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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 387)

Matt Lauer dating marketing executive Shamin Abas: report

Matt Lauer is moving on.

After finalizing his divorce from ex-wife Annette Roque, 53, in September, Lauer, 62, is now dating his longtime pal Shamin Abas, who runs a marketing firm, according to In Touch.

The outlet claims that the two embarked on a getaway in New Zealand just before the holiday. Lauer and Abas, 50, have known each other for over a decade.

SHARON OSBOURNE SAYS SHE SENT AN ASSISTANT INTO A BURNING BUILDING TO RETRIEVE ARTWORK, THEN FIRED HIM

“Obviously one thing led to another and they’re a full-fledged item now,” an insider told the magazine.

Westlake Legal Group Matt-Lauer-Shamin-Abas Matt Lauer dating marketing executive Shamin Abas: report Nate Day fox-news/person/matt-lauer fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 444d8f0b-8d1c-526a-aa98-afdd902cec30

Matt Lauer and longtime friend Shamin Abas are reportedly dating. (Getty)

According to the source, the disgraced television host has been “on the prowl” for a new girlfriend following his divorce from Roque after 21 years of marriage.

MATT LAUER AGREES TO PAY ANNETTE ROQUE UP TO $20M IN DIVORCE

“She knows who he is,” said the source. “She’s thrilled she’s with him. She doesn’t seem to have a care in the world. For everything he may have done, Matt’s very charming. I can see how Shamin fell for him.”

Lauer was fired from “Today” in 2017 after he was accused by several women of sexual harassment.

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Reps for Lauer did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Westlake Legal Group Matt-Lauer-Shamin-Abas Matt Lauer dating marketing executive Shamin Abas: report Nate Day fox-news/person/matt-lauer fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 444d8f0b-8d1c-526a-aa98-afdd902cec30   Westlake Legal Group Matt-Lauer-Shamin-Abas Matt Lauer dating marketing executive Shamin Abas: report Nate Day fox-news/person/matt-lauer fox-news/entertainment/events/scandal fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 444d8f0b-8d1c-526a-aa98-afdd902cec30

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Dana Perino calls Bloomberg’s ‘open office plan’ the ‘worst’ idea of Democratic primary

Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Perino_Fox-AP Dana Perino calls Bloomberg's 'open office plan' the 'worst' idea of Democratic primary Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e97a40d1-83a9-56c0-b0df-8a36df489b98 article

Dana Perino criticized Democratic presidential hopeful Michael Bloomberg‘s “open office plan” idea that the former New York City mayor tweeted about on Monday, calling it the “worst” idea put forth so far by a Democratic candidate.

“Of all the ideas that I have heard during the Democratic primary, of all of them — and I’m talking like the craziest of the crazy, I think this might be the worst of the ideas. The open floor plan,” Perino said on “The Five” on Tuesday. “First of all, no one in America, no human likes an open floor plan.”

BLOOMBERG UNWITTINGLY ‘EXPLOITED’ PRISONERS TO MAKE  PHONE CALLS ON BEHALF OF 2020 CAMPAIGN: REPORT

Bloomberg was blasted on social media over his campaign promise to turn the White House East Room into an “open office plan” as president after he shared a photograph on Twitter of himself in the middle of an open office plan from City Hall during his tenure as mayor, suggesting the White House will have an extreme makeover of its own if he wins in 2020.

“As president, I’ll turn the East Room into an open office plan, where I’ll sit with our team,” Bloomberg tweeted.  “I’ll use the Oval Office for some official functions — never for tweeting — but the rest of the time, I’ll be where a leader should be: with the team.”

Perino, who served as the White House press secretary during the George W. Bush administration from 2007 to 2009, argued that workers need their space.

“At White House, it’s like super tense. You need your space,” Perino said. “Fences make good neighbors. Offices make good colleagues. And also the East Room is for ceremonies. There is a history to the White House, and we want to preserve that.”

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“And you need the Oval Office for the president to think and also to have to be able to know that this is where decisions are being made rather than out on the open floor plan,” added the “The Daily Briefing” host.

