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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 363)

Former Boston College student charged in suicide death of boyfriend, echoing Michelle Carter case

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Former Boston College student charged in suicide death of boyfriend, echoing Michelle Carter case

BOSTON — Echoing the high-profile Michelle Carter case, state prosecutors in Massachusetts brought involuntary manslaughter charges Monday against a former Boston College student who they allege pressured her boyfriend to kill himself through relentless abuse.

Inyoung You, 21, of South Korea, was charged in connection with the May 20 suicide death of her boyfriend, 22-year-old Alexander Urtula, of New Jersey. Urtula, also a Boston College student, jumped from the top of a parking garage at a Boston hotel on the morning of his graduation. His girlfriend of 18 months watched, prosecutors said. 

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachel Rollins said the couple exchanged 75,000 text messages in the two months leading up to Urtula’s death. She said 47,000 were sent from You to Urtula including perhaps “thousands” urging him to kill himself. Urtula’s family was in town to attend his graduation when he died.

“Many of the messages clearly display the power dynamic in the relationship where Ms. You made demands and threats with the understanding that she had complete control over Mr. Urtula, both mentally and emotionally,” Rollins said. 

New law proposed: ‘Conrad’s Law’ proposed in Massachusetts in response to Michelle Carter suicide texting case

You is currently in her native South Korea, Rollins said. She said authorities will look to extradite her to the United States if she does not voluntarily turn herself in. A grand jury returned the indictment charging You on Oct. 18. 

USA TODAY was unable to immediately reach You or her attorney for comment. 

Rollins said You was aware of Urtula’s “spiraling depression and suicidal thoughts brought on by her abuse — yet she persisted, continuing to encourage him to take his own life.”

Her texts, according to prosecutors, included repeated abusive remarks for Urtula to “go kill himself” to “go die” and that she, his family, and the world would be better off without him.

The new charges drew immediate comparisons to the high-profile case involving Carter, also in Massachusetts, who was charged with involuntary manslaughter in the 2014 suicide death of her boyfriend, Conrad Roy III. Carter, who is serving 15 months in prison, was found guilty of pressuring Roy to kill himself in repeated text messages.

Rollins said You was tracking Urtula’s location on the morning of his suicide “as she frequently did” on her phone. She said You went to the parking garage and was present when Urtula jumped to his death.

“Abuse became more frequent and more powerful and more demeaning in the days and hours leading up to Mr. Urtula’s untimely death,” Rollins said. “The abuse was witnessed by family and classmates of both parties and documented extensively in text messages between Ms. You and Mr. Urtula and in Mr. Urtula’s journal entries.”

She added: “Students come to Boston and around the world to attend in our renowned colleges and universities, eager to learn and experience our vibrant city. Their families and loved ones certainly do not expect them to face unending physical and mental abuse.”

Carter, now 22, was denied early release by the Massachusetts Parole Board in September. She’s been in prison since February after being convicted in 2017. 

A strange connection: Suicide texting case: HBO film shows bizarre connection between Michelle Carter and ‘Glee’

Rollins said there are “similarities, of course” with the Carter case but called it a “separate and distinct case.”

“Where I would distinguish, and I think the facts will show, in Carter there was very limited contact prior,” she said. “We have a barrage, a complete and utter attack on this man’s very will and conscience and psyche by an individual to the tune of 47,000 text messages in the two months leading up.”

Carter was 17 at the time of Roy’s death in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. She pressured him incessantly by text messages to kill himself leading up to his death, which was caused by inhaling fumes in a generator that he put inside a truck. Roy had attempted suicide multiple times and had struggled with depression and mental illness. 

Early release request: Michelle Carter, who encouraged boyfriend to kill himself, denied early release from prison

Carter, of Plainville, Massachusetts, had a lengthy phone call with Roy when he was parked in a Kmart parking lot, where the death occurred, and later texted a friend that she told him to “get back in” the vehicle after he had stepped out.

Carter filed an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court seeking to overturn her 2017 involuntary manslaughter conviction by a state court. It was upheld by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in February. 

The troubling case reentered the spotlight this summer with HBO’s release of a two-part documentary, “I Love You, Now Die: The Commonwealth v. Michelle Carter.”

