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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 37)

Two Ohio teens charged in death of woman struck by falling 74-pound log

Two 16-year-old boys were reportedly arrested Thursday on charges of reckless homicide in the death last month of a woman who was struck by a falling six-foot log at an Ohio state park.

It was initially believed Victoria Shafer’s death was an accident, but investigators soon determined the log that hit her had been pushed or thrown off a cliff at Hocking Hills State Park in Logan.

Shafer, a 44-year-old professional photographer from Chillicothe, Ohio, was taking photographs with five of her students when the log, weighing 74 pounds, fell more than 75 feet off the cliff and struck her as she was sitting on a staircase, Fickel said. She was killed instantly.

Westlake Legal Group Victoria-Schafer Two Ohio teens charged in death of woman struck by falling 74-pound log Robert Gearty fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 934c0326-3d43-54fd-9cdc-1a69486ccab0

Victoria Schafer was 44 when she was struck and killed by a falling log in Hocking Hills State Park in Ohio  (Victoria Schafer Photography)

WISCONSIN MAN KILLED WHEN TREE BRANCH FALLS ON TENT DURING HUNTING TRIP

“Ohio Department of Natural Resources investigators determined early on that the six-foot log was pushed or thrown off the cliff,” he said.

Fickel said Tuesday a tipster called to report one of the juveniles in custody sent text messages to a classmate stating he had done something serious at the park with another juvenile.

Further investigation led to the arrests and admissions from the two boys that “they were involved in forcing the log over the cliff,” the prosecutor said. He said both boys were from Logan.

GIRL, 3, KILLED BY FALLING TREE BRANCH AT NEW JERSEY CAMPGROUND, STATE POLICE SAY

The Chillicothe Gazette reported Shafer, the mother of four children, owned a photography studio and was well known in the community for her contributions to various charitable causes.

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“My wife, Victoria, was suddenly and tragically killed on Labor Day, September 2, 2019, while exercising her passion for photography at Hocking Hills State Park,” her husband Fritz Shafer said on Facebook Sept 15. “An investigation is pending, and we are searching for answers.”

Westlake Legal Group Victoria-Schafer Two Ohio teens charged in death of woman struck by falling 74-pound log Robert Gearty fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 934c0326-3d43-54fd-9cdc-1a69486ccab0   Westlake Legal Group Victoria-Schafer Two Ohio teens charged in death of woman struck by falling 74-pound log Robert Gearty fox-news/us/crime/homicide fox news fnc/us fnc article 934c0326-3d43-54fd-9cdc-1a69486ccab0

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Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, Purdue football players will wear a moonwalk-inspired helmet and commemorative astronaut-themed patch during Saturday’s homecoming game against Maryland.

Purdue is the alma mater of a host of astronauts, including Neil Armstrong, Gus Grissom, who was the second American in space, and Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the Moon. The West Lafayette, Ind. school, dubbed ‘the cradle of astronauts,’ counts 25 former and current astronauts among its alumni.

Designed to resemble an astronaut’s helmet, the Boilermakers will take the field on Saturday wearing white helmets with a chrome gold mask. A gray and white Moon pattern on the helmets honors Armstrong and Cernan, and a center stripe commemorates Armstrong’s famous first steps on the lunar surface.

APOLLO 11: WHAT NEIL ARMSTRONG AND BUZZ ALDRIN SAW DURING DRAMATIC MOON LANDING

The helmet stripe also features the numbers 2, 25 and 64 — two Purdue alum walked on the Moon;  25 total Purdue astronauts; and 64 space missions completed by the school’s alums.

Westlake Legal Group purduesports2 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

Purdue players will wear the moon-inspired helmets for the homecoming game against Maryland. (Purdue University)

Additionally, a mission sticker with the Griffin from Purdue’s crest placing the school’s flag on the surface of the Moon will be featured on the back of the helmet. The school’s anniversary motto “150 years of giant leaps” is also incorporated into the sticker design.

A patch with the same design will also be on the players’ jerseys for the game against the Terrapins.

APOLLO 11: HOW ‘DUMB LUCK’ SAVED ICONIC MOON PHOTOS FROM BEING DESTROYED

In 2012, Purdue honored Neil Armstrong with a special helmet decal during a game at Notre Dame.

Westlake Legal Group purduesports3 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

The Boilermakers will take the field wearing white helmets with a chrome gold mask, which is designed to resemble an astronaut’s helmet. (Purdue University)

Some 13 Purdue astronaut alums will be attending Saturday’s homecoming game, including NASA astronaut Drew Feustel, who is a veteran of three spaceflights. Beth Moses, who became the first female commercial astronaut on Virgin Galactic’s spaceplane earlier this year, will also attend.

During a recent interview, Feustel told Fox News that America’s return to the Moon could unlock a vast trove of space resources.

NASA ASTRONAUT EYES MOON JACKPOT, RANGING FROM SPACE MINING TO POLAR ICE

NASA’s Artemis program aims to land American astronauts on the Moon by 2024 and establish a sustainable human presence on Earth’s natural satellite.

Westlake Legal Group purduesports1 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

The helmet stripe celebrates Purdue alums’ contribution to space exploration. (Purdue University)

After Apollo 11 astronauts Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin set foot on the Moon on July 20, 1969, only 10 more men, all Americans, walked on the lunar surface.  Apollo 17 Mission Cmdr. Cernan became the last NASA astronaut to set foot on the Moon on Dec. 14, 1972.

