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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 375)

Homeowners given $20G bill to clean up former California homeless camp

Westlake Legal Group oakland-homeless-2 Homeowners given $20G bill to clean up former California homeless camp fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 0a2bd98e-09be-5070-9097-adc895b9e8a3

Homeowners in a California subdivision have been charged $20,000 to clean up a former homeless camp near their neighborhood, with residents arguing the decision was delayed and shouldn’t just be their responsibility, according to multiple reports.

Walsh Property Management, which oversees the homeowners association (HOA) — charged each resident $300 to clean up the trash and waste at the camp, located in the San Lorenzo Creek ravine below their homes in Lakewood, a subdivision of 75 houses in Castro Valley, which is near San Francisco.

The encampment was reported back in Oct 2017, but there was confusion about who was responsible for the land. Alameda County reportedly told the HOA the camp was on the HOA’s property in August 2019.

HOMELESS WOMAN IN PORTLAND SLEEPING IN FRONT OF GARAGE RUN OVER BY DRIVER, DIES AT HOSPITAL, POLICE SAY

“There are no fences and such that would mark where the property line ended, so we were kind of hoping that it was someone else’s responsibility,” Ed Walsh, the owner of Walsh Property Management told San Francisco’s KPIX. “Unfortunately, this one happened to be on the association’s property.”

Residents told the outlet the delay in who was responsible caused more trash to pile up, making the cleanup costs more expensive.

“No one knew it was their responsibility. I think everyone assumed it was county’s responsibility,” resident Cece Adams told the outlet…“They should have known that this was our property, and they should have taken care of it a long time ago.”

One homeowner in the subdivision said they were left in the dark on the encampment and shouldn’t be held responsible for something they couldn’t see from their home, according to Oakland’s FOX 2.

CALIFORNIA MAN CLAIMS GROUP OF HOMELESS THUGS IN OAKLAND BEAT HIM WITH STICKS, TWO-BY-FOURS

“The homeowners association was informed and they just didn’t take any action. I don’t know if they didn’t want to or they were just kind of being careless,” homeowner An Loung told the outlet …”And it’s not like it’s on our property and we could see somebody camping out here and we could do something, but it’s kind of out somewhere.”

Loung says the responsibility shouldn’t be solely placed on the homeowners’ shoulders.

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“At least part of the responsibility for the negligence and stupidity, instead of putting everything on us,” Luong told the station.

Westlake Legal Group oakland-homeless-2 Homeowners given $20G bill to clean up former California homeless camp fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 0a2bd98e-09be-5070-9097-adc895b9e8a3   Westlake Legal Group oakland-homeless-2 Homeowners given $20G bill to clean up former California homeless camp fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/topic/homeless-crisis fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 0a2bd98e-09be-5070-9097-adc895b9e8a3

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Crowd lifts SUV to save woman trapped after New York City crash

Westlake Legal Group carlift-cropped-510am Crowd lifts SUV to save woman trapped after New York City crash Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/us fox-news/auto fnc/us fnc ccf8bb98-62ec-5d41-a4b6-32ad97730711 article

Nearly a dozen people on Sunday lifted an SUV to rescue a woman who became trapped under a car after she was apparently run over on the Lower East Side, video shows.

Footage posted on Twitter shows onlookers rushing to a black SUV at the intersection of Delancey and Norfolk Streets and tilting it on its right side to pull the pedestrian out.

KANSAS SNOWPLOW STRIKES, KILLS 2 PEDESTRIANS IN ‘TREMENDOUS TRAGEDY, OFFICIALS SAY

A photo shows her lying on her back on the ground and using her phone as first responders crowd around her.

Colby Droscher, who posted the video and photo, told The Post he was about a block away when he heard the crash and people screaming.

“As I approached there were big crowds forming all around the intersection,” he said in a message.

“All of a sudden everyone ran to lift the car. It all happened so fast.”

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An FDNY spokesman said the agency received a trauma call at 5:10 p.m. and that one person was transported to Bellevue Hospital.

The person’s condition was unclear.

A police spokesperson didn’t have any details about the incident.

Click for more from the New York Post

Westlake Legal Group carlift-cropped-510am Crowd lifts SUV to save woman trapped after New York City crash Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/us fox-news/auto fnc/us fnc ccf8bb98-62ec-5d41-a4b6-32ad97730711 article   Westlake Legal Group carlift-cropped-510am Crowd lifts SUV to save woman trapped after New York City crash Tamar Lapin New York Post fox-news/us fox-news/auto fnc/us fnc ccf8bb98-62ec-5d41-a4b6-32ad97730711 article

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Today on Fox News: Jan. 27, 2020

STAY TUNED

On Fox News: 

Fox & Friends, 6 a.m. ET: Sportscaster Jim Gray on the death and legacy of Kobe Bryant.

