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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 36)

Ex-Ethics Chief Breaks Down Why The Trump-Turnberry Story Is Such A ‘Big Deal’

Westlake Legal Group 5cf25976240000030985660f Ex-Ethics Chief Breaks Down Why The Trump-Turnberry Story Is Such A ‘Big Deal’

The former head of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics used a lengthy Twitter thread to explain what he believes should be the real concern about U.S. military personnel staying at President Donald Trump’s Turnberry golf resort in Scotland.

Walter Shaub wrote Friday that the focus should not be on whether Trump had ordered anyone to stay there, which he doubted, or even on when anyone first stayed there. Instead, he said, it was to do with “the questions raised by these trips.”

“Has [Trump] created a culture where officials believe he wants people to stay at his properties?” asked Shaub, who served under former President Barack Obama and then Trump for six months until he resigned in July 2017.

“We can see how many of his appointees perceive an expectation to socialize after hours at Trump hotel (an activity that was not traditionally common at that level of the exec branch),” he noted.

“He dispatches his VP and appointees to speak to his paying customers. He tweeted that officials who stayed at Turnberry showed ‘good taste,’” Shaub continued. “He takes his appointees on his frequent trips to his luxury resorts. He touts those resorts frequently. He’s bidding on the G7 Summit.”

Shaub claimed it was “implausible” to say it was a coincidence that military personnel stays at Turnberry had risen since Trump took office, a development that is being investigated by both the Air Force and the House Oversight Committee.

It “degrades the ethical culture of government” and “damages our standing in the world and our effort to preach anticorruption efforts to developing countries,” he added.

“Bottom line: Turnberry is a big deal because it’s a symptom of a problem in an administration that is anything but transparent,” Shaub concluded.

Check out Shaub’s full thread here:

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Ari Melber Tears Apart Lou Dobbs’ ‘Sunshine’ Review Of The Trump White House

Westlake Legal Group 5d7c9097240000122779f762 Ari Melber Tears Apart Lou Dobbs’ ‘Sunshine’ Review Of The Trump White House

MSNBC’s Ari Melber on Friday broke down why he believes Fox Business host Lou Dobbs went full sycophant with his review of what it’s like to work in President Donald Trump’s White House earlier in the week.

Dobbs, a vocal supporter of Trump, on Thursday claimed “the joint is hopping” with “sunshine beaming throughout the place, and on almost every face.” “It’s winner, and winning center, and our White House, our president, is at the top of his game,” he said.

“It’s ‘winning center.’ I almost wonder who wrote that,” Melber quipped.

Dobbs is “basically begging his viewers to ignore all of the chaos that is out there,” he added. “[It’s a] little bit like the policeman in that scene from ‘The Naked Gun’ when a rocket explodes in a fireworks factory.”

“Now, why does Dobbs overstate it this much? He’s not just speaking to his own audience, which might overlap with Trump’s base, he may also be speaking to the famed audience of one, Donald Trump [who] turns to these TV individuals, some of them, for information. The Washington Post notes that Trump is ’as likely to heed a Fox News host as any a senior administration official.”

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California lawmakers splashed with ‘what appeared to be blood’ during anti-vaxxing protest at Statehouse

A protester was taken into custody at the California Statehouse in Sacramento on Friday evening after she allegedly threw a feminine hygiene device containing “what appeared to be blood” onto the floor of the state Senate from a public viewing area, splashing the liquid onto lawmakers working below.

The Senate chamber was evacuated and lawmakers finished their work in a committee room on the final day of the legislative session.

The woman, who was not identified, was detained on charges including assault, vandalism and disrupting “the orderly conduct of official business” at the Statehouse, the California Highway Patrol said in a news release.

ANTI-VAXXER WHOSE SON CONTRACTED MEASLES SAYS SHE PLAYED ‘RUSSIAN ROULETTE’ WITH BOY’S HEALTH

Westlake Legal Group period-blood-on-paper California lawmakers splashed with 'what appeared to be blood' during anti-vaxxing protest at Statehouse fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d2d1da92-c657-5a18-90a8-27771a300c6f article

In this photo provided by state Senator Steven Glazer, red dots are splattered on papers on Glazer’s Senate desk, after a woman threw a container with red liquid from the public gallery of the Senate chambers during a legislative session, in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. (Senator Steven Glazer via AP)

The disruption occurred as a group of protesters — many holding signs promoting “Medical Freedom” — were permitted into the Senate chambers to overlook state Senate proceedings from the upstairs balcony. They had been demonstrating against a recently signed state measure intended to crack down on fraudulent medical exemptions for vaccinations.

