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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 396)

American detained on spying charges in Russia loses job due to ‘corporate restructuring’

A Marine veteran who has been jailed for nearly a year in Russia on espionage charges has lost his job with an automotive parts supplier, where his position was eliminated as part of a corporate restructuring.

Paul Whelan, 49, had worked as the director for global security for Auburn, Mich.,-based BorgWarner since 2017 and was responsible for security at its facilities around the world.

“His position was eliminated as part of that,” company spokeswoman Kathy Graham told The Detroit News of the restructuring first announced in April.

Whelan’s brother, David, told the newspaper his brother’s firing “increases the strain on our family’s ability to keep some semblance of his former life ready for when he returns home.”

SON OF RUSSIAN SPIES ALLOWED TO KEEP CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP 

Westlake Legal Group AP19353735104604-1 American detained on spying charges in Russia loses job due to 'corporate restructuring' Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox news fnc/world fnc article 00edf691-585a-5e24-8aad-c04f92b34cf5

In this Aug. 23, 2019, file photo, Paul Whelan, a former U.S. marine who was arrested for alleged spying in Moscow on Dec. 28, 2018, speaks while standing in a cage as he waits for a hearing in a courtroom in Moscow, Russia. Whelan, who has been imprisoned in Russia on spying charges for nearly a year has lost his job with an automotive parts supplier in a corporate restructuring, a move his brother has denounced. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

The News said the company doesn’t have any facilities in Russia but does have customers there.

Whelan is approaching the one-year mark since he was first detained in Russia on suspicion of receiving state secrets. He was arrested Dec. 28, 2018, in a Moscow hotel while visiting for a friend’s wedding. He has denied the allegations.

He has said he is held as a pawn in a potential prisoner swap between Russian and the United States. He accused Moscow of retaliating for sanctions after its interference the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

His detention has repeatedly been extended without trial, and he claims to have been assaulted in jail and believes his life is in danger. Russian officials allege Whelan is lying about his treatment and deteriorating health.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Whelan, of Novi, Mich., also holds British, Irish and Canadian citizenships. Congress has demanded Moscow present evidence against him or release him.

“Without action in Washington, D.C., to secure his freedom, his life will continue to unravel and Paul will end up spending many more months as a political prisoner of the Russian government,” David Whelan said.

Fox News’ Morgan Phillips and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Westlake Legal Group AP19353735104604-1 American detained on spying charges in Russia loses job due to 'corporate restructuring' Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox news fnc/world fnc article 00edf691-585a-5e24-8aad-c04f92b34cf5   Westlake Legal Group AP19353735104604-1 American detained on spying charges in Russia loses job due to 'corporate restructuring' Louis Casiano fox-news/world/world-regions/russia fox news fnc/world fnc article 00edf691-585a-5e24-8aad-c04f92b34cf5

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Trump Adviser Caught On Tape: Voter Suppression Key To GOP Battleground Efforts

Westlake Legal Group 5dfd480b250000d00798eda4 Trump Adviser Caught On Tape: Voter Suppression Key To GOP Battleground Efforts

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — One of President Donald Trump’s top re-election advisers told influential Republicans in swing state Wisconsin that the party has “traditionally” relied on voter suppression to compete in battleground states but will be able to “start playing offense” in 2020 due to relaxed Election Day rules, according to an audio recording of a private event obtained by The Associated Press.

“Traditionally it’s always been Republicans suppressing votes in places,” Justin Clark, a senior political adviser and senior counsel to Trump’s re-election campaign, said at the event. “Let’s start protecting our voters. We know where they are. … Let’s start playing offense a little bit. That’s what you’re going to see in 2020. It’s going to be a much bigger program, a much more aggressive program, a much better-funded program.”

Asked about the remarks by AP, Clark said he was referring to false accusations that the GOP engages in voter suppression.