On Fox Business:

Mornings with Maria, 6 a.m. ET: Matt Schlapp, chairman of American Conservative Union

On Fox News Radio:

The Fox News Rundown podcast: With the Iowa Caucuses Looming, Is Impeachment Drama Moving the Needle with Voters?- As the President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial enters its second week and Iowans get ready for next Monday’s caucuses, a new Fox News poll suggests voters aren’t being swayed by the drama on the Senate floor. Arnon Mishkin, Fox News Decision Desk director, breaks down the latest Fox News poll and what impact, if any, the impeachment trial could have on the 2020 race.

Also on the Rundown: For many people around the world, this is a date that changed history. On January 27, 1945, the notorious Nazi World War II death camp, Auschwitz in occupied Poland, was liberated by the Soviet Union. Fox News Radio’s Simon Owen talks to two survivors about what they went through and why they fear a rise in anti-Semitism today.

Plus, commentary by Paul J. Batura, vice president of communications at Focus on the Family.

Want the Fox News Rundown sent straight to your mobile device? Subscribe through Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher.

The Brian Kilmeade Show, 9 a.m. ET: Special guests include: Michael Goodwin, New York Post columnist; U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio and one of eight House Republicans who are part of President Trump’s impeachment defense team; and more.

Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Jan. 27, 2020 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc c83c0da9-08bc-5579-9d68-5fcbb1367d90 article   Westlake Legal Group fox-news-channel-logo Today on Fox News: Jan. 27, 2020 fox-news/media fox-news/entertainment/media fox news fnc/media fnc c83c0da9-08bc-5579-9d68-5fcbb1367d90 article

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‘Doctor Who’ Makes History With The First Black Doctor And Fans Are Loving It

Westlake Legal Group 5e2eaa1d1f00002e008581d4 ‘Doctor Who’ Makes History With The First Black Doctor And Fans Are Loving It

Doctor Who” on Sunday night revealed its first-ever Black incarnation of the title character, known as The Doctor, portrayed by actor Jo Martin. 

And fans quickly took to social media to celebrate the moment. 

Note: Spoilers ahead

Sunday night’s “Fugitive of the Judoon” episode involved the Judoon ― a band of rhino-like mercenary cops from space ― chasing down a fugitive on Earth. 

The current Doctor, portrayed by Jodie Whittaker (the first female incarnation of the character) steps in to protect their target, a tour guide named Ruth Clayton. 

However, Ruth isn’t a tour guide at all. 

She’s The Doctor. 

The Doctor can regenerate when mortally wounded, giving the character a new face and new life, via a new actor. Whittaker is officially the 13th after taking over from Peter Capaldi at the end of 2017.

In this case, Martin is not taking over the role but instead seems to be part of the season’s arc surrounding the destruction of The Doctor’s home planet of Gallifrey. 

It’s not yet clear where Martin’s incarnation sits in the timeline. 

It’s implied she is an earlier Doctor ― perhaps prior to William Hartnell’s original ― but Whittaker’s incarnation clearly has no recollection of Martin’s form.  

One thing is clear, given the nature of the show: Martin’s Doctor will almost certainly turn up again this season given the events of Sunday night.   

A Doctor outside of the official numbered timeline is not without precedent. 

In 2013, in celebration of the show’s 50th anniversary, acclaimed actor John Hurt portrayed an incarnation known as the War Doctor in a crossover episode that included both David Tennant’s 10th Doctor and Matt Smith’s 11th.  

Given the tight-lipped nature of the show’s production, Martin had to keep a lid on her character… until last night, when she updated her Twitter pic in celebration:

Fans loved it:

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Liz Peek: Showboating Schiff scuppers impeachment trial – here’s how he failed to make a case

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6126653963001_6126656710001-vs Liz Peek: Showboating Schiff scuppers impeachment trial – here's how he failed to make a case Liz Peek fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article acc3dbf7-7cfe-569b-a0c7-2dee70cf6049

Adam Schiff’s dream has come true: the House Intel chair is finally the center of attention. That’s bad news for Democrats.

As lead impeachment manager presenting the House’s case to the Senate, Schiff managed to offend senators in the chamber, insult voters and, when it was clear his endless hours of presentations had failed to harness GOP votes or alter public opinion, descend into hysterical hyperbole. It was quite the hat trick.

Schiff impugned the integrity of GOP senators, saying they had been warned that if they voted with Democrats their “head(s) will be on a pike,” hinting that they were subject to political blackmail. Angry Republicans protested it was not true, causing Schiff to backpedal, but the damage was done.