Fox News’ Joseph A. Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Perino_Fox-AP Dana Perino calls Bloomberg's 'open office plan' the 'worst' idea of Democratic primary Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e97a40d1-83a9-56c0-b0df-8a36df489b98 article   Westlake Legal Group Bloomberg-Perino_Fox-AP Dana Perino calls Bloomberg's 'open office plan' the 'worst' idea of Democratic primary Victor Garcia fox-news/shows/the-five fox-news/politics/elections fox-news/person/michael-bloomberg fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc e97a40d1-83a9-56c0-b0df-8a36df489b98 article

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Carlos Ghosn’s Escape: A Lawyer in Beirut, a French Passport and a Lot of Mystery

Westlake Legal Group 31GHOSN-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn’s Escape: A Lawyer in Beirut, a French Passport and a Lot of Mystery Securities and Commodities Violations Renault SA Nissan Motor Co Lebanon Japan Ghosn, Carlos extradition Courts and the Judiciary

TOKYO — By the time most of Japan had woken up on Tuesday, he was gone. One of the country’s most famous criminal suspects had slipped past the cameras trained on his house, past the police and border guards and the Japanese citizens who for the past year have followed his every move.

Carlos Ghosn, the deposed chief of the Nissan and Renault auto empire facing charges of financial wrongdoing, had fled to Lebanon, and no one in Japan — not the authorities, the media or even the auto executive’s own lawyer — could explain how it had happened.

“I want to ask him, ‘How could you do this to us?’” Mr. Ghosn’s lawyer in Tokyo, Junichiro Hironaka, told a crush of 40 reporters outside his office on Tuesday.

It was a cinematic escape, carried out just before New Years Day, Japan’s most important holiday, when government agencies and most businesses close for as long as a week.

The escape appeared to have been planned in Lebanon. A lawyer for Mr. Ghosn in Beirut played a lead role putting the plan together and acted as the go-between with the Lebanese government, one person familiar with the matter said.

An official in Beirut said Mr. Ghosn had entered the country using a French passport, while at least one Lebanese outlet reported, without offering proof, that the former Nissan chairman had been spirited out inside a box meant for musical equipment.

He chose refuge in Lebanon, where he grew up and has been treated as a folk hero since his 2018 arrest in Japan. A Lebanese newspaper reported that Mr. Ghosn had arrived in Beirut on a private plane from Turkey. After landing there, he released a statement assailing the “rigged Japanese justice system where guilt is presumed, discrimination is rampant, and basic human rights are denied.”

In the statement, he said he was ready to tell his story to the media “starting next week.” A public relations professional has been dispatched from the United States to Beirut to help organize a press conference, but the plans have divided those close to Mr. Ghosn, with some believing he should not speak publicly, the person familiar with the matter said.

Government officials in Japan were still trying to piece together the facts of the escape, as the aggressive local media scrambled for clues. Lebanon has no extradition treaty with Japan. Some politicians in Japan wondered whether shadowy figures or even a foreign government had been involved in his escape.

On Twitter, Masahisa Sato, a member of the upper house of Japan’s Parliament and a former top Foreign Ministry official, asked whether Mr. Ghosn “had the support of some country” in his departure.

“It’s a huge problem that his illegal escape from Japan was allowed so easily,” he wrote.

A former governor of Tokyo, Yoichi Masuzoe, accused the Lebanese Embassy of helping to smuggle Mr. Ghosn out.

“It’s a diplomat’s work to exfiltrate Lebanon’s national hero,” he wrote, providing no evidence. Calls to the Lebanese Embassy went unanswered.

Apparently caught flat footed, Japanese prosecutors rushed to ask a Tokyo court to rescind Mr. Ghosn’s bail, according to the national broadcaster NHK, possibly leaving him to forfeit the $9 million that he had paid for the privilege of living outside jail while he awaited trial.

Mr. Ghosn had turned over his passports to his lawyer, as a court had ordered, while he prepared for trial living in an elegant neighborhood in central Tokyo.

His lawyer, too, seemed dumbfounded by the Houdini-like disappearance. Addressing the reporters outside his Tokyo office, Mr. Hironaka said Mr. Ghosn’s departure was “totally unexpected.”

There had been no sign that Mr. Ghosn was preparing to flee, Mr. Hironaka said. To the contrary, he added, everything suggested that Mr. Ghosn had been preparing to defend himself in court.

