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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 350)

‘Angry’ Tortoise Saved After Setting House Ablaze On Christmas

Westlake Legal Group 5e057e7b24000015135a4576 ‘Angry’ Tortoise Saved After Setting House Ablaze On Christmas

English fire authorities rescued a middle-aged tortoise on Christmas after it allegedly set its house on fire.

Firefighters were called to a home in Great Dunmow, a town about 45 miles northeast of London, after a neighbor heard the smoke alarm going off, the Essex Fire Service said in an incident report. When authorities arrived on the scene, the house was filled with smoke and there was a fire in one of the rooms.

 “The fire started after the tortoise knocked a heat lamp onto its bedding, which then caught alight,” Gary Wain, watch manager at the Great Dunmow Fire Station, said. “This tortoise has had a very lucky Christmas Day ― he is 45 years young and will now hopefully continue to live a long and happy life thanks to working smoke alarms.”

The Essex Fire Service shared an image of the grumpy-looking tortoise and praised fire crews who left their families to tackle the blaze:

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Mike Glass, QB from Eastern Michigan, ejected after hitting Pitt player in helmet

Westlake Legal Group AP19361071042725 Mike Glass, QB from Eastern Michigan, ejected after hitting Pitt player in helmet fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc c0213b22-a110-534f-b63d-345b16b8d4fe article

Mike Glass, the senior quarterback for Eastern Michigan, was ejected from the team’s Quick Lane Bowl game against Pittsburgh on Thursday after he struck an opposing player and appeared to knock down a referee during a tense exchange.

He was ejected with 10 seconds left. Glass was 28 of 50 for 311 yards with two touchdowns and an interception. The senior also ran for 83 yards and a score.

Eastern Michigan cornerback Kevin McGill was ejected earlier for unsportsmanlike conduct.

Glass later tweeted, “I let God and my family down!”

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Pittsburgh defeated Eastern Michigan 34-30. Eastern Michigan plays at Kentucky on Sept. 5. The Eagles will be breaking in a new quarterback, attempting to replace Glass. Pitt hosts Miami of Ohio on Sept. 5. The Panthers will have a chance to be very good on defense if defensive lineman Jaylen Twyman, Patrick Jones and safety Paris Ford all choose to stay in college instead of entering the NFL draft.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group AP19361071042725 Mike Glass, QB from Eastern Michigan, ejected after hitting Pitt player in helmet fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc c0213b22-a110-534f-b63d-345b16b8d4fe article   Westlake Legal Group AP19361071042725 Mike Glass, QB from Eastern Michigan, ejected after hitting Pitt player in helmet fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox news fnc/sports fnc c0213b22-a110-534f-b63d-345b16b8d4fe article

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‘Angry’ Tortoise Saved After Setting House Ablaze On Christmas

Westlake Legal Group 5e057e7b24000015135a4576 ‘Angry’ Tortoise Saved After Setting House Ablaze On Christmas

English fire authorities rescued a middle-aged tortoise on Christmas after it allegedly set its house on fire.

Firefighters were called to a home in Great Dunmow, a town about 45 miles northeast of London, after a neighbor heard the smoke alarm going off, the Essex Fire Service said in an incident report. When authorities arrived on the scene, the house was filled with smoke and there was a fire in one of the rooms.

 “The fire started after the tortoise knocked a heat lamp onto its bedding, which then caught alight,” Gary Wain, watch manager at the Great Dunmow Fire Station, said. “This tortoise has had a very lucky Christmas Day ― he is 45 years young and will now hopefully continue to live a long and happy life thanks to working smoke alarms.”

The Essex Fire Service shared an image of the grumpy-looking tortoise and praised fire crews who left their families to tackle the blaze:

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Confidential Videos Show Why Navy SEALs Reported Edward Gallagher

Producers Jessica Dimmock and Zackary Canepari

Combat video, text messages and confidential interviews with members of the Navy SEALs obtained by The New York Times reveal chilling details about the conduct of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, a bona fide badass with a chest full of medals.

