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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 353)

The Streaming Era Has Finally Arrived. Everything Is About to Change.

LOS ANGELES — Every three decades, or roughly once a generation, Hollywood experiences a seismic shift. The transition from silent films to talkies in the 1920s. The rise of broadcast television in the 1950s. The raucous “I Want My MTV” cable boom of the 1980s.

It is happening again. The long-promised streaming revolution — the next great leap in how the world gets its entertainment — is finally here.

Streaming services, of course, have been challenging the Hollywood status quo for years. Netflix began streaming movies and television shows in 2007 and has grown into a giant, spending $12 billion on programming this year to entertain 166 million subscribers worldwide. There are 271 online video services available in the United States, according to the research firm Parks Associates, one for seemingly every predilection — Pongalo for telenovelas, AeroCinema for aviation documentaries, Shudder for horror movies, Horse Lifestyle for equine-themed content. (Offerings include a series called “Marvin the Tap Dancing Horse.”)

While all this was happening, however, the three biggest old-line media companies — Disney, NBCUniversal and WarnerMedia — largely stayed on the sidelines. Charging into the streaming fray would mean putting billions of dollars in profit from existing cable networks like USA, Disney Channel and TBS at risk. Building video platforms of the size needed to compete with Netflix and Amazon would be frightfully expensive. And mastering the underlying technology would require a sharp learning curve. Better to bide their time. When it became clear that protecting their existing business model was more perilous than embracing the future, no matter now disruptive in the near term, they would act.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157102929_88a61e60-dff5-43e4-b22f-fe5f3241eb81-articleLarge The Streaming Era Has Finally Arrived. Everything Is About to Change. Warner Media LLC Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming Television Netflix Inc Movies Disney Plus Apple Inc Amazon.com Inc

Netflix is spending $12 billion on programming this year to entertain 166 million subscribers worldwide.Credit…Hunter Kerhart for The New York Times

That time is now. And everything is changing.

“I get asked all the time, ‘Where does this stop? When does it stop?’” said Brett Sappington, a senior Parks Associates analyst and researcher. “The truth is that it is only getting started.”

Disney Plus arrived on Tuesday and costs less ($6.99 a month) than a single tub of popcorn at big-city movie theaters. It allows anyone with a high-speed internet connection to instantly watch Disney, Pixar, “Star Wars” and Marvel movies, along with original series and films, 30 seasons of “The Simpsons” and 7,500 episodes of old Disney-branded TV shows. “We’re all in,” Robert A. Iger, Disney’s chief executive, said in April at an event unveiling the service.

Disney said on Wednesday that more than 10 million people had already signed up for the service. Analysts had been hoping for eight million by the end of the year.

In May, WarnerMedia will introduce HBO Max ($14.99 a month), which will offer 10,000 hours of instant entertainment, including the entirety of “Friends” and “South Park,” hundreds of Warner Bros. movies, everything Batman, the HBO library, 50 years’ worth of “Sesame Street” episodes, and CNN documentaries. “We’re all in,” John Stankey, WarnerMedia’s chief executive, said at an HBO Max promotional event on Oct. 29.

Peacock, an NBCUniversal streaming service also scheduled for a spring debut, will offer 15,000 hours of content: complete seasons of “The Office” and “Frasier,” Universal films like “The Fast and the Furious” and “Despicable Me,” Telemundo shows, every episode of “Saturday Night Live,” a new reboot of “Battlestar Galactica.” Peacock, unlike Disney Plus and HBO Max, will carry advertising. NBCUniversal is expected to disclose pricing details (and presumably declare that it is “all in”) at an event of its own in the coming months.

As the Big Three entertainment companies launch their video platforms, streaming competition is mounting from Silicon Valley. Apple rolled out Apple TV Plus on Nov. 1. Facebook and Snapchat are determined to become bigger video forces. And never count out YouTube, part of the Google family. Feeling the need for more “quick bite” videos while standing in line at the grocery store? Quibi, a streaming start-up led by Meg Whitman and Jeffrey Katzenberg, is due in April.

The onslaught is upending how Hollywood does business in almost every way.

Instead of relying exclusively on middlemen (cable system operators, multiplex chains) to get shows and movies to viewers, traditional entertainment companies are for the first time selling content directly to consumers. As a result, studios are releasing fewer films in theaters; WarnerMedia said recently that “Superintelligence,” a Melissa McCarthy comedy scheduled for theatrical release in December, would instead debut in the spring — directly on HBO Max.

With more original movies bypassing big screens, the line between TV and film is blurring, prompting once-unthinkable operating questions. Studios, for instance, employ separate executive teams to oversee the development and production of movies and television series. Should that siloed approach end?

There has even been some muttering about whether the Emmys and the Oscars should merge.

So much change is suddenly happening so quickly that viewers are becoming overwhelmed and, studies suggest, not in a good way. For some people, the cable bundle is starting to seem downright manageable in comparison.

“Consumers are upset about the imminent changes in the media landscape,” consumer behavior researchers at the Langston Company, a Colorado consultancy, concluded in a September report. “These negative feelings are driven by fears of fragmentation, erosion of perceived value and the friction-cost of having multiple streaming accounts.”

Nearly 50 percent of consumers are frustrated by the growing number of subscription services required to see the content they want to watch, according to an August white paper by Fluent, a digital marketing company.

Without question, analysts say, the flood of new streaming services will cause more people to cancel traditional cable subscriptions. Cable television is still the entertainment industry’s cash cow, but millions of customers in the United States have already cut the cord. The annual pace of subscriber decline hit 5.4 percent in the second quarter, a statistic Craig Moffett, a senior analyst at MoffettNathanson, referred to in a recent report as “freaking ugly.”

For traditional companies like Disney and NBCUniversal, each of which run vast cable networks, that means reduced ad sales and harder negotiations with distributors over fees. “All signs point to subscriber losses continuing to accelerate,” Richard Greenfield, a founder of the LightShed Partners research firm, wrote in a client note. “Virtually every ambitious, must-see TV show is headed for a direct-to-consumer platform, with TV/basic cable taking the proverbial leftovers.”

Big cable channels like ESPN, Fox News, Bravo and HGTV aren’t going anywhere, but channels that are already poorly rated — BabyFirst, Ovation, Viceland — will have a harder time staying in business, analysts say. The culling of the herd has already started, with cable outlets like Cloo, Esquire, Pivot and Al Jazeera America calling it quits in recent years. Glenn Beck will pull the plug on his Blaze cable channel next month.

Even so, some of the biggest changes involve talent.

Netflix and other tech companies, including Apple and Amazon, have been steadily poaching writer-producers from established studios and television networks by offering eye-popping pay packages. Kenya Barris (“black-ish”), Ryan Murphy (“American Horror Story”), Shonda Rhimes (“Grey’s Anatomy”) and David Benioff and D.B. Weiss (“Game of Thrones”) have all high-tailed it to Netflix, following stars like Adam Sandler and David Letterman. The establishment has recently been punching back. To keep Greg Berlanti, the TV whiz behind shows like “The Flash” and “Riverdale,” Warner Bros. dug deep into its pockets. Warner completed a similar deal with J.J. Abrams in September.

“There is money being thrown at people and ideas and scripts at a level that has never happened before in Hollywood,” said Mr. Sappington, the Parks Associates analyst.

Even Netflix is starting to experience sticker shock. Ted Sarandos, the company’s chief content officer, told analysts on an October conference call that new bidders were driving up prices for “elite” content. “On a very competitive show, there has probably been 30 percent price escalation since last year,” Mr. Sarandos said.

Most definitely, streaming money is sloshing through the Hollywood economy. Producers in backwaters like children’s television are now in hot demand. Midlevel publicists are driving new luxury cars. Florists, caterers, set decorators, chauffeurs, hair stylists, headhunters — it’s gravy train time.

But fewer Hollywood people are turning cartwheels than outsiders might think. To keep their content assembly lines speeding (495 scripted original series aired in 2018, an 85 percent increase from 2011) companies are stretching some employees to a breaking point. Because streaming services order fewer episodes and cancel series after shorter runs, rank-and-file writers are having to switch jobs more frequently.