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Westlake Legal Group purduesports-1 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

Purdue players will also wear a specially-designed commemorative patch for the homecoming game. (Purdue University)

Purdue’s game against Maryland kicks off at noon ET Saturday.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

Westlake Legal Group purduesports2 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article   Westlake Legal Group purduesports2 Purdue honors Apollo 11 with Moon-themed helmets for homecoming game James Rogers fox-news/us/personal-freedoms/proud-american fox-news/topic/apollo-11 fox-news/science/air-and-space/spaceflight fox-news/science/air-and-space/nasa fox-news/science/air-and-space/moon fox news fnc/science fnc b4734600-61a4-5666-b21a-66d8899ed29e article

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Travel will be ‘impossible’ in the Dakotas as blizzard could bring up to 3 feet of snow

CLOSEWestlake Legal Group icon_close Travel will be 'impossible' in the Dakotas as blizzard could bring up to 3 feet of snow

Climate change is making winters colder despite rising temperatures and hotter summers. Here’s why. Just the FAQs, USA TODAY

Blizzard conditions have forecasters urging residents in portions of the Dakotas to travel only in emergencies as strong winds from a potent fall snowstorm whipped up heavy, accumulating snow.

By Friday night, an “all-out blizzard” is anticipated from central and northeastern South Dakota to central and eastern North Dakota, according to AccuWeather meteorologist Bernie Rayno. Unnecessary travel should be avoided in these areas.

Westlake Legal Group f745cdec-8ce2-4ce5-b04f-646683ebec08-101119-snowfall-midwest Travel will be 'impossible' in the Dakotas as blizzard could bring up to 3 feet of snow

The National Weather Service in Grand Forks, North Dakota, said the “forecast event total (through Saturday) snowfall ranges from 1 to 3 feet … we repeat feet … an incredibly impactful storm … prepare for impossible travel for several days in hardest hit areas.”

Winds could gust up to 60 mph, leading to whiteout conditions.

This snowstorm has the potential to set October snowfall records in parts of the northern Plains, the Weather Channel said.

Meanwhile in New England: Nor’easter slams coast with howling wind, drenching rain

Authorities in North Dakota issued a travel alert because heavy snow, reduced visibility and icy roads are creating hazardous driving conditions.

Dozens of schools in the Dakotas were closed Friday because of deteriorating travel conditions. That follows school closures and travel headaches Thursday in the Great Plains.

Earlier, the same storm brought Denver its first accumulating snow of the season on Thursday, with 2 to 4 inches falling in and around the area, AccuWeather said. Nearly 100 traffic accidents were reported in the Denver metro Thursday morning as snow made roadways slippery, the Weather Channel reported. 

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The highest snow total from the storm so far was the 24 inches that fell in Pony, Montana, the weather service reported. 

Along with the snow, bitter cold temperatures were recorded Friday morning across much of the western and central U.S. Dozens of record lows were set from Washington to Texas. 

Freeze watches have been posted as far south as Texas and Oklahoma, including Oklahoma City and Wichita Falls, Texas, according to WeatherBug. 

The national low temperature Friday morning was 9 degrees below zero, in West Yellowstone, Montana, the weather service said. 

Contributing: The Associated Press

‘Kill it immediately’: Snakehead fish that can breathe air, survive on land found in Georgia

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/11/winter-snow-storm-hits-dakota-travel-advisory/3942603002/

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Impeachment Updates: Ex-Ambassador Condemns ‘Hollowed Out State Dept.’

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_162499107_8952a520-3a86-4115-b2a5-39940b23a35d-articleLarge Impeachment Updates: Ex-Ambassador Condemns ‘Hollowed Out State Dept.’ Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment

President Trump spoke during a campaign rally Thursday in Minneapolis.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

Ms. Yovanovitch, who was abruptly recalled as the American ambassador to Ukraine in May, told impeachment investigators during a closed-door deposition on Capitol Hill that she believed Mr. Trump had intervened to have her removed “based, as far as I can tell, on unfounded and false claims by people with clearly questionable motives.”

The former ambassador, who spoke to the House Intelligence Committee in defiance of the White House’s declaration that administration officials would not cooperate with the House impeachment inquiry, delivered a scathing account of her own treatment and the Trump administration’s conduct of foreign policy.

According to a copy of her opening statement obtained by The New York Times, she said that the deputy secretary of state, who at the time was John Sullivan, had told her that Mr. Trump had pushed for her removal for months even though the department believed she had “done nothing wrong.”

She also described a “hollowed out State Department” under Mr. Trump, where private influence and personal gain have usurped diplomats’ judgment, threatening to undermine the nation’s interests and drive talented professionals out of public service.

Ms. Yovanovitch’s searing account, delivered at the risk of losing her job, contradicts the State Department’s initial claim that her term had simply ended.

Her account could lend new momentum to the impeachment inquiry that threatens to swamp Mr. Trump’s presidency. She said undermining loyal diplomats would embolden “bad actors” who would “see how easy it is to use fiction and innuendo to manipulate our system” and serve the interests of adversaries, including Russia.

“Today we see the State Department attacked and hollowed out from within,” she said. She said the allegations that she was disloyal to Mr. Trump, circulated by allies of Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, were totally “fictitious.”

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled 2-1 on Friday against the White House’s effort to crush an effort by House Democrats to extract Mr. Trump’s tax returns from his accounting firm, Mazars USA.

That had nothing to do with the House’s impeachment inquiry, but the dissenter, a Trump appointee, Judge Neomi Rao, raised it, saying that the House’s efforts were clearly looking for illegality and therefore those efforts should be done through an impeachment inquiry.

“Impeachment provides the exclusive method for Congress to investigate actions of illegal conduct by impeachable officials, particularly with the aid of compulsory process,” she wrote.

“Throughout our history, Congress, the President, and the courts have insisted upon maintaining the separation between the legislative and impeachment powers of the House and recognized the gravity and accountability that follow impeachment,” she argued, echoing House Judiciary Committee Democrats who have said an impeachment inquiry would have legal powers unavailable to other investigations.

As Democrats consider how wide their inquiry should be, Judge Rao may have given them an invitation to expand the scope of their “compulsory process.”

Gordon D. Sondland, the American ambassador to the European Union, has agreed to comply with a House subpoena and testify next week, despite the State Department’s instruction to him not to appear before lawmakers, Mr. Sondland’s lawyer said Friday. He was prepared to testify on Tuesday, but the Trump administration directed him not to in the 11th hour.