Trained as a medic, sniper and explosives expert, Gallagher was the consummate leader of Alpha Platoon, SEAL Team 7, part of the Navy’s elite commando force. But when his own men said he committed war crimes, it sent shock waves up the chain of command — reaching all the way to the commander in chief.

Gallagher’s case continues to roil the Navy even after his acquittal on the most severe charges, and the public debate on Fox News and Twitter has widened the rift between President Trump and some top military leaders.

What exactly happened in Iraq in 2017 that so alarmed Gallagher’s brothers in arms? And why has the case resonated with Trump and his political base?

On this episode of “The Weekly,” members of SEAL Team 7 tell Navy investigators that Gallagher was a reckless leader with a disturbing hunger for violence. They say they spent much of their time protecting Iraqi civilians from their battle-crazed chief instead of going after ISIS. And never-before-released video from the SEALs’ deployment shows Gallagher kneeling beside a defenseless ISIS captive moments before Gallagher plunged his knife into the prisoner’s neck.

[Join the conversation about @theweekly on Twitter and Instagram. #TheWeeklyNYT]


Westlake Legal Group 29theweekly-sandiego-dave-square320 Confidential Videos Show Why Navy SEALs Reported Edward Gallagher United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J The Weekly (TV Program) Spencer, Richard V navy seals Iraq Hulu.com Gallagher, Edward (1979- ) FX (TV Network) Defense Department

Dave Philipps is a national correspondent covering veterans and the military, and won a Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. Since joining The Times in 2014, he has covered the military community from the ground up, focusing largely on the unintended consequences of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Thousands of pages of photos, transcripts and investigative reports, as well as videos from Iraq were used to report this episode of “The Weekly.” It features confidential Navy interviews with the SEALs, who had never spoken publicly outside Gallagher’s trial. One Navy source was particularly helpful, but gave Dave only a 24-hour window to obtain materials.

[The full episode will be available to Times subscribers in the U.S. on Monday, Feb. 3]

Updates on some of the people in this episode of “The Weekly.”

ImageWestlake Legal Group 29theweekly-sandiego-edwardgallagher-where-articleLarge Confidential Videos Show Why Navy SEALs Reported Edward Gallagher United States Defense and Military Forces Trump, Donald J The Weekly (TV Program) Spencer, Richard V navy seals Iraq Hulu.com Gallagher, Edward (1979- ) FX (TV Network) Defense Department

Credit…John Gastaldo/ZUMA Wire

Edward Gallagher retired from the Navy with full honors on Nov. 30. He lives with his wife and family near the beach in Florida. The Navy recently returned items seized during the murder investigation, including a custom-made hatchet he took with him to Iraq.

Corey Scott, the SEAL medic who said he — not Gallagher — had killed the wounded ISIS captive, was medically retired from the Navy this fall for problems unrelated to the Gallagher investigation. He has reached out to other members of the platoon to talk. None have responded.

Pete Hegseth, a guest host on Fox & Friends on Fox News, continues to praise President Trump’s decision to intervene on Gallagher’s behalf. Hegseth has posted Twitter messages urging the president to pardon other service members convicted of war crimes.

  • After Gallagher’s acquittal for all but one relatively minor charge, his case set in motion a dispute between the Pentagon hierarchy committed to enforcing good order and discipline, and a president who has come to distrust the commanders running the military.


Senior Story Editors Dan Barry, Liz O. Baylen, and Liz Day
Director of Photography Boaz Freund
Video Editors David Herr and Pierre Takal
Associate Producers Brennan Cusack, Lora Moftah, and Valerie Schenkman

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Alabama car crash kills 3 high school cheerleaders on Christmas

Westlake Legal Group Crime-scene-iStock Alabama car crash kills 3 high school cheerleaders on Christmas New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fnc/us fnc article 55c8e1d1-d780-5d3a-83c2-d785f22e3d14

Three Alabama high school cheerleaders were killed on Christmas Day when one lost control of their car and smashed into a tree, authorities said Thursday.

The 16-year-old girls — Addyson Martin, Emilee Fain and Cassidy Dunn — had just left a home where they were celebrating the holiday together when their SUV careened off the road about 6 p.m., authorities said.