Bad precedent: Girlfriend suicide texting case sets wrong precedent, legal experts say

With the backing of Roy’s mother, Lynn Roy, Massachusetts state lawmakers are considering legislation, dubbed “Conrad’s Law,” that would would criminalize suicide coercion in the commonwealth.

Massachusetts is one of 10 sates that lack laws that explicitly punish individuals who induce others to kill themselves. Rather than being subject to manslaughter, like Carter, the bill would impose a new criminal liability specifically for a person who intentionally “encourages or coerces” a suicide or suicide attempt.

Reach Joey Garrison on Twitter @joeygarrison.

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/28/former-boston-college-student-charged-suicide-death-boyfriend/2484454001/

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Gov. Northam Announces New Wine Production Facility in Nelson Co.

Westlake Legal Group 18892197_G Gov. Northam Announces New Wine Production Facility in Nelson Co.

“Nelson County has long been a leader in Virginia’s craft beverage and tourism industries,” said Chairman of the Nelson County Board of Supervisors Larry Saunders. “The family behind the Virginia Sparkling Company is familiar to Nelson and an important part of the success we have had. Following the company motto, ‘In Vino Veritas, in wine there is truth,’ they will no doubt remain true to their legacy of quality wine with this next venture. On behalf of the county and the community, we welcome the Virginia Sparkling Company and wish them much success.”

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Robert Evans, Iconic ‘Chinatown’ Producer, Dies at 89

LOS ANGELES (Variety.com) – Robert Evans, the Paramount executive who produced “Chinatown” and “Urban Cowboy” and whose life became as melodramatic and jaw-dropping as any of his films, died on Saturday night. He was 89.

Even though Hollywood history is filled with colorful characters, few can match the tale of Evans, whose life would seem far-fetched if it were fiction. With his matinee-idol looks but little acting talent, Evans was given starring roles in a few movies and then, with no studio experience, was handed the production reins at Paramount in the 1960s. When he left the exec ranks, his first film as a producer was the classic “Chinatown,” and he followed with other hits, like “Marathon Man” and “Urban Cowboy.” Eventually, his distinctive look and speaking style turned him into a cult figure, and he had the distinction of being the only film executive who starred in his own animated TV series.

His life was a continuous roller-coaster. Amid the successes, Ali MacGraw left him for Steve McQueen, her costar in the 1972 “The Getaway,” a love triangle that got huge media attention. (MacGraw was the third of Evans’ seven wives.) In 1980, Evans was arrested for cocaine possession and a few years later, was involved in an even bigger scandal: the murder of would-be Hollywood player Roy Radin during the production of “The Cotton Club.” Due to his association with Radin, Evans became a material witness in the execution-style slaying, though no proof of Evans’ knowledge of or connection to the murder was ever established.

Westlake Legal Group 5db72d93200000de2f507055 Robert Evans, Iconic ‘Chinatown’ Producer, Dies at 89

Alfred Eisenstaedt via Getty Images Then VP of Paramount Pictures Robert Evans studying his script by the pool at his home. (Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images)

Drug dependency and the studios’ changing corporate culture plagued Evans’ later career. When he eventually resurfaced at Paramount in the ’90s, his production track record was mostly undistinguished (“The Saint,” “Sliver”). But by then his larger-than-life persona was already the stuff of Hollywood legend. Evans parodied himself in the film “Burn, Hollywood, Burn” (1998), and Dustin Hoffman, a longtime friend, borrowed liberally from Evans in creating the character of an outrageous producer in the 1997 satire “Wag the Dog,” earning an Oscar nomination in the process.

Westlake Legal Group 5db72d562100002838ad4248 Robert Evans, Iconic ‘Chinatown’ Producer, Dies at 89

Paramount Pictures via Getty Images Producer Robert Evans (left) with director John Frankenheimer on the set of the film, ‘Black Sunday’, 1976. (Photo by Paramount Pictures/Archive Photos/Getty Images)

Evans was born Robert Shapera in New York. Before the age of 18 he had worked on more than 300 radio shows and the occasional TV show and play. A collapsed lung forced him to recuperate for a year, and when he returned, he realized he’d lost his momentum. He worked his charms as a salesman at the sportswear firm Evan-Picone, co-founded by his brother Charles.

