her hair color was the BOMB! Of course we kept it for the shoot!” Horton said of the student’s now-signature hairstyle.

In response, the Scott family is incredibly grateful for the outpouring of support that Marian’s story has been met with, WLIX reports. Moving forward, Doug hopes to stay involved with discussions surrounding equitable school policies in the local area.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“It’s only going to get better and hopefully we are going to be able to deal with these situations in schools better in the future,” the parent said of the crusade for greater inclusivity.

Westlake Legal Group Jermaine-Horton-Photography-6-1 Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 44eda769-8cc3-5177-a87f-8bed71bcffaa   Westlake Legal Group Jermaine-Horton-Photography-6-1 Girl, 8, rocks photo shoot after being denied school picture for hair extensions Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle/parenting fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc article 44eda769-8cc3-5177-a87f-8bed71bcffaa

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Louisville athletic director breaks out Pappy Van Winkle after football team becomes bowl-eligible

Westlake Legal Group Vince-Tyra-Getty Louisville athletic director breaks out Pappy Van Winkle after football team becomes bowl-eligible Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fox news fnc/sports fnc article 215b9b71-be47-5287-8c39-a38e30558c64

The Louisville Cardinals became bowl eligible Saturday after defeating North Carolina State, 34-20, and athletic director Vince Tyra celebrated pretty hard with the coaching staff afterward.

Louisville will return to a bowl game with first-year head coach Scott Satterfield after going 2-10 in 2018 between Bobby Petrino and Lorenzo Ward. It was the first time the Cardinals had missed a bowl game since the 2009 season in Steve Kragthorpe’s last year.

CLEMSON’S TREVOR LAWRENCE MEETS WITH TEEN DOPPELGANGER AHEAD OF WAKE FOREST GAME

Tyra wore a Cardinals mask and told WDRB-TV he was breaking out some of the expensive liquor to celebrate. Tyra told the station he brought 15-year-old Pappy Van Winkle, a rare bourbon that sometimes sells for thousands of dollars, to give a toast to Satterfield and the coaching staff for being bowl-eligible.

“We’ll be the only guys ever to drink Pappy out of Gatorade cups,” Tyra told the station.

ALABAMA STAR TUA TAGOVAILOA SET FOR HIP SURGERY IN HOUSTON

Louisville had close wins over Boston College and Wake Forest this season but suffered a close loss to Florida State earlier in the year.

The Cardinals’ Malik Cunningham is leading the team with 1,466 passing yards and 14 touchdown passes. Against N.C. State on Saturday, he had 242 passing yards and a career-high four touchdown passes. Chatarius Atwell is leading the team with nine touchdown catches this season.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

Louisville has Syracuse and Kentucky left on the season.

Westlake Legal Group Vince-Tyra-Getty Louisville athletic director breaks out Pappy Van Winkle after football team becomes bowl-eligible Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fox news fnc/sports fnc article 215b9b71-be47-5287-8c39-a38e30558c64   Westlake Legal Group Vince-Tyra-Getty Louisville athletic director breaks out Pappy Van Winkle after football team becomes bowl-eligible Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fox news fnc/sports fnc article 215b9b71-be47-5287-8c39-a38e30558c64

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Fox News impeachment hearings coverage tops all broadcast, cable networks for second day

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6104756439001_6104758870001-vs Fox News impeachment hearings coverage tops all broadcast, cable networks for second day fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 13659415-4881-5ff3-ab15-22aa8d1d0a42

Fox News Channel’s coverage of impeachment hearings continued to outperform all other broadcast and cable news networks among total viewers during the second day on Friday, according to early Nielsen Media Research data.

Fox News averaged 2.8 million viewers from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. ET on Friday during the open hearing, compared to 2.7 million for MSNBC and CNN’s 1.8 million. FNC also topped cable news among the key demographic of adults age 25-54, averaging 412,000 compared to MSNBC’s 393,000 and CNN’s 381,000.

CNN’S BRIAN STELTER IGNORES ABC NEWS’ JEFFREY EPSTEIN SCANDAL ON ‘RELIABLE SOURCES’ MEDIA SHOW

Fox News’ coverage, led by Bret Baier, Martha MacCallum, Chris Wallace, Juan Williams, Bill Hemmer, Sandra Smith and Dana Perino, peaked from 1-2 p.m. ET with 3.1 million viewers.

FNC topped broadcast networks, too, averaging 2.7 million viewers when the hearing was aired on ABC, NBC and CBS affiliates from 9-11 a.m. ET and 1-2 p.m. ET.

