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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 383)

Olivia Newton-John gives health update on breast cancer diagnosis

Olivia Newton-John has offered an update on her breast cancer diagnosis.

The 71-year-old actress opened up at the G’Day USA event on Saturday, revealing that she has no plans of letting cancer slow her down.

“Life is a gift and I’ve had an amazing life and I intend to keep going with it and I want to help other people with cancer of course,” she said (via People).

‘JEOPARDY!’ HOST ALEX TREBEK GIVES HEALTH UPDATE, SHARES HIS PLANS AFTER RETIREMENT

“I have my wellness center in Melbourne and I want to see it in my lifetime so other people don’t have to suffer,” added Newton-John at the gala, where money was raised for wildfire relief in Australia.

Newton-John’s first cancer diagnosis came in 1992 before fighting it off again in 2013. In 2017, however, Newton-John was told that the cancer had spread to her bones.

“I’m winning over it well and that’s how I see it,” she said of her illness. “I don’t think about it a lot, to be honest. Denial is a really good thing and I’m getting stronger and better all the time! I’m doing well!”

KOBE BRYANT DEAD: STARS PAY TRIBUTE TO NBA LEGEND KILLED IN HELICOPTER CRASH

John Travolta, who co-starred in “Grease” with Newton-John, was also at the event and spoke about her optimistic attitude.

“Olivia is a survivor and she’s smart and she’s got a lot of life in her and I think she looks at it from the glass half full always and that’s her beautiful, natural approach towards life and I think we all need to do that,” said Travolta, 65.

Westlake Legal Group olivia-newton-john-health Olivia Newton-John gives health update on breast cancer diagnosis Nate Day fox-news/person/john-travolta fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 2cb012a9-d8bd-51af-98ec-b990e4d2991e

Olivia Newton-John in 2018. ((Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images))

In September of 2019, Newton-John was interviewed by Gayle King, when she said: “I’m happy. I’m lucky. I’m grateful. I have much to live for. And I intend to keep on living it.”

“‘Why me?’ has never been a part of it,” she said. “But I never felt victimized… Maybe deep down I knew there was a reason or a purpose for it, or maybe I needed to create one to make it OK for myself. Because, again, it’s a decision: ‘How am I gonna deal with it?’”

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Newton-John told King that she’s “gonna live longer” than what the statistics surrounding her prognosis have implied.

Westlake Legal Group olivia-newton-john-health Olivia Newton-John gives health update on breast cancer diagnosis Nate Day fox-news/person/john-travolta fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 2cb012a9-d8bd-51af-98ec-b990e4d2991e   Westlake Legal Group olivia-newton-john-health Olivia Newton-John gives health update on breast cancer diagnosis Nate Day fox-news/person/john-travolta fox-news/health/cancer fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/movies fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 2cb012a9-d8bd-51af-98ec-b990e4d2991e

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In Impeachment Trial, Geography Dictates Politics

Westlake Legal Group 26dc-assess1-facebookJumbo In Impeachment Trial, Geography Dictates Politics United States International Relations Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Russian Interference in 2016 US Elections and Ties to Trump Associates Russia Putin, Vladimir V Presidential Election of 2020 impeachment

WASHINGTON — When Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, in a curse-laden tirade to a reporter on Friday, asked, “Do you think Americans care about Ukraine?” he was getting at an essential element of President Trump’s defense in the impeachment trial. White House officials are convinced that Americans are indifferent to what happens in the struggling former Soviet republic, and they may well be right.

But the impeachment trial is about more than the fate of Ukraine — and whether Mr. Trump sold it out for a “domestic political errand,” as his former adviser, Fiona Hill, put it so bitingly. To Democrats, it’s about a president who undercut his own administration’s stated goal of pushing back hard against Vladimir V. Putin’s Russia — the geopolitical challenge of a new, very different Cold War.

It is one of those cases where the geography of the debate shapes the politics of the argument.

As long as the president’s lawyers can focus the debate on the narrower question of Ukraine, they can argue that the charges against the president focus on a foreign policy sideshow: how the president uses the spigot of American aid and attention to mold another country’s behavior.

“They basically said, ‘Let’s cancel an election over a meeting with the Ukraine,’” Mr. Trump’s White House counsel, Pat A. Cipollone, said on Saturday, characterizing the Democrats’ arguments as he opened the president’s defense. Mr. Cipollone made the case that the Democrats are seeking to undo Mr. Trump’s 2016 victory or fear that they cannot beat him in 2020.

Yet the defense team’s characterizations about Ukraine are also designed to make the impeachment charges appear to be on a fundamentally trivial affair, surrounding the treatment of a faraway country that, as Mr. Pompeo suggests, most people could not find on a map stripped of country names. (He challenged the NPR reporter, Mary Louise Kelly, to identify Ukraine, and she reported that she did.)

That is precisely why the man leading the Democrats’ prosecution of the case, Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, focused so relentlessly on Russia last week.

Mr. Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, understands that Russia resonates in a way that Ukraine never can. His argument revives questions of whether Mr. Putin has some strange, still unexplained control over the American president — which is why Mr. Schiff played the cringe-worthy tape of Mr. Trump’s news conference with Mr. Putin in Helsinki, Finland, in summer 2018. In his public statements, Mr. Trump appeared to adopt the Russian leader’s self-interested theory that someone else was behind the hacking of the Democratic National Committee’s servers in the last presidential election.

“It’s a breathtaking success of Russian intelligence,” Mr. Schiff said. “This is the most incredible propaganda coup,” he continued, because “it’s not just that the president of the United States standing next to Vladimir Putin is reading the Kremlin talking points. He won’t read his own national security staff talking points.”

Cast that way, this is no argument over the history of American aid to Kyiv. It is part of a battle over Russia’s use of Ukraine as a petri dish in disruption — the place where Mr. Putin has experimented with seizing territory, undermining a hostile government and conducting cyberattacks that literally turned off the lights.

And it is an argument over Mr. Putin’s efforts to manipulate the 2020 election, at a moment when even Mr. Trump’s own Department of Homeland Security says the Russians are already testing new techniques. By demanding that the new president of Ukraine investigate Joseph R. Biden Jr., the former vice president and a political opponent of Mr. Trump, and reviving theories that the Democratic National Committee’s server is somewhere in Ukraine, Mr. Trump was essentially joining that manipulation effort, Mr. Schiff was saying.

“The threat that he will continue to abuse his power and cause grave harm to the nation,’’ Mr. Schiff said of the president, “is not hypothetical.”

In less partisan times — say, when a presidential election does not loom — Mr. Schiff’s argument might strike a political chord, chiefly because it is the Republicans who, until recently, have been particularly hawkish about Mr. Putin’s Russia.

It is easy to forget now, but when Mr. Trump tried to water down sanctions on Russia two years ago, his own party pushed back so hard that new penalties for Moscow passed 98 to 2. (In one of the strange twists of history, one of the two opposing votes was cast by Senator Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent who is a leading contender to take on Mr. Trump in November.) In the House, the measure passed 419 to 3. Angry, Mr. Trump signed the bill, knowing any veto would be overturned.