Several years later, however, his show business career was revived: In the perhaps apocryphal tale, he was spotted by the pool of the Beverly Hills Hotel by actress Norma Shearer, who asked him to played her deceased husband, the legendary MGM exec Irving Thalberg, in the film “The Man of a Thousand Faces.” Darryl Zanuck then cast him as a bullfighter in the 1957 version of Ernest Hemingway’s “The Sun Also Rises.” The other actors pleaded with Zanuck to replace Evans, but Zanuck sent a telegram saying “The kid stays in the picture,” which provided the title for his eventual autobiography. Evans’ dark good looks carried him only so far, however. His stiff onscreen presence in those movies and in “The Fiend Who Walked the West” (1958) and “The Best of Everything” (1959) did not warm the hearts of reviewers, however, and he returned to the garment industry.

After Evan-Picone was sold to Revlon (netting Evans $2 million, according to some sources), he decided to return to the industry in a producing capacity. He purchased the rights to a novel, “The Detective.” New York Times reporter Peter Bart chronicled Evans’ tale in an article that caught the attention of Fox executives Richard Zanuck and David Brown, who put him in charge of such projects as “Achilles Force” (which was never made) and “The Detective,” starring Frank Sinatra. But his stay at Fox was brief.

He befriended and charmed Charles Bluhdorn of Gulf & Western, which owned Paramount Pictures. The born salesman recognized another born salesman when he met him. In 1966 Bluhdorn controversially named the neophyte Evans VP in charge of production. By 1969 he was exec VP of worldwide production.

Evans’ early Paramount tenure included such monumental flops as “Paint Your Wagon” and “Darling Lili,” which were Bluhdorn’s pet projects. Evans oversaw disappointments including “Catch-22” and the 1974 “The Great Gatsby.”

But they were more than offset by Evans’ successes, starting with “Rosemary’s Baby” (1968), “Romeo and Juliet,” “Goodbye, Columbus,” “Love Story” and “The Godfather” films. The degree to which he personally deserved credit for any of these has always been debated, and even Evans claims that some of the best decisions made during his tenure, particularly with respect to “The Godfather,” were arrived at over his objections.

Evans hired Bart at Paramount; Bart eventually joined Variety in 1989, and profiled Evans in his 2011 book “Infamous Players: A Tale of Movies, the Mob, (and Sex).”

As a studio ambassador Evans was a success. His attention to day-to-day production, however, soon deteriorated, exacerbated by his public divorce from MacGraw and growing cocaine dependency. He clashed openly with Francis Ford Coppola on “The Godfather” (and was slighted by Coppola when he accepted his screenplay Oscar). After Barry Diller was brought in over him in 1974, Evans eased into a producing deal. His first crucible was “Chinatown,” a tempestuous but ultimately successful enterprise that was nominated for 11 Oscars.

After that Evans started to slowly go downhill even as a producer. Thriller “Marathon Man,” starring Dustin Hoffman, was a hit in 1976, and 1977′s “Black Sunday” did OK but did not live up to expectations. His tennis drama “Players” (starring MacGraw) was a flop, and neither “Urban Cowboy” nor “Popeye” (both 1980) were big enough hits to restore his golden-boy reputation.

In 1980, at age 50, he was convicted of cocaine possession, during a period when widespread drug use was plaguing the industry and tarnishing its reputation nationally. Evans’ Rat Pack-style behavior was by then quickly falling out of fashion in an increasingly buttoned-down corporate town.

A personal dream, “The Cotton Club,” became a never-ending nightmare, taking up several years of Evans’ life and almost $50 million. The hybrid of music and gangsters found Evans begging Coppola to take over the reins. The results were uneven but artistically interesting; the production was tied to underworld money and, in attempting to raise more funds for the film, Evans became involved with Radin, whose murder seemed to be a case of life imitating art. The scandal cast a large shadow over Evans that he never successfully overcame. “The Cotton Club,” released by Orion Pictures in 1984, went down in flames.