Mr. Ghosn’s bail conditions limited his phone use, and he spent most of his days in his lawyer’s office, the only place he was allowed to use the internet. For months, he had been commuting from his home to meet with his lawyers and prepare for his trial.

All the while, a court-ordered camera monitored his doorway, recording his comings and goings. Whenever he went out, he suspected that the authorities and private investigators from Nissan followed him around the city, according to people familiar with the matter.

Mr. Ghosn spoke with his wife, Carole, for about an hour on Dec. 24, Mr. Hironaka said. Prosecutors had asked a judge to forbid the couple to contact each other over concerns that they might conspire to tamper with evidence or witnesses. The court had kept the couple from communicating for months, Mr. Hironaka said, and they had spoken only twice since Mr. Ghosn was rearrested in April.

Nevertheless, Mr. Ghosn stayed in touch with his family. His daughter Maya visited him in Tokyo, according to people familiar with his movements. And his outings with his children would occasionally be reported by the Japanese press or pop up on social media, where commentators speculated about his welfare.

Mr. Hironaka said the legal team spent Christmas Day in court discussing preparations for Mr. Ghosn’s trial, which was expected to take place sometime in 2020.

The team had planned to regroup on Jan. 7 for the first strategy session of the new year.

All three of Mr. Ghosn’s passports were in his lawyers’ possession, Mr. Hironaka said. It was one of the conditions of his bail, which his lawyers had won only after repeated, hard-fought attempts to convince the court that their client, with all of his wealth and power, was not a flight risk.

“He left his things here,” Mr. Hironaka told reporters. “It would have been difficult for him to do this without the assistance of some large organization.”

Mr. Ghosn’s defense team had repeatedly spoken out about what it described as a “hostage justice” system, complaining that Japanese courts and prosecutors had put him at an almost impossible disadvantage as he sought to defend himself.

“I wanted to prove he was innocent,” Mr. Hironaka said on Tuesday. “But when I saw his statement in the press, I thought, ‘He doesn’t trust Japan’s courts.’”

The Japanese media rushed for clues as well, but news outlets were hampered by skeleton staffs and closed government offices ahead of New Year’s Day. NHK reported that border control officials in Japan and Lebanon had no record of Mr. Ghosn’s leaving the country, speculating that he may have used a fake passport and an assumed name.

But in Lebanon, the minister for presidential affairs, Salim Jreissati, said late Tuesday that Mr. Ghosn had “entered the country legally using his French passport and Lebanese ID.”

Mr. Jreissati said the Lebanese government had not been notified in advance of his arrival, adding, “We were all surprised.”

“The government has nothing to do with his decision to come,” he said. “We don’t know the circumstances of his arrival.”

In France, a deputy minister for economy and finance, Agnès Pannier-Runacher, said she had learned about Mr. Ghosn’s flight from news reports. “We have to understand what happened,” she said on France Inter radio.

Mr. Ghosn is not above the law, she said, and “if a foreign citizen fled the French justice system, we would be very angry.” But she noted that, as a French citizen, he could use the country’s consular services.

A group of children may have been among the last people to see him before he left Japan, according to a report in The Asahi Shimbun. It described the possible sighting on Friday morning in much the way one would an appearance by Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster.

“His eyebrows stand out,” the 12-year-old girl told a reporter combing the streets near Mr. Ghosn’s home for clues about his disappearance.

“Everyone was saying to each other, ‘Isn’t that Ghosn?’”

Ben Dooley reported from Tokyo, and Michael Corkery from New York. Reporting was contributed by Makiko Inoue and Eimi Yamamitsu from Tokyo, Elian Peltier from London, Hwaida Saad from Beirut, and Amy Chozick from New York.

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Benghazi team member: Iraq’s response to Baghdad embassy attack a ‘slap in the face,’ Iran must be punished

Westlake Legal Group 10a35e83-ENC3_132222320173040000 Benghazi team member: Iraq's response to Baghdad embassy attack a 'slap in the face,' Iran must be punished fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 19c9a999-ac8b-590a-b56b-63f206efa145

Retired Marine Sgt. John “Tig” Tiegen, one of the four men who defended the Libyan consulate in Benghazi during the 2012 attack there, said the Iraqi government’s slow response to a deadly attack on the U.S. embassy is a “slap in the face.”