CBS averaged 2 million, ABC averaged 1.9 million and NBC picked up 1.8 million total viewers.

FNC’s audience carried over to primetime, as it topped MSNBC and CNN across the board on Friday night. Fox News averaged 3.2 million viewers from 8-11 p.m. ET, compared to 2.9 million for MSNBC and 1.3 million for CNN.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

FNC also topped all competitors during first day of open impeachment hearings on Wednesday, 2.9 million viewers between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. ET during the hearing before the House Intelligence Committee.

The House Intelligence Committee’s second week of hearings are scheduled for Tuesday morning.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6104756439001_6104758870001-vs Fox News impeachment hearings coverage tops all broadcast, cable networks for second day fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 13659415-4881-5ff3-ab15-22aa8d1d0a42   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6104756439001_6104758870001-vs Fox News impeachment hearings coverage tops all broadcast, cable networks for second day fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 13659415-4881-5ff3-ab15-22aa8d1d0a42

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Impeachment Investigators Exploring Whether Trump Lied to Mueller

Westlake Legal Group 18dc-mueller-facebookJumbo Impeachment Investigators Exploring Whether Trump Lied to Mueller United States Politics and Government Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Special Prosecutors (Independent Counsel) Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Mueller, Robert S III

WASHINGTON — Impeachment investigators are exploring whether President Trump lied in his written answers to Robert S. Mueller III during the Russia investigation, a lawyer for the House told a federal appeals court on Monday, raising the prospect of bringing an additional basis for a Senate trial over whether to remove Mr. Trump.

The statement — during a hearing in a case over the House’s request for secret grand-jury evidence gathered by Mr. Mueller — came shortly after Mr. Trump said on Twitter that he may provide written answers about the Ukraine affair to impeachment investigators.

“Even though I did nothing wrong, and don’t like giving credibility to this No Due Process Hoax, I like the idea & will, in order to get Congress focused again, strongly consider it!” Mr. Trump wrote, after insulting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

During the Mueller investigation, Mr. Trump refused to testify orally about what he knew and did during the 2016 campaign in relation to Russia’s election interference operation, or his later efforts to impede the special counsel’s inquiry. But he did provide lawyerly written answers to some questions, which were appended to the Mueller report.

On Monday, Douglas Letter, the general counsel for the House, told a federal appeals court panel that impeachment investigators have an “immense” need to see the grand jury evidence — redacted portions of the Mueller report, as well as the underlying testimony transcripts they came from — because Mr. Trump may have lied.

“Was the president not truthful in his responses to the Mueller investigation?” Mr. Letter said, adding: “I believe the special counsel said the president had been untruthful in some of his answers.”

He was referring to Mr. Mueller’s congressional testimony in July. Near the end of the hearing, a lawmaker brought up Mr. Trump’s written responses and asked whether “his answers showed that he wasn’t always being truthful.” Rather than demurring as he had to similar questions, Mr. Mueller instead appeared to confirm her assessment, responding, “I would say generally.”

Both the lawmaker in July and Mr. Letter on Monday appeared to be referring in particular to the question of whether Mr. Trump lied about his campaign’s advance knowledge of and contacts with WikiLeaks about its possession of hacked Democratic emails and plans to publish them.

Mr. Trump wrote that he was “not aware during the campaign of any communications” between “any one I understood to be a representative of WikiLeaks” and people associated with his campaign, including his political adviser Roger J. Stone Jr., who was convicted at trial last week for lying to congressional investigators about his efforts to reach out to WikiLeaks and his discussions with the campaign.

“I do not recall discussing WikiLeaks with him,” Mr. Trump also wrote of Mr. Stone, “nor do I recall being aware of Mr. Stone having discussed WikiLeaks with individuals associated with my campaign.”

But the publicly available portions of the Mueller report suggest that evidence exists to the contrary. Several Trump aides, including Michael D. Cohen and Rick Gates, testified that they heard Mr. Trump discussing coming WikiLeaks releases over the phone. And in October 2016 Stephen K. Bannon, the campaign chairman, wrote in an email that Mr. Stone had told the campaign “about potential future releases of damaging material” by WikiLeaks shortly before it began publishing more hacked emails.

Mr. Letter brought up redactions in the report associated with Mr. Stone and a redacted reference to something that Paul Manafort, Mr. Trump’s former campaign chairman, had said to a grand jury.

“Manafort said that shortly after WikiLeaks’ July 22, 2016, released of hacked documents, he spoke to Trump [redacted]; Manafort recalled that Trump responded that Manafort should [redacted] keep Trump updated,” the Mueller report said, citing grand-jury material as the reason for the redactions.