Around 5:15 p.m., a woman in the group leaned over the railing and hurled the unidentified red liquid onto the unsuspecting lawmakers. Someone reportedly called out: “That’s for the dead babies.”

The Senate called a quick recess and law enforcement evacuated the chambers. A video posted to social media shows a woman, who walked out of the gallery into the hallway, saying, “My menstrual blood is all over the Senate floor… a representation of the blood of the dead babies,” before she is then handcuffed.

State Sen. Scott Wiener, a Democrat, posted on Twitter after the ordeal.

“A few minutes ago, the anti-vaxxer stalkers – who’ve engaged in a harassment campaign all week – dropped a red substance onto the Senate floor from the elevated public gallery, dousing several of my colleagues,” Wiener wrote. “These anti-vaxxers are engaging in criminal behavior. They’ve now repeatedly assaulted senators and are engaging in harassing and intimidating behavior every single day, as we try to do the people’s work. They’re a cancer on the body politic and are attacking democracy.”

The incident comes after Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, signed controversial legislation into law this week that places restrictions on medical vaccine exemptions for children. State Sen. Richard Pan, a Democrat representing Sacramento, authored the bill. He was shoved by a protester last week outside the Capitol.

“This incident was incited by the violent rhetoric perpetuated by leaders of the antivaxx movement,” Pan said in a statement to FOX 40 Sacramento. “As their rhetoric escalates, their incidents of violence does as well. This is an attack on the democratic process and an assault on all Californians and it must be met with strong condemnation by everyone.”

Westlake Legal Group antrvaxxer-blood-senate-floor California lawmakers splashed with 'what appeared to be blood' during anti-vaxxing protest at Statehouse fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d2d1da92-c657-5a18-90a8-27771a300c6f article

A California Highway Patrol Officer photographs a desk on the Senate floor after a red liquid was thrown from the Senate Gallery during the Senate session at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. (Associated Press)

Senate Bill 276 and SB 714 intend to increase oversight on California’s vaccine medical exemption system, according to the Sacramento Bee. Doctors in the state will be required to submit a form to the state Department of Public Health every time they issue a medical exemption. Public health officials will be alerted when doctors issue more than five exemptions a year and review each exemption case to evaluate if fraud is being committed. The system will also flag schools that fall below a 95 percent vaccination rate.

Westlake Legal Group california-highway-patrol California lawmakers splashed with 'what appeared to be blood' during anti-vaxxing protest at Statehouse fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d2d1da92-c657-5a18-90a8-27771a300c6f article

California Highway Patrol Officers inspect the Senate Gallery after a red substance was thrown from the gallery during the Senate session at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Supporters argue the new legislation would protect children who are too sick or young to be vaccinated from being exposed to preventable diseases while at school, according to the Bee. Those in opposition to the new law say vaccines are not universally safe and that the measure would infringe on the patient-doctor relationship.

Westlake Legal Group california-senate-evacuated California lawmakers splashed with 'what appeared to be blood' during anti-vaxxing protest at Statehouse fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d2d1da92-c657-5a18-90a8-27771a300c6f article

State Senator Mike McGuire, D-Healdsburg, right, leaves the Senate Chambers after a red substance was thrown from the Senate Gallery during the Senate session at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Protesters camped outside the governor’s office this week as others in opposition to the legislation crowded hallways in Sacramento’s Capitol building and attempted to disrupt hearings and floor sessions, the Los Angeles Times reported. The group responsible for organizing the rally outside the Capitol denounced the woman’s behavior Friday.

“We strongly denounce this, it goes far beyond crossing a line,” Jonathan Lockwood, executive director of Conscience Coalition, told the Sacramento Bee.