But the politics of impeachment are different than the politics of sanctions. So it is no surprise that, as the Republicans focus on Ukraine and the Democrats focus on Russia, both are bending the facts to fit their case.

Mr. Pompeo, for example, has been known to pause his episodic blasts at State Department correspondents to make the legitimate point that it was the Trump administration that gave powerful anti-tank weapons — called Javelins — to Ukrainian forces, a step that President Barack Obama refused.

The issue came up this weekend, as Jay Sekulow accused the Democrats of keeping that fact out of their 23 hours of arguments. “Javelin missiles are serious weapons,” Mr. Sekulow, the president’s personal lawyer, reminded the senators at the trial on Saturday. He quoted the testimony of the two previous top American diplomats in Ukraine, including Marie L. Yovanovitch, who was recalled from her post last year, in one of the events at the center of the impeachment charges.

The Javelin decision is the best piece of evidence that the Republicans have at hand that Mr. Trump has been willing to stand up to Mr. Putin. Almost everything else cuts the other way, leaving little doubt that in twisting the arm of the new Ukrainian government, Mr. Trump was not only pursuing his own political interests but also helping Mr. Putin’s.

Even before he was elected, Mr. Trump wondered aloud why the United States was helping Ukraine fight off the Russians. It made no sense, he argued in a March 2016 interview on foreign policy, his first extended discussion of his worldview as a candidate.

“Now I’m all for Ukraine, I have friends that live in Ukraine,” Mr. Trump said during the interview at Mar-a-Lago, his Florida golf resort. He complained that when the Obama administration moved to sanction Russia for its annexation of Crimea and “was getting very confrontational, it didn’t seem to me like anyone else cared other than us.”

He added: “Even their neighbors didn’t seem to be talking about it. And, you know, you look at Germany, you look at other countries, and they didn’t seem to be very much involved.”

In fact, they were very involved and continue to provide aid to Ukraine to prop up its democracy and its economy while often complaining about rampant corruption. But in the interview, Mr. Trump made no mention of corruption; instead, he lumped Ukraine in with the many other examples he cited of nations that the United States supports while other countries freeload.

The release over the weekend of a recording of Mr. Trump at a dinner in 2018 makes clear that the president understood early in his term that unless aid continued to Ukraine, it could be easily overrun.

“How long would they last in a fight with Russia?” Mr. Trump asked at the dinner.

“I don’t think very long,” said Lev Parnas, the Soviet émigré who worked for Rudolph W. Giuliani in pressuring Ukraine. “Without us, not very long.”

What’s missing from the record of Mr. Trump’s manipulation of the aid to Ukraine last summer is any indication that he sought an assessment from the Pentagon, the intelligence agencies or his own National Security Council over whether suspending American help could, in fact, lead to the downfall of the government.

And that, in the end, may be the most telling fact of all.

If nothing else, what Americans learned from watching the impeachment trial over the past week is that Mr. Trump regarded the conduct of foreign policy the way he has regarded any other policy: a chess move toward re-election rather than geopolitical advantage for the United States. Otherwise, there would be conversations weighing the benefits of restricting aid against the harm to American interests in countering the power of Russia.

There is anecdotal evidence that many around Mr. Trump did in fact push back — including Mr. Pompeo, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper, and the C.I.A. director, Gina Haspel. Their arguments were ignored until a whistle-blower’s complaint made clear that the suspension of aid to Ukraine was about to become public.

So far, not one has testified as part of the impeachment process or spoken publicly about what they told Mr. Trump about the potential consequences of his domestic political errand. It is a silence that speaks as loudly as the arguments made in the Senate.

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Kobe Bryant’s final tweet praised LeBron James for passing him on NBA scoring list

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6126661607001_6126676640001-vs Kobe Bryant's final tweet praised LeBron James for passing him on NBA scoring list Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fox news fnc/sports fnc b0568be9-1af6-5955-9e3b-9fc5ca163a5e article

Kobe Bryant, who died in a helicopter crash Sunday, was remembered on Twitter, as fans noted his final tweet paid homage to LeBron James, who moved past the late basketball icon for third place on the NBA’s career scoring list.

‘“Continuing to move the game forward @KingJames. Much respect my brother 💪🏾 #33644,” Bryant tweeted.

The 35-year-old James set the milestone on a driving layup against the Philadelphia 76ers on Saturday night.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The Los Angeles Lakers star scored the basket with 7:23 left in the third quarter and he waved to a Sixers crowd that gave him a rousing standing ovation when the mark was announced by the public address announcer. The basket gave him 33,644 points.

James entered 18 points shy of passing Bryant on the list and couldn’t quite get there in the first half. He scored six points in the first quarter but had four turnovers that included an errant pass into the seats. He opened the second quarter with a layup, and then went to the free throw line for his next four points, giving him 12.

He finished the first half 3 for 7 from the floor, missed all three 3s, had five turnovers and three fouls for 14 points.

With a nod to Bryant’s nickname, James scribbled “Mamba 4 Life” on his Nikes against the 76ers.

Bryant, who played his entire career with the Lakers, finished with 33,643 points.

The hashtag on Bryant’s last tweet, “#33644,” referred to the number of points needed to beat his own record that James scored as small forward.

The 18-time NBA All-Star who won five championships and became one of the greatest basketball players of his generation during a 20-year career with the Lakers was 41.

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After James passed Bryant on Saturday, he remembered listening to Bryant when the superstar came to speak at a childhood basketball camp.

“I remember one thing he said: If you want to be great at it, or want to be one of the greats, you’ve got to put the work in,” James said. “There’s no substitution for work.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6126661607001_6126676640001-vs Kobe Bryant's final tweet praised LeBron James for passing him on NBA scoring list Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fox news fnc/sports fnc b0568be9-1af6-5955-9e3b-9fc5ca163a5e article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6126661607001_6126676640001-vs Kobe Bryant's final tweet praised LeBron James for passing him on NBA scoring list Frank Miles fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox-news/person/lebron-james fox news fnc/sports fnc b0568be9-1af6-5955-9e3b-9fc5ca163a5e article

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Miranda Lambert recalls going through a ‘really hard time’ following Blake Shelton divorce

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1187475416 Miranda Lambert recalls going through a 'really hard time' following Blake Shelton divorce Nate Day fox-news/person/miranda-lambert fox-news/person/blake-shelton fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/country fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 29bcf5e0-4251-5073-ae7a-da6add05a680

Miranda Lambert has opened up about her divorce from fellow country music superstar Blake Shelton.

Speaking to Billboard, Lambert, 36, spoke about the city of Nashville and her experiences moving there during her divorce.

“I feel like Nashville is somewhere where you can go if you need to be a dreamer and not be judged about it. I spent a lot of time here on highs and lows… I went through a really hard time in my life,” said Lambert.