There is also a fundamental shift with employment contracts underway. Disney, for instance, has adopted new terms for TV shows. Under the old model, in place for decades, show creators were paid handsome fees from the beginning. But the big money came in success: a slice of profits from rerun sales. Disney, following a model popularized by Netflix, now offers higher upfront payments but little or no “back end.” Other traditional companies are doing the same; they say it allows for distribution flexibility inside their corporate ecosystems (broadcast, cable, streaming).

The shift has rankled members of the Writers Guild of America, which represents about 13,000 screenwriters and has been whispering about a potential strike. The W.G.A.’s contract with studios expires on May 1. Studio contracts with two additional Hollywood unions, SAG-AFTRA (actors) and the Directors Guild of America, expire on June 30.

Courtney Kemp, creator of the Starz drama “Power,” campaigned on the topic during September elections for the writers’ guild’s West Coast board. “The companies are looking actively to ‘buy us out’ up front, so they don’t have to share profits with us, and they don’t have to pay us for reuse — and they will never have to tell us the truth about the value of our content,” Ms. Kemp wrote in her campaign statement.

“They will own your intellectual property outright and forever,” Ms. Kemp continued. “As my 8-year-old daughter would say — no backsies. And that’s an issue worth striking over.”

Revolutions are not known for their tranquillity.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The White Nationalist Websites Cited by Stephen Miller

Westlake Legal Group 15dc-MILLER-facebookJumbo The White Nationalist Websites Cited by Stephen Miller United States Politics and Government The Camp of the Saints (Book) Southern Poverty Law Center Race and Ethnicity Peter Brimelow Miller, Stephen (1985- ) McHugh, Katie Jared Taylor Immigration and Emigration Coolidge, Calvin Breitbart News Network LLC

WASHINGTON — Peter Brimelow, the founder of the anti-immigration website VDARE, believes that diversity has weakened the United States, and that the increase in Spanish speakers is a “ferocious attack on the living standards of the American working class.”

Jared Taylor, the editor of the white nationalist magazine American Renaissance, is a self-described “white advocate” who has written that “newcomers are not the needy; they are the greedy.”

As a young Senate aide, Stephen Miller, President Trump’s chief immigration adviser, referred to the two sources while promoting his anti-immigration views, suggesting deeper intellectual ties to the world of white nationalism than previously known.

“The heart of where these guys differ from neoconservatives and Republican orthodoxy is basically: ‘What is the American nation and what is the nature of American nationhood?’” Lawrence Rosenthal, the chair and lead researcher at the Berkeley Center for Right-Wing Studies at the University of California, said in an interview.

“It’s not based on ‘We hold these truths to be self evident.’ It’s based on ‘What were the color of the people who wrote those words?’”

A cache of Mr. Miller’s emails obtained by the Southern Poverty Law Center and shared with The New York Times shows Mr. Miller’s interest in disseminating some of the views of Mr. Brimelow and Mr. Taylor and their writers with the help of allies at Breitbart News.

The law center has labeled VDARE a “hate website” for its ties to white nationalists and publication of race-based science, and the Anti-Defamation League calls American Renaissance a “white supremacist journal.” Both sites approvingly cite Calvin Coolidge’s support for a 1924 law that excluded immigrants from southern and Eastern Europe, and praise “The Camp of the Saints,” a 1973 French novel that popularizes the idea that Western civilization will fall at the hands of immigrants.

Mr. Miller had no comment on the emails. The White House, which has publicly denounced “bigotry” on Mr. Miller’s behalf and equated the law center’s report to libel, did not respond to a request for comment.

But Katie McHugh — the former Breitbart editor who leaked the messages, some 900 emails sent from March 2015 to June 2016 — said in an interview last week that “it’s easy to draw a clear line from the white supremacist websites where he is getting his ideas to current immigration policy.”

Ms. McHugh was fired in 2017 for posting anti-Muslim tweets. She has since renounced white nationalist viewpoints and shared her emails with the Southern Poverty Law Center to “make amends,” Michael Hayden, the law center reporter with whom she initially shared the messages, said in an interview.

Cas Mudde, a political scientist at the University of Georgia who studies right-wing movements, said in an email that “both VDARE and American Renaissance are white nationalist organizations, who provide a pseudo-intellectual veneer to classic racism.”

Mr. Miller’s familiarity with white nationalist thinking predated his job as a staff aide to Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama. As a college student at Duke University, he worked with a fellow student, the white nationalist Richard Spencer, to arrange for Mr. Brimelow to speak on campus.

The emails show a continued interest after his arrival in Washington. In the emails to Breitbart, a topic Mr. Miller referred to more than once was the Coolidge-era immigration law, which ushered in 40 years of lowered immigration levels with discriminatory quotas aimed at southern and Eastern Europeans, whom critics at the time attacked as nonwhite.

On Aug. 4, 2015, Mr. Miller sent an email supporting the idea of a complete ban on immigration “like Coolidge did,” an apparent reference to the 1924 law. As a result of those new “national origin quotas,” immigration fell by half and the arrival of Italians and Poles fell by 90 percent. Mr. Sessions, Mr. Miller’s boss at the time, was known for publicly praising Coolidge’s policies because he believed they had bolstered American wages.

The 1924 law endorsed by Coolidge is widely seen today as a symbol of bigotry and was heavily influenced by the eugenics movement and theories that immigrants from Eastern and southern Europe were genetically inferior.

Coolidge “embraced the so-called scientific argument that Italians and Eastern Europeans were genetically inferior,” Daniel Okrent, whose book “The Guarded Gate” is a history of the 1924 law. The law was disturbing, he said, not only because of the theories behind it but also because it prevented hundreds of thousands of would-be migrants from escaping the Nazis.

“Those people could have lived if they hadn’t locked the door,” Mr. Okrent said.

Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies, whose work Mr. Miller has often referred to in White House policy discussions, said that Coolidge had a “complicated” legacy. “He reached the right result” — meaning low immigration — “but in the wrong way.”

But a recent article by Jerry Kammer of the immigration studies center, which advocates restricting immigration, says Coolidge behaved in an “odious” fashion in embracing the national origin quotas. In an interview, Mr. Kammer said citing Coolidge as a lodestar for the restrictionist movement was “an unfortunate and unwise and highly dubious association.”

“I think Stephen Miller has taken legitimate concerns about immigration to illegitimate extremes when he ties it to ethnicity and nationality,” he said.

In his communications with Breitbart, Mr. Miller does not explicitly endorse the national origin quotas, but praises Coolidge and his legacy.

He complains that “something tells me there’s not a Calvin Coolidge exhibit” at an expanding immigration museum. On June 2, 2015, he wrote that Immigration Heritage Month “would seem a good opportunity to remind people about the heritage established by Calvin Coolidge, which covers four decades of the 20th century,” an apparent reference to the period between 1924 and 1965 when immigration quotas were in effect.

There are dozens of references to the Coolidge era on American Renaissance.

In one email to Ms. McHugh, Mr. Miller writes approvingly about “The Camp of the Saints.” Chelsea Stieber, a specialist in French literature at Catholic University, said the approving reference is disturbing because the book makes the case against migration in explicitly racial terms.

“In white nationalist circles, it invokes the theory of the Great Replacement and the fall of the white West,” she said, referring to the theory that white civilization will be overrun by dark-skinned invaders from the developing world.

Ms. McHugh recalled a phone conversation in July 2015 in which Mr. Miller called her to discuss an article he had read on “AmRen.”

The article, “New D.O.J. Statistics on Race and Violent Crime,” was by Mr. Taylor, who noted that the Justice Department had begun reporting Latinos in a separate category on crime statistics “rather than lumping them in with whites.”

Mr. Taylor also wrote that the department had “long counted Hispanics as a victim category in its hate crime reports.”

“We look forward to their inclusion as a perpetrator category,” he added.

While Mr. Miller has long pushed the idea that immigration increases crime, decades of evidence suggest otherwise.

In an interview, Mr. Taylor said he did not know Mr. Miller personally and had never met him. Still, Mr. Taylor suggested that the kind of material Mr. Miller wanted to read about immigration policies did not exist on mainstream media sites.