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Senate President Pro Tempore Toni Atkins said in a statement: “California’s legislative process, as well as our doors, should remain open to all who wish to observe or speak out on a variety of issues, but we cannot allow anyone to endanger others. The behavior that occurred in the Senate Chamber is unacceptable and has been dealt with by Capitol law enforcement. We will continue to do the people’s important business.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group period-blood-on-paper California lawmakers splashed with 'what appeared to be blood' during anti-vaxxing protest at Statehouse fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d2d1da92-c657-5a18-90a8-27771a300c6f article   Westlake Legal Group period-blood-on-paper California lawmakers splashed with 'what appeared to be blood' during anti-vaxxing protest at Statehouse fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/politics/state-and-local fox-news/health/infectious-disease/vaccines fox news fnc/politics fnc Danielle Wallace d2d1da92-c657-5a18-90a8-27771a300c6f article

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Abortion doctor’s family finds remains of more than 2,200 fetuses at his home after his death: reports

Westlake Legal Group ultrasound-istock Abortion doctor's family finds remains of more than 2,200 fetuses at his home after his death: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/indiana fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 5c854029-19be-5a75-a172-c81438ab5d81

The remains of more than 2,200 unborn children have been found at the Illinois home of a former Indiana abortion doctor who died earlier this month, according to reports.

The discovery was made by members of the family of Dr. Ulrich Klopfer, who died Sept. 3. The family members had been searching through Klopfer’s belongings after he died, FOX 59 of Indianapolis reported.

There is no evidence that any abortions were performed at the private residence, the Will County (Ill.) Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

BROTHER-IN-LAW: BUTTIGIEG SHOULD ‘RECONSIDER’ ABORTION STANCE, READ BIBLE’S DESCRIPTION OF LIFE

Klopfer formerly worked at the Women’s Pavilion in South Bend, Ind., the report said. The home where the remains were found is located in Will County, Ill.

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According to FOX 59, Klopfer’s medical license was suspended in 2015 after accusations that he failed to report an abortion performed on a 13-year-old girl.

The Will County Sheriff’s Office has launched an investigation into the matter, WSBT-TV of South Bend reported. The county coroner’s office took possession of the remains, the sheriff’s office said in a news release.

Westlake Legal Group ultrasound-istock Abortion doctor's family finds remains of more than 2,200 fetuses at his home after his death: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/indiana fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 5c854029-19be-5a75-a172-c81438ab5d81   Westlake Legal Group ultrasound-istock Abortion doctor's family finds remains of more than 2,200 fetuses at his home after his death: reports fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/indiana fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/illinois fox-news/politics/judiciary/abortion fox news fnc/us fnc Dom Calicchio article 5c854029-19be-5a75-a172-c81438ab5d81

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Bill Maher says Amy Klobuchar would be solid ‘compromise’ choice for Dems’ 2020 nomination

Westlake Legal Group bill-maher-season-17-5-HBO Bill Maher says Amy Klobuchar would be solid 'compromise' choice for Dems' 2020 nomination Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc bdead0fa-a645-536b-b6bd-4ef2977422c3 article

“Real Time” host Bill Maher said Friday that Democrats could be heading toward a contested 2020 convention and suggested that Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., could emerge as a strong “compromise candidate.”

“Can I present a scenario?” Maher asked his guests during the show’s panel segment. “I think this might be one of those years where … they can’t get over that ‘centrist’ versus ‘socialist’ thing. So Elizabeth Warren at some point takes Bernie’s voters, he drops out. It’s Warren and Biden. And they go into the convention and it’s deadlock. This has happened before in American politics and they need a compromise candidate.”

He then pointed to Klobuchar as a viable option for Democrats in the general election against President Trump.

MAHER MOCKS MSNBC’S ‘NEVER TRUMPERS’: THEY’RE ‘VERY FAR LEFT’ BECAUSE ‘LOOK AT WHO’S GIVING THEM THEIR PAYCHECK’

“I’m looking hard at Amy Klobuchar,” Maher said. “You know why? Because — this is not an insult to Amy Klobuchar — I like you, but they put generic Democrat on the ballot, they win.”

Plus, he added, “She’s a woman. That moves a lot with the wokesters.”

Guest Krystal Ball of The Hill rejected Maher’s argument, insisting a “centrist” would lead to another defeat for Democrats. She insisted that Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., would beat Trump.

Maher pushed back, saying, “Even the centrists in the Democratic Party are pretty far left.”