MIRANDA LAMBERT REVEALS ‘DEAL-BREAKER’ THAT WOULD HAVE LED TO SPLIT FROM BRENDAN MCLOUGHLIN

“I moved here in 2015 in the middle of a s–tshow,” she said. “But I was lifted up by people who were like, ‘We got you, girl.’ My friends and my songwriters and my fans and everybody here.”

Shelton, 43, and Lambert married in 2011 before splitting in 2015. Lambert is now married to Brendan McLoughlin.

Lambert also took to Instagram on Sunday to wish McLoughlin a happy anniversary.

PAMELA ANDERSON SHARES FIRST PHOTO WITH HUSBAND JON PETERS

The picture showed the duo on their wedding day, walking hand-in-hand with wide smiles.

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“1 year ❤️. I’m so happy to walk through this life with you,” she wrote in the caption. “Thank you Brendan for making me the proudest wife and stepmom. You are the reason for all my new smile lines. I love you.”

Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1187475416 Miranda Lambert recalls going through a 'really hard time' following Blake Shelton divorce Nate Day fox-news/person/miranda-lambert fox-news/person/blake-shelton fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/country fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 29bcf5e0-4251-5073-ae7a-da6add05a680   Westlake Legal Group GettyImages-1187475416 Miranda Lambert recalls going through a 'really hard time' following Blake Shelton divorce Nate Day fox-news/person/miranda-lambert fox-news/person/blake-shelton fox-news/entertainment/music fox-news/entertainment/genres/country fox-news/entertainment/events/divorce fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 29bcf5e0-4251-5073-ae7a-da6add05a680

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Kobe Bryant’s Daughter Gianna Killed With Father In Helicopter Crash

Gianna Bryant, the 13-year-old daughter of NBA great Kobe Bryant, was killed alongside her father in a helicopter crash in California on Sunday, according to multiple reports.

Gianna was traveling with her father and three others when the helicopter went down in Calabasas, in Los Angeles County, killing everyone on board, TMZ first reported.

The identities of the other crash victims have not yet been confirmed.

Westlake Legal Group 5e2dff1f24000034000b4e1e Kobe Bryant’s Daughter Gianna Killed With Father In Helicopter Crash

ASSOCIATED PRESS Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna watch the first half of an NCAA college basketball game between Connecticut and Houston on March 2, 2019.

Gianna was Bryant’s second-oldest of four children. His oldest daughter, Natalia, turned 17 earlier this month. His third daughter, Bianka, is 3 and his youngest daughter, Capri, was born in June of last year.

Gianna shared her father’s love of basketball and was “hellbent” on one day playing for the University of Connecticut, the Hartford Courant reported in 2018.

“She watches their interviews, watches how they play and learns — not just in wins, but in tough losses, how they conduct themselves,” her father told the Courant. “It’s great, as a parent, to be able to see my daughter pull inspiration from them.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e2dff4124000034000b4e1f Kobe Bryant’s Daughter Gianna Killed With Father In Helicopter Crash

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP Kobe Bryant is seen with his wife Vanessa Bryant and their two oldest daughters, Natalia Bryant and Gianna Maria-Onore Bryant.

Bryant’s Instagram account showcased himself as a proud family man, with him sharing numerous photos that included his wife, Vanessa Bryant, and their children.

Former President Barack Obama was among those expressing his condolences to Bryant’s family on Twitter while highlighting the particular heartbreak of losing a child.

“To lose Gianna is even more heartbreaking to us as parents. Michelle and I send love and prayers to Vanessa and the entire Bryant family on an unthinkable day,” he tweeted.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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Site That Ran Anti-Semitic Remarks Got Passes for Trump Trip

Westlake Legal Group 26trunews-facebookJumbo Site That Ran Anti-Semitic Remarks Got Passes for Trump Trip World Economic Forum White House Correspondents Assn Trump, Ivanka Trump, Donald J Jr Trump, Donald J News and News Media Media Jews and Judaism Freedom of the Press Deutch, Ted (1966- ) Davos (Switzerland)

To coordinate coverage of President Trump’s trip to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, the White House provided press credentials to the usual mix of American news organizations, including Fox News, Reuters and The New York Times.

One media outlet stood out: TruNews, a website aimed at conservative Christians whose founder, a pastor named Rick Wiles, recently described Mr. Trump’s impeachment as “a Jew coup” planned by “a Jewish cabal.”

Five employees of TruNews, which is based in Florida, received formal credentials from the White House to cover the president’s trip, Mr. Wiles said in an interview last week from his hotel room in Switzerland — a room in a ski lodge reserved by the Trump administration for traveling members of the American press. (Like other media organizations, TruNews paid for its flights and lodging.)

White House officials, in this and previous administrations, tend to be flexible in choosing which news organizations receive press credentials: Reporting is a form of free speech and there are no legal restrictions on who can declare themselves a journalist.

But Mr. Wiles’s ability to secure credentials after his anti-Semitic remarks — which prompted a formal rebuke from two members of Congress — has left civil rights groups deeply troubled.

“It’s a validation of their work,” said Kyle Mantyla, a senior fellow at the progressive group People for the American Way, which has tracked Mr. Wiles’s work. TruNews, he said, “sees it as the White House being on their side.”

TruNews was not granted special access to the president in Davos, nor did its members travel on Air Force One. But one of Mr. Wiles’s colleagues, Edward Szall, asked a question of the president’s daughter Ivanka Trump during a news conference.

“We want to thank President Trump and the White House for extending the invitation to be here,” Mr. Wiles said in a video from Davos. “We are honored to be here, representing the kingdom of heaven and our king Jesus Christ.”

It was not the first time TruNews has gotten close to Mr. Trump and his family.

The president took a question from Mr. Szall at a 2018 news conference in Midtown Manhattan. In March 2019, a TruNews correspondent filmed an interview with Donald Trump Jr., the president’s son, after a rally in Michigan. (A spokeswoman for Donald Trump Jr. told The Washington Post that the interview was impromptu and that Mr. Trump was unfamiliar with the site.)

TruNews, which Mr. Wiles founded as an online radio program in 1999 called America’s Hope, has a history of spreading conspiracy theories and proclaiming an imminent apocalypse. It drew more scrutiny in November after Mr. Wiles, in an online video, accused Jews of orchestrating Mr. Trump’s impeachment.

“That’s the way Jews work,” Mr. Wiles said. “They are deceivers. They plot, they lie, they do whatever they have to do to accomplish their political agenda. This ‘Impeach Trump’ movement is a Jew coup, and the American people better wake up to it really fast.”

Mr. Wiles also warned his listeners that “when Jews take over a country, they kill millions of Christians.”

Afterward, Representatives Ted Deutch of Florida and Elaine Luria of Virginia, wrote to the White House asking why TruNews had been allowed to attend presidential events. They did not receive a response.

The White House declined to comment for this article. In the past, the administration has faced lawsuits after revoking press credentials from reporters from CNN and Playboy.