Tiegen told Charles Payne on Tuesday’s “Your World” that, additionally, Iran must face retaliation — as the attack appeared to be sanctioned by Tehran, according to the president.

“To me, this is a real big slap in the face on the Iraqis’ [part] in my personal opinion,” Tiegen told Payne.

“They allowed the protesters to walk through multiple security checkpoints before they got to the embassy,” he continued, adding, “Something has got to happen against Iran. If they are backing it and Hezbollah is behind it, there has got to be some sort of retaliation against them.”

Regarding the Iraqi government’s purported “slap” to the U.S., Tiegen said it’s the responsibility of the “host country” to protect embassies and consulates within their territories.

U.S. EMBASSY COMPOUND IN BAGHDAD TARGETED BY MOB PROTESTING AIRSTRIKES

He said that in the Baghdad case, it’s unwise to have U.S. military forces firing upon civilians and protesters simply because they were setting fires and destroying property. He said it’s Iraq’s responsibility, in that case, to “protect American lives.”

“If it comes down to it… make sure you shoot straight and shoot fast.”

In addition, Tiegen expressed regret that, after the trillions of dollars spent in Iraq, incidents such as the embassy attack still have unfolded.

“This is what they do to us. It seems like there is a lot of backstabbing going on. They should have stopped the protests and should’ve had military people there when they saw the protests starting to move from the funeral,” he said.

Earlier Tuesday, crowds of angry Iraqis protesting America’s recent airstrikes against an Iran-backed militia laid siege to the embassy compound, chanting “Down, Down USA!” as they stormed through a main gate, prompting U.S. guards to fire back tear gas in response.

As of Tuesday night, protesters set up tents outside the embassy in the Iraqi capital where they said they intended to stage a sit-in “until American troops leave Iraq and the embassy is closed.” About 100 Marines were sent to the embassy to bolster security and an Army Apache helicopter flew over the premises and dropped flares in a “show of force,” with the goal of dispersing the crowd, a U.S. defense official told Fox News.

Tiegen, a Colorado native, had helped defend the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, 2012, after it faced RPG and small arms fire.

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Militants killed U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, as well as U.S. Foreign Service Officer Sean Smith and CIA contract protective officer Glen Doherty. Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later was sentenced to prison on terrorism-related charges in connection with the attack.

The Benghazi siege and U.S. response precipitated a high-profile congressional investigation, featuring testimony from then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Fox News’ Eddie DeMarche and Greg Norman contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 10a35e83-ENC3_132222320173040000 Benghazi team member: Iraq's response to Baghdad embassy attack a 'slap in the face,' Iran must be punished fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 19c9a999-ac8b-590a-b56b-63f206efa145   Westlake Legal Group 10a35e83-ENC3_132222320173040000 Benghazi team member: Iraq's response to Baghdad embassy attack a 'slap in the face,' Iran must be punished fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/terrorism fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/shows/your-world fox-news/politics/foreign-policy/middle-east fox-news/person/donald-trump fox-news/media/fox-news-flash fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Charles Creitz article 19c9a999-ac8b-590a-b56b-63f206efa145

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Up to 4,000 US troops could deploy to Middle East amid Baghdad unrest: officials

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118983861001_6118984842001-vs Up to 4,000 US troops could deploy to Middle East amid Baghdad unrest: officials Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox news fnc/politics fnc eef9ea98-f1b7-5e31-9424-fe79af1fe6f2 article

The U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division’s alert brigade has been issued orders to deploy rapidly to Kuwait amid the unrest in Baghdad, three U.S. defense officials told Fox News on Tuesday.

At least 500 paratroopers are already making their way to Kuwait, Fox News is told.

The alert brigade of roughly 4,000 paratroopers, known as the DRB — the Deployment Ready Brigade — has been told to pack their bags for a possible deployment in the days ahead after hundreds of Iranian-backed militiamen tried to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad Tuesday.

Within that alert brigade, three rifle battalions have a certain alert sequence, 18 hours, 36 hours and 54 hours for the third. The entire brigade has a 96-hour alert window to deploy.

TRUMP THREATENS IRAN AFTER ATTACK ON EMBASSY COMPOUND: ‘THEY WILL PAY A VERY BIG PRICE!’