“As should be clear from the context of my remarks, my point was that Republicans historically have been falsely accused of voter suppression and that it is time we stood up to defend our own voters,” Clark said. “Neither I nor anyone I know or work with would condone anyone’s vote being threatened or diluted and our efforts will be focused on preventing just that.”

Clark made the comments Nov. 21 in a meeting of the Republican National Lawyers Association’s Wisconsin chapter. Attendees included the state Senate’s top Republican, Scott Fitzgerald, along with the executive director of the Wisconsin Republican Party.

Audio of the event at a country club in Madison obtained by the liberal group American Bridge was provided to AP by One Wisconsin Now, a Madison-based liberal advocacy group.

The roughly 20-minute audio offers an insider’s glimpse of Trump’s re-election strategy, showing t he campaign focusing on voting locations in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, which form the the so-called “blue wall” of traditional Democratic strength that Trump broke through to win in 2016. Both parties are pouring millions of dollars into the states, anticipating they’ll be just as critical in the 2020 presidential contest.

Republican officials publicly signaled plans to step up their Election Day monitoring after a judge in 2018 lifted a consent degree in place since 1982 that barred the Republican National Committee from voter verification and other “ballot security” efforts. Critics have argued the tactics amount to voter intimidation.

The consent decree was put in place after the Democratic National Committee sued its Republican counterpart, alleging the RNC helped intimidate black voters in New Jersey’s election for governor. The federal lawsuit claimed the RNC and the state GOP had off-duty police stand at polling places in urban areas wearing armbands that read “National Ballot Security Task Force,” with guns visible on some.

Without acknowledging any wrongdoing, the RNC agreed to the consent decree, which restricted its ability to engage in activities related to ballot security. Lifting of the consent decree allows the RNC to “play by the same rules” as Democrats, said RNC communications director Michael Ahrens.

“Now the RNC can work more closely with state parties and campaigns to do what we do best, ensure that more people vote through our unmatched field program,” Ahrens said.

Although the consent decree forced the Trump campaign to conduct its own poll monitoring in 2016, the new rules will allow the RNC to use its multi-million dollar budget to handle those tasks and coordinate with other Republican groups on Election Day, Clark said. State directors of election day operations will be in place in Wisconsin and every battleground state by early 2020, he said.

In 2016, Wisconsin had 62 paid Trump staff working to get out the vote; in 2020, it will increase to around 100, Clark said.

Trump supports the effort, he said in the audio recording.

“We’ve all seen the tweets about voter fraud, blah, blah, blah,” Clark said. “Every time we’re in with him, he asks what are we doing about voter fraud? What are we doing about voter fraud?’ The point is he’s committed to this, he believes in it and he will do whatever it takes to make sure it’s successful.”

Clark said Trump’s campaign plans to focus on rural areas around mid-size cities like Eau Claire and Green Bay, areas he says where Democrats “cheat.” He did not explain what he meant by cheating and did not provide any examples.

“Cheating doesn’t just happen when you lose a county,” Clark said. “Cheating happens at the margin overall. What we’re going to be able to do, if we can recruit the bodies to do it, is focus on these places. That’s where our voters are.”

There is no evidence of widespread voter fraud in Wisconsin.

“If there’s bad behavior on the part of one side or the other to prevent people from voting, this is bad for our democracy,” Wisconsin Democratic Gov. Tony Evers said in reaction to Clark’s comments. “And frankly, I think will whoever does that, it will work to their disadvantage. It will make them look, frankly, stupid.”

Wisconsin’s attorney general, Democrat Josh Kaul, represented the Democratic National Committee in a 2016 New Jersey lawsuit that argued the GOP was coordinating with Trump to intimidate voters. Kaul argued then that Trump’s campaign “repeatedly encouraged his supporters to engage in vigilante efforts” in the guise of ferreting out potential voter fraud. The Republican Party disputed any coordination.

“It is vital that Wisconsinites have free and fair access to the polls, and that we protect the security and integrity of our elections,” Kaul said in a statement in reaction to Clark’s comments. “The Wisconsin Department of Justice has been and will continue working with other agencies to protect our democratic process.”