On the phone from Switzerland, Mr. Wiles explained how his Davos trip had come about.

“We’re on a list of media organizations at the White House and from time to time they send out notices that there are events taking place,” Mr. Wiles said, adding that his team had also covered Mr. Trump’s visits to NATO summits and Group of 20 gatherings. He said that he received an email from the White House about the Davos trip and that his request to attend was approved.

The team from TruNews — three correspondents and a two-person production crew — stayed at a hotel where the White House had reserved a block of rooms for the use of American journalists. (As with a wedding block, those who used the rooms paid the hotel directly.) Reporters spotted Mr. Wiles at the breakfast buffet at the hotel, the Privà Alpine Lodge.

Asked in the interview if he understood why his “Jew coup” comments prompted charges of anti-Semitism, Mr. Wiles replied: “I coined a phrase. It came out of my mouth: ‘It looks like a Jew coup.’ All I pointed out was many of the people involved were Jewish.”

Pressed if such rhetoric could be reasonably interpreted as anti-Semitic, Mr. Wiles said: “It’s hard to say. I don’t know. I can tell you from my heart there is no ill will toward the Jewish people, with all sincerity.”

His critics disagree. Mr. Deutch, the representative from Florida, learned of TruNews’s presence in Davos while on a congressional trip to Jerusalem to commemorate the Holocaust.

“I can’t believe the day before I attend an event at Yad Vashem marking 75 years since the liberation of Auschwitz, anti-Semites were given WH credentials to broadcast from European soil,” Mr. Deutch wrote on Twitter. (Yad Vashem is the Israeli Holocaust memorial.)

The president of the White House Correspondents’ Association, Jonathan Karl of ABC News, has asked the Trump administration why TruNews was credentialed for the trip.

“It’s puzzling that a known hate group would get press credentials from the same White House that revoked the credentials of a correspondent for a major television network,” Mr. Karl said on Sunday, referring to Jim Acosta of CNN, whose credentials were revoked — and then restored after a lawsuit — in 2018.

“We have asked why this happened and if the White House intends to issue credentials to this group in the future,” Mr. Karl said. “We have not received an on-the-record response.”

Mr. Wiles, in the interview, said that he had been unfairly attacked by “the self-appointed gods and goddesses of the news media, who do not think we should be permitted to attend any event.” He went on to blame George Soros, the Jewish financier often cited in anti-Semitic conspiracy theories, for coordinating a campaign against him.

“I don’t think anybody can find fault with our news coverage at these events,” Mr. Wiles said. “They may not agree with our analysis and conclusions. But our behavior at these events — we’re professional, we’re respectful.”

He added: “And we’re able to get interviews with prominent people.”

Annie Karni contributed reporting.

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Kobe Bryant’s Daughter Gianna Killed With Father In Helicopter Crash

Gianna Bryant, the 13-year-old daughter of NBA great Kobe Bryant, was killed alongside her father in a helicopter crash in California on Sunday, according to multiple reports.

Gianna was traveling with her father and three others when the helicopter went down in Calabasas, in Los Angeles County, killing everyone on board, TMZ first reported.

The identities of the other crash victims have not yet been confirmed.

Westlake Legal Group 5e2dff1f24000034000b4e1e Kobe Bryant’s Daughter Gianna Killed With Father In Helicopter Crash

ASSOCIATED PRESS Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna watch the first half of an NCAA college basketball game between Connecticut and Houston on March 2, 2019.

Gianna was Bryant’s second-oldest of four children. His oldest daughter, Natalia, turned 17 earlier this month. His third daughter, Bianka, is 3 and his youngest daughter, Capri, was born in June of last year.

Gianna shared her father’s love of basketball and was “hellbent” on one day playing for the University of Connecticut, the Hartford Courant reported in 2018.

“She watches their interviews, watches how they play and learns — not just in wins, but in tough losses, how they conduct themselves,” her father told the Courant. “It’s great, as a parent, to be able to see my daughter pull inspiration from them.”

Westlake Legal Group 5e2dff4124000034000b4e1f Kobe Bryant’s Daughter Gianna Killed With Father In Helicopter Crash

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP Kobe Bryant is seen with his wife Vanessa Bryant and their two oldest daughters, Natalia Bryant and Gianna Maria-Onore Bryant.

Bryant’s Instagram account showcased himself as a proud family man, with him sharing numerous photos that included his wife, Vanessa Bryant, and their children.

Former President Barack Obama was among those expressing his condolences to Bryant’s family on Twitter while highlighting the particular heartbreak of losing a child.

“To lose Gianna is even more heartbreaking to us as parents. Michelle and I send love and prayers to Vanessa and the entire Bryant family on an unthinkable day,” he tweeted.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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Shaq Pays Tribute After Kobe Bryant’s Shocking Death: ‘I Love You Brother’

Westlake Legal Group 5e2e0066240000540064c54b Shaq Pays Tribute After Kobe Bryant’s Shocking Death: ‘I Love You Brother’

Bryant was traveling in a private helicopter with eight others when it crashed in Calabasas around 10 a.m., resulting in the deaths of all on board. 

As countless tributes poured in for the NBA great, O’Neal expressed his utter disbelief and sadness over the tragedy. 

“There’s no words to express the pain I’m going through now with this tragic and sad moment of loosing my friend, my brother, my partner in winning championships, my dude and my homie,” O’Neal said in an Instagram caption, alongside a photo of him carrying Bryant.

“I love you brother and you will be missed. My condolences goes out to the Bryant family and the families of the other passengers on board. IM SICK RIGHT NOW !” 

O’Neal’s son, Shareef O’Neal, tweeted out his last text message exchange with Bryant and said the two had spoken on Sunday morning, just before the crash. 

“Literally this morning you reached out to me…. ” Shareef said, adding “I love you forever unc. I love you.” 

Bryant, known to his fans as “Black Mamba,” played for the Lakers for 20 years. 

He won five NBA championships with the team ― and three with O’Neal specifically ― before retiring in 2016. The two had a loving, but contentious and competitive relationship with each other, trading barbs (before quickly making up) as recently as August 2019. 

Countless friends, fans and former teammates also paid their respects to Bryant after news of his death spread. 

“Beyond devastated… my big brother… I can’t, I just can’t believe it,” former teammate Pau Gasol tweeted

Jim Boeheim, head coach of Syracuse’s men’s basketball team and former assistant coach for the United States men’s national basketball team, said that he was “so fortunate to have known [Bryant] and coached him with Team USA.” 

“Kobe Bryant was not only one of the greatest basketball players ever, he was also the hardest working player I’ve ever been around,” Boeheim tweeted Sunday. “Our thoughts and our prayers are with his wife, Vanessa, and the Bryant family.”

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Buttigieg suggests it would be too risky to nominate Sanders.

Westlake Legal Group 26-live-pete-facebookJumbo Buttigieg suggests it would be too risky to nominate Sanders.