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Meanwhile, Democratic strategist Fernand Amandi told Maher that a centrist is the wrong “C-word” and that it’s actually “charisma” that matters most — and stressed the Democratic candidate should have plenty of it.

“Well, we’re f—ed then,” Maher replied.

Westlake Legal Group bill-maher-season-17-5-HBO Bill Maher says Amy Klobuchar would be solid 'compromise' choice for Dems' 2020 nomination Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc bdead0fa-a645-536b-b6bd-4ef2977422c3 article   Westlake Legal Group bill-maher-season-17-5-HBO Bill Maher says Amy Klobuchar would be solid 'compromise' choice for Dems' 2020 nomination Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/person/amy-klobuchar fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc bdead0fa-a645-536b-b6bd-4ef2977422c3 article

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Carrie Underwood reveals the one condition she has for an ‘American Idol’ reunion

Fans first saw Carrie Underwood compete on “American Idol” in 2005. Now, 14 years later, the star is sharing whether she’d be up for a reunion.

On Wednesday, the 36-year-old singer — who won the reality competition series in season 4 — revealed she had one condition when it comes to returning to her roots.

“An ‘Idol’ reunion?” Underwood asked Entertainment Tonight‘s host Nischelle Turner.

CARRIE UNDERWOOD GLOWS IN MAKE-UP FREE SELFIE 

“I see all of those judges,” the “Southbound” songstress added of Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson. “I’ve never seen them together since I was on the show but that’s pretty incredible,” she said.

The mom of two was referencing how Kelly Clarkson — who won season one — recently brought together the show’s three original judges for her daytime talk show.

CARRIE UNDERWOOD WILL ‘NEVER’ WEAR A TRIANGLE BIKINI

“As long as they don’t judge me,” the star teased. “I’m down if nobody critiques anything.”

Underwood — who is currently on her “Cry Pretty Tour 360” tour — is set to host the CMA Awards again in November.

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Her co-host since 2008, Brad Paisley, is taking a break this year. Underwood will be joined by “special guest hosts” Dolly Parton and Reba McEntire.

Westlake Legal Group 4a514103-AP19157000933415 Carrie Underwood reveals the one condition she has for an 'American Idol' reunion Mariah Haas fox-news/person/carrie-underwood fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/entertainment fnc d2c58c32-de14-534b-b1c5-e8e9096c1a23 article   Westlake Legal Group 4a514103-AP19157000933415 Carrie Underwood reveals the one condition she has for an 'American Idol' reunion Mariah Haas fox-news/person/carrie-underwood fox-news/entertainment/music fox news fnc/entertainment fnc d2c58c32-de14-534b-b1c5-e8e9096c1a23 article

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Sean Hannity: Trouble ahead for US if voters don’t reject Dems’ ‘Venezuela-style socialism’

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086167168001_6086172367001-vs Sean Hannity: Trouble ahead for US if voters don't reject Dems' 'Venezuela-style socialism' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 86521c3a-8bf6-567a-bc2e-219514948830

What 2020 Democrats were touting at Thursday’s presidential debate in Houston was essentially “Venezuela-style socialism,” Sean Hannity said Friday night.

“Just 24 hours ago all the Democrats running for the highest office in the land basically pushed a Venezuela-style socialism as the solution to all of America’s problems,” the Fox News host said on “Hannity.”

CASTRO LANDS LOW BLOWS ON BIDEN, SAYS HE’S NOT ‘FULFILLING’ OBAMA LEGACY AND MOCKS HIS MEMORY

The host pointed to all of the Democrats’ policy proposals, especially those on health care and energy.

“They call for a hostile government takeover of the entire private health care industry with proposals to kick all Americans off their private health care plans. Not an option,” Hannity said. “They called for a hostile government takeover of the private energy sector, putting all oil and gas companies out of business.”

The Democratic Party once again showed it has shifted further to the left, he added.

“Socialism 101 and it is now the status quo,” Hannity said. “There are no moderates inside the Democratic Party.”

Hannity called the new ideology being put forth by the Democratic presidential candidates “scary.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX  NEWS APP

“If you stand back and observe all the Democrats and their radical, extremist proposals are going to find one common theme. Centralization of power and money in order to protect law-abiding Americans from themselves,” Hannity said. “It is a scary ideology. If America doesn’t reject it I see a lot of trouble ahead.”