“We’re not sure for what reason they lost control, but it hit a big oak tree,” said Lt. Michael McDuffie, a spokesman for the Geneva Police Department.

“It could have been a deer ran out in front of them,” he said.

The three teenagers — all students at Geneva High School — were “in the front seat of the car,” according to Geneva County Coroner Donny Adkinson.

Two other girls were in the car with them at the time of the crash.

One of the girls in the back seat was seriously injured and airlifted to a hospital in Birmingham. She is expected to recover.

The other girl in the back was not seriously injured.

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A photo from local outlet WTVY-TV showed the wrecked vehicle, with its roof apparently ripped off.

Click for more from NYPost.com

Westlake Legal Group Crime-scene-iStock Alabama car crash kills 3 high school cheerleaders on Christmas New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fnc/us fnc article 55c8e1d1-d780-5d3a-83c2-d785f22e3d14   Westlake Legal Group Crime-scene-iStock Alabama car crash kills 3 high school cheerleaders on Christmas New York Post fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/alabama fnc/us fnc article 55c8e1d1-d780-5d3a-83c2-d785f22e3d14

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Anguish and Anger From the Navy SEALS Who Turned In Edward Gallagher

[Watch a special Times documentary featuring combat video and confidential interviews with the Navy SEALs who accused their chief of war crimes, streaming on Hulu.]

The Navy SEALs showed up one by one, wearing hoodies and T-shirts instead of uniforms, to tell investigators what they had seen. Visibly nervous, they shifted in their chairs, rubbed their palms and pressed their fists against their foreheads. At times they stopped in midsentence and broke into tears.

“Sorry about this,” Special Operator First Class Craig Miller, one of the most experienced SEALs in the group, said as he looked sideways toward a blank wall, trying to hide that he was weeping. “It’s the first time — I’m really broken up about this.”

Video recordings of the interviews obtained by The New York Times, which have not been shown publicly before, were part of a trove of Navy investigative materials about the prosecution of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher on war crimes charges including murder.

They offer the first opportunity outside the courtroom to hear directly from the men of Alpha platoon, SEAL Team 7, whose blistering testimony about their platoon chief was dismissed by President Trump when he upended the military code of justice to protect Chief Gallagher from the punishment.

“The guy is freaking evil,” Special Operator Miller told investigators. “The guy was toxic,” Special Operator First Class Joshua Vriens, a sniper, said in a separate interview. “You could tell he was perfectly O.K. with killing anybody that was moving,” Special Operator First Class Corey Scott, a medic in the platoon, told the investigators.

Such dire descriptions of Chief Gallagher, who had eight combat deployments and sometimes went by the nickname Blade, are in marked contrast to Mr. Trump’s portrayal of him at a recent political rally in Florida as one of “our great fighters.”

Though combat in Iraq barely fazed the SEALs, sitting down to tell Naval Criminal Investigative Service agents about what they had seen their platoon chief do during a 2017 deployment in Iraq was excruciating for them.

Not only did they have to relive wrenching events and describe grisly scenes, they had to break a powerful unwritten code of silence in the SEALs, one of the nation’s most elite commando forces.

The trove of materials also includes thousands of text messages the SEALs sent one another about the events and the prosecution of Chief Gallagher. Together with the dozens of hours of recorded interviews, they provide revealing insights into the men of the platoon, who have never spoken publicly about the case, and the leader they turned in.

Platoon members said they saw Chief Gallagher shoot civilians and fatally stab a wounded captive with a hunting knife. Chief Gallagher was acquitted by a military jury in July of all but a single relatively minor charge, and was cleared of all punishment in November by Mr. Trump.

Video from a SEAL’s helmet camera, included in the trove of materials, shows the barely conscious captive — a teenage Islamic State fighter so thin that his watch slid easily up and down his arm — being brought in to the platoon one day in May 2017. Then the helmet camera is shut off.

In the video interviews with investigators, three SEALs said they saw Chief Gallagher go on to stab the sedated captive for no reason, and then hold an impromptu re-enlistment ceremony over the body, as if it were a trophy.

“I was listening to it, and I was just thinking, like, this is the most disgraceful thing I’ve ever seen in my life,” Special Operator Miller, who has since been promoted to chief, told investigators.