“Ambassador Sondland has at all times acted with integrity and in the interests of the United States,” his lawyers said in a statement Friday. “He has no agenda apart from answering the Committees’ questions fully and truthfully.”

Lawmakers have requested documents related to Ukraine, but Mr. Sondland’s attorneys said he would not be able to provide them because doing so would violate federal law and State Department regulations.

Impeachment investigators want to know more about Mr. Sondland’s role in the pressure campaign to get Ukraine to investigate one of Mr. Trump’s political rivals and other inquiries that could personally benefit the president.

Maryland’s Republican governor, Larry Hogan, is nobody’s idea of a stalwart supporter of President Trump, but his embrace of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry on Thursday night was not helpful to the Republican effort to delegitimize the investigation.

“I think we do need an inquiry because we have to get to the bottom of it,” Mr. Hogan, a moderate Republican, said on P.B.S.’ Firing Line. “I’m not ready to say I support impeachment and the removal of the president, but I do think we should have an impeachment inquiry.”

Along with the governors of Massachusetts and Vermont, Mr. Hogan is part of the “Never Trump” Republican gubernatorial brigade. Mr. Hogan did implore Democrats to use “a fair, objective” process, but he did not say moving forward should depend on new rules.

“I don’t see any other way to get the facts,” he said.

The indictment of two associates of Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, added new details to the narrative at the heart of the impeachment inquiry. The two men, Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, helped Mr. Giuliani navigate connections in Ukraine in pursuit of evidence that would undercut the legitimacy of the special counsel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and lift Mr. Trump against his political rivals heading into 2020.

The two men also appear to have made illegal campaign donations to Representative Pete Sessions, Republican of Texas, from whom Mr. Parnas sought support in pressing the Trump administration to remove the United States ambassador to Ukraine, Marie L. Yovanovitch. Some Trump allies believed Ms. Yovanovitch was trying impede their effort to dig up damaging information about former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his son Hunter, according to a former Ukrainian official.

Read more: Giuliani’s Ukraine Team: In Search of Influence, Dirt and Money

  • President Trump repeatedly pressured President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate people and issues of political concern to Mr. Trump, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Here’s a timeline of events since January.

  • A C.I.A. officer who was once detailed to the White House filed a whistle-blower complaint on Mr. Trump’s interactions with Mr. Zelensky. Read the complaint.

Video

Westlake Legal Group vidxx-trump-ukraine-1-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Impeachment Updates: Ex-Ambassador Condemns ‘Hollowed Out State Dept.’ Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment

President Trump’s personal lawyer. The prosecutor general of Ukraine. Joe Biden’s son. These are just some of the names mentioned in the whistle-blower’s complaint. What were their roles? We break it down.CreditCreditIllustration by The New York Times

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Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Westlake Legal Group 2019-10-09-img_9159-mblock_custom-e19a70ce2dec32c53ff23e8f71a9ed6a491dff27-s1100-c15 Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Canvassing for votes in Virginia Beach, Democrat Missy Cotter Smasal meets voter Mildred Manger. “It’s just stupid that everybody has to have a gun,” Manger says. “I mean give me a break!” Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Canvassing for votes in Virginia Beach, Democrat Missy Cotter Smasal meets voter Mildred Manger. “It’s just stupid that everybody has to have a gun,” Manger says. “I mean give me a break!”

Melissa Block/NPR

Gun control has emerged as a key issue in next month’s off-off-year elections in Virginia, a state that is seen as a bellwether of what could be to come in national elections in 2020.

Republicans currently hold a razor-thin majority in both houses of the state legislature, and with all 140 seats on the ballot this year, Democrats hope to flip those chambers blue.

One race where the discussion of guns is especially fraught is in Virginia Beach, the 8th State Senate district.

Virginia Beach was the scene of a mass shooting on May 31, when a longtime city employee stalked through a municipal building armed with two .45-caliber pistols, killing 12 people and wounding four others before he was killed in a gun battle with police.

That crime has amplified the debate over gun laws as the campaigns head into the final weeks before the Nov. 5 election.

The race in the 8th Senate district in Virginia Beach pits two U.S. Navy veterans against each other.

Democrat Missy Cotter Smasal, a 41-year-old political newcomer, is challenging the incumbent Republican, 54-year-old Bill DeSteph.

Westlake Legal Group permissionsphoto_bil_desteph_custom-c49f8bdf142279379c80257132e706059d2255e9-s800-c15 Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Bill DeSteph, the incumbent Republican who represents Virginia’s Beach’s 8th State Senate District. Friends of Bill DeSteph for Senate hide caption

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Friends of Bill DeSteph for Senate

Westlake Legal Group  Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Bill DeSteph, the incumbent Republican who represents Virginia’s Beach’s 8th State Senate District.

Friends of Bill DeSteph for Senate

Cotter Smasal served as a surface warfare officer in the Navy before opening an Italian ice shop in Virginia Beach.

DeSteph was a naval special-warfare intelligence officer, who later served on the Virginia Beach city council and in the state House of Delegates.

Four years ago, DeSteph won his Senate seat handily, beating his challenger by 18 points. But this year, Democrats — bolstered by large cash infusions from gun control groups — think they have a good chance of unseating him.

With the city’s mass shooting fresh in mind, Cotter Smasal is campaigning hard on gun control.

Last week, she began airing a TV ad that features Karen Havekost, who worked in the building where the shooting took place.

“I walked out of the bathroom, I saw the gunman on the other end of the hallway, and I saw a coworker in the middle, and he looked at me and he yelled, ‘Go!” Havekost says in the ad.

Havekost goes on to fault DeSteph for protecting gun rights.

“He blocked the Senate from even voting on gun safety laws,” she says in the ad. “He has a chance to make a difference, but he refuses to do it.”

Within a couple of days, DeSteph hit back with a response ad.

“Missy Cotter Smasal is using our local tragedy for her political gain. It’s shameful,” the narrator says. “A veteran, Bill DeSteph is the only candidate who will defend our Second Amendment rights.”