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086167168001_6086172367001-vs Sean Hannity: Trouble ahead for US if voters don't reject Dems' 'Venezuela-style socialism' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 86521c3a-8bf6-567a-bc2e-219514948830   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6086167168001_6086172367001-vs Sean Hannity: Trouble ahead for US if voters don't reject Dems' 'Venezuela-style socialism' Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/hannity fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc article 86521c3a-8bf6-567a-bc2e-219514948830

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John Bolton gets back into political game after leaving White House

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close John Bolton gets back into political game after leaving White House

President Donald Trump explains he wasn’t seeing eye-to-eye with ousted hawkish national security adviser John Bolton. The sudden shake-up comes as the president faces pressing decisions on difficult foreign policy issues. (Sept. 11) AP

WASHINGTON — John Bolton wasted no time getting back in the political game Friday, just a few days after being ousted as President Donald Trump’s National Security Adviser.

Bolton has resumed his old job as the head of two political action committees, the John Bolton PAC and John Bolton Super PAC, announcing that he would be donating $10,000 to five Republican incumbent re-election campaigns for 2020.

These include Sens. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) and Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and Reps. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) and Lee Zeldin (R-N.Y.).

The website reads, “The John Bolton PAC and John Bolton Super PAC seek a strong, clear, and dependable US national security policy, resting on constancy and resolve.”

“The experience that these incumbent members of Congress have provides them with a remarkable understanding and knowledge of the threats we face from international terrorism and rogue regimes such as Iran and North Korea,” the statement continues.

Trump fired Bolton, his third national security adviser, on Tuesday, saying the two “disagreed strongly” on foreign policy matters. Bolton, however, contradicted Trump’s characterization of his departure, writing in a tweet minutes after the president’s that he offered to resign.

Bolton had temporarily suspended his political activity during his time at the White House.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/09/13/john-bolton-resumes-political-activity-after-leaving-white-house/2313821001/

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Maher mocks MSNBC’s ‘Never Trumpers’: They’re ‘very far left’ because ‘look at who’s giving them their paycheck’

Westlake Legal Group bill-maher-season-17-1-HBO Maher mocks MSNBC's 'Never Trumpers': They're 'very far left' because 'look at who's giving them their paycheck' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 32d01175-5866-58f9-9918-77ce21493977

“Real Time” host Bill Maher mocked MSNBC‘s “Never Trump” hosts and analysts for going “very far left” during the Trump era.

During the “Overtime” segment of Friday night’s show, Maher asked former RNC chairman and MSNBC political analyst Michael Steele about the “roster” of former Republican politicians and operatives that appear on the network, invoking former Bush official-turned-MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace and former GOP strategist Steve Schmidt.

“We only see Never Trumpers,” Maher began. “We see people like you on TV. And Nicolle Wallace. And Steve Schmidt. You’re a Never Trumper, right?”

BILL MAHER SAYS FAR-LEFT POLICIES OF 2020 DEMS ARE A ‘CANCER ON PROGRESSIVISM’

“No, I don’t classify myself,” Steele responded.

“So you could vote for Trump?” Maher asked.

“No,” Steele quickly answered.

“Well, that’s a Never Trumper!” Maher exclaimed, sparking laughter from the rest of the panel and the audience.

Steele attempted to explain himself, saying he refuses to play the “political game” of labeling himself, which he suggested helps opponents.

Maher then pivoted to Never Trumpers and how they would vote in the 2020 election.

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“What do the Never Trumpers do? What do they say on MSNBC, who have gone very far left because look who’s giving them their paycheck,” Maher continued. “What do they say if it’s Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren at the top of the ticket? They ‘never Trump’ but would Nicolle Wallace vote for them?”

“There are a lot of folks like Nicolle and Joe [Scarborough] and others who have said, ‘Look, I’ll vote for the dog in the car’ if that’s who the Democrats nominate,” Steele said.

“I’m just amused because I see them on MSNBC and I remember how they used to talk when it was Bush and Romney and they didn’t even want ObamaCare!” Maher exclaimed.