“People with inquiring minds have to look elsewhere,” Mr. Taylor said, disputing the idea that he is a white supremacist, “and more power to those who have inquiring minds.”

Mr. Brimelow said his visit to Duke was the only time he and Mr. Miller had met. Mr. Miller also arranged for Peter Laufer, an author who wrote a book arguing for open borders with Mexico, to visit and debate Mr. Brimelow.

Mr. Laufer recalled sitting with Mr. Miller, Mr. Spencer and Mr. Brimelow before the debate and realizing that he had been invited to be “knocked down” for his beliefs.

“There is no question that these people were learning from each other, feeding off each other, and in concert in these viewpoints,” Mr. Laufer said.

Much of the emails’ content can be seen as foreshadowing the course that the Trump administration has taken under the influence of Mr. Miller. The nostalgia for Coolidge and all-white, northern European immigration of the past was echoed in Mr. Trump’s famous denunciation of immigrants from “shithole countries” and his calls for more Norwegians.

In a report on the administration’s proposed “public charge rule,” the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute concluded that it would shift migration away from Mexico and Central America and move it “toward other world regions, especially Europe.”

The central theme of “The Camp of the Saints,” another work Mr. Miller referred to in his communications with Breitbart, is that immigrants seek to exploit Western societies’ kindness — that a welcoming ethos is itself a threat.

That is a theme that Mr. Trump has advertised at mass rallies with his recitation of “The Snake,” a poem that he has turned into a parable of refugee treachery about a kindly woman who takes in a wounded reptile and is repaid with a venomous bite:

“I saved you,” cried that woman.
“And you’ve bitten me even, why?
“You know your bite is poisonous and now I’m going to die.”
“Oh shut up, silly woman,” said the reptile with a grin.
“You knew damn well I was a snake before you took me in.”

With Mr. Miller taking the lead, refugee admissions during the Trump administration have fallen by nearly three-quarters, to the lowest level since the modern program began in 1980.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

The Streaming Era Has Finally Arrived. Everything Is About to Change.

LOS ANGELES — Every three decades, or roughly once a generation, Hollywood experiences a seismic shift. The transition from silent films to talkies in the 1920s. The rise of broadcast television in the 1950s. The raucous “I Want My MTV” cable boom of the 1980s.

It is happening again. The long-promised streaming revolution — the next great leap in how the world gets its entertainment — is finally here.

Streaming services, of course, have been challenging the Hollywood status quo for years. Netflix began streaming movies and television shows in 2007 and has grown into a giant, spending $12 billion on programming this year to entertain 166 million subscribers worldwide. There are 271 online video services available in the United States, according to the research firm Parks Associates, one for seemingly every predilection — Pongalo for telenovelas, AeroCinema for aviation documentaries, Shudder for horror movies, Horse Lifestyle for equine-themed content. (Offerings include a series called “Marvin the Tap Dancing Horse.”)

While all this was happening, however, the three biggest old-line media companies — Disney, NBCUniversal and WarnerMedia — largely stayed on the sidelines. Charging into the streaming fray would mean putting billions of dollars in profit from existing cable networks like USA, Disney Channel and TBS at risk. Building video platforms of the size needed to compete with Netflix and Amazon would be frightfully expensive. And mastering the underlying technology would require a sharp learning curve. Better to bide their time. When it became clear that protecting their existing business model was more perilous than embracing the future, no matter now disruptive in the near term, they would act.

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_157102929_88a61e60-dff5-43e4-b22f-fe5f3241eb81-articleLarge The Streaming Era Has Finally Arrived. Everything Is About to Change. Warner Media LLC Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming Television Netflix Inc Movies Disney Plus Apple Inc Amazon.com Inc

Netflix is spending $12 billion on programming this year to entertain 166 million subscribers worldwide.Credit…Hunter Kerhart for The New York Times

That time is now. And everything is changing.

“I get asked all the time, ‘Where does this stop? When does it stop?’” said Brett Sappington, a senior Parks Associates analyst and researcher. “The truth is that it is only getting started.”

Disney Plus arrived on Tuesday and costs less ($6.99 a month) than a single tub of popcorn at big-city movie theaters. It allows anyone with a high-speed internet connection to instantly watch Disney, Pixar, “Star Wars” and Marvel movies, along with original series and films, 30 seasons of “The Simpsons” and 7,500 episodes of old Disney-branded TV shows. “We’re all in,” Robert A. Iger, Disney’s chief executive, said in April at an event unveiling the service.

Disney said on Wednesday that more than 10 million people had already signed up for the service. Analysts had been hoping for eight million by the end of the year.

In May, WarnerMedia will introduce HBO Max ($14.99 a month), which will offer 10,000 hours of instant entertainment, including the entirety of “Friends” and “South Park,” hundreds of Warner Bros. movies, everything Batman, the HBO library, 50 years’ worth of “Sesame Street” episodes, and CNN documentaries. “We’re all in,” John Stankey, WarnerMedia’s chief executive, said at an HBO Max promotional event on Oct. 29.

Peacock, an NBCUniversal streaming service also scheduled for a spring debut, will offer 15,000 hours of content: complete seasons of “The Office” and “Frasier,” Universal films like “The Fast and the Furious” and “Despicable Me,” Telemundo shows, every episode of “Saturday Night Live,” a new reboot of “Battlestar Galactica.” Peacock, unlike Disney Plus and HBO Max, will carry advertising. NBCUniversal is expected to disclose pricing details (and presumably declare that it is “all in”) at an event of its own in the coming months.

As the Big Three entertainment companies launch their video platforms, streaming competition is mounting from Silicon Valley. Apple rolled out Apple TV Plus on Nov. 1. Facebook and Snapchat are determined to become bigger video forces. And never count out YouTube, part of the Google family. Feeling the need for more “quick bite” videos while standing in line at the grocery store? Quibi, a streaming start-up led by Meg Whitman and Jeffrey Katzenberg, is due in April.

The onslaught is upending how Hollywood does business in almost every way.

Instead of relying exclusively on middlemen (cable system operators, multiplex chains) to get shows and movies to viewers, traditional entertainment companies are for the first time selling content directly to consumers. As a result, studios are releasing fewer films in theaters; WarnerMedia said recently that “Superintelligence,” a Melissa McCarthy comedy scheduled for theatrical release in December, would instead debut in the spring — directly on HBO Max.

With more original movies bypassing big screens, the line between TV and film is blurring, prompting once-unthinkable operating questions. Studios, for instance, employ separate executive teams to oversee the development and production of movies and television series. Should that siloed approach end?

There has even been some muttering about whether the Emmys and the Oscars should merge.

So much change is suddenly happening so quickly that viewers are becoming overwhelmed and, studies suggest, not in a good way. For some people, the cable bundle is starting to seem downright manageable in comparison.

“Consumers are upset about the imminent changes in the media landscape,” consumer behavior researchers at the Langston Company, a Colorado consultancy, concluded in a September report. “These negative feelings are driven by fears of fragmentation, erosion of perceived value and the friction-cost of having multiple streaming accounts.”

Nearly 50 percent of consumers are frustrated by the growing number of subscription services required to see the content they want to watch, according to an August white paper by Fluent, a digital marketing company.

Without question, analysts say, the flood of new streaming services will cause more people to cancel traditional cable subscriptions. Cable television is still the entertainment industry’s cash cow, but millions of customers in the United States have already cut the cord. The annual pace of subscriber decline hit 5.4 percent in the second quarter, a statistic Craig Moffett, a senior analyst at MoffettNathanson, referred to in a recent report as “freaking ugly.”

For traditional companies like Disney and NBCUniversal, each of which run vast cable networks, that means reduced ad sales and harder negotiations with distributors over fees. “All signs point to subscriber losses continuing to accelerate,” Richard Greenfield, a founder of the LightShed Partners research firm, wrote in a client note. “Virtually every ambitious, must-see TV show is headed for a direct-to-consumer platform, with TV/basic cable taking the proverbial leftovers.”