Evans planned to make an acting comeback in 1985 in “The Two Jakes,” a sequel to “Chinatown” to be directed by Robert Towne (who wrote the original). But he had not grown as an actor and, soon after production began, Evans was fired. The film was shut down, only to be revived in 1990 under the direction of Jack Nicholson, who co-starred with Harvey Keitel. Evans was distanced from the sequel, which was a failure.

He returned to Paramount in the early ’90s as a producer, but the salacious “Sliver” (1993) and “Jade” (1995) were both significant failures. The comicbook-like “The Phantom” (1996) also sank without a trace. In 1997 Evans produced “The Saint,” based on the long-running TV espionage-adventure series. He’d been nurturing the project for several years and hoped the film would be the first entry in a franchise. But the movie, starring Val Kilmer, didn’t turn out as well as expected and the sequels never came to pass.

His private life once again made the headlines when Evans’ name was mentioned among the customers for Hollywood madam Heidi Fleiss’ service. An entire chapter on his sexual habits was detailed in the salacious and hyperbolic book “You’ll Never Make Love in This Town Again.” Evans had already published a frank memoir of his life, 1994′s “The Kid Stays in the Picture,” admitting some of his virtues and his vices.

Westlake Legal Group 5db72d85210000063334b477 Robert Evans, Iconic ‘Chinatown’ Producer, Dies at 89

J.Emilio Flores via Getty Images Producer Robert Evans, photographed at Paramount Pictures. (Photo by J. Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images)

In 1998 Evans suffered a stroke that left him paralyzed on one side and unable to speak, but he eventually made a full recovery after much therapy.

He made a triumphant return in some sense with the 2002 documentary adaptation of “The Kid Stays in the Picture,” directed by Nanette Burstein and Brett Morgen, in which Evans idiosyncratically discussed his life.

Taking advantage of the increased exposure, he exec produced “Kid Notorious,” a 2003 animated series based on his unique persona for Comedy Central. The same year he produced the successful romantic comedy “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days.”

Evans maintained an office on the Paramount Pictures lot, and continued to develop projects, though none came to fruition: He had long planned a movie based on the renegade car builder John DeLorean, written by James Toback to be produced with Brett Ratner; he also had in development a sci-fi movie set in a futuristic Manhattan and based on a graphic novel, “NYC2123”; “Whip Smart,” the story of a young dominatrix to be directed by Catherine Hardwicke; and a superhero film, “Foreverman,” based on an original character created by Stan Lee and to be produced with Lee.

He was married and divorced seven times, first to actress Sharon Hugueny, then to actress Camilla Sparv and, after his divorce from MacGraw, to former Miss America Phyllis George. His brief 1998 marriage to actress Catherine Oxenberg was annulled. Thereafter he was married to Leslie Ann Woodward and Victoria White.

He and MacGraw had a son, Josh, an actor and director. Survivors also include a grandson.

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James Carafano: Al-Baghdadi is dead –Trump was proven right on this one. So now what?

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098504885001_6098505058001-vs James Carafano: Al-Baghdadi is dead –Trump was proven right on this one. So now what? James Jay Carafano fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 352024ec-a0b5-57c3-b65a-4b384e2a5c8c

The self-proclaimed Caliph of ISIS is dead. That’s going to make it really tough for him to follow through on the terrorist group’s promise that “history is over”—a promise they made when starting their rampage of slaughter and misery.

While history isn’t over, the question remains: What does the future hold? Here is what we know for sure.

ISIS has now suffered two devastating psychological blows. The first was the obliteration of their territorial “caliphate.” Baghdadi’s obliteration is the second. In the Middle East, where honor is power, the humiliating death of their dear leader triggers a loss of respect and prestige. This is another big setback to the Islamist terrorist “cause.”

HOW ISIS LEADER AL-BAGHDADI’S HEADLESS BODY WAS ID’D MINUTES AFTER DEATH

And more bad news is likely headed the terrorists’ way. The raid on Baghdadi’s hideout was as much an intelligence collection operation as a military assault. No doubt the U.S. special forces teams scarfed up stuff that will tell them even more about ISIS, information that can and will be used to further degrade the terrorist organization.

The successful operation also suggests that, on this score at least, Trump was right and his critics wrong. The U.S. can continue to conduct effective counterterrorism operations in Syria—and it doesn’t need a massive military presence there to do it.