Special Operator Miller said that when the platoon commander, Lt. Jacob Portier, told the SEALs to gather over the corpse for photos, he did not feel he could refuse. The photos, included in the evidence obtained by The Times, show Chief Gallagher, surrounded by other SEALs, clutching the dead captive’s hair; in one photo, he holds a custom-made hunting knife.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 27SEALS-trophy-articleLarge Anguish and Anger From the Navy SEALS Who Turned In Edward Gallagher War Crimes, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity Vriens, Josh United States Navy United States Defense and Military Forces Scott, Corey Portier, Jacob navy seals Naval Criminal Investigative Service Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Miller, Craig Gallagher, Edward (1979- ) Ethics and Official Misconduct Dille, Dylan

This photo, recovered from Chief Gallagher’s phone after the death of an Islamic State fighter, was included in an investigative report by the Navy.

“I think Eddie was proud of it, and that was, like, part of it for him,” Special Operator Miller told investigators.

Chief Gallagher’s lawyer, Timothy Parlatore, said the video interviews were rife with inconsistencies and falsehoods that created “a clear road map to the acquittal.”

Since his arrest nearly a year ago, Chief Gallagher has insisted that the charges against him were concocted by six disgruntled SEALs in his platoon who could not meet his high standards and wanted to force him out.

“My first reaction to seeing the videos was surprise and disgust that they would make up blatant lies about me, but I quickly realized that they were scared that the truth would come out of how cowardly they acted on deployment,” Chief Gallagher said in a statement issued through his lawyer.

“I felt sorry for them that they thought it necessary to smear my name, but they never realized what the consequences of their lies would be. As upset as I was, the videos also gave me confidence because I knew that their lies would never hold up under real questioning and the jury would see through it. Their lies and N.C.I.S.’s refusal to ask hard questions or corroborate their stories strengthened my resolve to go to trial and clear my name.”

The video interviews and private group text conversations obtained by The Times do not reveal any coordinated deception among the SEALs in the chief’s platoon. Instead, they show men who were hesitant to come forward, but who urged one another to resist outside pressure and threats of violence, and to be honest.

“Tell the truth, don’t lie or embellish,” one sniper who is now in SEAL Team 6 told the others in a group text in 2017, when they first tried to report the chief. “That way, he can’t say that we slandered him in any way.”

When several SEALs in the group questioned what would come of reporting the chief to their commanders, another wrote: “That’s their decision. We just need to give them the truth.”

It is an unspoken rule among their teams that SEALs should not report other SEALs for misconduct. An internal investigation could close off choice assignments or end careers for the accusers as well as the accused. And anyone who reported concerns outside the tight-knit SEAL community risked being branded a traitor.

“In a perfect world, there would be no risk, but that is not where we are,” Rick Haas, a retired command master chief who served in the SEALs for 30 years, said in an interview with The Times. “The teams are now divided over this, like I’ve never seen happen before.”

In cramped interview rooms in San Diego, SEALs who spoke to Navy investigators painted a picture of a platoon driven to despair by a chief who seemed to care primarily about racking up kills. They described how their chief targeted women and children and boasted that “burqas were flying.”

Asked whether the chief had a bias against Middle Eastern people, Special Operator Scott replied, “I think he just wants to kill anybody he can.”

Some of the SEALs said they came to believe that the chief was purposefully exposing them to enemy fire to bait ISIS fighters into revealing their positions. They said the chief thought that casualties in the platoon would increase his chances for a Silver Star.

Special Operator Vriens told investigators he had wanted to confront the chief in Iraq but had worried that if he did, he would be cut from missions and no longer be present to protect other SEALs from the chief. As he spoke, he struggled to keep his composure.

“I can speak up, stand my ground,” he said in the interview. “He’s just going to do this to a new guy who he can manipulate. So I was like, I’m going to be his right-hand man, so — so no one else got hurt.”

He pressed his forehead into his fists and started to cry. Then he took several deep breaths, rubbed his hands together and tried to continue.

“So I worked for him and I kept my mouth shut,” he said.