DeSteph is a gun collector and a licensed firearms dealer. He declined to be interviewed for this story, but sent a statement that says, in part, “My opponent has a lot to learn about our community if she thinks that voters will be fooled by her attempts to gain a political advantage from this tragedy.”

In July, weeks after the mass shooting, DeSteph spoke at an NRA town hall meeting in Virginia Beach that was closed to the media.

Afterward, in a video that was posted on an NRA Facebook page but has now been taken down, DeSteph urged NRA members to call their elected representatives: “Tell all of ’em there’s no level of legislation that they can present that would have stopped what happened here.”

The week after that NRA meeting, Democrats were outraged when Republican legislators shut down a special session of the Virginia General Assembly after just 90 minutes.

Westlake Legal Group 2019-10-09-img_9316-mblock_custom-c01808c48c60a605aed77d851869d908a0696243-s1100-c15 Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Campaign poster for Republican Bill DeSteph, the incumbent state senator, who is seeking his second term. Melissa Block /NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block /NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Campaign poster for Republican Bill DeSteph, the incumbent state senator, who is seeking his second term.

Melissa Block /NPR

Virginia’s Democratic governor, Ralph Northam, had called the session to consider a package of gun control bills, including universal background checks and a red flag law.

Instead, on a party-line vote, Republicans voted to adjourn until after the November elections. They asked the Virginia State Crime Commission to examine the Virginia Beach shooting and report back with recommendations.

A few weeks later, right after the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, DeSteph appeared on the John Fredericks Show, a conservative talk radio program, and warned against what he called a “knee-jerk reaction” to mass shootings.

“This isn’t a gun control issue,” he said. “This is a mental health issue.”

“What’s gonna work the best?” he said. “Is it more discipline in schools? Is it more fathers in the families? I don’t know…. I don’t think there’s one type of thing that will work here.”

DeSteph’s views align with those of Virginia Beach resident Bruce Johnson, a retired Naval officer who’s a gun owner and an NRA member.

“The NRA is a polarizing organization. I get it,” he says. But when it comes to gun violence, Johnson echoes DeSteph: The problem, he says, isn’t the firearm. It’s what he calls “broken people.”

“Sen. DeSteph is absolutely on point with his message,” Johnson says. “We’re in a world of hurt if he doesn’t win.”

For her part, Cotter Smasal says her push for tighter gun laws is right in step with the views of Virginia voters.

She points to polls showing Virginians overwhelmingly support legislation requiring universal background checks and red flag laws.

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Pausing for an interview as she canvassed last week in a wealthy Virginia Beach neighborhood, Cotter Smasal said, “People like Bill DeSteph and the gun lobby really try to bully people into silence so that they can continue their agenda. And we’re not going to be bullied by them. We’re going to stand up for what’s right, for what the people here in Virginia Beach want, for what Virginians across the Commonwealth want, and that’s commonsense gun violence prevention.”

That view was clearly shared by resident Mildred Manger, who greeted Cotter Smasal’s door-knock with an enthusiastic, “Oh! I’ve been seeing your signs everywhere,” and agreed to take a sign for her front yard.

Cotter Smasal, sporting red, white and blue sneakers patterned with stars and stripes, ticked off the gun legislation she’d like to help pass as state senator: “Universal background checks, red flag laws, reducing magazines…”

Westlake Legal Group 2019-10-09-img_9077-mblock_custom-c12b0df7d5d65c0de2294768d8da2e4537453db1-s800-c15 Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Promotional items at Democrat Missy Cotter Smasal’s campaign headquarters in Virginia Beach. Melissa Block /NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block /NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Promotional items at Democrat Missy Cotter Smasal’s campaign headquarters in Virginia Beach.

Melissa Block /NPR

Manger nodded. “It’s just stupid that everybody has to have a gun!” Manger said, her voice rising. “Give me a break. I mean, how could anybody not focus on this? Just don’t get me going,” she said. “It’s just bad.”

One sign of how bullish gun control groups are about their prospects in Virginia is that they’re outspending the NRA on these state races, by about 10:1.

According to Federal Election Commission data, the NRA has invested about $300,000 in Virginia races this year.

By contrast, the group Everytown for Gun Safety, founded by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, has funneled more than $2.3 million into Virginia races to date, and has pledged to spend at least another $200,000. More than $200,000 from Everytown has gone directly to Cotter Smasal’s campaign.

This week, Giffords PAC, the gun control group founded by former congresswoman Gabby Giffords, who survived an assassination attempt in a mass shooting in 2011, launched a $300,000 ad buy supporting Democratic candidates in Virginia.

But the chairperson of the state Republican Party, Jack Wilson, sounds undaunted. In an interview in his Richmond, Va., office, Wilson says he knows the Virginia electorate well, and he’s not worried.

“This isn’t the first year that the folks that want to grab Virginians’ guns have come into the Commonwealth and spent money on it. So we’re not surprised by that,” Wilson says. “And I think when we get down to it, the voters of Virginia aren’t ready to turn into California or New Jersey.”

Echoing that view, the executive director of the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, Jason Ouimet, said in an emailed statement:

“Anti-gun organizations are backed by distant billionaires, not local interests. These elitists funnel money into our communities to prop-up weak candidates defined by one trait: their willingness to bow to the billionaire’s gun control agenda, even if it turns great places — like Virginia — into New York City.”

But talk to local volunteers with the grassroots gun control group Moms Demand Action, and they point to a palpable shift in public opinion since the mass shooting in Virginia Beach.

Westlake Legal Group 2019-10-09-img_9217-mblock_custom-656aa9ce8db5d40ed8bf3a4a9a49502b1f6c0840-s1100-c15 Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Allison Graves’ husband barricaded himself in his office while the mass shooting rampage unfolded outside the door. “When it happens, it forever changes you,” she says. “The activism is a part of healing.” Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Allison Graves’ husband barricaded himself in his office while the mass shooting rampage unfolded outside the door. “When it happens, it forever changes you,” she says. “The activism is a part of healing.”