The Pentagon is expected to issue a statement in the coming hours about the deployment.

Some of the paratroopers already have left their base in Fort Bragg, N.C., to fly overseas in Air Force C-17 cargo planes, according to officials.

The U.S. Army has kept an alert brigade of roughly 4,000 paratroopers in the 82nd Airborne for crisis response like this.

U.S. PRESSES IRAQ TO PROTECT AMERICAN PERSONNEL AFTER EMBASSY ATTACK: ‘THERE WILL BE NO BENGHAZIS’

There are roughly 5,000 U.S. troops currently deployed to Iraq now, among the roughly 60,000 U.S. troops currently deployed to the region. According to the Pentagon, 14,000 have been added since May as the threat from Iran increased.

The aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman has been in the Gulf of Oman, its strike group armed with hundreds of Tomahawk cruise missiles in addition to the dozens of strike aircraft aboard Truman.

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More than 100 U.S. Marines arrived at the U.S. embassy in Baghdad earlier Tuesday to help bolster security after the mob of Iranian-backed Shite militiamen tried to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

The crowd attacked the embassy following funerals for 25 Iranian-backed fighters killed in U.S. airstrikes Sunday in Iraq and Syria–retribution for an American defense contractor killed in Iraq Friday, according to U.S. defense officials.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118983861001_6118984842001-vs Up to 4,000 US troops could deploy to Middle East amid Baghdad unrest: officials Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox news fnc/politics fnc eef9ea98-f1b7-5e31-9424-fe79af1fe6f2 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6118983861001_6118984842001-vs Up to 4,000 US troops could deploy to Middle East amid Baghdad unrest: officials Lucas Tomlinson fox-news/world/world-regions/middle-east fox-news/world/world-regions/iraq fox-news/world/conflicts/iran fox-news/us/military fox-news/politics/defense/pentagon fox news fnc/politics fnc eef9ea98-f1b7-5e31-9424-fe79af1fe6f2 article

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Sarasota man with ‘hit list,’ weapons didn’t deserve plea deal with no jail after shooting, lawyer says

A Florida man who police say had a “hit list” and weapons in his home after a standoff with police last year did not deserve a no-jail plea deal, attorneys for the people on the hit list say.

Ryan Flanzer, 27, pleaded no contest on Dec. 19 to multiple charges, including firing a weapon into a dwelling and possession of a controlled substance, WWSB reported.

Flanzer was arrested in Sarasota in May 2018 after firing several rounds at a condo door before fleeing to a hotel. There he barricaded himself in a room until police convinced him to surrender.

Westlake Legal Group FLANZER Sarasota man with 'hit list,' weapons didn't deserve plea deal with no jail after shooting, lawyer says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 4f76089d-a9ab-598e-b2d9-7c8705aef3bf

Ryan Flanzer will receive no jail time for shooting through a condo and engaging in a standoff with police during an incident in May 2018, prosecutors said.  (Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office)

He was subsequently treated for mental health problems, and his firearms and assault weapons were seized by police. Flanzer has since resided at an addiction treatment rehab center in Malibu, Calif., the Herald-Tribune reported.

As part of Flanzer’s plea agreement, the charges of first-degree attempted armed burglary, second-degree impersonating an officer, and third-degree wearing a bulletproof vest during a crime, were dropped, according to the paper.

Flanzer was sentenced to more than 11 months in county jail and 48 months of probation, but he won’t serve jail time because Sarasota County Circuit Judge Charles Williams gave him credit for time served in the Malibu treatment center.

MISSOURI COP ACCUSED OF MANSLAUGHTER AFTER KILLING GIRL, 4, IN ON-DUTY ACCIDENT

After his arrest in May 2018, authorities discovered drugs, an arsenal of weapons, shirts bearing the faces of the Columbine shooters and a “hit list” of at least six people, police said.

Attorneys for some of those people say their clients are terrified and have hired personal security. They also question why Flanzer won’t receive any jail time.

Prosecutors said they agreed to a no-jail plea for Flanzer because of the good behavior he has shown in rehab, pointing to good grades and a psychological report that did not deem him a threat.