Big cable channels like ESPN, Fox News, Bravo and HGTV aren’t going anywhere, but channels that are already poorly rated — BabyFirst, Ovation, Viceland — will have a harder time staying in business, analysts say. The culling of the herd has already started, with cable outlets like Cloo, Esquire, Pivot and Al Jazeera America calling it quits in recent years. Glenn Beck will pull the plug on his Blaze cable channel next month.

Even so, some of the biggest changes involve talent.

Netflix and other tech companies, including Apple and Amazon, have been steadily poaching writer-producers from established studios and television networks by offering eye-popping pay packages. Kenya Barris (“black-ish”), Ryan Murphy (“American Horror Story”), Shonda Rhimes (“Grey’s Anatomy”) and David Benioff and D.B. Weiss (“Game of Thrones”) have all high-tailed it to Netflix, following stars like Adam Sandler and David Letterman. The establishment has recently been punching back. To keep Greg Berlanti, the TV whiz behind shows like “The Flash” and “Riverdale,” Warner Bros. dug deep into its pockets. Warner completed a similar deal with J.J. Abrams in September.

“There is money being thrown at people and ideas and scripts at a level that has never happened before in Hollywood,” said Mr. Sappington, the Parks Associates analyst.

Even Netflix is starting to experience sticker shock. Ted Sarandos, the company’s chief content officer, told analysts on an October conference call that new bidders were driving up prices for “elite” content. “On a very competitive show, there has probably been 30 percent price escalation since last year,” Mr. Sarandos said.

Most definitely, streaming money is sloshing through the Hollywood economy. Producers in backwaters like children’s television are now in hot demand. Midlevel publicists are driving new luxury cars. Florists, caterers, set decorators, chauffeurs, hair stylists, headhunters — it’s gravy train time.

But fewer Hollywood people are turning cartwheels than outsiders might think. To keep their content assembly lines speeding (495 scripted original series aired in 2018, an 85 percent increase from 2011) companies are stretching some employees to a breaking point. Because streaming services order fewer episodes and cancel series after shorter runs, rank-and-file writers are having to switch jobs more frequently.

There is also a fundamental shift with employment contracts underway. Disney, for instance, has adopted new terms for TV shows. Under the old model, in place for decades, show creators were paid handsome fees from the beginning. But the big money came in success: a slice of profits from rerun sales. Disney, following a model popularized by Netflix, now offers higher upfront payments but little or no “back end.” Other traditional companies are doing the same; they say it allows for distribution flexibility inside their corporate ecosystems (broadcast, cable, streaming).

The shift has rankled members of the Writers Guild of America, which represents about 13,000 screenwriters and has been whispering about a potential strike. The W.G.A.’s contract with studios expires on May 1. Studio contracts with two additional Hollywood unions, SAG-AFTRA (actors) and the Directors Guild of America, expire on June 30.

Courtney Kemp, creator of the Starz drama “Power,” campaigned on the topic during September elections for the writers’ guild’s West Coast board. “The companies are looking actively to ‘buy us out’ up front, so they don’t have to share profits with us, and they don’t have to pay us for reuse — and they will never have to tell us the truth about the value of our content,” Ms. Kemp wrote in her campaign statement.

“They will own your intellectual property outright and forever,” Ms. Kemp continued. “As my 8-year-old daughter would say — no backsies. And that’s an issue worth striking over.”

Revolutions are not known for their tranquillity.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Many Native Americans Can’t Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Westlake Legal Group watertribe2_custom-0fc3c60c18dd8dd72b2eeb21ed001dd0b2dd6ebc-s1100-c15 Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie typically hauls water from a windmill 5 miles from her house for her sheep. Officials tell her it’s unsafe for humans but OK for livestock. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Westlake Legal Group  Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie typically hauls water from a windmill 5 miles from her house for her sheep. Officials tell her it’s unsafe for humans but OK for livestock.

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For many people, turning on the tap or flushing the toilet is something we take for granted. But a report released Monday, called “Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States,” shows that more than 2 million Americans live without these conveniences and that Native Americans are more likely to have trouble accessing water than any other group.

The nearest water station for Darlene Yazzie is 9 miles away at the Dennehotso Chapter House — a community center — in the Four Corners region of the Navajo Nation. On Tuesday, she counted her dimes and nickels to pay for water. It costs $1.10 plus gas money to fill up two 50-gallon barrels, and she has just been told the price is going up next month.

Yazzie lugged a T-shaped key as tall as her out to the well, where she dropped it down into the hole and turned the crank to open the valve.

Water gushed into the plastic barrel. A cool mist from a leak in the hose rained over her. This is Yazzie’s drinking water. For her animals, she usually drives to a windmill, but on this day it was empty and the sheep were thirsty.

“There’s no water in the windmill,” Yazzie said. “It’s dry because it’s not blowing. The only way they have water is if it’s blowing.”

Yazzie said the windmill water isn’t safe for humans anyway. Officials told her arsenic and uranium levels are too high. Yazzie and many others give the water to their animals, even though they plan to eat them.

“A lot of people died of cancer around here,” Yazzie said. “I noticed that more are being diagnosed. I’m pretty sure it’s because of the environment and the water.”

The groundwater in some areas has been contaminated by the 521 abandoned uranium mines. The new report, by DigDeep and the U.S. Water Alliance, says gastric cancer rates doubled in the 1990s where uranium mining occurred. Unregulated drinking water sources are the greatest public health risk on the Navajo Nation, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Westlake Legal Group image_2_custom-1225d5260d567d3f0ee97d13657af871f834453d-s800-c15 Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie, a retired community health worker, says hauling water, firewood and trash, as well as using an outhouse, are just a few of the things that make life hard on the Navajo Nation. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Westlake Legal Group  Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie, a retired community health worker, says hauling water, firewood and trash, as well as using an outhouse, are just a few of the things that make life hard on the Navajo Nation.

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Fifty-eight out of every 1,000 Native American households lack plumbing, compared with three out of every 1,000 white people, according to the report. This disparity has implications for public health. They experience more deaths, poverty and higher unemployment rates.

“We knew the problem was much bigger, but when we went out to look at the data, it didn’t exist,” said George McGraw, the founder of DigDeep, a nonprofit that has helped build water systems on the Navajo Nation. “No one could tell us, from federal to state agencies to other nonprofits, just how many Americans still don’t have running water or a working toilet where they live.”

So McGraw commissioned experts from around the U.S. to piece together the data they did have and come up with the water gap report. What he found was that race is the strongest predictor of water and sanitation access.

A century ago, water-borne illnesses were a leading cause of death. The U.S. government invested in modern water and sanitation systems and nearly eradicated those diseases. But some communities were passed over.

“Our nations didn’t have access to funding for infrastructure in the same way that it’s federally allocated for cities and states overall,” said Mahrinah von Schlegel, an anthropologist from San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico.

She said that in the Southwest, it’s expensive to build pipelines across such remote sparsely populated tribal nations.

“It’s been a struggle, one, to get the access to that infrastructure capital, and then, two, it’s really expensive to develop some of these remote areas,” von Schlegel said.

In Mexican Water, the next town over from Dennehotso, Richard Nelson helped his elderly mother haul water.

Nelson has been asking community leaders when his mom is going to get clean running water.

“A chapter official told me, ‘Yeah, we’re going to have running water,’ ” Nelson said. ” ‘We’re going to start laying the pipe.’ It took another two whole years to do the piping system. Then they said we’re going to have water in a year. And that was two years ago.”

Today federal funding for water infrastructure is a small percentage of what it once was. Across the country, 44 million people are served by water systems that recently had Safe Drinking Water Act violations. The Indian Health Service estimated that it would cost $200 million to provide basic water and sanitation access on the Navajo Nation.

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Hong Kong Protests: Campus Under Siege as Mask Ban Is Overturned

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_164602680_86dc06b7-7b44-4d37-9c8c-2c91f428c4b6-articleLarge Hong Kong Protests: Campus Under Siege as Mask Ban Is Overturned Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Colleges and Universities

Protesters inside Hong Kong Polytechnic University on Monday.

Police officers on Monday cornered hundreds of student protesters who occupied a Hong Kong university, offering the demonstrators one way out: drop your weapons and surrender or be met with a hail of tear gas and rubber bullets.