More from Opinion

The U.S. maintains a substantial counterterrorism footprint in the region. From Somalia and Yemen to Iraq, the U.S. has shown it can find and take out America’s enemies. No ISIS operative can rest easy in their bed at night, thinking that he is out of harm’s way.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER

Finally, we know this is not over.  In 2001, we found ourselves in this global war against Islamist terrorists because we took our eye off the ball in the 1990s. We thought Afghanistan was too far away and Al Qaeda too insignificant to really bring the war to us.

The successful operation also suggests that, on this score at least, Trump was right and his critics wrong. The U.S. can continue to conduct effective counterterrorism operations in Syria—and it doesn’t need a massive military presence there to do it.

The threat roared back in 2011, when President Obama decided to take the foot off the gas pedal on operations to hunt the Islamists into oblivion. Now that the Caliphate is gone and the enemy is once again down on its luck, this is no time to declare “mission accomplished” and call it a day.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

While the U.S. does not need to occupy Syria, there is more work to be done in the region. The U.S. has to safeguard against foreign fighters and thwart terrorist travel. We have to keep a footprint in Afghanistan so we can also conduct effective counterterrorism operations in South Asia. We have to work with allies. And we have to remain vigilant here at home.

It would also be great if we could put aside the endless political squabbling. The truth is we have had the three most successful years in the fight against global terrorism. We should be building on that record of achievement—not fighting each other.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM JAMES JAY CARAFANO

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098504885001_6098505058001-vs James Carafano: Al-Baghdadi is dead –Trump was proven right on this one. So now what? James Jay Carafano fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 352024ec-a0b5-57c3-b65a-4b384e2a5c8c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6098504885001_6098505058001-vs James Carafano: Al-Baghdadi is dead –Trump was proven right on this one. So now what? James Jay Carafano fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/conflicts/syria fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/politics/foreign-policy fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article 352024ec-a0b5-57c3-b65a-4b384e2a5c8c

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Gunfire along I-43 in Milwaukee closes lanes for 3rd time in 2 weeks

Westlake Legal Group Milwaukee-Sherrifs Gunfire along I-43 in Milwaukee closes lanes for 3rd time in 2 weeks Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article ad1a6d10-c9ba-594e-8568-577d3fa0391d

Three shootings have been reported along a busy interstate in Milwaukee in a two-week stretch.

It was not immediately known whether the incidents were connected.

The latest shooting happened Sunday evening and closed the southbound lanes of Interstate 43 as deputies with the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office canvassed the roadway for evidence, according to reports. No injuries were reported.

On Oct. 16, the northbound lanes of I-43 were shut down after an individual said his vehicle was shot at when he gestured to the occupants of a Ford Taurus for cutting him off.

MILWAUKEE BUS DRIVER HONORED FOR SAVING RESIDENTS FROM BURNING APARTMENT

Two bullets struck the individual’s vehicle, FOX6 Milwaukee reported. The man was not hurt. Deputies recovered a .40 caliber shell casing.

On Oct. 14, a 19-year-old driver exited I-43 after being shot and drove to a McDonald’s, where an ambulance then took him to the hospital, the station reported. Deputies closed the southbound lanes as they investigated the shooting.

VICTIMS OF DEADLY TEXAS HIGHWAY SHOOTING ARE IDENTIFIED, SHOOTER STILL AT LARGE

Prosecutors told the station the victim’s injuries were minor but the shooting was being treated as a serious crime.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Just one moment of unregulated behavior is going to have dramatic consequences to the victims, and if you are caught, it’s going to have dramatic consequences for the individual engaging in that behavior, too,” Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm said.

Westlake Legal Group Milwaukee-Sherrifs Gunfire along I-43 in Milwaukee closes lanes for 3rd time in 2 weeks Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article ad1a6d10-c9ba-594e-8568-577d3fa0391d   Westlake Legal Group Milwaukee-Sherrifs Gunfire along I-43 in Milwaukee closes lanes for 3rd time in 2 weeks Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/wisconsin fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc article ad1a6d10-c9ba-594e-8568-577d3fa0391d

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DOJ Says It’ll Be ‘Irreparably Harmed’ if Congress Gets Its Hands on Mueller’s Secret Grand Jury Materials

This is how he has always ran things. The same way trump ran his businesses. One set of books for when he needed to look wealthy to creditors. And another set of books when he needed to look broke for debtors and the tax man. The facts don’t matter they only care to shift their argument to whatever suits them in that moment.