ADRIANA COHEN: RAMPANT IMPEACHMENT HYPOCRISY — TRUMP ON TRIAL, DEMOCRATS GET A PASS

The California Democrat also managed to disparage voters, saying “the president’s misconduct cannot be decided at the ballot box, for we cannot be assured that the vote will be fairly won.” He thinks impeachment is essential because Americans are too stupid to judge the president’s conduct.

Last but not least, Schiff resorted to fear-mongering, suggesting that Trump’s delay of aid to Ukraine endangered our national security, saying it meant “that we can fight Russia over there, and we don’t have to fight Russia here…” The statement was widely mocked on social media; as Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said, “Trump gave them missiles, Obama gave them blankets.”

More from Opinion

As they began their defense of the president, Trump’s legal team presented actual facts that refuted accusations of wrongdoing, drawing a vivid contrast to the Democrats’ reliance on hearsay and on Gordon Sondland’s “presumptions.” The lawyers noted, for example, that President Trump had on several occasions held up aid to foreign countries, rebutting claims that doing so in Ukraine was unprecedented and therefore suspicious.

In addition, Trump’s lawyers focused on the credibility of Adam Schiff. This is, after all, the same Adam Schiff who claimed on several occasions to have “direct” and “ample” evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. It was not true; there was no collusion and therefore no evidence.

Schiff also misrepresented his connections to the whistleblower, pretending not to know the identity of the individual who started the impeachment ball rolling even as it turned out his office had been in contact with that person. That deceit tainted the entire proceeding, reviving memories of the coordinated and dishonest behind-the-scenes attack on Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Schiff at various times misrepresented the testimony heard during the House investigation, such as when he asserted that several officials listening to Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President   Zelensky “came forward in real time to report the president’s conduct.” He singled out Tim Morrison, a former member of the White House National Security Council, but the transcript of Morrison’s testimony reveals he saw nothing inappropriate about the call.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi allowed one of the most partisan members of her caucus to act as ringmaster to the circus; all that was missing was the red coat. 

You have to ask: why on earth did Democrats make showboating Adam Schiff the face of their impeachment effort?  Over the past few years, his hostility to the president has made the partisan congressman widely reviled and distrusted by Republicans; that antagonism weakened from the outset any claims that the House investigations or Senate trial would be fair. His secret hearings and orchestrated leaks confirmed he could not be trusted.

Moreover, it was clear his House investigation had failed to win over the public. Enthusiasm for impeachment slumped during Schiff’s presentation in the House, with the RealClearPolitics average of polls showing those in favor at 51 percent of respondents before the House push got underway and dropping to 48 percent as it wrapped up. Those opposed jumped from 42 percent to 45 percent. The public didn’t buy what Schiff was selling.

The House undertaking was so limp and unsuccessful that Schiff actually dithered over whether Democrats should take an impeachment vote, telling an astonished Jake Tapper on CNN that he wanted to “discuss this with my constituents and colleagues before I make a final judgment on this.”

The Senate trial has similarly failed. A new Washington Post/ABC News poll finds a plurality of voters (49 percent) are against removing the president from office while only 47 percent favor impeachment.

At the same time, the poll reveals that Trump’s approval rating is now at the highest level of his presidency. Perhaps more significant: 47 percent of independents now give the president a thumbs-up, up from 38 percent in October.

Those are remarkable findings in the midst of an impeachment trial, but not surprising given who has led the charge.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi knew the stakes, and for many months resisted pressure from the progressive hounds baying for Trump’s blood. Forced into impeachment, she has tried to travel the high road, on many occasions insisting that her party has undertaken this quest solemnly and sadly, even as she giddily handed out signature pens.

Nonetheless, and contrary to her past insistence that impeachment should be bipartisan, Pelosi allowed one of the most partisan members of her caucus to act as ringmaster to the circus; all that was missing was the red coat.

Impeachment is a political act. Success is not necessarily defined by the outcome, but rather by the impact on public opinion. Though various polls have shown that Democrats have brought their own party along on this journey, they also confirm they have failed to attract the backing of millions of independents, and have only hardened Republican support for the president.

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The most compelling argument against impeachment is that we are but months away from a presidential election. Instead of trying to eject President Trump from office through skimpy charges and partisan hearings, Democrats should offer up a candidate who can beat him in November.