Mike Browne, deputy director of One Wisconsin Now, said Clark’s comments suggest the Trump campaign plans to engage in “underhanded tactics” to win the election.

“The strategy to rig the rules in elections and give themselves an unfair partisan advantage goes to Donald Trump, the highest levels of his campaign and the top Republican leadership,” Browne said. “It’s clear there’s no law Donald Trump and his right-wing machine won’t bend, break or ignore to try to win the presidency.”

Follow Scott Bauer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sbauerAP

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

NASCAR legend Junior Johnson dead at 88

Westlake Legal Group 051110_nascar2 NASCAR legend Junior Johnson dead at 88 Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/sports fnc article 9c68de7c-b1cc-5dde-b080-4aec09e3b781

Junior Johnson, the son of a North Carolina bootlegger who became one of the first superstars of NASCAR in the 1950s and 1960s, has died. He was 88.

NASCAR announced Johnson’s death Friday. No cause was given, but a statement from the racing association said Johnson “had been in declining health and entered hospice care earlier this week.”

“Junior Johnson truly was the ‘Last American Hero,'” said NASCAR Chairman and CEO Jim France, referencing the title of a 1965 essay about Johnson by author Tom Wolfe. “From his early days running moonshine through the end of his life, Junior wholly embodied the NASCAR spirit.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“He was an inaugural NASCAR Hall of Famer, a nod to an extraordinary career as both a driver and team owner. Between his on-track accomplishments and his introduction of Winston to the sport, few have contributed to the success of NASCAR as Junior has. The entire NASCAR family is saddened by the loss of a true giant of our sport, and we offer our deepest condolences to Junior’s family and friends during this difficult time.”

This is a developing story, check back for more updates.

Westlake Legal Group 051110_nascar2 NASCAR legend Junior Johnson dead at 88 Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/sports fnc article 9c68de7c-b1cc-5dde-b080-4aec09e3b781   Westlake Legal Group 051110_nascar2 NASCAR legend Junior Johnson dead at 88 Samuel Chamberlain fox-news/auto/nascar fox-news/auto/attributes/racing fox news fnc/sports fnc article 9c68de7c-b1cc-5dde-b080-4aec09e3b781

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Leaked audio: Trump adviser says Republicans ‘traditionally’ rely on voter suppression

Westlake Legal Group aBm6uPPMcXJnMVpxpnfbaH9eG9tcZS_eP4oo0Iv3Ul4 Leaked audio: Trump adviser says Republicans 'traditionally' rely on voter suppression r/politics

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Tori Spelling fires back at trolls alleging she uses her kids for profit: ‘Please make informed judgments’

Tori Spelling isn’t having any negative banter on her Instagram and fired back at numerous commenters who accused her of exploiting her children for financial gain.

The “BH90210” star shared a family photo to the social media site on Thursday that showed her husband Dean McDermott and their five children – Liam, 12; Stella, 11; Hattie, 8; Finn, 7; and Beau, 2 – wearing matching holiday pajamas as they posed next to an artificial Christmas tree.

“Having a ‘snow’ ball putting the finishing touches on our amazing @kingofchristmas tree in our chic and cozy holiday family pjs by @santandabel xoxo,” Spelling, 46, captioned the snap.

TORI SPELLING CRITICIZED ON SOCIAL MEDIA AFTER PROMOTING MUFFINS AS HEALTHY SNACK FOR KIDS

However, the former reality star was immediately inundated with criticism alleging she was using her kids for money from advertisers after she tagged two companies in her post.

“I wonder if your kids get tired of being directed and produced for these paid promotions,” one commenter wrote, eliciting a response from Spelling.

“The answer is no bc we weren’t paid for anything in this picture. This is our tree and these are their jammies. Is that ok with you?” retorted the actress.