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Mayor Pete Buttigieg at a campaign event in West Des Moines, Iowa.Credit…Eric Thayer/Reuters

WEST DES MOINES, Iowa — Picking up on a line of attack he first introduced Saturday, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg suggested to voters here, without naming him, that it would be too risky to nominate Senator Bernie Sanders to face off against President Trump.

Mr. Buttigieg first called Mr. Sanders “a risk we can’t take” in a fund-raising appeal Saturday. During a Sunday rally at Maple Grove Elementary School here, he went after Mr. Sanders again.

“We cannot run the risk of trying to defeat this president with the same Washington political warfare mentality that brought us to this point,” he said. “It’s time for something new, it’s time for something different and it’s time to turn the page.”

Mr. Buttigieg, who is spending the final days of his Iowa campaign making a case for his own electability, suggested Mr. Sanders’s left-wing politics and pledge to organize supporters to push his agenda as president were not the prescription the nation needed.

“The country will be crying out for a president capable of unifying and healing the American people,” he said. “It won’t be enough to just say, ‘Let’s get together,’ we’re going to have to get together and do something, fast.”

When he spoke with reporters after his rally, Mr. Buttigieg drew a contrast with Mr. Sanders that alluded to Mr. Sanders’s experience in the combat of Washington politics.

“We need to turn the page on the political mind-set that got us here,” he said. “We have an opportunity to choose both unity and boldness.”

DES MOINES — It’s the final sprint in Iowa, but with three top candidates spending much of the past week in Washington as jurors for President Trump’s impeachment trial, televisions here in Iowa have been inundated with political ads to help provide air cover in this bifurcated political moment.

Over the past week, Democratic candidates have spent over $3.5 million in the four main Iowa television markets, according to Advertising Analytics, an ad tracking firm. More than $4 million is booked through caucus day, though that is likely to change as candidates make their final arguments on air.

Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont has been rotating heavily between two ads in Iowa over the past week, one promoting his record on women’s rights, including issues like abortion access and making child care affordable, and another ad calling for a Sanders-brand of unity, asking people to “fight for someone else as much as you would fight for yourself.”

His ad focusing on women’s rights began airing after his public argument with Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts over whether Mr. Sanders once said a woman couldn’t win the presidency.

The campaign has spent more than $464,000 on ads in Iowa in the past week.

Ms. Warren also has two ads in heavy rotation, spending more than $450,000 on ads in Iowa last week.

She is evenly split between an ad showcasing her large crowds and endless selfie lines, as she repeats her campaign mantra — “big, structural change” — and an ad making the case that President Trump is most afraid of facing Ms. Warren in the general election.

Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, who is also taking part in the impeachment trial, is spending about half as much as Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren.

Her main ad is a rehash of her 100-day plan. The ad, tapping into the candidate’s sense of humor, features Ms. Klobuchar breathlessly listing all of the policy goals she has for the first 100 days of her administration, and runs out of time before she can finish the phrase “affordable housing.”

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WEST DES MOINES — Former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., said he was “shocked” about Kobe Bryant’s death, which he learned about after a campaign event at Maple Grove Elementary School here.

“This is someone who affected so many fans and supporters,” he said. “Of course we’ll be thinking of not just his family but everyone who is going to be impacted and in mourning.”

Asked what he would remember most about Mr. Bryant, Mr. Buttigieg replied, “I mean, obviously, on the court, what he did as an extraordinary athlete.”

Then he told a story about his father. “Folks grow up looking up to our sports heroes, and you know, my father was a fan of Manchester United,” he said. “His loyalty to that team really cemented in a tragic crash that killed a number of those athletes when he was a child. It can have an effect on people for the rest of their lives when somebody that they feel a connection with, even without having met them, is lost too soon.”

In 1958, a plane carrying the Manchester United football team crashed shortly after taking off from the Munich airport. In all, 23 people died, including eight members of the team.

Elsewhere in Iowa, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, responding to a question from an NBC news reporter, said of Mr. Bryant: “He’s certainly one of the great basketball players who’ve ever lived.”

DES MOINES — At former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s second campaign stop of the day, an event hosted by the Des Moines branch of the N.A.A.C.P. and two local organizations, Creative Visions and Urban Dreams, the audience was informed that the basketball superstar Kobe Bryant had been killed in a helicopter crash, along with four other people, and a moment of silence was observed.

Mr. Biden spoke shortly thereafter and said he had learned the news as he was arriving at the event. He said he had met Mr. Bryant a couple of times. “It makes you realize that you’ve got to make every day count,” he said.

Another Democratic candidate, the entrepreneur Andrew Yang, also reacted to the news on Sunday, calling Mr. Bryant “an all-time great who had his entire life ahead of him.”

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Senator Elizabeth Warren addressed her electability as a woman at a rally in Davenport, Iowa.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times

DAVENPORT, Iowa — Senator Elizabeth Warren was asked, yet again, the question on Sunday that has bogged down her candidacy in Iowa and elsewhere in recent months: whether a candidate from the more moderate wing of the Democratic Party would more easily defeat President Trump.

“I think the old ways of looking at things just don’t work anymore,” Ms. Warren said.

Then, as she did at last week’s debate, she invoked her own electoral history — beating a popular Republican incumbent, then-Senator Scott Brown, in 2012 — the ambitions of her agenda and her gender.

“Can we just address it right here? Women win,” she said, explaining that the “world changed” with Mr. Trump’s election and the mass protest marches led by women the day after his inauguration.

“Women candidates have been outperforming men candidates since Donald Trump was elected,” she said. “We took back the House and we took back statehouses around the nation because of women candidates and the women who get out there and do the hard work to get it done.”

She added that her focus on corruption could “pull in Republicans.”

“We’re going to win it by drawing the distinction, the sharpest distinction between the most corrupt administration in history and a Democrat who is willing to get out there and fight corruption,” she said.

PERRY, Iowa — Bernie Sanders and Joseph R. Biden Jr. are fighting over yet another issue: climate change.

After days of back-and-forth jabs over Social Security, the two leading candidates have turned to attacking each other over their plans to fight climate change.

“Well Joe, you’re wrong,” Mr. Sanders said at an event in Perry on Sunday. “Many leading scientists agree with our plan and in a few days we’re gonna have a long list of scientists who agree with our plan.”

Mr. Sanders’s remark came in response to Mr. Biden’s comment two days ago denouncing Mr. Sanders’s plan. “There’s not a single solitary scientist that thinks it can work,” Mr. Biden said on Friday.

Mr. Sanders’s sweeping plan aligns with the Green New Deal and involves reducing domestic carbon emissions by at least 71 percent by 2030.

The two men represent the two factions of the Democratic Party, and have often dealt each other glancing blows. But more recently, they have landed more direct hits over Social Security. Mr. Sanders has also gone after Mr. Biden over his vote to authorize the war in Iraq.

ANKENY, Iowa — It would have been in 1973, if Maxine Goldstein recalls correctly, and she would have been 16 or 17.