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“This is a man who had no prior criminal record, no one was injured, and he was able to successfully pursue recovery and treatment over approximately the past 18 months,” Assistant State Attorney Art Jackman told the Herald-Tribune. “Based upon the defendant’s exceptional turnaround over the last 18 months, Judge Williams, an experienced judge, in conjunction with three separate psychological reports and evaluations showing the defendant was a very low risk to re-offend, approved and accepted this plea disposition as fair and appropriate.”

Westlake Legal Group FLANZER Sarasota man with 'hit list,' weapons didn't deserve plea deal with no jail after shooting, lawyer says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 4f76089d-a9ab-598e-b2d9-7c8705aef3bf   Westlake Legal Group FLANZER Sarasota man with 'hit list,' weapons didn't deserve plea deal with no jail after shooting, lawyer says fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/us/crime fox news fnc/us fnc Bradford Betz article 4f76089d-a9ab-598e-b2d9-7c8705aef3bf

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Impeachment Trial Looming, Chief Justice Reflects on Judicial Independence

WASHINGTON — As Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. prepares to preside over the impeachment trial of President Trump, he issued pointed remarks on Tuesday in his year-end report on the state of the federal judiciary that seemed to be addressed, at least in part, to the president himself.

The two men have a history of friction, and Chief Justice Roberts used the normally mild report to denounce false information spread on social media and to warn against mob rule. Some passages could be read as a mission statement for the chief justice’s plans for the impeachment trial itself.

“We should reflect on our duty to judge without fear or favor, deciding each matter with humility, integrity and dispatch,” he wrote in the report. “As the new year begins, and we turn to the tasks before us, we should each resolve to do our best to maintain the public’s trust that we are faithfully discharging our solemn obligation to equal justice under law.”

The nominal focus of the report was the importance of civics education, but even a casual reader could detect a timely subtext, one concerned with the foundational importance of the rule of law.

Chief Justice Roberts’s Year-End Report

Read Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.’s annual report on the state of the federal judiciary for 2019.

Westlake Legal Group thumbnail Impeachment Trial Looming, Chief Justice Reflects on Judicial Independence Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Supreme Court (US) Senate Roberts, John G Jr impeachment Federal Courts (US) Courts and the Judiciary   7 pages, 0.52 MB

Chief Justice Roberts began his report, as is his custom, with a bit of history, recalling a riot at which John Jay, an author of the Federalist Papers and later the first chief justice, was struck in the head by a rock “thrown by a rioter motivated by a rumor.”

Jay and his colleagues, Chief Justice Roberts wrote, “ultimately succeeded in convincing the public of the virtues of the principles embodied in the Constitution.”

“Those principles leave no place for mob violence,” the chief justice wrote. “But in the ensuing years, we have come to take democracy for granted, and civic education has fallen by the wayside. In our age, when social media can instantly spread rumor and false information on a grand scale, the public’s need to understand our government, and the protections it provides, is ever more vital. The judiciary has an important role to play in civic education.”

The report seemed to continue a conversation with Mr. Trump about the role of the courts.

In 2018, the two men had a sharp exchange, with Mr. Trump suggesting that federal judges carry out the wishes of the presidents who appointed them and Chief Justice Roberts defending the independence and integrity of the judicial branch.

The exchange started when Mr. Trump called a judge who had ruled against his administration’s asylum policy “an Obama judge.” In response, the chief justice said the president had misunderstood the role of the federal courts in the constitutional system.

“We do not have Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges,” Chief Justice Roberts said in a statement. “What we have is an extraordinary group of dedicated judges doing their level best to do equal right to those appearing before them. That independent judiciary is something we should all be thankful for.”

Mr. Trump took issue with the chief justice’s statement on Twitter. “Sorry Chief Justice John Roberts, but you do indeed have ‘Obama judges,’” Mr. Trump wrote, “and they have a much different point of view than the people who are charged with the safety of our country.”

On Tuesday, the chief justice returned to his theme. “We should celebrate our strong and independent judiciary, a key source of national unity and stability,” he wrote. “But we should also remember that justice is not inevitable.”

The friction with the president has only added to the delicate spot the chief justice will find himself in when he takes on his constitutionally assigned duty to preside over Mr. Trump’s Senate trial. Mr. Trump has repeatedly pinned the future of his presidency on the trial, the details and timing of which have not been set.