Westlake Legal Group bill-maher-season-17-1-HBO Maher mocks MSNBC's 'Never Trumpers': They're 'very far left' because 'look at who's giving them their paycheck' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 32d01175-5866-58f9-9918-77ce21493977   Westlake Legal Group bill-maher-season-17-1-HBO Maher mocks MSNBC's 'Never Trumpers': They're 'very far left' because 'look at who's giving them their paycheck' Joseph Wulfsohn fox-news/entertainment/politics-on-late-night fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 32d01175-5866-58f9-9918-77ce21493977

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Casper Dreams of Being Bigger Than Mattresses

Neil Parikh hadn’t been getting a lot of rest, and it showed. It was deep into the afternoon, and Mr. Parikh, a founder of the direct-to-consumer mattress start-up Casper, was looking at the menu of a Midtown Manhattan coffee shop, debating whether it was too late for another cappuccino.

“This whole week, basically, I’ve been in the toilet — I had a 57, a 59,” he said, sighing. He was referring to readings taken by a silver band, called an Oura, that was on his right ring finger and tracks things like R.E.M. sleep and heart rate and returns a “readiness” score out of 100.

Standing next to Mr. Parikh was Dr. Frank Lipman, a sleep specialist who has been treating the executive for a year and a half. “That’s not good,” he said, frowning. “I’m usually in the high 80s, unless I sit up at night and watch Rachel Maddow.”

Mr. Parikh, who has a Casper Wave model in his bed at home, settled on a decaf. It’s not a great look for one of the top executives of a mattress company to seem haggard and kvetch about z’s during prime working hours, but recently, Casper has quietly acknowledged that it’s not enough to be a mere foam-slab company. The start-up needs a bigger market, and the concept it’s embracing is sleep itself.

Five years ago, the start-up started slinging compressed mattresses in cardboard boxes straight to buyers’ homes — an alternative to cluttered mattress chains that tried to baffle consumers with jargon. Casper’s basic proposition, that going to a mattress store is a drag and no one should have to do it, made sense to fans of other retail start-ups trying to cut out middlemen, such as Warby Parker.

But in the years since, Casper has had to shift positions. Dozens of mattress-in-a-box competitors crowded the market. Realizing the limitations of an entirely virtual business model, Casper began opening storefronts and selling products like pillows and sheets. All the while, the wellness industry rose up, with companies attaching their wares to a sense of higher, healthful purpose. While businesses devoted to optimizing most of the core bodily functions abound — start-ups that promise more healthful eating, more holistic hydration, etc. — no company has yet established itself as the clear leader of the sleep space.

It’s a slightly absurd concept, until you consider that humans spend about one-third of their lives sleeping, and that the potential market is enormous. CB Insights, a research firm, estimates that the size of the so-called sleep health economy will reach $85 billion by 2021.

“Buying a mattress is not a recurring purchase,” said Jacob Matthews, an analyst with the research firm CB Insights. “As Casper thinks about expanding, opportunities to bring the customer back into the brand ecosystem, whether it’s for an experience or a product, are going to be key.”

And so ahead of a possible initial public offering, Casper is trying to recast itself as “the Nike of sleep,” in the company’s phrase. It has assembled a “sleep advisory board” that includes Dr. Lipman, who contributes articles and recipes to Goop.com, in addition to impressively credentialed academics and supposed sleep experts from Brown, the University of Arizona and elsewhere. The panel will advise Casper’s 500 employees on how to sleep better so that they, in turn, can better advise customers at the company’s stores.

As Mr. Parikh sees it, this will help shoppers develop a lucrative affection for Casper, one that is impossible to imagine them feeling for the conglomerates that constitute Big Sleep, namely Serta Simmons Holdings and Tempur Sealy International.

“Those companies don’t understand that long term, consumers are investing in things that mean something bigger,” Mr. Parikh said. “If I’m wearing a pair of Nike shoes, a little part of me feels connected to the Olympic athletes that wear those shoes, and maybe I feel like I’m a little bit faster of a runner. That’s the mentality shift.

“We’re trying to shift the cultural norms so that hopefully, over time, when people pick a Casper, they’re buying into something a lot bigger than just a slab of memory foam.”

Casper is also expanding its wellness offerings. This year, it debuted Glow, a cordless bedside light designed to expedite the wind-down process, a somewhat oxymoronic proposition. Glow gradually dims for 45 minutes and turns on or off with a simple shake. (It can also be programmed with a proprietary app, although looking at the melatonin-suppressing blue light of your phone screen might defeat Glow’s purpose.)