TORI SPELLING: FROM SUPER-RICH HOLLYWOOD DADDY’S GIRL TO OVERWHELMED, STRUGGLING REALITY STAR

Another follower echoed the sentiment, asking Spelling, “Is there anything this family will not do or wear for money! Wow, these poor kids,” to which she responded, “Just FYI we were not paid for anything in this picture. No exchange of $ at all. We are just complete fans of these products.”

Once more, an additional commenter admonished Spelling for not letting her children “make their decisions,” writing, “It is sad how you use your children to promote yourself and make money. Do what you gotta do but make the kids make their decisions when they are old enough to.”

Westlake Legal Group Tori-Spelling-and-family Tori Spelling fires back at trolls alleging she uses her kids for profit: ‘Please make informed judgments’ Julius Young fox-news/person/tori-spelling fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 1face064-fed6-51ea-b4e7-7cf2e06036b0

Tori Spelling, husband Dean McDermott got their kids all dressed up from head to toe for the L.O.L. Surprise! Winter Disco Launch Party on Friday, September 27, 2019 in Los Angeles, Calif. (Michael Kovac / Getty Images)

THEN/NOW: SEE THE ‘BH90210’ CAST OVER THE YEARS AHEAD OF THE NEW REBOOT

Spelling charged back, writing, “Didn’t make any $ from this picture and not promoting anything aside from sharing our actual lives. This is us. Please make informed judgements [sic].”

McDermott has long been a defender of his wife and has even gone on social media himself to combat the “social bullying” of Spelling after she was criticized back in June for sharing a modest bikini picture of herself while working on the “BH90210” revival in Vancouver, Canada, with costars Gabrielle Carteris and Jennie Garth.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In March, he also posted a video response to air his grievances about comments Spelling received after revealing she gives their children muffins as snacks.

“I am sick and tired, sick and tired of everybody taking a shot at my wife, Tori Spelling. Just because she’s a celebrity, they think they can say and do whatever they want. She posted about a snack,” he said. “It’s a snack, people. Haven’t we given our kids a snack before? Huh? Cakes, cookies whatever. It’s a snack.”

Fox News’ Tyler McCarthy contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group Spelling-1 Tori Spelling fires back at trolls alleging she uses her kids for profit: ‘Please make informed judgments’ Julius Young fox-news/person/tori-spelling fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 1face064-fed6-51ea-b4e7-7cf2e06036b0   Westlake Legal Group Spelling-1 Tori Spelling fires back at trolls alleging she uses her kids for profit: ‘Please make informed judgments’ Julius Young fox-news/person/tori-spelling fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article 1face064-fed6-51ea-b4e7-7cf2e06036b0

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Yes, It Is Plainly Wrong To Meet Donors In A Billionaire’s Crystal Wine Cave

Westlake Legal Group 5dfd0d0a2400001e135a3fe7 Yes, It Is Plainly Wrong To Meet Donors In A Billionaire’s Crystal Wine Cave

After Thursday night’s debate, this much, at least, is clear: The central issue of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary is corruption.

Not purity. Not electability. Not socialism or fiscal responsibility or any of the other buzzwords floating around the party discourse. Corruption. 

The corruption question is simple: Will the richest people in America be permitted to put their fingers on the scales of our democracy ― including the inner workings of the Democratic Party

For two candidates in the race, Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), the answer to that question has been a consistent, resounding “no.” They don’t court big donors, don’t hold big-dollar fundraisers for them, and won’t even meet with them behind closed doors. If you want Warren’s attention, you can get in line for a selfie with everyone else. Sanders even scrutinizes his contributions and returns checks from people who are too rich. 

The message is impossible to misconstrue. These campaigns are putting people first, not money. Their time, attention and agenda are not for sale. 

For everyone else in the race … Well, you know some of these rich guys aren’t so bad. Take Craig and Kathryn Hall. They’re in real estate. You should talk to them. Maybe in their wine cave. The one with a chandelier decorated with 1,500 Swarovski crystals.