Chief Justice Roberts’s report concentrated on the central role the judiciary has played in educating the public, notably by issuing accessible decisions, in both senses of the word.

“When judges render their judgments through written opinions that explain their reasoning, they advance public understanding of the law,” he wrote. “Chief Justice Earl Warren illustrated the power of a judicial decision as a teaching tool in Brown v. Board of Education, the great school desegregation case. His unanimous opinion on the most pressing issue of the era was a mere 11 pages — short enough that newspapers could publish all or almost all of it and every citizen could understand the court’s rationale. Today, federal courts post their opinions online, giving the public instant access to the reasoning behind the judgments that affect their lives.”

Current Supreme Court decisions in major cases are much longer than the ruling in Brown. Citizens United, the 2010 campaign finance decision, was 176 pages long, with roughly the same number of words as “The Great Gatsby.”

Chief Justice Roberts praised the many educational programs offered by federal courts across the nation in which students are invited to visit courthouses. He did not address the role that camera coverage of arguments at the Supreme Court, currently forbidden, could play in civics education.

The chief justice singled out, but did not name, a colleague, praising his exemplary educational work. “As just one example,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote, “the current chief judge of the District of Columbia Circuit has, over the past two decades, quietly volunteered as a tutor at a local elementary school, inspiring his court colleagues to join in the effort.”

That judge is Merrick B. Garland, who was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Barack Obama in 2016 but denied a hearing by Senate Republicans. Mr. Trump appointed Justice Neil M. Gorsuch to fill the vacancy.

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What the Year in Business News Looked Like

Not all business news happens in the boardroom.

Over the last year, photographers at The New York Times have chased business stories across the world, from oil fields to garbage dumps, from Silicon Valley to Kazakhstan. They have captured the struggles of electric rickshaw drivers in India, ventured into China’s national meat reserve and documented the flooding in the Mississippi Delta.

Here are our picks for the best photographs and graphic illustrations that we produced in 2019.

Image<img alt="

Workers spooling undersea cable in cavernous tanks aboard the Durable, a 456-foot ship carrying 4,000 miles of the cable to lay down a new Google link between the United States and Chile.

Related article: “How the Internet Travels Across Oceans”

” class=”css-1m50asq” src=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/03/05/business/05seacables/merlin_148363527_91c6037b-1999-4d3e-bd1e-4bfb43526464-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale” srcset=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/03/05/business/05seacables/merlin_148363527_91c6037b-1999-4d3e-bd1e-4bfb43526464-articleLarge.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 600w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/03/05/business/05seacables/merlin_148363527_91c6037b-1999-4d3e-bd1e-4bfb43526464-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 1024w,https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/03/05/business/05seacables/merlin_148363527_91c6037b-1999-4d3e-bd1e-4bfb43526464-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto=webp 2048w” sizes=”((min-width: 600px) and (max-width: 1004px)) 84vw, (min-width: 1005px) 80vw, 100vw” itemprop=”url” itemid=”https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/03/05/business/05seacables/merlin_148363527_91c6037b-1999-4d3e-bd1e-4bfb43526464-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale”>

Workers spooling undersea cable in cavernous tanks aboard the Durable, a 456-foot ship carrying 4,000 miles of the cable to lay down a new Google link between the United States and Chile.

Related article: “How the Internet Travels Across Oceans”

Credit…Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

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Trump event in Miami church may violate IRS rules, non-profit says

Westlake Legal Group 75yyPCxAKq_ygOFm3_BtjA3N5mflbqGZIqs4yd6z57E Trump event in Miami church may violate IRS rules, non-profit says r/politics

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Impeachment Trial Looming, Chief Justice Reflects on Judicial Independence

WASHINGTON — As Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. prepares to preside over the impeachment trial of President Trump, he issued pointed remarks on Tuesday in his year-end report on the state of the federal judiciary that seemed to be addressed, at least in part, to the president himself.

The two men have a history of friction, and Chief Justice Roberts used the normally mild report to denounce false information spread on social media and to warn against mob rule. Some passages could be read as a mission statement for the chief justice’s plans for the impeachment trial itself.

“We should reflect on our duty to judge without fear or favor, deciding each matter with humility, integrity and dispatch,” he wrote in the report. “As the new year begins, and we turn to the tasks before us, we should each resolve to do our best to maintain the public’s trust that we are faithfully discharging our solemn obligation to equal justice under law.”