The platoon members told investigators that they tried repeatedly to report what they saw, but that the chain of command above them was friendly toward Chief Gallagher and took no action. Finally, in April 2018, they went outside the SEALs to the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. Chief Gallagher was arrested a few months later.

The SEALs in the platoon were scattered to new assignments. They tried to keep tabs on the case, texting one another and commiserating over a series of setbacks, including accusations of prosecutorial misconduct, the removal of the lead prosecutor and reports that the judge overseeing the case was being investigated on suspicion of lying under oath.

“This stuff is frustrating to read and makes it seem like Eddie will possibly get away with murder (literally),” Special Operator First Class Dylan Dille texted the group. “Let’s not forget there are 7-12 of us in here who had the balls to tell the truth about what Eddie has done.”

He said he thought the case against Chief Gallagher was strong despite the procedural setbacks. “I am also convinced that we are gonna answer to a higher power someday, and everything happens for a reason,” wrote Special Operator Dille, who has since left the Navy. “Not compromising our integrity and keeping right on our side is all we can do.”

Video

transcript

‘The Weekly,’ Streaming Now on Hulu

Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher’s case continues to roil the Navy even after his acquittal on most charges after another SEAL surprised prosecutors on the stand. Watch Corey Scott’s interview and hear his testimony.

Corey Scott changed his story on the stand. What Corey Scott had told investigators multiple times beforehand is— “You say he stabbed him one time, multiple times?” “It was probably two or three times.” “O.K.” “Just like a stab about right here, just in a few times.” “Is there any possible way that what he was doing could be interpreted as for medical purposes, to help this guy.” “No.” “There was no way this was anything other than to attack and to kill this person.” “No.” “O.K.” “What did you do next?” “I stayed at the scene until the ISIS fighter asphyxiated.” The prosecutor sits down without having gotten any of the testimony he expected. And very quickly, the defense attorney stands up and starts asking— “You didn’t say that Chief Gallagher suffocated him, did you?” “No.” Well, if Eddie Gallagher didn’t kill that guy, who did? “Did Craig Miller suffocate him?” “No.” “Did you suffocate him?” “Yes.” [SCOFFS] “How?” “I held my thumb over his ET tube until he stopped breathing.” And there is just this heavy silence— “No further questions.” —because all of a sudden, you can’t get this guy for murder because someone else has just admitted to the killing.

Westlake Legal Group NYTW_SAN-DIEGO_SOCIAL-STILL-10-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Anguish and Anger From the Navy SEALS Who Turned In Edward Gallagher War Crimes, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity Vriens, Josh United States Navy United States Defense and Military Forces Scott, Corey Portier, Jacob navy seals Naval Criminal Investigative Service Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Miller, Craig Gallagher, Edward (1979- ) Ethics and Official Misconduct Dille, Dylan

Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher’s case continues to roil the Navy even after his acquittal on most charges after another SEAL surprised prosecutors on the stand. Watch Corey Scott’s interview and hear his testimony.

Seven members of the 22-person platoon testified at the trial that they saw the chief commit war crimes. Two men from the platoon testified that they did not see any evidence of crimes. Others refused to cooperate with prosecutors. Crucially, one SEAL who had accused the chief during the investigation — Special Operator Scott — changed his story on the witness stand, testifying that he and not Chief Gallagher had caused the captive’s death.

Three of the men who testified at the trial left the Navy afterward, and have been trying to keep a low profile while they build civilian lives. Others are still in the SEAL teams, in some cases working on classified assignments. Some fear that coming forward has hurt their chances at success in the SEALs, but none have reported any retaliation. All of them declined to comment for this article.

Since the trial, Chief Gallagher has repeatedly insulted them on social media and on Fox News, especially Craig Miller, whom the chief singled out for weeping while talking to investigators.

Chief Gallagher retired from the Navy with full honors at the end of November, and has announced that he was starting a SEAL-themed clothing line.

A few days after he retired, an Instagram account belonging to him and his wife posted a photo of a custom-made hatchet, forged by the same SEAL veteran who made the hunting knife he was accused of using to kill the captive. Before the deployment, Chief Gallagher had told the knife maker he hoped to “dig that knife or hatchet on someone’s skull!”