That, of course, is their problem. So far, that candidate has not emerged.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM LIZ PEEK 

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6126653963001_6126656710001-vs Liz Peek: Showboating Schiff scuppers impeachment trial – here's how he failed to make a case Liz Peek fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article acc3dbf7-7cfe-569b-a0c7-2dee70cf6049   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6126653963001_6126656710001-vs Liz Peek: Showboating Schiff scuppers impeachment trial – here's how he failed to make a case Liz Peek fox-news/politics/trump-impeachment-inquiry fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/person/adam-schiff fox-news/opinion fox news fnc/opinion fnc article acc3dbf7-7cfe-569b-a0c7-2dee70cf6049

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Trump Tries To Hold On To Spotlight As Impeachment Enters Week 2

Westlake Legal Group ap_20015677237393-99ab95f65ae8c21769a2c07819776a50faddf95b-s1100-c15 Trump Tries To Hold On To Spotlight As Impeachment Enters Week 2

President Trump points to Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, during a trade deal signing ceremony with Chinese officials earlier this month. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Tries To Hold On To Spotlight As Impeachment Enters Week 2

President Trump points to Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, during a trade deal signing ceremony with Chinese officials earlier this month.

Steve Helber/AP

As the Senate impeachment trial begins its second week, President Trump is making sure not to fully cede the spotlight to Democrats’ effort to oust him.

Trump is set to meet Monday with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and then Netanyahu’s political rival, Benny Gantz, as the administration plans to release its plan for Middle East peace.

On Wednesday, Trump is expected to sign a much-anticipated trade deal with Mexico and Canada in a White House ceremony.

And he has teased plans to expand his so-called travel ban, adding new restrictions for travelers from additional countries. He says it’s a matter of national security.

Hogan Gidley, the White House deputy press secretary, also cited the recent signing of “phase 1” of a trade deal with China and the president’s trip to Davos, Switzerland, where Trump touted the United States’ economic accomplishments at the World Economic Forum.

“It’s very clear that in this process, as the president continues to rack up victory after victory to improve the lives of the American people,” Gidley said, “[House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats continue to put their own selfish interests, their own political desires, above the needs of the American people. And that’s a shame.”

Even as Trump grows frustrated with efforts to oust him, his schedule offers him an opportunity to promote issues that are important to him and his Republican base.

Critics accuse Trump of trying to distract from his impeachment trial.

Matt Bennett, who worked on former President Bill Clinton’s two presidential campaigns, calls Trump a master at using his official powers — as well as Twitter account — to get people talking about something else.

“It is absolutely not a coincidence or a surprise that he’s rolling out a lot of big things on the very week in which the Senate [may vote] on impeachment,” Bennett said. “The notion that he would allow the Senate to vote on removing him from office without doing something completely different, to show that he is, you know, completely unaffected by this and is moving on, is to ignore three years of history with Trump as president.”

Trump’s peace plan may not solve the deep divisions between Israel and the Palestinians. (Trump has said the administration will talk with Palestinians at a later time.) And his partial trade deal with China doesn’t address the root causes of the trade war.

But both have proven a great opportunity for Trump to grab attention, at least temporarily, away from impeachment.

Westlake Legal Group ap_19233628747233-aae550e259b9f8114104f22e3e16f8fdb3199cfa-s1100-c15 Trump Tries To Hold On To Spotlight As Impeachment Enters Week 2

President Trump speaks as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks on, on Aug. 21, 2019. Netanyahu visits the White House again Monday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Tries To Hold On To Spotlight As Impeachment Enters Week 2

President Trump speaks as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks on, on Aug. 21, 2019. Netanyahu visits the White House again Monday.

Susan Walsh/AP

It would not be the first time the president offered counter-programming to the day’s news.

Earlier this month, at the same time that the House was voting to send its articles of impeachment to the Senate, Trump held a more-than-hour-long ceremony to celebrate the partial trade pact with China. Much of that time was spent reading out names and thanking people who were there — and others who were not — for their support.

On the night in December he was impeached, Trump flew to Michigan and held a widely televised campaign rally.

“By the way, it doesn’t feel like I’m being impeached,” he told the raucous crowd.

And this week, Trump holds two rallies, including one in Des Moines, Iowa, on Thursday — just days before the Democratic caucuses there.

Alex Conant, a Republican strategist, said there is no question the White House wants to present the president as being focused on doing his job while Congress is focused on impeachment.

Conant said all these issues — from global trade to peace in the Middle East, as well as Trump joining Friday’s March for Life rally — are important issues to wide swaths of conservative voters. They also help ease uncertainty among Republicans members of Congress about the allegations against him.

Westlake Legal Group ap_20024651226720-b176d36788079229f39c35f22bb1df81337b6ce2-s1100-c15 Trump Tries To Hold On To Spotlight As Impeachment Enters Week 2

Supporters listen and hold signs as President Trump speaks during the annual March for Life rally on the National Mall, on Friday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Westlake Legal Group  Trump Tries To Hold On To Spotlight As Impeachment Enters Week 2

Supporters listen and hold signs as President Trump speaks during the annual March for Life rally on the National Mall, on Friday.