For days, the protesters have held the police off from entering the campus of Hong Kong Polytechnic University, fortifying their holdout with homemade fire bombs, giant sling shots, bricks and bows and arrows.

At least 38 people were injured in a protracted battle at the university on Sunday, the city’s Hospital Authority said, after a bloody battle in which a police officer was struck by an arrow and demonstrators set a police van on fire.

As other protests raged across the city, Hong Kong’s High Court on Monday struck down a contentious ban on the wearing of face masks in public. The court found that the ban, enacted in October, violated the territory’s mini-constitution, know as the Basic Law.

By The New York Times

Running out of weapons and supplies, protesters at PolyU on Monday sought to flee the campus, only to find all of their routes blocked by a cordon of heavily armed riot police officers and a hailstorm of tear gas and rubber bullets.

The students on Monday afternoon tried unsuccessfully to rush a police cordon only to be pushed back into the campus. Despite running out of options, the students fear that following police instructions to “drop their weapons” and leave through one designated exit will result in their arrest.

The protesters, many of them university and high school students, have occupied the campus for a week. On Sunday night and well into Monday morning they clashed with the police in one of the most violent confrontations in months of conflict.

At least 500 protesters remained on campus by Monday afternoon, after the police tried to enter the campus that morning but were pushed back.

Westlake Legal Group Sequence-06-articleLarge Hong Kong Protests: Campus Under Siege as Mask Ban Is Overturned Hong Kong Protests (2019) Hong Kong Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Colleges and Universities

Six Months of Hong Kong Protests. How Did We Get Here?

The protests started as peaceful marches and rallies against an unpopular bill. Then came dozens of rounds of tear gas and a government that refused to back down.

Conditions on the campus have grown increasingly desperate with injured protesters unable to receive treatment, Owan Li, a student council member, told reporters. Student leaders said protesters suffered eye injuries and hypothermia after being struck by a stinging dye shot from a police water cannon.

Areas near the university had the feel of a battle zone, with streets engulfed by tear gas and fires.

Scores were arrested by the police on Monday morning near the university. A large group of people were seen seated outside a hotel in the Tsim Sha Tsui district of Kowloon, their hands zip-tied behind their backs.

It was unclear if the bulk of the arrestees were protesters trying to flee the campus or allies responding to calls for help evacuating protesters.

The police said 154 people were arrested over the weekend, bringing the total number of arrests to 4,491 since the protests started in June.

The city’s High Court on Monday struck down a ban on wearing face masks in public, issuing a blow to the local government’s ability to characterize the ongoing protests as a situation that requires the invocation of emergency powers.

The ban, which was enacted in October, quickly inflamed tensions in the city and set off a series of violent clashes. The city’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, imposed the ban without seeking legislative approval by invoking powers granted under the rarely used Emergency Regulations Ordinance, or E.R.O.

In its ruling, the court said the ban violated the city’s mini-constitution, known as the Basic Law, because it was too vague and endangered the ability of the Legislative Council, or LegCo, to make the territory’s laws.

“The E.R.O. is so wide in its scope, the conferment of powers so complete, its conditions for invocation so uncertain and subjective, the regulations made thereunder invested with such primacy, and the control by the LegCo so precarious, that we believe it is not compatible with the constitutional order laid down by the Basic Law,” the court said in its ruling.

Masks have been worn by protesters since the early days of the movement, as a way for protesters to conceal their identities and protect themselves from the pepper spray and tear gas routinely deployed by the police. Many protesters saw the law a pretext that would allow officers to arrest nonviolent demonstrators in order to discourage people from joining the street actions.

Austin Ramzy and Tiffany May contributed reporting.

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Eric Shawn: I know where Jimmy Hoffa is buried (and who killed him)

Editor’s note: To watch all of the Fox Nation special  “Riddle: The Search for James R. Hoffa,”  anchored by Fox New’s Eric Shawn, go to Fox Nation and sign up today.

He says he has been carrying the secret for five years and finally wants it out.

“I know where Jimmy Hoffa is buried, absolutely” says Phillip Moscato, Jr. He also says he knows who killed him: mob hitman Salvatore ‘Sally Bugs’ Briguglio.

“‘Sally Bugs’ is the one who pulled the trigger in Detroit.”

Phil is the son of Hoffa suspect Phillip “Brother” Moscato, Sr., a Genovese crime family powerhouse in New Jersey who died of liver cancer in 2014 at the age of 79. Phil told Fox Nation in an exclusive interview that not only did his father reveal that his close childhood friend and fellow Genovese mobster “Sally Bugs” shot the iconic labor leader, but that his Dad also told him where the body ended up.

“I am the only person who knows the location of his final resting place,” he told Fox Nation. “He is there, I believe one hundred million percent, I know it is.”

Federal investigators have long stated that Hoffa was murdered in Detroit when he disappeared on July 30th, 1975, and reported transported to New Jersey by the Genovese crime family mobsters responsible for his killing. It is believed that he was buried in the large dump that Moscato’s father owned in Jersey City, the PJP Landfill, known as “Moscato’s dump.” But Phil says that after one of his father’s mafia cohorts flipped and cooperated with the F.B.I. in November of 1975, four months after Hoffa vanished, the body was moved so that authorities would not discover it. The remains have yet to be found.

Phil’s father, known as “Brother,” took the Fifth before the federal grand jury probing Hoffa’s disappearance. He was a multi-millionaire New Jersey and Florida restaurant owner who also served as a major Garden State mobster. A 1972 FBI Report described him as “one of the top loan sharks in Hudson and Bergen county New Jersey…An LCN (La Cosa Nostra) Member and labor racketeer, reputed to be a ‘hitman.'”

More from Opinion

Moscato, Sr. was close to Anthony ‘Tony Pro’ Provenzano, who federal prosecutors have said orchestrated Hoffa’s disappearance. ‘Tony Pro’ was a notorious Genovese family New Jersey Capo who also served as president of the Jersey City Teamsters Union Local 560. He held a long-standing personal animus toward Hoffa that centered on money, and his Mafia bosses opposed Hoffa’s attempts to regain the presidency of the Teamsters Union.

Westlake Legal Group c6468fbb-Hoffa-Philip-Moscato-Fox-Nation Eric Shawn: I know where Jimmy Hoffa is buried (and who killed him) fox-news/us/crime fox-news/us fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/opinion fnc fc791078-2bbd-57d8-b371-0bc7d6263170 Eric Shawn article

​Phillip Moscato (the man who made the deathbed confession to his son, Phillip Jr,). Moscato later spoke with Fox News’ Eric Shawn. ​

Phil says Provenzano ordered that Hoffa’s body be brought back to New Jersey “as a trophy.”

“‘Tony Pro’ is the one who put it all together. He is the one who wanted the body brought back to New Jersey, that is why the body was brought back here. The thing between all of them was, the body comes back to Jersey. It was a Jersey thing, and there’s a Jersey guy is in control now. keep him close, keep him where we can see him. It kind of sounds like a sick thing, but that’s the way it was. It was a control-type deal. Kind of like a trophy. He wanted him in Jersey, and that was his trophy, and he wanted everybody to understand. That’s how it went down back then.”

Phil related his stunning story in an exclusive Fox Nation interview for a new episode of “Riddle, The Search for James R. Hoffa,” and my Fox News Channel reporting on the case. He explains that his father finally decided to come clean toward the end of his life, on the day he was discharged from the Jersey Shore Medical Center in Neptune, New Jersey, to go home for hospice care in 2014.

“He was a tough guy, one of the toughest guys to ever come out of Jersey City,” says Phil. “He was a straight-up, old-school mobster.”

“He was going out of his way. He wanted to be home with my mother, with my family, it was probably the scariest day of my life.”

Phil says when his mother Angela went to the hospital cafeteria to bring back some lunch, his father took the moment to reveal what he knew to his son. As they sat together on the hospital bed, back to back because of his dad’s back problems, he says his father slipped him the secrets.