“Eddie finally got his stuff back from NCIS,” the post said, listing the hatchet among a “few of our favorite things now returned.”

Another item returned to him was a black-and-white Islamic State flag. On Saturday, Chief Gallagher presented Mr. Trump with a folded black-and-white cloth that other SEALs from the platoon said appeared to be the flag.

A post on the chief’s Instagram account said, “Finally got to thank the President and his amazing wife by giving them a little gift from Eddie’s deployment to Mosul.”

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Almaty airport says 9 killed in Kazakhstan plane crash

Westlake Legal Group AP19361151180841 Almaty airport says 9 killed in Kazakhstan plane crash fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc article 38d54665-cd29-5ebc-8345-8d1ac8a543c5

A Bek Air plane crashed into a two-story building in Kazakhstan shortly after takeoff Friday, killing at least nine and prompting a massive rescue effort.

There were 100 passengers and crew aboard.

GIRL DIES ABOARD PLANE AT LAX AFTER SUFFERING HEART ATTACK

The airport said the plane lost altitude at 7:22 a.m. A Reuters reporter near the airport reported that there was thick fog in the area.

In a statement on its Facebook page, Almaty International Airport said there was no fire and a rescue operation got underway immediately following the crash.

The plane was flying to Nur-Sultan, the country’s capital formerly known as Astana.

The aircraft was identified as a Fokker-100, a medium-sized, twin-turbofan jet airliner.

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The company manufacturing the aircraft went bankrupt in 1996 and the production of the Fokker-100 stopped the following year.

Fox News’ Edmund DeMarche and the Associated Press contributed to this report

Westlake Legal Group AP19361151180841 Almaty airport says 9 killed in Kazakhstan plane crash fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc article 38d54665-cd29-5ebc-8345-8d1ac8a543c5   Westlake Legal Group AP19361151180841 Almaty airport says 9 killed in Kazakhstan plane crash fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc article 38d54665-cd29-5ebc-8345-8d1ac8a543c5

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Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057440965001_6057439675001-vs Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says fox-news/travel fox news fnc/travel fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a80ba8e-fefd-5f45-b9cf-68142af0dd33

An unidentified girl was pronounced dead Thursday at Los Angeles International Airport after she suffered a cardiac arrest while aboard a plane bound for Seattle, a report said.

The Delta flight was still over Los Angeles during the medical emergency and turned around for an emergency landing where it was met by a team of paramedics, ABC 7 reported. The teams attempted to save the girl– who was believed to have been about 10 years old– but were unsuccessful. NBC Los Angeles reported that she was considered “beyond medical help.” She was pronounced dead at the scene.

“LAFD paramedics responded to a medical aid for a minor female child and furiously worked to save her life,” a statement from the fire department said. “Sadly, all efforts were futile and the child was beyond medical help.”

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Police dod not believe there was any foul play.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057440965001_6057439675001-vs Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says fox-news/travel fox news fnc/travel fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a80ba8e-fefd-5f45-b9cf-68142af0dd33   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057440965001_6057439675001-vs Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says fox-news/travel fox news fnc/travel fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a80ba8e-fefd-5f45-b9cf-68142af0dd33

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Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057440965001_6057439675001-vs Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says fox-news/travel fox news fnc/travel fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a80ba8e-fefd-5f45-b9cf-68142af0dd33

An unidentified girl was pronounced dead Thursday at Los Angeles International Airport after she suffered a cardiac arrest while aboard a plane bound for Seattle, a report said.

The Delta flight was still over Los Angeles during the medical emergency and turned around for an emergency landing where it was met by a team of paramedics, ABC 7 reported. The teams attempted to save the girl– who was believed to have been about 10 years old– but were unsuccessful. NBC Los Angeles reported that she was considered “beyond medical help.” She was pronounced dead at the scene.

“LAFD paramedics responded to a medical aid for a minor female child and furiously worked to save her life,” a statement from the fire department said. “Sadly, all efforts were futile and the child was beyond medical help.”