Evan Vucci/AP

“Trump’s actions in Ukraine make a lot of Republicans very uncomfortable, especially congressional Senate Republicans,” Conant said. “But then when they see him pushing these conservative policies and being their champion on issues they really care about, whether it’s trade or immigration or abortion, it reminds them that at the end of the day, the Trump presidency is worth it.”

Republican strategist Ryan Williams is impressed with what he called the “incredibly choreographed” rollout of successive agreements and meetings with foreign leaders.

The challenge he sees is whether Trump can stick to the plan his aides created. Or will he become distracted by the impeachment drama, respond in an aggressive fashion, and then draw attention away from his policy wins?

“He needs to remain disciplined,” Williams said. “Everybody needs to be singing from the same song sheet in order to drive a message. And if the president is tweeting or talking about something else, he’s undercutting the message that his advisers and his administration are trying to drive.”

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75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Westlake Legal Group 4-img_8439-edit-d33d46d939437cc69e37f07fde63b990f377b2cb-s1100-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, “Work sets you free.” More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The front gate of the former Auschwitz death camp, now a museum, reads Arbeit macht frei, “Work sets you free.” More than 2 million people visit the Auschwitz museum each year.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Alina Dabrowska was 20 years old when she first heard about Auschwitz. She was an inmate at a prison in Nazi-occupied Poland — incarcerated for helping Allied forces — and one day in 1943, while walking the grounds, a new arrival warned her about it.

“She said, ‘You’re all going to Auschwitz! Do you know what kind of camp that is?'” Dabrowska recalls. “She told us that if someone is out of strength, they were immediately killed. She told us many horrible things. None of us believed her.”

Westlake Legal Group 1-img_8384-5890ca86b673b97e77ea236c3808cb974445f303-s1100-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Auschwitz survivor Alina Dabrowska, 96, shows her Auschwitz prisoner number tattoo at her home in Warsaw. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was caught by the Nazis helping the allied forces in German-occupied Poland during World War II. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Auschwitz survivor Alina Dabrowska, 96, shows her Auschwitz prisoner number tattoo at her home in Warsaw. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was caught by the Nazis helping the allied forces in German-occupied Poland during World War II.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Of the estimated 1.3 million people sent to Auschwitz, some 1.1 million died at the camp, including 960,000 Jews. It was the largest extermination camp run by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland during World War II. The Soviet Army liberated Auschwitz 75 years ago, on Jan. 27, 1945.

Now 96, Dabrowska is among a handful of Auschwitz survivors still alive. For her, the importance of sharing her stories has only grown with time. She raised a family and had a fulfilling career with Poland’s foreign ministry, but only in recent years decided to speak publicly about the memories of Auschwitz that still haunt her. She and other survivors fear the world will forget the Holocaust’s horrors if their stories are not made public.

When German soldiers first imprisoned Dabrowska, they executed her accomplices, including her brother. She spent a year in prison, and then the Nazis transferred her in June 1943 to Auschwitz.

“When we got off the train, we were taken to a large hall, where we stripped down completely,” she remembers. “Our hair was shaved and they tattooed numbers on our arms.”

She rolls up her sleeve to show hers: a small, faded black “44165” etched into her forearm. Dabrowska remembers the next morning, taking stock of the camp, beginning to realize what she’d heard about it was true.

Westlake Legal Group 5-img_8474_custom-ffcff8e9e12a687fa226c3db9d35152b4cbf1b0f-s800-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Thousands of shoes from those exterminated at Auschwitz make up one of the many exhibits at the museum on the site of the former death camp. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Thousands of shoes from those exterminated at Auschwitz make up one of the many exhibits at the museum on the site of the former death camp.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

“I noticed an electric fence around the camp,” she recalls. “Whenever we came back from working in the mornings, there was usually someone glued to it. If someone couldn’t take it anymore, they jumped over the ditch and threw themselves onto the electric fence and their lives were over.”

A year later, she says, she had had enough of the cold, the hunger and the death surrounding her. She too found herself in front of the fence. She was about to jump when a guard yelled at her. She instinctively turned around and never tried it again.

“I focused on doing whatever I could to survive,” Dabrowska says. “I had hope, but sometimes an officer with a cane selected some of us to go to the gas chamber. What left the deepest impression on me was watching those marches to the chambers where so many were murdered.”

Some 865,00 Jews were sent to their deaths in the gas chambers upon arrival at the camp. Dabrowska remembers the horror of noticing a friend’s body among a pile of bodies of the executed. “I saw her lying in that pile of naked bodies,” she says, “and I approached. There she was, just lying there. I grasped her cold hand, and that’s how I said goodbye to my friend.”