Questions about corruption continue to whip party leaders into a frenzy like no other issue. Former Obama administration officials, ex-senators, think tank presidents, TV contract Democrats and ― of course ― billionaires, are simply beside themselves that the party they belong to is seriously considering downgrading them to the ordinary status of “citizen.” It’s why billionaire (and former New York City Mayor) Michael Bloomberg has entered the primary. It’s why Bill Gates is thinking about voting for Donald Trump. It’s why “Morning Joe” continues to exist.

When Warren assailed her rival, South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg at Thursday’s debate for holding his now-infamous fundraiser at a $900-a-bottle California winery, the rest of the evening became an afterthought. Everybody not named Sanders and Warren became desperate to prove that their opponents were hypocrites or that their own campaign finances were on the up-and-up. Buttigieg called Warren a “millionaire.” Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) said fighting about fundraising standards was a distraction from the real issues.

TV Democrats who interviewed Warren later that night were incensed. CNN’s Van Jones said Warren’s refusal to hold fundraisers with billionaires was a “purity test” that made “a lot of people feel left out” and was therefore “elitist.” Let that sink in: Jones portrayed the refusal to grant special consideration of the rich as elitist. Jones even asked if it would be corrupt for him, as a millionaire, to give to Warren’s campaign.

“Buttigieg said the Democrats are going to tie one hand behind their back if they continue on your road with this,” added anchor Chris Cuomo.

Former Obama confidant David Axelrod — another CNN talking head — pointed out that Warren had raised money from wealthy donors in the past without turning her office into a favor-mill for the rich. If Warren could stand up to donor pressure, Axelrod suggested, why wouldn’t any other Democrat? 

CNN’s Democrats aren’t alone in their elite anger. TV lawyer Lisa Bloom, a one-time Harvey Weinstein ally, derided Warren on Twitter for turning down money that could be used to defeat Trump. “Pete Buttigieg is right,” Bloom wrote. “We don’t need purity tests. Who cares if he had a fundraiser in a wine cave. Our country is currently run by a whining cave man. Take any legal money you can raise and beat him in November.”

People don’t really frame other pressing issues as purity tests, of course. When a Democrat gets up and talks about voting rights as a basic, inviolable commitment of democratic government, no self-proclaimed centrist rises to emphasize the need to make pragmatic concessions to racists. 

Axelrod’s insistence that big money doesn’t necessarily corrupt lawmakers, meanwhile, is akin to the argument put forward by the Supreme Court majority in its infamous 2010 Citizens United decision: that money in politics is not corrupt unless it involves an explicit trading of political favors for cash. 

Until very recently, it would have been disgraceful for a Democrat to publicly champion such an idea. In the modern Democratic party, corruption has never been conceived of as a narrow question of trading favors for cash. It’s about who counts in a democracy, and how citizens hold their leaders accountable. Corruption contributes to who sets the agenda, whose problems are considered the most pressing, which bills get written, which get a vote, and who gets fancy Washington jobs. If you want to be the next ambassador to Denmark or Barbados, the best way to go about doing it is to attend a fundraiser and tell the candidate that’s what you want. (Kathryn Hall, co-owner of the crystal-laden wine cave, served as ambassador to Austria under President Bill Clinton.)

And for most Democrats, Bloom’s idea of accepting literally any legal money is noxious. Some sources are just obviously improper ― the NRA, oil executives, Harvey Weinstein. Democrats don’t want their leaders taking money from these people for a reason: It’s corrupt. They don’t want their elected representatives to be thinking about Harvey Weinstein’s interests, consciously or unconsciously.

Instead of framing corruption as a basic dispute over democratic values, Buttigieg, Bloom and Cuomo present the issue as a mere campaign tactic. But even there, Warren and Sanders are not paying a price for their so-called purity. They’ve consistently out-raised everyone else in the race, including Buttigieg, despite their focus on small donors and detailed policy agendas that infuriate the superrich

In the fall of 2010, Axelrod, then a member of President Barack Obama’s White House, appeared on ”Face the Nation” to downplay the severity of a “robo-signing” epidemic that was sweeping the housing industry. At the time, thousands of mortgages were frozen because the banks that wanted to foreclose on them couldn’t document who actually owned the property. Axelrod promised the administration was working for a speedy resolution.