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Police dod not believe there was any foul play.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057440965001_6057439675001-vs Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says fox-news/travel fox news fnc/travel fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a80ba8e-fefd-5f45-b9cf-68142af0dd33   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6057440965001_6057439675001-vs Girl dies of heart attack on plane leaving LAX, report says fox-news/travel fox news fnc/travel fnc Edmund DeMarche article 6a80ba8e-fefd-5f45-b9cf-68142af0dd33

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Her Job Requires 7 Apps. She Works Retail.

Westlake Legal Group 24oldnavy8-facebookJumbo Her Job Requires 7 Apps. She Works Retail. Shopping and Retail old navy Manhattan (NYC) Labor and Jobs Fashion and Apparel E-Commerce Customer Relations christmas

It’s Dec. 17 and a customer at the Old Navy on 18th Street and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan has a problem: She’s looking to get matching Jingle Jammies for her family but can’t find a size 3T for her son.

Daisy Tecotl has a solution. She checks the In Stock On Shelf app on her store-issued mobile device to see if there’s a 3T in the stockroom. There isn’t, so she opens the Order In Store app and arranges to ship it to the woman before Christmas.

The sale is reflected in yet another app, the Sell app, that pings Ms. Tecotl, a 24-year-old merchandising manager, with hourly figures on sales and credit card sign-ups and several other metrics, which she uses to broadcast guidance to “refocus” her sales associates, who, like her, are outfitted with earpieces and walkie-talkies.

“Maybe our focus is getting more customers that come in to purchase more,” Ms. Tecotl said by way of example, “so maybe the refocus is handing out mesh bags” — the store’s branded shopping bags — “and saying hello a little bit more.”

This is the job of a retail clothing worker at the end of 2019: dashing back and forth between stockroom and fitting room and sales floor, online and in-store, juggling the hats of cashier and cheerleader and personal shopper and visual merchandiser and database manager.

As brick-and-mortar stores scramble to justify their continued existence, they’re trying to be all things to all customers, to blend instant gratification and infinite selection. And it falls upon the workers on the front lines to make it all happen.

Entry-level associates at Old Navy have store-issued mobile devices, too, that do things like ping them when a customer buys the last item in a particular size so they can replenish it from a stockroom that holds over 250,000 items (don’t worry, the app tells them where to find it), or ring up customers anywhere in the store’s 30,000-square-foot, three-story expanse, or notify them of a BOPIS — that’s Buy Online Pickup In Store, which sends an associate to find the items on the sales floor — “sort of a reverse replenishment,” Ms. Tecotl explained — and scan them in and print the invoice and stick it on a bag with the customer’s information and bring it up to the BOPIS register, where it goes on a numbered shelf.

Old Navy at Christmastime is like Old Navy only more so — more people, more shirts and sweaters and Rockstar jeans stacked high or lying in picked-over piles sprawling off the shelves and hangers, more exclamation points. “Jingle! Jolt! Jam!” reads a sign above the women’s pajamas. “Zip. Zap. Gifts!!” “S¡ze Yes!” “Giftastic!”

The work revs up, too. During peak hours, said Jennifer Oberle Eyler, the store director at 18th Street, one associate might be dedicated to watching for the red dot on the In Stock On Shelf App that tells workers to bring out more items in that size. Another might take orders from the Ship From Store app, which effectively turns the store into an auxiliary warehouse that fulfills online purchases from store inventory rather than from distribution centers in the name of efficiency.

Christmas cheer aside, it’s a grim moment for physical retail. The nation’s offramps are littered with the skeletons of defunct malls. In New York City, retail clothing jobs declined by 9 percent from 2013 to 2018, even as overall employment in the city jumped about 14 percent. A report last week by the Center for an Urban Future found that the number of national retail chain stores in the city shrank 4 percent this year, the biggest drop since at least 2008.

Old Navy hopes to buck the trend. It has performed so much better than its sister chains in the Gap empire that Gap Inc. decided in February to spin off Old Navy into its own company — one that plans to open 800 new stores, despite a dip in sales so far this year.

But to compete in a world where Amazon moves mountains of merchandise without a retail sales force takes a particular focus, said Saravanan Kesavan, associate professor of operations at the University of North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School.