Westlake Legal Group Hoffa-Salvatore-Briguglio-Fox-Nation Eric Shawn: I know where Jimmy Hoffa is buried (and who killed him) fox-news/us/crime fox-news/us fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/opinion fnc fc791078-2bbd-57d8-b371-0bc7d6263170 Eric Shawn article

Salvatore Briguglio, center, smiles as he waits to enter the lobby of the Oakland County Jail in Pontiac, Mich., Dec. 6, 1975 where he was to appear in a court ordered lineup in connection with the disappearance of James R. Hoffa. Thomas Andretta, left, was also to appear in the lineup. (AP Photo)

“My mother goes and leaves and he says, ‘I’ve got a few things I want to talk to you about,’ and I’m thinking take care of your mother, I’m going to hear all that, and is there anything financial that I have to take care of, we spoke about things of this sort and then he drops a bombshell on me. He says I have something I want to tell you and I want you to listen real good. He says, ‘I need to tell you the location of where Jimmy Hoffa is buried.’ I’m like, ‘what do you mean you’re going to tell me the location?’  He says ‘I’m going to tell you where Jimmy Hoffa is buried,’ and he told me. He gave me the location of where Jimmy Hoffa is buried.”

It took several years for Phil to process and fully absorb what his father told him, to put the pieces together and then become comfortable with sharing it. He finally decided to come forward earlier this year after watching a television news segment that I anchored on the Fox News Channel about our Hoffa investigation. He contacted me on Facebook. The segment that he watched featured former Fox News Producer Ed Barnes, with whom I worked on our investigation, and noted Washington, D.C. investigative journalist and author  Dan Moldea, who is considered the most prominent Hoffa expert in the country, debating Hoffa’s fate.

Moldea, who started on the Hoffa beat in 1974 and went on to write the landmark book “The Hoffa Wars” in 1978, first interviewed Phil’s father in 2007 and had earned the family’s trust through the years. Moldea then teamed up with us on our Fox Nation investigation.

“He was a stand-up guy,” says Moldea of Moscasto, Sr.

“Hoffa is killed in Detroit, (and) loaded into a 55-gallon drum and taken to New Jersey. Moscato confirmed to me that Hoffa’s body was brought back to New Jersey.

Moscato, Sr. told Moldea “They said that me and Sal Briguglio buried Hoffa in my dump…brought the truck in and Hoffa was in there and we buried him.”

Westlake Legal Group Hoffa-SAL-BRIGUGLIO-2-Fox-Nation-1 Eric Shawn: I know where Jimmy Hoffa is buried (and who killed him) fox-news/us/crime fox-news/us fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/opinion fnc fc791078-2bbd-57d8-b371-0bc7d6263170 Eric Shawn article

Sal Briguglio/Fox Nation

However, he refused to tell Moldea where Hoffa’s remains apparently then ended up after being moved out of his dump.

In November of 1975 a member of ‘Tony Pro’s’ crew, Ralph Picardo, tipped off the F.B.I. about Hoffa’s murder and suggested that he was buried in “Moscato’s dump.” That news seemingly prompted the mobsters to move the body to another location before the Feds could discover it.

“Once they hear that Ralph Picardo is talking and informing, and actually locating Brother Moscato’s dump as the site of the body, which it was at that point, that the whole Provenzano crew decided to go ‘red alert’ to get the body out of there,” says Moldea.

Picardo’s son, Ralph Picardo, Jr. told me that his father told the truth about the murder.

“I am confident in what he said,” Picardo told me. “There is an overwhelming possibility the remains will be found…the chances are getting better with the passage of time.”

The bureau searched the dump but came up empty, a not unsurprising result considering if the body had already been moved. In fact, Briguglio was so brazen that he two of the other suspects, his brother Gabe and Thomas Andretta, put up a $10,000 reward to “anyone who unearthed Hoffa’s corpse” in the dump, money they knew would never have to be paid out because the remains were no longer there.

Some F.B.I. and Department of Justice officials have stated that Briguglio was the shooter, but prosecutors were unable to make a case against him by the time he was shot to death in a suspected mob rub-out on Mulberry Street in Manhattan’s Little Italy in 1978, three years after Hoffa disappeared. The killing remains unsolved.

“‘Sally Bugs,’ yes…was the one,” says Phil. “It was a Sal Briguglio hit…I remember Sally from when I was a little kid.”

A 1976 U.S. Federal Strike Force Memo stated: “Briguglio was given the actual assignment and, thereafter, he notified the interested parties of its successful completion on the evening of 7/30/75 either personally or through a third party.”

The Department of Justice report also said that Briguglio was trying to get his hands on a backhoe, presumably to bury Hoffa. The memo says Briguglio and two unidentified men “found themselves urgently in need of a backhoe on Thursday morning (7/31/75),” which happened to be the day after Hoffa disappeared.

“An informant advised a Strike Force Attorney in Newark that Briguglio had borrowed a backhoe around the time of Hoffa’s disappearance.” The memo, which is heavily redacted, indicates that the backhoe appeared to have been borrowed from the nearby Orlando Construction Company. The president of Orlando Construction had been identified as Thomas Principe, a “reputed high ranking member of the powerful Genovese crime family.’

Phil would not reveal the exact location where his father said Hoffa’s remains were buried, but our Fox Nation investigation turned up two potential spots in the New Jersey Meadowlands, the traditional burial ground for Mafia victims, that could be possibilities.

One is now a paved-over parking lot, the other a plot of abandoned land. While we are continuing to investigate the parking lot location, and have reports of yet another site, the vacant plot of land in Carlstadt, New Jersey, alongside the Hackensack River raises questions. That address is 200 Outwater Lane, a parcel that just happens to have an historic mob provenance. The former boss of the Genovese crime family’s New Jersey operations, John DiGillio, was found dumped there in a body bag in 1988 and there have been rumors that Jimmy Hoffa is buried there too.

The address was used as a marina for years, and it has a troubled past. A 1982 Carlstadt police report described 200 Outwater as “tantamount to a western shoot-out movie…with larceny, rape, theft, explosion, arson, burglary.”

The president of Riverview Associates, a company that bought the land in 1988, Alfred Porro, was a lawyer who represented many of the local reputed mobsters in business dealings, including Phil’s father. Porro and others told us that there had been talk that Hoffa was possibly buried there at the time.

The site was not being used in November of 1975, when Hoffa’s corpse could have potentially been transported there. Sources say the parking lot was not paved back then, and that it was loosely covered with stones and shingles. The land is now the location of a closed night club and golf driving range that is for sale.

Phil refuses to confirm 200 Outwater Lane as the location where his father told him that Hoffa was buried, or if the site is the other location that Fox Nation has identified in the Meadowlands nearby. He says that he is waiting for further confirmation of a few more details that would corroborate his father’s information before going public. When he does, he says that he will tell what he knows to law enforcement authorities in a sworn affidavit so they can start a dig looking for Hoffa’s remains.

Interest in the Hoffa disappearance has been heightened with the release of the Netflix film “The Irishman,” which is based on the claim of Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran, who claimed he killed Hoffa. I met Sheeran in 2001 and he told me that he shot Hoffa in the head with a .22 caliber handgun, in a house in Detroit.

In 2004 I led the Fox News team that found blood on the floor of that house, in a pattern that matched Sheeran’s story. The F.B.I. confirmed that 28 drops that we found on the floorboards were human blood, but the bureau was only able to extract DNA from one sample, and determined that it came from “an unidentified male,” not from Hoffa. Authorities deemed Sheeran’s story “unfounded.”

For years I believed Sheeran, but then the new information emerged about what may have happened. As an investigative journalist, I have to follow every new lead, even those that conflict with my previous findings and contradict my conclusions. 

Phil and others say that Seerhan’s story is not just unfounded, but an outright fabrication.

“Frank Sheeran is full of s***”, ” Phil told Fox Nation. “He doesn’t know what he’s talking about. It doesn’t add up. I’m not here to hurt nobody, but I want the real story to be told for the Hoffa family.”

A variety of former law enforcement officials who investigated Hoffa’s disappearance have also recently come forward to claim that Sheeran’s story is false.

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Even the Mafia doesn’t buy his tale.

“The man that killed Jimmy Hoffa was Sal Briguglio, he was the triggerman,” says former Philadelphia Mob Boss Ralph Natale, whose book is “Last Don Standing,” details his days running the Mafia in the city of brotherly love in the 1990’s.