Another Auschwitz survivor, Janina Iwanska, now 89 and living in Warsaw, was deported to the camp at the height of the killing in 1944. In an eight-week period between May and July, guards killed 330,000 people.

Westlake Legal Group 3-img_8417-edit-3a379bbeb10fe60f36dea596b69150f5e39fa3bb-s800-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Janina Iwanska, 89, is photographed in her Warsaw apartment. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was separated from her parents at the age of 14 during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944 when the Nazis laid siege to the city. She arrived to the death camp at the height of its exterminations, when the SS guards killed 330,000 people in a span of eight weeks. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

Janina Iwanska, 89, is photographed in her Warsaw apartment. She was sent to Auschwitz after she was separated from her parents at the age of 14 during the Warsaw Uprising in 1944 when the Nazis laid siege to the city. She arrived to the death camp at the height of its exterminations, when the SS guards killed 330,000 people in a span of eight weeks.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

She was 14 years old. She had been separated from her parents during the Warsaw Uprising against Nazi forces and arrived at Auschwitz alone, packed among hundreds of strangers in a train car.

“We were taken off the train at night, and the air was thick with smoke that smelled like burning hair,” remembers Iwanska. “We walked through a forest and I asked a prisoner, ‘What are those bonfires?’ and she said, ‘You’ll find out, child.’ It was only later that I learned they were burning bodies because they couldn’t keep up with the crematoriums alone.”

Iwanska, who is Roman Catholic, slept in the children’s dorm, and she quickly made herself useful by taking care of the younger children at the camp. This, and the fact that she isn’t Jewish, were the reasons she believes she survived.

Westlake Legal Group 6-img_8514-e93f22c14ca636495f3206b9cf6b4c1cd65a6cbf-s1100-c15 75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The former site of the Auschwitz death camp has been preserved to appear the same as it looked 75 years ago, when it was liberated by the Soviet Army. Some 1.3 million people were deported to the camp, and 1.1 million died there. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Westlake Legal Group  75 Years After Auschwitz Liberation, Survivors Urge World To Remember

The former site of the Auschwitz death camp has been preserved to appear the same as it looked 75 years ago, when it was liberated by the Soviet Army. Some 1.3 million people were deported to the camp, and 1.1 million died there.

Rob Schmitz/NPR

Today, Auschwitz is a museum commemorating the evil humans are capable of inflicting on each other. Tour groups quietly shuffle from an exhibit holding two tons of hair shaved from the victims of the gas chambers to the gallows where the former commandant of Auschwitz was hanged after he was tried by a military tribunal in 1947.

Pawel Sawicki, a guide at the museum, has seen thousands of tourists come from all over the world. “Sometimes I think that when they leave a candle or a stone or they put the flower or they say a prayer and they leave the memorial, and they go back to their lives, they think: ‘Our job is done. We remembered,'” he says. “But I think there should be a next step. People should look at this place and think about our moral responsibility. This is not an anthropological discovery of ‘Oh, people 75 years ago were able to do something like this,’ and we are surprised. They [still] are able to do it. They did it before. And people still hate each other.”

Each December, Piotr M.A. Cywinski, the Polish director of the Auschwitz museum, sends a holiday card with a similar reminder. This year, the card, with a message wishing a peaceful holiday season, included a photograph of Chinese soldiers marching past Uighur children in Xinjiang, where China’s government has sent an estimated 1 million ethnic Muslims to internment camps.

But talking about the lessons of Auschwitz can be painful, especially for those who lived through it.

Berlin Rabbi Daniel Fabian’s grandmother survived Auschwitz but never talked about her time there.

“We did not talk about it at home,” Fabian says. “The Holocaust was never a topic, as I remember it.”

It was only when he was required to sign up for German military service that he says he began to realize what his grandmother had been through. Fabian’s mother gave him an envelope to hand-deliver to the German officers in charge of registering him. Inside were his grandmother’s liberation papers from Auschwitz.

After the German officers saw the documents, they exempted Fabian from service. From then on, he says, he began to think in earnest about what Germany had done to Jews during the war.

“When I lived in the United States, I realized that the Holocaust is a very big part of Jewish identity in America,” says Fabian. “And that seemed strange to me, because in Germany, it is not.”

Fabian says that doesn’t mean German Jews ignore it — on the contrary, he says, there are reminders everywhere. It’s just that not much is said about it, he says.

“The Holocaust is something that’s part of them, but they don’t base their Jewish identity on the Holocaust, or not exclusively on the Holocaust,” he explains. “But there are many other things also that, you know, remind them of being Jewish. And they identify with being Jewish. And so this is just this is one important aspect of it, but it’s just one aspect of many.”