“Retail for the most part is not a place where they’re looking for salespeople,” he said. “They’re looking for retail transaction enablers.”

At every shift, each Old Navy store employee on the sales floor is issued a “Ticket To Win,” which the company describes as “a contest-driven tool” to help managers and associates “focus on how best to serve the customer and drive business results.”

“It’s a little paper that we carry,” Ms. Tecotl said, “where we put our goals on it and it shows the main focuses we have.”

Ms. Tecotl, the Manhattan-born daughter of a maid and a chimney cleaner who immigrated from Mexico, embraces the multitasking with the unswervable cheerfulness of a retail professional. “All the technology we have also helps me stay organized and do my job quickly,” she said.

In addition to working full time, she is studying at Hunter College, majoring in human biology with a minor in psychology.

The other day, she spent her lunch break at work finishing a presentation about human evolution. Sometimes, she said, “you get a little stressed out. But then you end up liking what you’re doing.”

The store sold Schwinn classic cruiser bikes, and an old-fashioned lunch counter dished out peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and sugar doughnuts.

Those extras are gone, replaced, in part, by features that bow to the gods of e-commerce. The first sign a customer sees, hanging over a mannequin display, advertises Old Navy’s Order In Store service. “Can’t find a size?” it says. “Order and Ship Free. Ask an Associate.”

A few feet away is an Easy Online Order Return station with a handle like a library book drop. “This kiosk doesn’t accept items purchased in store,” the screen announces.

Arrows on the floor point the way to the Buy Online Pickup In Store register. As patrons leave, they’re confronted with a sign that seems to encourage them to skip the sales floor altogether: “Want your fashion in a flash? Next time try Buy Online Pickup In Store. Fun, fast, free!”

On a recent Thursday, the afternoon shift at 18th Street started as it always does, with a team huddle. The human resources general manager, Nicole Salzman, asked for a round of applause for the associates of the month — “Yes, Lincoln!” someone called.

The metrics got a shout-out, too. Jasmine Ramos, a customer operations manager, reminded the associates of the targets for Customer Information Capture — signing people up to receive notifications for things like Today-Only specials. “We can do it!” someone said.

The huddle closed with everyone putting their hands in the middle.

“One, two, three, Greateenth!” everyone yelled.

“We always bring it into something positive and cheery,” Ms. Tecotl said.

The store director, Ms. Eyler, explained: “This store is known in the company as 18th Street, but we call it Greateenth because we’re great. And we expect greatness.”

Ms. Tecotl made the rounds, checking in with associates about new merchandise.

“I executed a minor move,” one of the children’s floor leads, Destyni Johnson, told Ms. Tecotl. A shipment of boys’ flex pants had arrived in new colors, Ms. Johnson explained, so she shifted a rack of bomber jackets “to bring symmetry back to the wall.” Ms. Tecotl approved.

By 5:30, after-work shoppers had swelled the checkout line. Ms. Salzman got out a stepladder and a megaphone to offer a special available only in-store.

“I’ve got snacks and jelly beans!” she shouted. “Who wants to play a game? First question, who is actually wearing Old Navy right now? Woo!” A man pulled open his coat to reveal a red fleece jacket.

Ms. Eyler handed out prizes — a bag of 10 jelly beans and a $1 coupon.

“Who can name all seven dwarfs?” Ms. Salzman asked. More answers, more prizes.

“All right, guys!” Ms. Salzman said. “Who can be the first one to high-five the person in line next to them?” A woman extended her hand to a man in a newsboy cap behind her.

“Who’s already started watching holiday movies?”

“Elf!” the high-five woman called out.

“Oh, that’s my favorite one!” Ms. Salzman said.

Shortly before 7, the line was building up again. Ms. Tecotl hopped on a register.

“I can take the following guest,” she said. She rang up a woman’s shoes and shirts and tried to interest her in an Old Navy credit card — “20 percent off your order if you get approved.” No thanks, the woman said. But she did agree to get her receipt by email: one more Customer Information Capture.

The jam at the registers was over. “And there, we got the line,” Ms. Tecotl said, and headed back to the sales floor.

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