Melissa Block/NPR

Allison Graves, a third-grade teacher, says as she’s gone door to door canvassing for those endorsed by the group as “gun sense candidates,” she’s heard something new: people who say they didn’t think too much about gun control before, but they do now.

“I see some people who would never be political coming out and saying, ‘Something’s got to change,'” Graves says.

Graves’ voice quavers as she thinks back to May 31, the day of the shooting. She was wrapping up her teaching day when she received two texts from her husband.

The first said, “I love you.”

The second text followed immediately, and made her heart stop: “There’s an active shooter in our building.”

It was 14 agonizing minutes before Allison heard from her husband again.

He had managed to barricade himself in his office and hide under his desk as the rampage unfolded just outside the door. He knew nearly all of those who were killed.

“When it happens, it forever changes you,” Graves says, noting that the personal toll of that mass shooting has driven her to become even more involved with Moms Demand Action.

“The activism is a part of healing,” she says. “Something has to be done, and I can’t sit on the sidelines.”

Two of Graves’ fellow Moms Demand Action volunteers, Marian Kiehl-Kearney and Karen Havekost, who is featured in Cotter Smasal’s recent ad, take umbrage at DeSteph’s claim that his opponent is “exploiting” or “politicizing” the local tragedy in her campaign.

Westlake Legal Group 10-2019-09-img_9254-mblock_custom-7fba5b8bf8905aedb5332969a8558d052bb6767b-s800-c15 Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Karen Havekost, a retired city worker, was able to flee Municipal Building 2 during the mass shooting on May 31. She’s featured in a TV ad for Democrat Missy Cotter Smasal, and advocates for gun law reform in Virginia. “This is the perfect time to say we have a problem. We can change it.” Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Melissa Block/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  Gun Control Is Front And Center In Virginia Races

Karen Havekost, a retired city worker, was able to flee Municipal Building 2 during the mass shooting on May 31. She’s featured in a TV ad for Democrat Missy Cotter Smasal, and advocates for gun law reform in Virginia. “This is the perfect time to say we have a problem. We can change it.”

Melissa Block/NPR

“It’s absurd to say that there is a bad time to talk about how we might make our communities safer,” says Kiehl-Kearney. “If we can’t talk about it when our community is hurting, if we can’t talk about it when lives have been lost, then when is the right time to talk about it?”

Havekost adds, “When I hear those words, [‘Too soon’], I think, ‘Too soon? It’s too late.’ … This is the perfect time for us to say, ‘We have a problem. We can change it.'”

The 8th District in Virginia Beach, with a sizable military presence, tilts Republican.

Donald Trump won here by nine points. But the district has also gone for Democrats in races for governor and the U.S. senate.

If Missy Cotter Smasal manages to defeat Bill DeSteph on Nov. 5, political science professor Quentin Kidd of Christopher Newport University says he’ll give credit to two things: the issue of guns, and a surge of mobilized and energized women voters.

That trend, he says, would have implications well beyond Virginia Beach.

“If she beats Bill DeSteph, in my mind it would be a big signal to candidates across the country, especially in these suburban areas — you know, the suburban Phillies, the suburban Kansas Cities, the suburban Clevelands — that you can use the issue of gun control and you can win on it,” Kidd says.

That would herald a major political shift.

“It wasn’t so long ago where a Democrat was afraid to talk about gun control because it was gonna punish them in a big way,” Kidd says. “It would be a sea change.”

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Bullock, long-shot 2020 Dem, insists nomination ‘won’t be decided by the debates’

MANCHESTER, N.H. — Two long-shot candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination who failed to make next week’s debate stage are taking aim at the showdowns.

“This won’t be decided by the debates. What I hear from folks time and time again is nothing meaningful came out of these debates and they’re often disconnected from peoples’ lives,” Montana Gov. Steve Bullock said Friday.

Bullock spoke with reporters from Fox News, NBC News, and NPR after headlining the “Politics and Eggs” speaking series, a must-stop for White House hopefuls in the first-in-the-nation presidential primary state of New Hampshire.

BULLOCK ACCUSES STEYER OF BUYING HIS WAY ONTO DEBATE STAGE

Bullock, who launched his campaign in the late spring, qualified for the second round of debates but didn’t reach the Democratic National Committee’s polling and fundraising criteria to make the cut for last month’s showdown or Tuesday’s debate, which will be held in Ohio.

The DNC’s raising the thresholds again for candidates to make the stage for November’s fifth round showdown, which will be held in Atlanta.

Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet is in a similar situation. He jumped into the race relatively late and qualified for the first two rounds of debates, but didn’t make the stage last month and won’t be in the debate spotlight next week.

“I had to make a decision on the debate stage, whether I was going to keep laundering money through Facebook to try to stay on a debate stage that was pre-season football, that wasn’t going to make a difference in the standings, or whether I was going to talk to voters directly in Iowa and New Hampshire,” Bennet explained in an interview on Tuesday with Fox News and NHTalkRadio.com.

“I decided I was going to talk to voters directly in Iowa and New Hampshire at a time when they were going to start paying attention to this race,” he emphasized.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

Twelve candidates have qualified for Tuesday’s showdown. Bullock, Bennet, and four other contenders in the still extremely large but shrinking field of Democratic White House hopefuls failed to make the cut.

Most of the lower-tier candidates have fired away for months at the DNC for their debate criteria, arguing it’s unfair and winnows the field of candidates before voters in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, and South Carolina – the first four states in the primary and caucus presidential nominating calendar, get to cast their ballots.