They did the same shit under bush.

They argued that Cheney had executive privilage as part of the executive branch on some issue. But for any rules that applies to the executive branch they argued he was not subject to them because he was actually part of congress since he cast the tie breaking vote in the Senate. Bassically switching which branch he is a part of depending on the issue to claim immunity.

It’s like the enemy combatant designation too. They didn’t want to list them as POWs so they weren’t subject to international POW law. But couldn’t detain them under US criminal law because then they would be subject to US laws. Also the reason they hold terrorist in gitmo. To avoid laws governing their treatment.

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DOJ Says It’ll Be ‘Irreparably Harmed’ if Congress Gets Its Hands on Mueller’s Secret Grand Jury Materials

This is how he has always ran things. The same way trump ran his businesses. One set of books for when he needed to look wealthy to creditors. And another set of books when he needed to look broke for debtors and the tax man. The facts don’t matter they only care to shift their argument to whatever suits them in that moment.

They did the same shit under bush.

They argued that Cheney had executive privilage as part of the executive branch on some issue. But for any rules that applies to the executive branch they argued he was not subject to them because he was actually part of congress since he cast the tie breaking vote in the Senate. Bassically switching which branch he is a part of depending on the issue to claim immunity.

It’s like the enemy combatant designation too. They didn’t want to list them as POWs so they weren’t subject to international POW law. But couldn’t detain them under US criminal law because then they would be subject to US laws. Also the reason they hold terrorist in gitmo. To avoid laws governing their treatment.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Dissent Erupts at Facebook Over Hands-Off Stance on Political Ads

Westlake Legal Group merlin_163177695_a8bcff7f-50cb-4cb9-b101-3862aadda7ac-facebookJumbo Dissent Erupts at Facebook Over Hands-Off Stance on Political Ads Zuckerberg, Mark E United States Politics and Government Social Media Rumors and Misinformation Presidential Election of 2020 Politics and Government Political Advertising Online Advertising Freedom of Speech and Expression Facebook Inc Computers and the Internet

SAN FRANCISCO — The letter was aimed at Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, and his top lieutenants. It decried the social network’s recent decision to let politicians post any claims they wanted — even false ones — in ads on the site. It asked Facebook’s leaders to rethink the stance.

Facebook’s position on political advertising is “a threat to what FB stands for,” said the letter, which was obtained by The New York Times. “We strongly object to this policy as it stands.”

The message was written by Facebook’s own employees. For the past two weeks, the text has been publicly visible on Facebook Workplace, a software program that the Silicon Valley company uses to communicate internally. More than 250 employees have signed the letter, according to three people who have seen it and who declined to be identified for fear of retaliation.

While the number of signatures on the letter was a fraction of Facebook’s 35,000-plus work force, it was one sign of the resistance that the company is now facing internally over how it treats political ads.

Many employees have been discussing Mr. Zuckerberg’s decision to let politicians post anything they want in Facebook ads because those ads can go viral and spread misinformation widely. The worker dissatisfaction has spilled out across winding, heated threads on Facebook Workplace, the people said.

For weeks, Facebook has been under attack by presidential candidates, lawmakers and civil rights groups over its position on political ads. But the employee actions — which are a rare moment of internal strife for the company — show that even some of its own workers are not convinced the political ads policy is sound. The dissent is adding to Facebook’s woes as it heads into the 2020 presidential election season.

“Facebook’s culture is built on openness, so we appreciate our employees voicing their thoughts on this important topic,” Bertie Thomson, a Facebook spokeswoman, said in a statement. “We remain committed to not censoring political speech, and will continue exploring additional steps we can take to bring increased transparency to political ads.”

Facebook has been struggling to respond to misinformation on its site since the 2016 presidential election, when Russians used the social network to spread inflammatory and divisive messages to influence the American electorate. Mr. Zuckerberg has since appointed tens of thousands of people to work on platform security and to deter coordinated disinformation efforts.