Joe Biden was a new senator reeling from the deaths of his wife and daughter. Ms. Goldstein was on Capitol Hill for a congressional workshop program, and she wanted to meet him more than anyone.

It was “his warmth, his passion, his sincerity” that drew her to him, she said. Mr. Biden spoke with her in his office for about 15 minutes — “he was remarkably generous,” she said — and someone took a photo of them.

On the back, Mr. Biden wrote:

Maxine —

Please come back and visit

Joe Biden

USS

So she did Saturday night, 47 years later, at a conference center just north of Des Moines, 350 miles from her home in St. Louis.

Ms. Goldstein, now 63, is not an Iowan. Missouri doesn’t vote until after Super Tuesday. She isn’t even positive she’s going to vote for Mr. Biden, though she is leaning that way. But she wanted to see him.

And how did it go?

“It’s everything that I imagined,” she said, her husband smiling beside her. “He’s exactly now as he was then.”

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DES MOINES — If it’s Sunday, it’s shopping time at Mercado Iowa Market, a small swap meet of sorts at El Malecon Event Center in south Des Moines. The mercado features food of all sorts — carne asada tacos, cheese-oozing pupusas and tlacoyos heaped with nopales.

So just what does all that food have to do with the upcoming Iowa caucuses? The market is perhaps one of the best places to see evidence of the growing Latino community in the state, which has more than doubled in the last two decades.

That growth is likely to affect the caucus — or “el caucus,” as it is known in Spanish. More Spanish speakers than ever are expected to show up to caucus night this year. And for the first time, the state Democratic Party is offering six Spanish-language satellite caucus sites, in an attempt to increase participation.

The problem? Party officials are still scrambling to find enough bilingual Spanish speakers to work at those sites and others around the state.

Last weekend, we spent time with one interpreter as she joined a few other community activists for a local a caucus training. Vanessa Marcano-Kelly, a native of Venezuela, became a citizen just last year and will participate in her first caucus next month.

Ms. Marcano-Kelly is a precinct captain for the Sanders campaign, one of just a few designated so far for the bilingual caucus sites. But as she learned more about the process last week, she wondered just who should have her loyalty on caucus night — the campaign or individual voters? And how could anyone be sure that everything at the bilingual caucus sites would operate smoothly?

Read more:

How Will Thousands of Latinos in Iowa Be Greeted at ‘El Caucus’?

The state’s Latino population is a potentially important bloc in the Democratic voting. But some local leaders believe efforts to make caucus sites friendlier to Spanish speakers have fallen short.

Jan. 24, 2020

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Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. at a campaign event in Osage, Iowa, last week. Credit…Tamir Kalifa for The New York Times

With Joe Biden still leading most national polls, his rivals, especially Bernie Sanders, are increasingly hitting out at his decades-long record.

And as Mr. Biden has defended himself, emphasizing his standing among black voters and his foreign policy experience, he has made some misleading claims.

We fact-checked some of his statements on Social Security, birth control, North Korea and his role in the civil rights movement. Read more here.

HARTSVILLE, S.C. — If you live in South Carolina, you could be forgiven for thinking that Tom Steyer is the leading Democratic challenger to President Trump.

That’s because Mr. Steyer is everywhere in the state — TV commercials, Facebook ads, old-fashioned mailers through the postal system.

A hedge-fund billionaire from California, he is using his vast wealth to lavish money on black businesses in particular, hiring dozens of African-American staff members and spending generously with black-owned news organizations.

So far, it seems to be paying off. A Fox News survey this month showed Mr. Steyer in a surprisingly strong position in South Carolina — in second place with 15 percent of the vote.

An impressive showing in the Feb. 29 primary by Mr. Steyer could chisel into support for former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., who is the clear front-runner in polls here.

Mr. Steyer’s focus on courting black voters seems to have earned him some good will, or at least positive media attention.

But some experts question the wisdom of Mr. Steyer’s spending here, and whether his money could be put to better use. Nonprofit groups and community organizations always need more funding; the Democratic presidential field does not necessarily need more candidates who are unlikely to win the nomination.

“If I’m running that campaign, I’m thinking it’s great that after all these tens of millions of dollars we’re finally starting to show some movement,” said Lachlan McIntosh, a Charleston-based Democratic consultant. “But my goodness, it is worth it?”

Read more here.

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Senator Bernie Sanders at a rally in Ames, Iowa on Saturday.Credit…Tamir Kalifa for The New York Times

DES MOINES — A new CBS News poll released Sunday shows Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. neck-and-neck in Iowa eight days before the caucuses.

The poll, which was conducted from Jan. 16-23 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.9 percentage points, showed Mr. Sanders with 26 percent support and Mr. Biden with 25 percent, a statistically insignificant difference. Former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., was also very close, at 22 percent.

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts had 15 percent support, and Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota had 7 percent. Nobody else had more than 1 percent support.

Candidates must get at least 15 percent support to be considered viable in a precinct; if they are below that threshold in the first vote, their supporters must realign themselves with a viable candidate. Only those who exceed 15 percent are eligible to win delegates, some of which will be awarded at the state level and some of which will be awarded in each of Iowa’s four congressional districts.

The CBS poll paints a somewhat different picture than a New York Times/Siena College poll of likely caucusgoers released on Saturday. That poll showed essentially the same amount of support for Mr. Sanders — 25 percent — but gave him a clearer lead over his competitors, showing Mr. Buttigieg at 18 percent, Mr. Biden at 17, Ms. Warren at 15 and Ms. Klobuchar at 8. The margin of error was plus or minus 4.8 percentage points.

PERRY, Iowa — Senator Bernie Sanders opened his remarks at his first town hall meeting of the day on Sunday with a slightly wistful interlude about what could have been.

“A few weeks ago, I would not have told you that I would be spending the last week of the campaign in Washington, D.C.,” he said.

The Vermont senator planned to spend the lead-up to the Iowa caucuses much as he spent it four years ago — criss-crossing the state, greeting thousands of potential voters and holding, by his estimation, 20 or 30 events.

Instead, like the three other senators running for president, Mr. Sanders will likely spend much of the next week marooned in the Senate chamber, listening to President Trump’s lawyers make their arguments.

While this isn’t ideal, his team believes Mr. Sanders’s brand and established organization in the state will be strong enough to withstand his absence. Recent polling has buoyed their hopes: A series of state and national polls show Mr. Sanders emerging as a late-breaking leader in the contest, consolidating support from liberals and benefiting from a divided moderate wing.

Mr. Sanders said he expects the momentum to continue until the caucuses. “The reason we are going to win here in Iowa is we have the strongest grass-roots movement of any campaign,” he said.

DES MOINES — Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. has not been a favorite of newspaper editorial boards so far, and he lost out on the coveted Des Moines Register endorsement on Saturday. But his campaign emerged from the day with a different endorsement to trumpet, from The Sioux City Journal in northwest Iowa.