Natale told Fox Nation that Sheeran “did nothing. His whole life was a lie. He didn’t kill him, not in a million years.”

Charles Brandt, the author of Sheeran’s biography, “I Heard You Paint Houses,” that is the basis for the film, and the book’s publisher Chip Fleischer stand by Sheeran, who died in 2003. Brandt has denied that Sheeran fabricated his story to sell a book, telling Fox Nation that Sheeran did it. “It is the law of confession, the law of corroboration and it’s satisfied over and over again,” he said.

Phil hopes his information will help prosecutors find Hoffa’s remains, so that the case can be finally put to rest and the Hoffa family can have some solace. Hoffa’s son James P. Hoffa is the current president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and his daughter Barbara is a retired judge in St. Louis, Missouri.

“A big part of this is the Hoffa family,” Phil says, adding that he wants to act “responsibly.”

“I really want this to happen. For them never knowing, I am hoping that this…will give them a little closure. People will say, ‘oh he should just tell, that poor family,’ and I understand that, believe me, I really understand that, I do. It’s partly why I am going slow. I want to make sure that when it comes out, it comes out the right way. I want them to feel comfortable about the location that I am giving too. This is a process that I am doing. I am just not blurting it out. But the story is together, it is definitely together, it makes sense.”

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“I’m a son, I’m a Dad, I’m a Grandfather, and I can only imagine. I cannot imagine what they must have went through and what they still go through, and I want to be a part of making that better. It’s been too long. The family deserves it, they really do.”

Fox News has called for the government’s still-secret Hoffa files to be fully released so that all of the information about the disappearance and the suspects can finally be made public. The Hoffa family supports that effort.

Watch the episodes of “Riddle, The Search for James R. Hoffa” on Fox Nation, and for Hoffa investigation updates on the Fox News Channel at 4 – 6 pm ET on Saturdays 1 pm ET, on Sundays on “America’s News Headquarters” anchored by Eric Shawn and Arthel Neville and on Foxnews.com. Look for “Riddle: The Podcast.” Follow Eric Shawn on Twitter @EricShawnTV.

To watch all of “Riddle: The Search for James R. Hoffa,” go to Fox Nation and sign up today.

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Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation today to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Ainsley Earhardt, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

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Many Native Americans Can’t Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Westlake Legal Group watertribe2_custom-0fc3c60c18dd8dd72b2eeb21ed001dd0b2dd6ebc-s1100-c15 Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie typically hauls water from a windmill 5 miles from her house for her sheep. Officials tell her it’s unsafe for humans but OK for livestock. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Westlake Legal Group  Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie typically hauls water from a windmill 5 miles from her house for her sheep. Officials tell her it’s unsafe for humans but OK for livestock.

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

For many people, turning on the tap or flushing the toilet is something we take for granted. But a report released Monday, called “Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States,” shows that more than 2 million Americans live without these conveniences and that Native Americans are more likely to have trouble accessing water than any other group.

The nearest water station for Darlene Yazzie is 9 miles away at the Dennehotso Chapter House — a community center — in the Four Corners region of the Navajo Nation. On Tuesday, she counted her dimes and nickels to pay for water. It costs $1.10 plus gas money to fill up two 50-gallon barrels, and she has just been told the price is going up next month.

Yazzie lugged a T-shaped key as tall as her out to the well, where she dropped it down into the hole and turned the crank to open the valve.

Water gushed into the plastic barrel. A cool mist from a leak in the hose rained over her. This is Yazzie’s drinking water. For her animals, she usually drives to a windmill, but on this day it was empty and the sheep were thirsty.

“There’s no water in the windmill,” Yazzie said. “It’s dry because it’s not blowing. The only way they have water is if it’s blowing.”

Yazzie said the windmill water isn’t safe for humans anyway. Officials told her arsenic and uranium levels are too high. Yazzie and many others give the water to their animals, even though they plan to eat them.

“A lot of people died of cancer around here,” Yazzie said. “I noticed that more are being diagnosed. I’m pretty sure it’s because of the environment and the water.”

The groundwater in some areas has been contaminated by the 521 abandoned uranium mines. The new report, by DigDeep and the U.S. Water Alliance, says gastric cancer rates doubled in the 1990s where uranium mining occurred. Unregulated drinking water sources are the greatest public health risk on the Navajo Nation, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Westlake Legal Group image_2_custom-1225d5260d567d3f0ee97d13657af871f834453d-s800-c15 Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie, a retired community health worker, says hauling water, firewood and trash, as well as using an outhouse, are just a few of the things that make life hard on the Navajo Nation. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Westlake Legal Group  Many Native Americans Can't Get Clean Water, Report Finds

Darlene Yazzie, a retired community health worker, says hauling water, firewood and trash, as well as using an outhouse, are just a few of the things that make life hard on the Navajo Nation.

Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Fifty-eight out of every 1,000 Native American households lack plumbing, compared with three out of every 1,000 white people, according to the report. This disparity has implications for public health. They experience more deaths, poverty and higher unemployment rates.

“We knew the problem was much bigger, but when we went out to look at the data, it didn’t exist,” said George McGraw, the founder of DigDeep, a nonprofit that has helped build water systems on the Navajo Nation. “No one could tell us, from federal to state agencies to other nonprofits, just how many Americans still don’t have running water or a working toilet where they live.”

So McGraw commissioned experts from around the U.S. to piece together the data they did have and come up with the water gap report. What he found was that race is the strongest predictor of water and sanitation access.

A century ago, water-borne illnesses were a leading cause of death. The U.S. government invested in modern water and sanitation systems and nearly eradicated those diseases. But some communities were passed over.

“Our nations didn’t have access to funding for infrastructure in the same way that it’s federally allocated for cities and states overall,” said Mahrinah von Schlegel, an anthropologist from San Ildefonso Pueblo in New Mexico.

She said that in the Southwest, it’s expensive to build pipelines across such remote sparsely populated tribal nations.

“It’s been a struggle, one, to get the access to that infrastructure capital, and then, two, it’s really expensive to develop some of these remote areas,” von Schlegel said.

In Mexican Water, the next town over from Dennehotso, Richard Nelson helped his elderly mother haul water.

Nelson has been asking community leaders when his mom is going to get clean running water.

“A chapter official told me, ‘Yeah, we’re going to have running water,’ ” Nelson said. ” ‘We’re going to start laying the pipe.’ It took another two whole years to do the piping system. Then they said we’re going to have water in a year. And that was two years ago.”

Today federal funding for water infrastructure is a small percentage of what it once was. Across the country, 44 million people are served by water systems that recently had Safe Drinking Water Act violations. The Indian Health Service estimated that it would cost $200 million to provide basic water and sanitation access on the Navajo Nation.

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Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness

Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here’s what you need to know as you start your Monday …

Westlake Legal Group NFLWatchshooting111819 Shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead; Republicans and Dems wary of key Trump impeachment witness fox-news/columns/fox-news-first fox news fnc/us fnc article 504df7cf-87be-5875-a724-679104beca79

Police and emergency vehicles work at the scene of a shooting at a backyard party, Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, in southeast Fresno, Calif. (Larry Valenzuela/The Fresno Bee via AP)

California shooting at NFL-watch party leaves 4 dead, 6 wounded: reports
A backyard gathering of football fans turned into a bloodbath after gunfire broke out in Fresno, Calif., on Sunday night. The shooting left four people dead and six wounded, according to police. Three of the dead were killed at the scene while a fourth victim died in a local hospital. Responding Fresno police officers were going door to door in the neighborhood, in hopes of collecting security camera footage or witness accounts, Fresno’s FOX 26 reported. They were looking for leads to help them locate “unknown suspects.” Click here for more on our top story.

Both Democrats and Republicans appear wary of upcoming testimony from EU ambassador at Trump impeachment hearing
Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union who met with President Trump several times regarding Ukraine, is scheduled to testify publicly before the House Intelligence Committee this week as part of Democrats ongoing impeachment inquiry, but lawmakers from both parties Sunday seemed hesitant to put much weight in what he will say.