Westlake Legal Group SteveBullock-Politics-Eggs Bullock, long-shot 2020 Dem, insists nomination ‘won’t be decided by the debates’ Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/steve-bullock fox-news/person/michael-bennet fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2c7dd382-5e10-5b29-bc1b-0f90863f6b3e

Democratic presidential candidate and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock mingles with the crowd after headlining the ‘Politics and Eggs’ speaking series, in Manchester, NH on Oct. 11, 2019

A slightly more diplomatic Bullock said on Thursday that “the DNC was well-intentioned but I don’t think the best example is for campaigns to be spending $50 or $60 to get each individual donor…. I don’t think that’s the best way to pick a candidate or nominee.”

Pushing back against the criticism, DNC Chair Tom Perez told Fox News last month that the process has been “eminently fair” and added “we’re going “to continue to be transparent.”

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard  – who failed to qualify for last month’s debate but made the stage for next week’s showdown – announced on Thursday that she may boycott next Tuesday’s debate.

GABBARD THREATENS TO BOYCOTT DEBATE TO PROTEST DNC

The congresswoman from Hawaii accused the DNC and its national media debate partners of “rigging” the primary battle against many of the lower-tier candidates and political outsiders running for the nomination.

“I am seriously considering boycotting October 15 debate to bring attention to DNC/corporate media’s effort to rig 2020 primary,” she tweeted.

Even though he’s not making the stage, Bullock says he’s marching on. He told Fox News he has enough campaign cash to survive until the first votes in the early voting states in February.

“We’re still 120 days out from any voter expressing preference. I still think there’s a lot of time for this,” he stressed.

And Bennet took aim at the top-tier contenders for the nomination, such as former Vice President Joe Biden and Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

“I think the support for the leaders in the race is very, very soft, maybe as soft as it’s ever been at this stage of the race,” he predicted.

Westlake Legal Group SteveBullock-Politics-Eggs Bullock, long-shot 2020 Dem, insists nomination ‘won’t be decided by the debates’ Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/steve-bullock fox-news/person/michael-bennet fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2c7dd382-5e10-5b29-bc1b-0f90863f6b3e   Westlake Legal Group SteveBullock-Politics-Eggs Bullock, long-shot 2020 Dem, insists nomination ‘won’t be decided by the debates’ Paul Steinhauser fox-news/us/us-regions/northeast/new-hampshire fox-news/us/democratic-party fox-news/politics/elections/presidential-debate fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/person/steve-bullock fox-news/person/michael-bennet fox news fnc/politics fnc article 2c7dd382-5e10-5b29-bc1b-0f90863f6b3e

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Highlights From the L.G.B.T.Q. Town Hall, Where Protesters Took the Spotlight

Westlake Legal Group 10HRCforum6SUB-facebookJumbo-v2 Highlights From the L.G.B.T.Q. Town Hall, Where Protesters Took the Spotlight Transgender and Transsexuals Same-Sex Marriage, Civil Unions and Domestic Partnerships Presidential Election of 2020 Homosexuality and Bisexuality Defense of Marriage Act (1996)

LOS ANGELES — During a nationally televised forum on Thursday focusing on gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender issues, several Democratic presidential candidates were interrupted by transgender activists who repeatedly called for more focus on the murders of black transgender women and said that the forum had not done enough to include their voices.

Ultimately, one woman took the microphone from an audience member while former Representative Beto O’Rourke was onstage.

“Black trans women are dying,” said the woman, Blossom C. Brown. “Our lives matter. I am an extraordinary black trans woman, and I deserve to be here.”

There have already been at least 19 deaths of transgender people this year, according to the Human Rights Campaign. And last year, there were at least 26 such deaths, most of which were of black trans women.

The protesters first surfaced when Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., took the stage during the forum, which was sponsored by CNN and the Human Rights Campaign. Protesters greeted him waving large signs as they shouted for greater awareness of violence against transgender women of color.

After they had quieted down, Mr. Buttigieg turned to them, saying, “I do want to acknowledge what these demonstrators were speaking about, which is the epidemic of violence against black trans women in this country right now.” He continued, “And I believe or would like to believe that everybody here is committed to ending that epidemic, and that does include lifting up its visibility and speaking to it.”

Another member of the audience interrupted Senator Kamala Harris of California, who pledged Thursday to appoint transgender and gender-nonconforming people to her cabinet and to the federal judiciary.

“How do we get those men to stop killing trans women of color? We are hunted,” the audience member said.

“I know,” Ms. Harris said, addressing the questioner, “I know.”

Each of the candidates seemed to welcome the protesters, as did the CNN moderators, who praised them. Don Lemon returned a microphone to Ms. Brown saying, “The reason we are here is to validate women like you.”

The forum featured nine Democratic presidential candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont was the only top-tier candidate who missed the event, having declined the invitation after suffering a heart attack last week, though he addressed the group by video before the forum began.

Their attendance was a clear sign of how gay rights have become an essential part of the party’s platform. Several candidates said they would withhold aid from countries that condone discrimination against the L.G.B.T.Q. community and several said they would consider withholding money from nonprofit groups and schools that do not recognize same-sex couples.

The event featured questions from the audience, many of whom were activists and health and social work professionals, on topics such as family leave for gay couples, violence against transgender people and the conflicts between religious freedom and L.G.B.T.Q. rights.

Mr. Buttigieg, the first openly gay presidential candidate, released an 18-page plan hours before the forum, saying he would rescind the policy that blocks military veterans from receiving insurance coverage for gender reassignment surgery, and add non-binary gender options on federal documents, including passports.

Onstage, Mr. Buttigieg spoke in personal terms in several of his answers.

“There is no right or wrong way to be gay, to be queer, to be trans,” he said. “I hope that our own community, even as we struggle to define what our identity means, defines it in way that lets everybody know that they belong among us.”

Mr. Buttigieg also talked about his own coming out process.

“What it was like was a civil war, because I knew I was different long before I knew I was gay,” he said, and pointed to the stigmas he still faces, such as the prohibition against blood donations from men who have sex with men. “I can’t lead by example on this one, because my blood is not welcome in this country.”

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts also released plans on Thursday, saying that she would restore many Obama-era policies that the Trump administration has eliminated and crack down on “overly broad religious exemptions to nondiscrimination.” Ms. Warren said she would ban so-called conversion therapy.