But figuring out what is and isn’t allowed on the social network is slippery. And last month, Facebook announced that politicians and their campaigns would have nearly free rein over content they post there. Previously, the company had prohibited the use of paid political ads that “include claims debunked by third-party fact checkers.”

This month, President Trump’s campaign began circulating an ad on Facebook that made false claims about former vice president Joseph R. Biden Jr., who is running for president. When Mr. Biden’s campaign asked Facebook to remove the ad, the company refused, saying ads from politicians were newsworthy and important for discourse.

Senator Elizabeth Warren, the Democrat from Massachusetts who is also running for president, soon took Facebook to task. She bought a political ad on Facebook that falsely claimed Mr. Zuckerberg and his company supported Mr. Trump for president. (Neither Mr. Zuckerberg nor Facebook have endorsed a political candidate.)

Ms. Warren said she wanted to see how far she could take it on the site. Mr. Zuckerberg had turned his company into a “disinformation-for-profit machine,” she said.

But Mr. Zuckerberg doubled down. In a 5,000-word speech to students at Georgetown University in Washington this month, the chief executive defended his treatment of political ads by citing freedom of expression. He said Facebook’s policies would be seen positively in the long run, especially when compared with policies in countries like China, where the government suppresses online speech.

“People having the power to express themselves at scale is a new kind of force in the world — a Fifth Estate alongside the other power structures of society,” Mr. Zuckerberg said at the time.

Mr. Zuckerberg also said Facebook’s policies were largely in line with what other social networks — like YouTube and Twitter — and most television broadcasters had decided to run on their networks. Federal law mandates that broadcast networks cannot censor political ads from candidates running for office.

Inside Facebook, Mr. Zuckerberg’s decision to be hands-off on political ads has supporters. But dissenters said Facebook was not doing enough to check the lies from spreading across the platform.

While internal debate is not uncommon at the social network, it historically has seen less internal turmoil than other tech companies because of a strong sense of mission among its rank and file workers.

That has set it apart from Google and Amazon, which for the last few years have grappled with several employee uprisings. Most notably, 20,000 Google workers walked off the job in 2018 to protest the company’s massive payouts to executives accused of sexual harassment.

Last week, Google employees again challenged management over new software that some staff said was a surveillance tool to keep tabs on workplace dissent. At an employee meeting on Thursday, Sundar Pichai, Google’s chief executive, said he was working on ways to improve trust with employees, while acknowledging it was challenging to maintain transparency as the company grows. A video of Mr. Pichai’s comments was leaked to The Washington Post.

Amazon has faced employee pressure for nearly a year to do more to address the company’s impact on climate change. Some employees worked on a shareholder resolution to push the company on the matter, and more than 7,500 Amazon workers publicly signed a letter to support the proposal. In September, Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive, announced the company was accelerating its climate goals, aiming to be carbon neutral by 2040.

In the Facebook employee letter to Mr. Zuckerberg and other executives, the workers said the policy change on political advertising “doesn’t protect voices, but instead allows politicians to weaponize our platform by targeting people who believe that content posted by political figures is trustworthy.”

It added, “We want to work with our leadership to develop better solutions that both protect our business and the people who use our products.”

The letter then laid out product changes and other actions that Facebook could take to reduce the harm from false claims in advertising from politicians. Among the proposals: Changing the visual design treatment for political ads, restricting some of the options for targeting users with those ads, and instituting spending caps for individual politicians.

“This is still our company,” the letter concluded.

Daisuke Wakabayashi and Karen Weise contributed reporting from Seattle.

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The Ford Flex, its oldest SUV, is being discontinued

Ford’s oldest utility vehicle is being discontinued after a decade.

Westlake Legal Group flex-09 The Ford Flex, its oldest SUV, is being discontinued Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/suv fox-news/auto/make/ford fox news fnc/auto fnc efa552f7-56bc-527e-8bb5-63e973dcde73 article

The Flex has been one of the automaker’s lowest selling family car offerings since it was introduced as a 2009 model. Despite many positive reviews, the utility vehicle’s offbeat boxy design never really caught on with consumers, and its head designer left the company just a few months after it debuted. It was the first Ford brand model to offer one of the company’s now-ubiquitous EcoBoost turbocharged engines.