Fabian thinks more personal stories should be shared while the few remaining survivors are still alive.

Many of those survivors agree, though it has taken decades for them to want to speak publicly about their experiences. Iwanska now does so during regular visits to Germany.

She tells stories like this one from the end of the war — when she and four friends kept each other from freezing to death while Nazi soldiers transferred them to other camps on a death march.

“We were put into open train cars and we huddled together — standing because there was no room to sit or lie down — to keep warm,” says Iwanska. “When it snowed, we collected it to drink, because they didn’t give us water. We were in such complete solidarity that when one of us fell asleep standing, none of the others would steal the snow that accumulated on her. That snow belonged to her. Thanks to our solidarity, we lived.”

It’s also taken decades for Dabrowska to share her stories of Auschwitz.

“I was seeing my camp friends, but I didn’t want to talk about it,” she says. “I was always hiding the number on my arm, so that I wouldn’t have to talk about it. One time, a Jewish woman recognized me and said, ‘You were there!’ and I answered, ‘No, you have mistaken me for someone else.’ It took 50 years before I made the conscious decision to go to Auschwitz.”

It was only when she returned to the camp for the first time in 2001 that she felt strong enough to share her memories of it.

Like Iwanska, she travels to Germany twice a year to speak to young people about her memories of the camp.

“Those children will grow up one day and they will be the ones deciding about how to rule the world,” she says. “It is important [to talk about it] in order to develop the conviction that war is not a good thing, in order to seek peace and try to talk about it, in order to think that it is us who are responsible for this earth and for passing it on, undamaged, to the next generations.”

Grzegorz Sokol contributed to this report from Warsaw and Austin Davis contributed from Berlin.

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Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds

Seven in 10 millennials consider themselves “plant parents,” according to new research.

While millennial demand for houseplants is high, a poll of 2,000 millennials (aged 25–39) revealed that 67 percent say taking care of plants is more of a challenge than they bargained for.

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Almost half don’t currently own plants because they don’t know how to take care of them — and 20 percent would sooner sit through a root canal than take care of a plant because of the pressure.

Westlake Legal Group PlantWoman2Istock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

Not her, though! (iStock)

The study, conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Article, examined the attitudes and behaviors of millennials toward plants and uncovered that 22 percent are apprehensive about owning a plant because they’ve accidentally killed one in the past.

With the great responsibility of having a plant come great benefits — but also great challenges. And according to study’s results, we could all benefit from a crash course in the art of keeping plants alive.

In fact, the average plant parent has killed seven plants they’ve brought into their home.

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The most challenging part about taking care of plants was found to be knowing the proper amount of sunlight needed. But the challenges don’t end there — respondents were also clueless on how much water a plant needs, whether the plant should live inside or outside, and the practice of pruning a plant.

Three in 10 respondents revealed one of hardest lessons that comes with being a good “plant parent” is how easy it can be to accidentally kill your plant. This leads to a bit of anxiety, as three in five often worry about making sure their plants have enough sunlight, while a further 56 percent say they often worry about whether their plants have enough water.

“Plants are an easy way to add color and life to any space,” said Zoe Garred, director of product development at Article. “The survey revealed millennials’ desire to incorporate plants into their home despite the apprehension and challenges associated with plant care.”

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According to the survey results, half of respondents said they decided to add plants to their space because it complemented their overall aesthetic and decor, while a further 47 percent said they incorporate greenery into their home because it’s trendy. And 81 percent of those surveyed said that adding plants to their space has had a positive effect on mental and physical health.

Westlake Legal Group PlantMillennialIstock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

She’s probably one of them! (iStock)

Many millennials (three in four) also said that taking on plants is a good indicator of whether they’re responsible enough to take on a real pet. It even improves self-care, as four in five said that taking care of their plants has caused them to start taking better care of themselves.

“We’ve seen a rising home decor trend of pairing bold tropical leaf plants with natural elements like dark wood and raw concrete,” said Zoe Garred, director of product development at Article. “It doesn’t come as a surprise that the No. 1 reason millennials own plants is because they complement their overall home decor aesthetic. A touch of greenery is a simple way to make any modern space more beautiful.”

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Being a plant owner seems to be addicting, too: Forty-one percent of survey respondents say they plan on adding to their plant collection in the coming year.

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Westlake Legal Group PlantWoman2Istock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE   Westlake Legal Group PlantWoman2Istock Most millennials are intimidated by plants, survey finds Zoya Gervis SWNS fox-news/house-and-home fnc/lifestyle fnc article 5a30ecf8-437a-5783-9eb0-4375c9bc70cf /FOX NEWS/LIFESTYLE/REAL ESTATE

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This Day in History: Jan. 27

On this day, Jan. 27 …

1967: Astronauts Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom, Edward H. White and Roger B. Chaffee die in a flash fire during a test aboard their Apollo spacecraft.