Asked during the town hall about a previous statement she had made during her 2012 campaign for Senate, in which she said that transition-related surgery for a transgender inmate was not a good use of taxpayer dollars, Ms. Warren said she regretted the answer and now believes it should be supported.

“It was a bad answer,” she said. “I believe that everyone is entitled to medical care and medical care that they need and that includes people who are transgender” who seek “gender-affirming surgery.”

There were several moments of levity during the forum. One audience member asked Ms. Warren how she might respond to someone on the campaign trail say to her, “My faith teaches me that marriage is between one man and one woman.”

She responded without missing a beat. “Well, I’m going to assume it’s a guy who said that,” Ms. Warren said flatly, “And I’m going to say, ‘Then just marry one woman. I’m cool with that.’”

She paused for a moment and then added: “If you can find one.”

The candidates’ proposals and comments make clear that they largely agree with one another on L.G.B.T.Q. issues and are making considerable efforts to court voters from the community. And the plans also show just how far the party has moved in the last decade.

When Mr. Obama ran for president in 2008, he said he was opposed to same-sex marriage. That same year, California voters approved Proposition 8, a ballot measure that made same-sex marriage unconstitutional in the state. In 2012, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. said that he was “absolutely comfortable” with gay marriage, a stance Mr. Obama did not adopt until later that year.

“When I came out,” Mr. Biden began to say on Thursday at the town hall, referencing that decision. “Er, when I publicly stated,” he said, to roars of laughter from the audience. Mr. Biden then went on to talk about how drastically attitudes toward the L.G.B.T.Q. community had changed. “The idea is normal,” he said. “It’s normalized, it’s not anything strange.”

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Trump Impeachment Inquiry Updates: Ex-Ambassador Says Trump Removed Her Based on “False Claims”

ImageWestlake Legal Group merlin_162499107_8952a520-3a86-4115-b2a5-39940b23a35d-articleLarge Trump Impeachment Inquiry Updates: Ex-Ambassador Says Trump Removed Her Based on “False Claims” Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment

President Trump spoke during a campaign rally Thursday in Minneapolis.CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Here’s what you need to know:

Ms. Yovanovitch, who was abruptly recalled as the American ambassador to Ukraine in May, told impeachment investigators during a closed-door deposition on Capitol Hill that she believed Mr. Trump had intervened to have her removed “based, as far as I can tell, on unfounded and false claims by people with clearly questionable motives.”

The former ambassador, who spoke to the House Intelligence Committee in defiance of the White House’s declaration that administration officials would not cooperate with the House impeachment inquiry, delivered a scathing account of her own treatment and the Trump administration’s conduct of foreign policy.

According to a copy of her opening statement obtained by The New York Times, she said that the deputy secretary of state, who at the time was John Sullivan, had told her that Mr. Trump had pushed for her removal for months even though the department believed she had “done nothing wrong.”

She also described a “hollowed out State Department” under Mr. Trump, where private influence and personal gain have usurped diplomats’ judgment, threatening to undermine the nation’s interests and drive talented professionals out of public service.

Ms. Yovanovitch’s searing account, delivered at the risk of losing her job, could lend new momentum to the impeachment inquiry that imperils Mr. Trump. She said undermining loyal diplomats would embolden “bad actors” who would “see how easy it is to use fiction and innuendo to manipulate our system” and serve the interests of adversaries, including Russia.

“Today we see the State Department attacked and hollowed out from within,” she said. She said the allegations that she was disloyal to Mr. Trump, circulated by allies of Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, were totally “fictitious.”

Gordon D. Sondland, the American ambassador to the European Union, has agreed to comply with a House subpoena and testify next week, despite the State Department’s instruction to him not to appear before lawmakers, Mr. Sondland’s lawyer said Friday. He was prepared to testify on Tuesday, but the Trump administration directed him not in the 11th hour.

“Ambassador Sondland has at all times acted with integrity and in the interests of the United States,” his lawyers said in a statement Friday. “He has no agenda apart from answering the Committees’ questions fully and truthfully.”

Lawmakers have requested documents related to Ukraine, but Mr. Sondland’s attorneys said he would not be able to provide them because doing so would violate federal law and State Department regulations.

Impeachment investigators want to know more about Mr. Sondland’s role in the pressure campaign to get Ukraine to investigate one of Mr. Trump’s political rivals and other inquiries that could personally benefit the president.

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled 2-1 on Friday against the White House’s effort to crush an effort by House Democrats to extract Mr. Trump’s tax returns from his accounting firm, Mazars USA.

That had nothing to do with the House’s impeachment inquiry, but the dissenter, a Trump appointee, Judge Neomi Rao, raised it, saying that the House’s efforts were clearly looking for illegality and therefore those efforts should be done through an impeachment inquiry.

“Impeachment provides the exclusive method for Congress to investigate actions of illegal conduct by impeachable officials, particularly with the aid of compulsory process,” she wrote.

“Throughout our history, Congress, the President, and the courts have insisted upon maintaining the separation between the legislative and impeachment powers of the House and recognized the gravity and accountability that follow impeachment,” she argued, echoing House Judiciary Committee Democrats who have said an impeachment inquiry would have legal powers unavailable to other investigations.

As Democrats consider how wide their inquiry should be, Judge Rao may have given them an invitation to expand the scope of their “compulsory process.”

Maryland’s Republican governor, Larry Hogan, is nobody’s idea of a stalwart supporter of President Trump, but his embrace of the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry on Thursday night was not helpful to the Republican effort to delegitimize the investigation.

“I think we do need an inquiry because we have to get to the bottom of it,” Mr. Hogan, a moderate Republican, said on P.B.S.’ Firing Line. “I’m not ready to say I support impeachment and the removal of the president, but I do think we should have an impeachment inquiry.”