Westlake Legal Group flex-13 The Ford Flex, its oldest SUV, is being discontinued Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/suv fox-news/auto/make/ford fox news fnc/auto fnc efa552f7-56bc-527e-8bb5-63e973dcde73 article

The Flex received a slight redesign for the 2013 model year. (Ford)

Sales of the Flex peaked at 38,000 in its first full year on the market, but it was soon overshadowed by the arrival of an all-new Ford Explorer in 2011 that featured a more conventional SUV look. Ford sold 250,000 Explorers in 2018 alone, while less than 300,000 Flexes have been sold during its entire run.

Ford hasn’t announced the exact date that the last Flex will come off of the line at its Oakville Assembly Complex in Canada, but the facility built the last Lincoln MKT that shared its platform earlier this month.

The Explorer has been fully redesigned again for 2020.

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Westlake Legal Group FLEX The Ford Flex, its oldest SUV, is being discontinued Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/suv fox-news/auto/make/ford fox news fnc/auto fnc efa552f7-56bc-527e-8bb5-63e973dcde73 article   Westlake Legal Group FLEX The Ford Flex, its oldest SUV, is being discontinued Gary Gastelu fox-news/auto/style/suv fox-news/auto/make/ford fox news fnc/auto fnc efa552f7-56bc-527e-8bb5-63e973dcde73 article

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‘The View’ host Joy Behar blasts Trump for ‘bragging’ that ISIS leader al-Baghdadi is dead

ABC News’ “The View” co-host Joy Behar said Monday that President Trump should “stop bragging” about the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Trump announced Sunday that al-Baghdadi detonated an explosive vest as U.S. Special Operations Forces stormed his compound in northwest Syria Saturday night. Co-host Whoopi Goldberg kicked off the daytime gabfest’s discussion by asking if we can “at least agree that the world is a better place without this guy in it?”

Behar joked, “Who Trump or al-Baghdadi?”

TRUMP DESCRIBES AL-BAGHDADI AS ‘WHIMPERING AND CRYING’ BEFORE DYING IN U.S. OPERATION: ‘HE DIED LIKE A COWARD’

Behar then said Baghdadi was a “bad guy” and she’s “glad” he died but condemned Trump for taking credit.

“In this case, the Special Ops or whoever they were did this thing… so maybe he should back off a little bit and stop bragging about it so much,” Behar said.

Co-host Sunny Hostin agreed it’s “a good thing” that the “self-proclaimed leader” of ISIS is dead, but she had an issue with the way Trump handled it.

“My problem is that, at least by New York Times reporting, folks inside of the intelligence community are saying that this operation was done despite, or in spite of, President Trump, not because of him,” Hostin said. “He had this sort of selective notification about the operation.”

Hostin criticized Trump for reportedly failing to inform some Democratic leaders

“It just concerns me that, even in something like this, he just doesn’t follow the rules,” Hostin said.

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Trump has defended his decision not to give Democratic congressional leaders advance notice of the raid, saying once again that he was concerned the details would leak out.

Media Research Center director Tim Graham issued a statement about media coverage of al-Baghdadi’s death, which included everything from nitpicking by CNN to a controversial Washington Post headline.

“What a fascinating glimpse into the mind of the liberal media,” Graham said. “They have developed such an aversion to covering the President favorably, that they cannot even bear to celebrate an American special-forces victory over ISIS.

“They can barely acknowledge this as a win for our country, dwelling on trashing Trump’s words and questioning his motives. For them, this is not a triumph for democracy over violent terrorists. It’s simply a temporary distraction from their obsession with impeaching Donald Trump.”

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059924440001_6059932352001-vs 'The View' host Joy Behar blasts Trump for 'bragging' that ISIS leader al-Baghdadi is dead fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 95fa72f6-035e-539a-abea-9a1fb1d35ec6   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6059924440001_6059932352001-vs 'The View' host Joy Behar blasts Trump for 'bragging' that ISIS leader al-Baghdadi is dead fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood article 95fa72f6-035e-539a-abea-9a1fb1d35ec6

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