The Journal’s case for Mr. Biden focused on his ability to pose a strong challenge to President Trump in the general election — an argument that is central to Mr. Biden’s candidacy. The Journal suggested Mr. Biden was well positioned to attract support not only from Democrats, but also from independents and from “disgruntled Republicans.”

“We view Biden as a pragmatist — and we believe his pragmatism is an attribute,” the newspaper wrote in its endorsement. “We refuse to believe middle-of-the-road compromise should be or is a relic of the past.”

Northwest Iowa is a heavily Republican area, and it has not been a top focus of campaigning for Democratic presidential candidates. But The Journal’s track record bodes well for Mr. Biden. The newspaper endorsed Al Gore in the 2000 primary race and Barack Obama in the 2008 contest, both of whom went on to win the Iowa caucuses and become the Democratic nominee.

Fresh off the heels of the endorsement, Mr. Biden began a day of campaigning on Sunday with a visit to an ironworkers union in Des Moines, where signs declared, “Bolt’n up for Biden.”

Many unions have held back from endorsing so far in the Democratic primary race, but the International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers gave its backing to Mr. Biden last week.

Mr. Biden used his visit to Iron Workers Local 67 to stress his support for organized labor, saying that collective bargaining would be “sacred” under a Biden administration.

Mr. Biden was joined by two high-profile supporters, Representatives Cindy Axne and Abby Finkenauer of Iowa, both of whom flipped Republican-held districts in the 2018 midterm elections.

Mr. Biden apologized to the audience members before him, many of whom were clad in gray union sweatshirts, for wearing a navy suit (though no tie) while he spoke to them.

“I just went to Mass,” Mr. Biden said. “My mother would kill me if I showed up in jeans.”

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Senator Elizabeth Warren speaks at Sudlow Intermediate School in Davenport, Iowa.Credit…Jordan Gale for The New York Times

DAVENPORT, Iowa — Patrick Peacock, an alderman on the Davenport city council, said before a gymnasium filled with more than 300 people Sunday morning that he had the high honor of introducing the next president of the United States: Senator Elizabeth Warren.

Then he tried to get the crowd fired up.

“El-Liz-A-Beth! El-Liz-A-Beth! El-Liz-A-Beth! El-Liz-A-Beth!” he exhorted.

The crowd tried. But four syllables do not an easy chant make — a fact that Ms. Warren acknowledged when she jogged out to the familiar tunes of Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5.”

“Next time, I’m going to get a more chantable name,” Ms. Warren joked.

Luckily, she has some ready-made options: Ms. Warren was known as Betsy growing up and later as Liz.

The first time we interviewed the Democratic presidential candidates, late last spring, we had a pile of yes-or-no, either-or policy questions to ask, many of them representing litmus-test issues at the heart of Democratic politics: single-payer health care and foreign wars, wealth concentration and tech regulation.

Our second round of interviews was different. For starters, we asked fewer candidates to participate, inviting only the ones with a realistic shot at accumulating a substantial number of delegates.

5 Things We Learned Interviewing 2020 Democrats (Again)

We sat down with Democratic presidential candidates and asked them a new set of questions, including how they’d debate President Trump to the last book they read.

Jan. 26, 2020

And we asked them, for the most part, a different genre of questions, exploring not just policy issues but also their ideas about leadership and the presidency.

Our hope was to produce a set of interviews that would guide voters trying to make a difficult final decision about which candidate they’d like to put in the country’s most powerful job.

Take a look.

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Andrew Yang during the December Democratic presidential debate in Los Angeles.Credit…Jim Wilson/The New York Times

DES MOINES — The entrepreneur Andrew Yang qualified for the next Democratic debate with a string of four strong polls released in quick succession on Saturday and Sunday.

Two polls of New Hampshire voters — one from CNN and the University of New Hampshire, and the other from NBC News and Marist — showed Mr. Yang at 5 percent, the minimum to qualify for the debate.

A national Fox News poll also showed him at 5 percent. And a national ABC News/Washington Post poll released Saturday found him at 7 percent, his best showing ever in a debate-qualifying survey.

Mr. Yang, who did not qualify for the last debate, is the seventh candidate to qualify for the next one. He had long since met the Democratic National Committee’s other qualification requirement: a minimum of 225,000 donors.

“America has spoken,” Mr. Yang’s campaign chief, Nick Ryan, said in a statement Sunday morning. “Voters clearly missed Andrew Yang’s presence in the most recent debate, and now they are making sure he will be on the debate stage in New Hampshire. The race for the nomination has only just begun, and Andrew Yang is going to keep fighting for all Americans to have their voices heard.”

Mr. Yang will join former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.; former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.; Senators Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts; and the former hedge fund executive Tom Steyer onstage in Manchester, N.H., on Feb. 7, four days before the New Hampshire primary.

Who’s Qualified for the Next 2020 Democratic Debate?

Here’s a look at who’s made the cut for the February debate so far.

Oct. 2, 2019

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STORM LAKE, Iowa — Pete Buttigieg had one of northwest Iowa’s most coveted surrogates introduce him before a town-hall-style event Saturday night at Buena Vista University: David Johnson, a former state senator who in 2016 quit the Republican Party when Donald J. Trump won its presidential nomination.

Mr. Johnson, who didn’t seek re-election in 2018, represents exactly what Mr. Buttigieg says he’d bring as the Democratic presidential nominee: support from former Republicans disgusted with Mr. Trump.

The only problem? Mr. Johnson endorsed Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota in September. He’s planning to serve as a precinct captain for Ms. Klobuchar in his hometown, Ocheyedan, just over the border between Iowa and Minnesota.

That didn’t stop the Buttigieg campaign from informing reporters that Mr. Johnson, who introduced Mr. Buttigieg as “the next president of the United States,” had “announced his support for him.”

Mr. Johnson said after the event that he’s still backing Ms. Klobuchar.

“They’re two good candidates,” he said. “I’m just happy with someone from the Midwest.”

Mr. Johnson said he was asked to introduce Mr. Buttigieg after the scheduled introducer had car trouble and missed the event. He called Mr. Buttigieg the next president, he said, because that’s just something you say when someone visits Iowa.

“It’s a courtesy,” he said. “I would do it for anyone who had a D behind their name.”

Despite his affection for them, Mr. Johnson doesn’t expect either Mr. Buttigieg or Ms. Klobuchar to win the state’s caucuses.

“My prediction is Senator Sanders,” he said, referring to Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who is leading in the latest Iowa polling.

“There’s a lot of things that have happened, and Secretary Clinton didn’t do any good to tamp down his case,” he said, referencing critical remarks Hillary Clinton made last week about her former primary rival.

“I tell you, that guy’s people are going to be out there with a vengeance.”

AMES, Iowa — The impeachment trial scrambled plans for the senators competing in the Democratic primary race. They would normally be blitzing Iowa in the final days before the caucuses, but they instead spent much of the past week in Washington, serving as jurors for the trial of President Trump, before returning to Iowa on Saturday.