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President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

That is likely because in a closed-door hearing, Sondland revised his prior testimony to say that he told a top Ukrainian official that U.S. aid would likely not resume until the country issues a corruption statement. Democrats quickly hailed the revelation as proof that Trump in a July 25 phone call tried to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky into investigating Joe Biden’s family business dealings in the country in exchange for the release of about $400 million in military aid. However, in prior testimony, Sondland said he had texted Ambassador Bill Taylor, the U.S. chargé d’affaires in Ukraine, that in September saying there was no quid pro quo.

When asked if Sondland was credible, Rep. Jim Himes, D-Conn., the No. 2 Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, told “Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace, “That’s a good question. I’m not going to prejudge his testimony.” House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., appeared equally noncommittal on Sondland.

Emails reviewed by The Wall Street Journal show Sondland kept several Trump administration officials informed of his effort to get Ukraine to launch investigations that Trump discussed in his call with Zelensky.

In other Trump impeachment inquiry developments: In an interview on “Life, Liberty & Levin,” Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif. and ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, told host Mark Levin that the Trump White House became involved in Ukrainian affairs to investigate a smear campaign from Democrats against the president. However, Nunes said, the fact-finding mission was twisted and used as an excuse for impeachment.

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ABC News must explain why it spiked Epstein story, House Republicans say in letter
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and two other top Republicans sent a letter to ABC News on Sunday demanding the network explain why it “quashed” ABC News anchor Amy Robach’s story that would have exposed allegations against the now-deceased sex offender Jeffrey Epstein three years ago. The letter, to ABC News President James Goldston, was first reported by Megyn Kelly, formerly of Fox News. House Foreign Affairs Committee Ranking Member Mike McCaul of Texas and House Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Doug Collins of Georgia also signed it.

Video captured Robach on a hot mic claiming higher-ups at her network killed the story. The footage was published earlier this month by Project Veritas, whose controversial founder, James O’Keefe, has described himself as a “guerrilla journalist.” Click here for more.

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SOME PARTING WORDS

Steve Hilton says Democrats are showing true desperation by shifting their language of choice in the Trump impeachment inquiry from “quid pro quo” to “bribery.”

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Kacey Musgraves’ Heart-Melting Throwback Video Proves Dreams Do Come True

Westlake Legal Group 5dd24ed92500007f08d2d5f4 Kacey Musgraves’ Heart-Melting Throwback Video Proves Dreams Do Come True

Willie Nelson and Kacey Musgraves teamed up at the CMA Awards last week to perform a stirring rendition of “Rainbow Connection” from the 1979 film “The Muppet Movie.” 

Musgraves won Female Vocalist of the Year and Music Video of the Year, adding to a growing list of honors that includes six Grammy Awards. 

But her duet with Nelson was a highlight of the night ―and over the weekend, she shared an old clip that shows just how far back she goes with the song. 

The footage shows her more than 20 years ago, singing “Rainbow Connection” at the age of 9 and already with the makings of her unmistakable voice: 

Nelson has his own history with the song, performing it on his 2001 album, also titled “Rainbow Connection.” 

Musgraves summed up their duet on Twitter: 

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Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump’s awful week – here’s how it will just get worse

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103474216001_6103467347001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump's awful week – here's how it will just get worse Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8c527767-e9fa-5dd4-9df4-a380cbbf4fd1

In the 147 weeks that Donald Trump has been in office, last week was the worst.

But, this week will be even worse … much worse.

Last week a parade of officials and former officials testified, under oath, in the impeachment hearings, about what House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is now calling a bribe offered to Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky to undertake an investigation of the Bidens in exchange for the release of military aid. Three witnesses, Ambassador Bill Taylor, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent, and former Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, struck a common chord: If you opposed corruption and supported the rule of law in Ukraine you ran into a buzz saw of opposition from Trump.

BRADLEY BLAKEMAN: DEMS’ IMPEACHMENT OPTION — THIS IS THEIR ONLY EXIT STRATEGY

“Perhaps it was not surprising that when our anti-corruption efforts got in the way of the desire for profit or power, Ukrainians who preferred to play by the old, corrupt rules sought to remove me,” Yovanovitch testified. “What continues to amaze me is that they found Americans willing to partner with them and, working together, they apparently succeeded in orchestrating the removal of the U.S. ambassador.”

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“How could our system fail like this?” she asked. “How is it that foreign corrupt interests could manipulate our government?”

When Kent was asked why Trump wanted Yovanovitch removed as ambassador of Ukraine, he replied, “[Y]ou can’t promote principled anti-corruption action without pissing-off corrupt people.”

Indeed.

But, it was Taylor’s testimony last Wednesday that may prove most damaging to Trump. Taylor revealed that a member of his staff, David Holmes, overheard a telephone conversation between Trump and Ambassador Gordon Sondland about Ukraine pursuing investigations. According to reports of Holmes’ closed-door testimony, Holmes confirmed that Sondland told the president that Zelensky would pursue investigations.

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Others have testified that Sondland made it clear there was a link to military aid and an  investigation into the Bidens. It was reported that Holmes also said Sondland made clear that he was acting upon the instructions of Trump. Holmes’ testimony contradicts Sondland’s previous congressional testimony about this matter.

On Friday, more bad news. Roger Stone, a longtime confidant of Trump, was found guilty on all seven charges he faced, including witness tampering, in connection with Wikileaks’ interference in the 2016 election that many believe benefited Trump. Trump tweeted about the verdict and then also attacked Yovanovitch by tweet – while she was still testifying before the Intelligence Committee. Many are calling the attack witness tampering, the very crime Stone was convicted of, adding an additional article of impeachment.

As more witnesses testify amid Trump’s diminished political clout, Republican senators who will ultimately decide his fate – and their own – should start to see that standing with him comes at a price.

Perhaps hoping for relief from his domestic woes, that afternoon Trump hosted Turkey’s President Tayyip Erdogan, whose genocide  of Kurds in Syria continues. The fact Trump met with Erdogan in the White House as he violates the human rights of Kurds can only be seen as a desperate attempt to divert coverage of the impeachment hearings.

Not only did the meeting fail to dominate the news cycle, Erdogan also used it to mock Trump. First, Erdogan unceremoniously returned the “don’t be a fool” letter Trump had sent in an effort to deny, after the fact, that he provided a green light for Turkey’s moves against the Kurds. Then he showed an anti-Kurd propaganda video to senators attending the White House meeting. Still, Trump proclaimed himself to be a “big fan” of Erdogan.

Despite that attempt at distracting the nation, testimony in the impeachment inquiry continued on Friday and Saturday.

And still the week got worse.

Saturday night Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, won re-election, despite three recent visits to the state by Trump in support of the Republican candidate. Edwards was the second Democrat to win a gubernatorial race in a red Southern state in less than two weeks.

As more witnesses testify amid Trump’s diminished political clout, Republican senators who will ultimately decide his fate – and their own – should start to see that standing with him comes at a price. After blindly supporting Trump for almost three years, the cost to the country and their political careers may be starting to outweigh any benefits. It will grow easier to oppose the president as polls show increased support for impeachment and if his candidates keep getting trounced at the polls.

All that, and next week will be even worse. Eight more witnesses are scheduled to testify in the impeachment inquiry, including Ambassador Sondland on Wednesday morning. This could be pivotal.

Sondland has already amended his previous congressional testimony, saying other witnesses had “refreshed my recollection.” As one of the few witnesses in the inquiry with access to the president, Sondland’s revised testimony could be damning.

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When Sondland was deposed before Congress four weeks ago a reporter asked if he needed to salvage his reputation. Sondland cheekily replied, “I don’t have a reputation to salvage.” Well, the stakes are now much higher. Sondland’s revised testimony could save himself but sink Trump. .

And that would make for the worst week of all for Trump … at least until the next one.

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Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103474216001_6103467347001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump's awful week – here's how it will just get worse Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8c527767-e9fa-5dd4-9df4-a380cbbf4fd1   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6103474216001_6103467347001-vs Mary Anne Marsh: Impeachment tops Trump's awful week – here's how it will just get worse Mary Anne Marsh fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 8c527767-e9fa-5dd4-9df4-a380cbbf4fd1

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