At $129, it’s more expensive than the average nightstand lamp. Philip Krim, Casper’s chief executive, said it served as an entry point for people curious about the brand but unwilling to drop $395 or more on a mattress.

ImageWestlake Legal Group 13CASPER-01-articleLarge Casper Dreams of Being Bigger Than Mattresses Tempur Sealy International Inc Start-ups sleep Simmons Bedding Co Shopping and Retail Mattresses Initial Public Offerings Casper Sleep Inc

The chief executive, Philip Krim, said he wanted Casper to be “a destination for all things sleep.”CreditBenjamin Lowy/Getty Images

“They’ll start with the Glow, or the pillows, or the sheets,” Mr. Parikh said. “And then they’ll be like, ‘Well, maybe I need a new bed’ — and then we start converting.”

Besides mattresses, Casper now sells bed frames (starting at $365), duvets ($250), dog beds ($125), even actual sleep. At the Dreamery, a hushed, high-ceilinged space attached to Casper’s store in SoHo, you can buy a 45-minute nap in a minimalist, yurtlike pod for $25. The price includes snacks, beverages and rental pajamas.

“Over time, revenue is going to increasingly be diversified outside of the mattress, as more and more people realize that Casper is not just a mattress destination but, really, a destination for all things sleep,” Mr. Krim said.

This spring, Casper quietly changed its social media strategy. Along with its usual photographs of shiny, happy people on Casper beds, the company began publishing guided meditations and bedtime stories on Instagram, YouTube and Spotify. Many are narrated by a somniferous entity named June the Moon.

“Hello there, creatures of the internet,” she intones breathily in one clip. “Are you dreaming of blissful sleep? Tired of chasing those elusive z’s? Ready to live your best life?” She promises to transport the bleary-eyed to “a magical internet slumberland filled with sounds, meditations and bedtime stories to help you wind down and drift off.”

“Social media tends to be really anxiety provoking,” said Jeff Brooks, Casper’s chief marketing officer. “We want to be an oasis.” Mr. Brooks also helped create the company’s new mission statement, as lofty and vaporous as a cumulus cloud: “Awakening the potential of a well-rested world.”

A mattress primer: For a long time, the American market has been dominated by Tempur Sealy and Serta Simmons, both of which date back to the 19th century. Simmons Bedding was founded in Atlanta in 1870; Sealy, which Tempur-Pedic acquired in 2012, was founded in Texas in 1881.

But the current state of the industry began to take shape in 2014, when a group of men at a co-working space noticed the direct-to-consumer trend and figured that a good industry to disrupt might be one whose incumbents had been around since Thomas Edison was messing with electricity. They started Casper, and before long it was synonymous with the mattress-in-a-box concept. Today Casper has a $1.1 billion valuation and a slew of imitators, including Purple, Avocado, Leesa and Saatva. [Wirecutter, a product review site owned by The New York Times, recently evaluated the best memory foam mattresses.]

The wrinkle is that Casper has never posted a profit. And its biggest rivals say they are not, well, losing sleep. “Our stock’s up 80 percent, and we’re a $4 billion company,” Scott Thompson, Tempur Sealy’s chief executive, told me. “We’re having a great time.”

“What we are not doing is spending money in P.R. to create buzz to raise more money to fund unprofitable operations,” he added. In Mr. Thompson’s view, Casper’s main innovation is “the willingness to lose tons of money for multiple years while hoping to find a business plan or find a greater fool to buy them.”

Perhaps because of the competition, Casper has gone to great lengths to protect its reputation, even at the cost of undercutting its cuddly image. Mr. Krim has publicly warred with mattress-review websites that rated Casper as inferior. In 2016, the company sued three of them, and the next year, it provided a loan that funded a takeover of one of the sites.

In March, the tech publication The Information published internal Casper financial statements that showed the start-up was still losing money. The company says its revenue for 2018 exceeded $400 million. By comparison, Tempur Sealy posted revenue of $2.7 billion, with operating income of $256 million.