Also on this day:

  • 1756: Composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is born in Salzburg, Austria.
  • 1832: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who would write “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” under the pen name Lewis Carroll, is born in Cheshire, England.
  • 1880: Thomas Edison receives a patent for his electric incandescent lamp.
  • 1943: Some 50 bombers strike Wilhelmshaven in the first all-American air raid against Germany during World War II.
  • 1945: During World War II, Soviet troops liberate the Nazi concentration camps Auschwitz and Birkenau in Poland.
  • 1951: An era of atomic testing in the Nevada desert begins as an Air Force plane drops a one-kiloton bomb on Frenchman Flat.
  • 1967: More than 60 nations sign a treaty banning the deploying of nuclear weapons in outer space.
  • 1973: The Vietnam peace accords are signed in Paris.
  • 1977: The Vatican issues a declaration reaffirming the Roman Catholic Church’s ban on female priests.
  • 1984: Michael Jackson suffers serious burns to his scalp when pyrotechnics set his hair on fire during the filming of a Pepsi-Cola TV commercial at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.
  • 1991: Super Bowl XXV: The New York Giants beat Buffalo Bills, 20-19 at Tampa Stadium in Tampa, Fla.
  • 1998: First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, on NBC’s “Today” show, charges the sexual misconduct allegations against her husband, President Bill Clinton, are the work of a “vast right-wing conspiracy.”
  • 2014: Folk singer and activist Pete Seeger, 94, dies in New York.
  • 2018: Casino mogul Steve Wynn resigns as finance chairman of the Republican National Committee amid allegations of sexual harassment and assault.
  • 2018: Comic strip artist Mort Walker, a World War II veteran who satirized the Army with the antics of the lazy private “Beetle Bailey,” dies in Connecticut at age 94.  
Westlake Legal Group AstronautsGetty012720 This Day in History: Jan. 27 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c02910cd-5d87-543c-a41a-f4a622b80384 article   Westlake Legal Group AstronautsGetty012720 This Day in History: Jan. 27 fox-news/us/this-day-in-history fox news fnc/us fnc c02910cd-5d87-543c-a41a-f4a622b80384 article

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Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say

A Florida man was arrested Wednesday after shining a laser pointer at multiple pilots making their approaches at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport, police said.

Charlie James Chapman Jr, 41, faces multiple charges after police said he temporarily blinded one of the pilots. Video claims to show him throwing rocks and directing the laser at a Manatee County Sheriff’s helicopter attempting to locate him.

“Pointing a laser at multiple aircraft didn’t end well for Charlie Chapman Jr.,” the MCSO said on Facebook. “He was arrested after pointing one at planes heading into SRQ Airport last night, and then at our MCSO Aviation Unit helicopter. He even tried throwing rocks at the helicopter!”

FAMILY OF FLORIDA DAD ANTHONY TODT FOUND DECOMPOSED WITH STAB WOUNDS IN HOME AS NEW DETAILS EMERGE

The MSCO Aviation unit helicopter eventually located the suspect on a forklift near the airport where they directed deputies on the ground to surround him. Chapman allegedly grabbed a hammer and made a striking motion towards the deputies who deployed a Taser and subdued the suspect.

“It was later learned that Chapman shot his laser pointer on a fixed-wing plane four times and one time at the MCSO helicopter,” police said. “One of the pilots of the plane advised that the laser hit him directly in the eyes, causing temporary blindness. The pilot stated he was still felt his eye sight was blurry from the laser.”

Westlake Legal Group Charlie-Chapman-Laser-Migshot Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 80eb13b5-139e-5608-aaae-0fefd19abde7

Charlie James Chapman Jr, 41 (Manatee County Sheriff’s Office)

FLORIDA ‘PILLOWCASE RAPIST’ CASE CRACKED WITH DNA FROM SUSPECT’S SON: PROSECUTORS

Chapman was transported to Lakewood Ranch Medical Center where he was cleared and sent to Manatee County Jail, police said. A laser pointer was found in his pocket,  police said.

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He was charged with aggravated assault on an officer, pointing a laser at pilot with and without injury, and resisting without violence.

Westlake Legal Group Charlie-Chapman-Laser-Migshot Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 80eb13b5-139e-5608-aaae-0fefd19abde7   Westlake Legal Group Charlie-Chapman-Laser-Migshot Florida man arrested after shining laser pointer at planes, police say fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox-news/us fox news fnc/us fnc David Aaro article 80eb13b5-139e-5608-aaae-0fefd19abde7

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