Bernie Sanders took something of a lighthearted tone about his Washington detention.

“I am really delighted to be here tonight,” he told a crowd in Ames, after being introduced by the filmmaker Michael Moore and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York. “You don’t know how delighted I am, because last night, I didn’t know that I would be here!”

Earlier in the night, he also briefly touched on his time in Washington.

“As you well know, we have had to radically change our schedule in the last week — kind of toss it into the garbage can and begin anew,” he said at a stop on Marshalltown. “But we are going to be back here in Iowa in the next week every moment that we possibly can.”

It is not clear how much, or even if, being away from the trail will affect Mr. Sanders and the other senators in the race. For now, he is surging in Iowa, and gaining momentum in other early states.

A New York Times/Siena College poll released on Saturday showed Mr. Sanders in a commanding first place, with 25 percent support — 7 percent ahead of his nearest opponent. A poll on Sunday from CNN showed him leading in New Hampshire, too.

MUSCATINE, Iowa — The Des Moines Register endorsed Senator Elizabeth Warren for the Democratic presidential nomination on Saturday night, calling her “the best leader for these times.”

The newspaper, Iowa’s largest and most influential, gave Ms. Warren a boost just over a week before the caucuses on Feb. 3, when Iowans will take part in the first nominating contest of the primary cycle.

The Register’s endorsement landed as Ms. Warren worked her way through her selfie line after a town-hall-style event in Muscatine, Iowa.

She did not find out until after she took the final picture, when her communications director, Kristen Orthman, pulled her aside to share the news.

Ms. Warren leapt back in excitement — pulling her hands to her chest, as if to say, “what, me?” — and then pumped both hands in the air and did a little dance. Ms. Orthman then appeared to show Ms. Warren the editorial on her phone.

Ms. Warren gulped down a sip of coconut water, one of her campaign trail staples, and headed over to a gathered group of reporters and microphones with a smile.

“I just heard and I’m delighted,” Ms. Warren said of the endorsement. “It really means a lot to me. I’m very happy.”

The endorsement was one of three released in quick succession Saturday evening. The New Hampshire Union Leader backed Amy Klobuchar, writing: “Her work in Washington has led to the passage of an impressive number of substantive bills, even as the partisan divide has deepened.

And The Sioux City Journal in Iowa gave its support to Joseph R. Biden Jr., calling him “the candidate best positioned to give Americans a competitive head-to-head matchup with President Trump.”

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DES MOINES — We’re approaching the final week before the Iowa presidential caucuses, and the Democratic campaign pulsed with a newly urgent and frenetic energy on Sunday morning as the five top candidates descended on the state and a crush of new polls and endorsements came out.

Here’s how to think about it:

There are eight days left until the caucuses next Monday night, and there are plenty of undecided or wavering Iowa voters who have a history of breaking late in favor of a candidate. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont is ahead in Iowa in the latest New York Times/Siena College poll, while he and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. are effectively tied in a new CBS News poll in Iowa published on Sunday. Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts just won The Des Moines Register’s endorsement and Mr. Biden picked up the Sioux City Journal’s backing.

Most of the campaign events on Sunday are in the Democratic population centers of Des Moines, Cedar Rapids and Davenport, and the candidates are making a case for their policy ideas but also for their electability.

While Mr. Sanders almost tied Hillary Clinton in Iowa in 2016, the competition is much greater now, but also fluid. There are two liberal candidates — Mr. Sanders and Ms. Warren — competing for Iowa’s big progressive vote, which often turns out energetically on caucus night. Three moderates — Mr. Biden, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., and Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota — are largely carving up the centrist vote.

Yes, there is overlap among the candidates. Ms. Warren and Mr. Buttigieg are both chasing upper-income, college-educated, left-leaning Democrats, for instance. But polls indicate that Mr. Sanders could be on a path to putting together a plurality of caucusgoers next Monday night.

The main takeaway from the new polls — in addition to the Iowa polls, there were two national surveys and two New Hampshire primary polls — is that Mr. Sanders and Mr. Biden are now co-front-runners, with Mr. Biden having the edge nationally and Mr. Sanders in New Hampshire (as well as Iowa). Mr. Buttigieg and Ms. Warren have strength in New Hampshire as well, but their fate in the Feb. 11 primary there is partly dependent on how well they do in Iowa.

We are out with the top five candidates across Iowa today and will bring you updates throughout the afternoon and evening.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

LA Mayor Garcetti reacts to Kobe Bryant’s death: ‘A giant’

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti took to Twitter Sunday to honor NBA legend Kobe Bryant following his death from a fiery helicopter crash in California on Sunday.

In a multi-part Twitter thread, Garcetti called Bryant a heroic figure who transcended the game of basketball and inspired people with his “incomparable skill on the court.”

He continued, “Kobe Bryant was a giant who inspired, amazed, and thrilled people everywhere with his incomparable skill on the court – and awed us with his intellect and humility as a father, husband, creative genius, and ambassador for the game he loved.”

The 48-year-old mayor added that Bryant “will live forever in the heart of Los Angeles, and will be remembered through the ages as one of our greatest heroes.”

He also wrote, “This is a moment that leaves us struggling to fund words that express the magnitude of shock and sorrow we are all feeling right now, and I am keeping Kobe’s entire family in my prayers at this time of unimaginable grief.”

KOBE BRYANT DEAD: STARS PAY TRIBUTE TO NBA LEGEND KILLED IN HELICOPTER CRASH

Bryant, an 18-time NBA All-Star who won five championships and became one of the greatest basketball players of his generation during a 20-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers, died in a helicopter crash near Calabasas — about 30 miles northwest of Los Angeles.

Westlake Legal Group AP20026717737548 LA Mayor Garcetti reacts to Kobe Bryant's death: 'A giant' fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc Bradford Betz beb48095-6b1e-544b-92dc-30cf7f2aec28 article

Firefighters working the scene of the helicopter crash where former NBA star Kobe Bryant died Sunday in Calabasas, Calif. (AP)

Bryant lived in South of Los Angeles in coastal Orange County for much of his adult life, and often used helicopters to avoid Southern California’s notorious traffic. He kept up the practice after retirement to attend to his business ventures.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office in a late-morning news conference said all five onboard died in Sunday morning’s crash. They did not confirm the identities of the passengers.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group AP20026714299676 LA Mayor Garcetti reacts to Kobe Bryant's death: 'A giant' fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc Bradford Betz beb48095-6b1e-544b-92dc-30cf7f2aec28 article   Westlake Legal Group AP20026714299676 LA Mayor Garcetti reacts to Kobe Bryant's death: 'A giant' fox-news/us/us-regions/west/california fox-news/us/disasters/transportation fox-news/sports/nba/los-angeles-lakers fox-news/sports/nba fox news fnc/sports fnc Bradford Betz beb48095-6b1e-544b-92dc-30cf7f2aec28 article

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com