Mr. Letter told the court, “The Manafort situation shows so clearly that there is evidence, very sadly, that the president might have provided untruthful answers,” he said, adding that this might be part of impeachment.

Attorney General William P. Barr permitted the House Judiciary Committee to see most of the Mueller report, including portions that are redacted from the public version because they pertained to ongoing cases, but has refused to let them see material that is subject to secrecy rules because it was presented to a grand jury.

In July, the House petitioned the chief judge of the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia for an order that would permit it to gain access to that material too. Its court filings in that matter were the first time that it formally pronounced itself engaged in an impeachment inquiry; there is precedent, including in the Nixon Watergate scandal, permitting the House to get grand jury information for impeachment proceedings.

The judge in October ruled that the House Judiciary Committee should be permitted to see the grand-jury material in the report and its underlying basis. The Justice Department appealed that ruling. The hearing on Monday centered on whether the appeals court should temporarily stay the district judge’s ruling while it considers that appeal.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump’s Made-for-TV Trade War Has No One Entertained

Westlake Legal Group merlin_164275284_1ba88126-ff22-41f4-a606-d6c65fb638b4-facebookJumbo Trump’s Made-for-TV Trade War Has No One Entertained United States International Relations United States Economy United States Politics and Government International Trade and World Market Economic Conditions and Trends Customs (Tariff) China Agriculture and Farming

When President Trump’s advisers suggested that Beijing resume buying around $20 billion in American farm products as part of a trade deal, Mr. Trump wasn’t satisfied. In a dramatic public retelling in the Cabinet Room, he said he pressed his team to more than triple that figure, then trimmed that a little and asked for up to $50 billion in annual purchases.

“My people had $20 billion done,” Mr. Trump recounted in an Oct. 21 cabinet meeting. “And I said, ‘I want more.’ They said, ‘The farmers can’t handle it.’ I said, ‘Tell them to buy larger tractors. It’s very simple.’” The cabinet members gathered around Mr. Trump laughed.

Mr. Trump has brought his characteristic love of show business to trade talks with China, injecting public drama into typically staid proceedings. He has alternated displays of anger and warmth toward Beijing and assumed the role of the insatiable negotiator, pairing ambitious goals for a trade pact with even bigger threats should China not accede to his terms.

But more than a year and a half into the biggest trade war in modern history, Mr. Trump’s approach has not yet produced the grand finale he hoped for. Instead, the president’s cliffhanger tactics appear to have made it even harder to bring complex trade talks to a close and exacerbated economic uncertainty across the globe.

Despite Mr. Trump’s Oct. 11 announcement that the United States and China had reached a “historic” Phase 1 trade agreement, actually signing a deal has proved elusive. The two sides continue to negotiate and a final agreement could be reached in the next few weeks, if negotiators decide to compromise. But Mr. Trump continues to give mixed signals about whether he actually wants a deal and if any of his tariffs on $360 billion worth of Chinese goods will ever be removed.

“We’re taking in billions of dollars in tariff money from China,” Mr. Trump said on Nov. 8. “I like our situation very much. They want to make a deal much more than I do, but we could have a deal.”

Businesses are not entertained. The unrelenting trade fight has prolonged financial pain for American farmers, companies and consumers, paralyzing firms that rely on robust trade flows between the world’s two largest economies.

Executives across the world say they have no choice but to postpone some hiring and investment, make sure any new expansions are not crippled by unforeseen policies, and conserve cash.

The uncertainty is weighing on the United States economy, particularly manufacturing, which has slumped over the past several months. Chinese economic growth has slowed to its lowest rate in nearly three decades, while Germany has barely avoided falling into recession.

“It’s striking that in almost every corner of the world geopolitical tensions are threatening to put the brakes on growth,” John Williams, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, said in a speech last week. “The uncertainty created by current events is no doubt having a lasting effect on the economic conditions we’re experiencing today.”

Mr. Trump’s theatrical embrace is not limited to China. He has injected similar drama into trade talks with other partners, including Europe, Japan, Canada and Mexico, publicly threatening them with tariffs and suggesting he might leave some trading partners behind.

The president says his approach has created leverage — and in some cases, he is right. The threat of tariffs has prompted officials from Mexico, Canada, Japan and elsewhere to make concessions they might not otherwise have agreed to. It has also brought China, which is heavily reliant on exports to the United States, to the negotiating table.

But that strategy may now be discouraging China from bringing the talks to a close. Mr. Trump’s tendency to waver and increase his demands have made China wary of offering concessions, for fear that he will only demand more, people familiar with Chinese trade policy said.