The nominal focus of the report was the importance of civics education, but even a casual reader could detect a timely subtext, one concerned with the foundational importance of the rule of law.

Chief Justice Roberts’s Year-End Report

Read Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.’s annual report on the state of the federal judiciary for 2019.

Westlake Legal Group thumbnail Impeachment Trial Looming, Chief Justice Reflects on Judicial Independence Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Supreme Court (US) Senate Roberts, John G Jr impeachment Federal Courts (US) Courts and the Judiciary   7 pages, 0.52 MB

Chief Justice Roberts began his report, as is his custom, with a bit of history, recalling a riot at which John Jay, an author of the Federalist Papers and later the first chief justice, was struck in the head by a rock “thrown by a rioter motivated by a rumor.”

Jay and his colleagues, Chief Justice Roberts wrote, “ultimately succeeded in convincing the public of the virtues of the principles embodied in the Constitution.”

“Those principles leave no place for mob violence,” the chief justice wrote. “But in the ensuing years, we have come to take democracy for granted, and civic education has fallen by the wayside. In our age, when social media can instantly spread rumor and false information on a grand scale, the public’s need to understand our government, and the protections it provides, is ever more vital. The judiciary has an important role to play in civic education.”

The report seemed to continue a conversation with Mr. Trump about the role of the courts.

In 2018, the two men had a sharp exchange, with Mr. Trump suggesting that federal judges carry out the wishes of the presidents who appointed them and Chief Justice Roberts defending the independence and integrity of the judicial branch.

The exchange started when Mr. Trump called a judge who had ruled against his administration’s asylum policy “an Obama judge.” In response, the chief justice said the president had misunderstood the role of the federal courts in the constitutional system.

“We do not have Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges,” Chief Justice Roberts said in a statement. “What we have is an extraordinary group of dedicated judges doing their level best to do equal right to those appearing before them. That independent judiciary is something we should all be thankful for.”

Mr. Trump took issue with the chief justice’s statement on Twitter. “Sorry Chief Justice John Roberts, but you do indeed have ‘Obama judges,’” Mr. Trump wrote, “and they have a much different point of view than the people who are charged with the safety of our country.”

On Tuesday, the chief justice returned to his theme. “We should celebrate our strong and independent judiciary, a key source of national unity and stability,” he wrote. “But we should also remember that justice is not inevitable.”

The friction with the president has only added to the delicate spot the chief justice will find himself in when he takes on his constitutionally assigned duty to preside over Mr. Trump’s Senate trial. Mr. Trump has repeatedly pinned the future of his presidency on the trial, the details and timing of which have not been set.

Chief Justice Roberts’s report concentrated on the central role the judiciary has played in educating the public, notably by issuing accessible decisions, in both senses of the word.

“When judges render their judgments through written opinions that explain their reasoning, they advance public understanding of the law,” he wrote. “Chief Justice Earl Warren illustrated the power of a judicial decision as a teaching tool in Brown v. Board of Education, the great school desegregation case. His unanimous opinion on the most pressing issue of the era was a mere 11 pages — short enough that newspapers could publish all or almost all of it and every citizen could understand the court’s rationale. Today, federal courts post their opinions online, giving the public instant access to the reasoning behind the judgments that affect their lives.”

Current Supreme Court decisions in major cases are much longer than the ruling in Brown. Citizens United, the 2010 campaign finance decision, was 176 pages long, with roughly the same number of words as “The Great Gatsby.”

Chief Justice Roberts praised the many educational programs offered by federal courts across the nation in which students are invited to visit courthouses. He did not address the role that camera coverage of arguments at the Supreme Court, currently forbidden, could play in civics education.

The chief justice singled out, but did not name, a colleague, praising his exemplary educational work. “As just one example,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote, “the current chief judge of the District of Columbia Circuit has, over the past two decades, quietly volunteered as a tutor at a local elementary school, inspiring his court colleagues to join in the effort.”

That judge is Merrick B. Garland, who was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Barack Obama in 2016 but denied a hearing by Senate Republicans. Mr. Trump appointed Justice Neil M. Gorsuch to fill the vacancy.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com