But while Mr. Thompson may scoff at the start-ups’ business model, his company has been forced to play catch-up. Tempur Sealy now offers Cocoon, a bed-in-a-box that, just like Casper, comes with a 100-night trial period. Direct-to-consumer sales now account for about 10 percent of the company’s sales. (Last year, Serta Simmons acquired the Casper rival Tuft & Needle.)

To a certain extent, there are only so many new ideas in sleep. In 2012, two years before Casper came along, Tempur Sealy rolled out flagship stores with semiprivate mattress testing pods and “sleep consultants” working not on commission but on salary. As of September, Tempur Sealy had 49 of these stores in North America, outpacing Casper’s 46.

While the start-up arrived heralding the end of IRL stores, its future may depend on them, especially if it broadens its market from mere mattresses to the entire category of sleep.

Casper’s goal is to have a sleep expert at every store, and “sleep coaching” is a possibility, said Neil Parikh, a company founder.CreditJake Rosenberg

At Casper headquarters in New York, the company recently instituted a “sleep in” policy for employees: Once a month, they can opt to not set an alarm and head to the office after whenever they wake up.

Elizabeth Wolfson, the head of human resources, is working with the new advisory board to develop a sleep training program that will be mandatory for every worker.

“We’ve laid out what Chapters 1 through 4 might look like,” Ms. Wolfson said. “All employees will participate in Chapter 1, which is really the foundations of what is good sleep: defining basic terms like circadian rhythms.”

“Phase 2 is more intermediate and for our front lines,” a.k.a. Casper’s retail staff, she added. The vision is that every store will eventually have a “black belt”-level sleep expert.

“We’re figuring out if it makes sense to offer sleep coaching,” Mr. Parikh said. “What other things can this sleep evangelist do?”

Promoting expertise is something of a change for Casper, given that many of its store personnel had no experience selling mattresses, or even selling anything.

“I’d rather find somebody that’s a great conversationalist than a great salesperson,” said Kyle Rod, the manager of a Casper store in Torrance, Calif.

Before he got the job, he spent 15 years running a Guitar Center. “People will talk about music all day long, but getting them to talk about how they’re sleeping, that’s a lot more difficult,” Mr. Rod said. “It’s a very intimate experience when you’re having to say: ‘O.K., so what’s happening in your shoulders? How do your hips feel? How are you situated in the bed?’”

To get his employees comfortable with initiating these conversations, Mr. Rod encourages them to read and discuss sleep studies — “It’s like homework,” he said — and role-play. On the day I visited, Mr. Rod pulled aside Tracie Dunifer, the assistant manager, and asked her to act as someone who was waking up with shoulder pain but didn’t know why.

A version of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” played out, with Mr. Rod guiding Ms. Dunifer to three products before she indicated that one felt best. It was the Wave mattress, she said, whose contours better supported her hips and shoulders thanks to some combination of technology that makes the mattress both firm and soft and, honestly, went completely over my head. The Casper store was certainly more homey than the anonymous strip mall where I bought my last mattress, but the sense of confusion was the same.

There’s no doubt that there is money to be made in sleep: Consider the $149,900 horsetail hair mattress from the Swedish company Hästens, or the parents who spend thousands of dollars on sleep consultants for their newborns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has decreed sleep deprivation a public health problem, saying that about a third of American adults do not get sufficient rest — contributing to the sense that quality shut-eye is becoming a luxury.

But that could all be a mismatch for Casper’s midmarket brand. Early engagement with its social media efforts are low. One Instagram clip of June the Moon has around 5,500 views, and only 7,400 users subscribe to the brand’s YouTube channel.

If Casper decides to file for an I.P.O., as is rumored, it will enter a market that’s increasingly skeptical about unprofitable start-ups. Uber’s debut this year was a comprehensive disappointment. Shares of Slack plunged in early September after the company announced an unexpectedly big loss. And WeWork is under pressure to delay its I.P.O., after initial hopes of an offering above $47 billion have faded to a level in the range of $15 billion to $20 billion.

All of the companies styled themselves as disrupters, and they did change the way Americans travel, communicate and work — just as Casper changed the way millions shop for their sleep. But none of them has ever turned a profit.

Back at the Dreamery, Mr. Parikh said Casper’s customer base was “everyone — everyone is in the market for sleep, because everyone can sleep better.” It may be true, but for now, in a business sense, it’s very much a dream.

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