Eswar Prasad, a trade professor at Cornell, said the president’s “mercurial temperament and predilection to undercutting his own negotiating team” had complicated the already challenging task of striking a deal. “By hyping up expectations and setting unrealistic goals for the trade talks, Trump makes the prospects for any sort of trade deal with China more uncertain and volatile,” he said.

The two sides have been unable to reschedule a meeting between Mr. Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, in Chile that was canceled because of domestic protests. Mr. Trump has since said that a deal signing would take place in United States “farm country,” but the Chinese have been reluctant to commit to a meeting until a deal that includes tariff reductions is finalized.

Without a set deadline, the two sides have lost a source of external pressure to get the deal done. Beijing is also concerned about the president’s unpredictable behavior — as demonstrated by his abrupt departure from a high-profile meeting last February in Hanoi with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un. They fear that Mr. Trump may end up giving fewer concessions than they anticipate, resulting in an embarrassing trip for Mr. Xi, according to people familiar with their thinking.

Mr. Trump continues to insist his tactics will be worth it, saying he is the only president tough enough to take on China without fear of repercussions and that the United States will be better off. Many businesses agree that China has long taken advantage of the United States and support Mr. Trump’s efforts to remove trade barriers and end coercive practices that have disadvantaged American firms operating in China.

But they have struggled with his approach, which has repeatedly escalated tensions, prolonging the trade fight far longer than most expected. The lack of resolution has been discouraging, given that many analysts believe that the administration is tackling only the easiest issues in its Phase 1 deal, and leaving more contentious topics, like the subsidies that China gives to its industry, for later talks.

The roller-coaster ride has been exasperating for businesses that thrive on certainty and cannot easily shift supply chains or adjust shipments of products that need weeks to cross oceans. The most recent twists in the China trade talks have left firms uncertain whether a 15 percent tariff that the Trump administration had planned to impose Dec. 15 on another $160 billion of goods, including smartphones, laptops and footwear, would go into effect — or whether a 15 percent tariff imposed on consumer goods in September would remain.

“It makes for better theater to hold this to the last minute,” said Phil Levy, the chief economist at Flexport, which coordinates international shipments for companies. “It really doesn’t fit well with the world of global supply chains. And we’re talking to a lot of businesses who are having difficulty with that.

Even Mr. Trump’s supporters have trouble at times disguising their frustration with his focus on showmanship over substance and a nagging feeling that the president doesn’t want the show to end.

In a letter to the president in May, Zippy Duvall, the president of the American Farm Bureau, said farmers faced “near-unprecedented economic uncertainty and hardship” stemming from the escalation of tariffs in China and other key markets. He urged Mr. Trump to make a deal as soon as possible, saying “time is running out for many in agriculture.”

But Mr. Trump’s approach has complicated his ability to get a final deal, including securing the big farm commitments that he showcased last month. American negotiators are now left with the difficult task of translating the massive purchases Mr. Trump requested — larger purchases “than any time in our history, by far” — into the actual text of a trade agreement.

While China needs and wants to buy agricultural goods like soybeans and pork, it has balked on terms that would leave it exposed to accusations that it favors American products over other countries’, as well as agreements that could result in more American tariffs if its purchases do not come through.

Even if American negotiators secure better market access for beef, pork, dairy and genetically modified products, Washington-based analysts who have done the calculations say they have difficulty figuring out how the United States could increase its agricultural exports to China to much more than $30 billion a year, without diverting trade from elsewhere.

Mr. Trump’s tariffs also remain a source of uncertainty, with his administration sending mixed signals about whether any of the existing levies will be removed if a deal is reached.

The president announced the Phase 1 trade deal during a meeting in the Oval Office with Liu He, China’s top trade negotiator. While Mr. Trump canceled an increase in tariffs planned for Oct. 15, he made no mention of rolling back any levies. That has not gone over well with the Chinese, who have since been under pressure domestically for seemingly giving away too much to the United States.

“Without rolling back some of the tariffs, or reducing the uncertainty of not raising additional tariffs, then I would ask what is the additional incentive of implementing this deal on the Chinese part?” He Jianxiong, the former executive director for China at the International Monetary Fund, said at a Nov. 6 event at the Peterson Institute in Washington.