Along with the governors of Massachusetts and Vermont, Mr. Hogan is part of the “Never Trump” Republican gubernatorial brigade. Mr. Hogan did implore Democrats to use “a fair, objective” process, but he did not say moving forward should depend on new rules.

“I don’t see any other way to get the facts,” he said.

The indictment of two associates of Rudolph W. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer, added new details to the narrative at the heart of the impeachment inquiry. The two men, Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, helped Mr. Giuliani navigate connections in Ukraine in pursuit of evidence that would undercut the legitimacy of the special counsel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and lift Mr. Trump against his political rivals heading into 2020.

The two men also appear to have made illegal campaign donations to Representative Pete Sessions, Republican of Texas, from whom Mr. Parnas sought support in pressing the Trump administration to remove the United States ambassador to Ukraine, Marie L. Yovanovitch. Some Trump allies believed Ms. Yovanovitch was trying impede their effort to dig up damaging information about former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and his son Hunter, according to a former Ukrainian official.

Read more: Giuliani’s Ukraine Team: In Search of Influence, Dirt and Money

  • President Trump repeatedly pressured President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate people and issues of political concern to Mr. Trump, including former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Here’s a timeline of events since January.

  • A C.I.A. officer who was once detailed to the White House filed a whistle-blower complaint on Mr. Trump’s interactions with Mr. Zelensky. Read the complaint.

Video

Westlake Legal Group vidxx-trump-ukraine-1-videoSixteenByNineJumbo1600 Trump Impeachment Inquiry Updates: Ex-Ambassador Says Trump Removed Her Based on “False Claims” Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry impeachment

President Trump’s personal lawyer. The prosecutor general of Ukraine. Joe Biden’s son. These are just some of the names mentioned in the whistle-blower’s complaint. What were their roles? We break it down.CreditCreditIllustration by The New York Times

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My name is Gregory Conley and I run the American Vaping Association. Ask me anything about harm reduction, flavors, state bans, moral panics, and more starting at 2 PM Eastern!

Westlake Legal Group vdKm93FQBvyTZw_8GXIifjRIpJeNiTB0tZwlrO-rJ6g My name is Gregory Conley and I run the American Vaping Association. Ask me anything about harm reduction, flavors, state bans, moral panics, and more starting at 2 PM Eastern! r/politics

Hi, I’m Gregory Conley and I currently serve as president of the American Vaping Association, a nonprofit that advocates for sensible policies towards vaping products with the aim of dramatically reducing the United States’ combustible cigarette use.

I have been an advocate for tobacco harm reduction for nearly a decade after managing to quit smoking with vaping while in law school in 2010. Very soon after switching to vaping, I became concerned that government and public health officials were aiming to ban vaping products while leaving deadly combustible cigarettes freely available on the market. That led me to become the volunteer legislative director for three years for the U.S.’ largest organization representing consumers of vaping products, the Consumer Advocates for Smoke-Free Alternatives Association, which any vaper or harm reduction supporter should join today.

America is in the midst of a moral panic about nicotine vaping products, driven primarily by illnesses and deaths that are increasingly being linked to contaminated illicit THC products. According to recent CDC data, just 13% of lung illness patients claim that they only vaped nicotine products, but most news stories on the illnesses continue to focus on nicotine.

Last month, President Trump announced his support of a move by the Department of Health & Human Services to enact a de facto ban on flavors other than tobacco and perhaps menthol in vaping products. Adding to those headaches, governors of multiple states — including Michigan, Oregon, Massachusetts, and Washington — have banned or are in the process of taking action to institute bans on flavors without the approval of elected legislators. A ban in New York is on hold while a judge reviews legal arguments about whether to enact a more permanent stay to stop enforcement of the ban.

To say the least, the last two months have been busy for us, but I’ll happily be taking a break to answer your burning questions about vaping. Looking forward to it!

For those curious to learn more, here are video links to a few of our recent media appearances:

CNN with Chris Cuomo

CNN with Sonjay Gupta

[C-SPAN Washington Journal] (https://www.c-span.org/video/?464719-3/washington-journal-gregory-conley-discusses-health-concerns-related-vaping-cigarettes&fbclid=IwAR2nT_TdeepGkUb6lK5J70S77cw2eNGXEcsozoc0JC4EEjvY1sAd4XQ4gII) (a personal dream come true for any politics nerd)

Fox Business with Neil Cavuto

My Twitter: @GregTHR

AVA Twitter: @AVABoard

AVA Facebook: /VapingAssociation

PROOF

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Rudy Giuliani’s relationship with arrested men is subject of criminal investigation: Sources

Westlake Legal Group wIPyA9KYMyvVWfzQ_YIiMxuhnuzAsT6ahS0MJ_KF9hU Rudy Giuliani's relationship with arrested men is subject of criminal investigation: Sources r/politics

These guys were all heading to Vienna and went there a lot.

[NYT] We would have to aim for lunch, Giuliani told me, because he was planning to fly to Vienna, Austria, at night. He didn’t offer any details beyond that. Giuliani called me at 6:22 p.m. last night—around the same time that two of his associates, Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, were arrested at Dulles Airport while waiting to board an international flight with one-way tickets. As The Wall Street Journal reported this afternoon, the two men were bound for Vienna. 

But Giuliani, when confirming today that Parnas and Fruman were heading to Vienna on matters “related to their business,” told the Journal that he himself only had plans to meet with them when they returned to Washington. By this logic, Giuliani was also planning to fly to Vienna within roughly 24 hours of his business associates, but do no business with them while all three were there.

Lev Parna was frequently in Vienna lately. You see, a law firm run by Joe diGenova and Victoria Toensing {{these fucking two again}}, who were working off the books for Trump via Giuliani, hired him in July to serve as an interpreter related to their representation of Ukrainian oligarch Dmitry Firtash who is fighting extradition to the U.S.

That name might sound familiar- he’s a Ukranian oligarch with deep ties to the** Russian mob, and Paul Manafort’s business partner** and he’s currently under house arrest in Vienna.

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