Keith Bradsher contributed reporting from Hong Kong.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

U.S. Firms Get 90-Day Extension To Work With Huawei On Rural Networks

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1176167606_wide-1dd2628e9a9ed2ad1d2e916120968accb302b9cb-s1100-c15 U.S. Firms Get 90-Day Extension To Work With Huawei On Rural Networks

The U.S. government is letting American businesses work with Chinese tech giant Huawei for another three months, in a third delay to a ban enacted in May for national security reasons. Stefan Wermuth/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Stefan Wermuth/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  U.S. Firms Get 90-Day Extension To Work With Huawei On Rural Networks

The U.S. government is letting American businesses work with Chinese tech giant Huawei for another three months, in a third delay to a ban enacted in May for national security reasons.

Stefan Wermuth/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration is giving American companies another three months to do business with the Chinese telecom giant Huawei, the Commerce Department said Monday.

It is the third time the U.S. has extended a reprieve, which is meant to help ease disruption for Huawei customers. Many Internet and cellphone carriers in rural parts of the U.S. buy networking equipment from Huawei, and the temporary extension means they can keep their networks up to date.

“The Temporary General License extension will allow carriers to continue to service customers in some of the most remote areas of the United States who would otherwise be left in the dark,” said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in a statement.

The U.S. first put Huawei on a blacklist, known as the “Entity List,” in May, amid an escalating trade war with China. American firms are barred from selling to or buying products to companies on the list due to national security concerns.

The Trump administration is worried that Huawei and other big Chinese companies could be spying for Beijing, or stealing intellectual property from U.S. firms. Huawei denies the allegations and says the U.S. has given no evidence that the company presents a threat.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Rare World War II ‘escape kits’ sold at auction

A rare collection of “escape kits” from World War II POWs that included hidden maps, a pencil with a dagger inside and a shaving razor blade have been sold at auction.

The secret devices were made for and built by British prisoners in an effort to help them evade capture and get out of detention camps, SWNS reports. The items sold for $486 (375 British pounds) at an auction held by East Bristol Auctions in Hanham, Bristol, the news agency added.

The blue pencil, which has Royal Sovereign designs on it and sports a metal spike dagger inside, sold for $77, or 60 British pounds. The shaving razor blade, stemming from the Kleen brand, is actually a compass. It also has a magnetized blade that will point true north when placed in water.

Westlake Legal Group world-war-2-pencil Rare World War II 'escape kits' sold at auction fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 70e57bb4-06df-519d-b266-ca9f34c8217a

A rare original WWII Second World War SOE Special Operations Executive ‘Escape & Evade’ secret dagger pencil. It is a normal ‘Royal Sovereign No.107’ blue pencil but it has a secret large, metal spike dagger inside. (Credit: SWNS)

RARE PATEK PHILLIPE WATCH SELLS FOR $31M AT AUCTION

The razor sold for $65 or 50 British pounds at auction.

Westlake Legal Group world-war-2-razor Rare World War II 'escape kits' sold at auction fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 70e57bb4-06df-519d-b266-ca9f34c8217a

A rare WWII Second World War 1945 dated British SOE ( Special Operations Executive ) Escape & Evade razor, with a compass razor blade. The blade made by Kleen, and still present within its original paper envelope. (Credit: SWNS)

A collection of four double-sided World War II Royal Air Force pilot maps on silk were also sold at auction for $84, or 65 British pounds. It includes maps of Istanbul, Batumi, Al-Jawf, and Ankara, all four of which are marked ‘restricted,” SWNS added.

Westlake Legal Group world-war-2-maps Rare World War II 'escape kits' sold at auction fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 70e57bb4-06df-519d-b266-ca9f34c8217a

A rare collection of 4 original vintage WWII Escape & Evade RAF Pilot / Officer’s maps on silk. Includes maps of Istanbul, Batumi, Al-Jawf, and Ankara. Each is double-sided and all are marked “restricted.” (Credit: SWNS)

The British news agency also noted that an original Kelton wristwatch, which hid a compass on the back of its face, sold for $259, or 200 British pounds.

Westlake Legal Group a95ac8e9-world-war-2-watch Rare World War II 'escape kits' sold at auction fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 70e57bb4-06df-519d-b266-ca9f34c8217a

(Credit: SWNS)

Westlake Legal Group world-war-2-watch-2 Rare World War II 'escape kits' sold at auction fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 70e57bb4-06df-519d-b266-ca9f34c8217a

(Credit: SWNS)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Westlake Legal Group a95ac8e9-world-war-2-watch Rare World War II 'escape kits' sold at auction fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 70e57bb4-06df-519d-b266-ca9f34c8217a   Westlake Legal Group a95ac8e9-world-war-2-watch Rare World War II 'escape kits' sold at auction fox-news/topic/world-war-two fox news fnc/science fnc Chris Ciaccia article 70e57bb4-06df-519d-b266-ca9f34c8217a

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com