“We are working closely with these institutions to make sure they go expedite the process of going back and reconstructing [mortgages] and throwing out those that don’t work,” he said.

It wasn’t true. The banking problem was not a technical hiccup and the Obama administration was not lighting a fire under the banks to sort it out. It was instead a widespread fraud which the biggest banks in the country eventually agreed to pay tens of billions of dollars to settle. Obama’s Treasury Department had essentially turned over the administration of its own anti-foreclosure initiative to big banks, which were squeezing homeowners for whatever they could, with or without the right paperwork, often overcharging families or even wrongfully evicting them. After dragging its feet about this outrage for years, the Justice Department under Obama eventually inked a settlement, and then promptly declined to prosecute anyone for the wrongdoing involved.

Maybe it was a coincidence that Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign raised nearly $44 million from the financial sector ― more than any other candidate in history ― including more than $1 million from employees of Goldman Sachs, nearly $1 million from JPMorganites, and over three-quarters of a million from his supporters at Citigroup, some of whom ended up staffing his administration.

So guys like Axelrod get touchy when candidates talk about corruption. But it’s not just people with fancy TV contracts. Rank-and-file Democratic voters don’t like corruption, but they also don’t like to think about ways their favorite Democrats have failed them in the past. Accepting the standard Warren and Sanders are setting means coming to terms with the fact that Obama and Bill Clinton’s administrations engaged in activity that is hard to defend. Even Warren and Sanders know that’s a big ask for most Democratic voters, so they rarely apply the implications of their own rhetoric to Obama’s activities.

But the divide over corruption isn’t going away. It cuts to the core of what it means to be a member of a party that calls itself democratic. Do Democrats represent everyone, or are some Democrats more equal than others?

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Yes, It Is Plainly Wrong To Meet Donors In A Billionaire’s Crystal Wine Cave

Westlake Legal Group 5dfd0d0a2400001e135a3fe7 Yes, It Is Plainly Wrong To Meet Donors In A Billionaire’s Crystal Wine Cave

After Thursday night’s debate, this much, at least, is clear: The central issue of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary is corruption.

Not purity. Not electability. Not socialism or fiscal responsibility or any of the other buzzwords floating around the party discourse. Corruption. 

The corruption question is simple: Will the richest people in America be permitted to put their fingers on the scales of our democracy ― including the inner workings of the Democratic Party

For two candidates in the race, Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), the answer to that question has been a consistent, resounding “no.” They don’t court big donors, don’t hold big-dollar fundraisers for them, and won’t even meet with them behind closed doors. If you want Warren’s attention, you can get in line for a selfie with everyone else. Sanders even scrutinizes his contributions and returns checks from people who are too rich. 

The message is impossible to misconstrue. These campaigns are putting people first, not money. Their time, attention and agenda are not for sale. 

For everyone else in the race … Well, you know some of these rich guys aren’t so bad. Take Craig and Kathryn Hall. They’re in real estate. You should talk to them. Maybe in their wine cave. The one with a chandelier decorated with 1,500 Swarovski crystals.

Questions about corruption continue to whip party leaders into a frenzy like no other issue. Former Obama administration officials, ex-senators, think tank presidents, TV contract Democrats and ― of course ― billionaires, are simply beside themselves that the party they belong to is seriously considering downgrading them to the ordinary status of “citizen.” It’s why billionaire (and former New York City Mayor) Michael Bloomberg has entered the primary. It’s why Bill Gates is thinking about voting for Donald Trump. It’s why “Morning Joe” continues to exist.

When Warren assailed her rival, South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg at Thursday’s debate for holding his now-infamous fundraiser at a $900-a-bottle California winery, the rest of the evening became an afterthought. Everybody not named Sanders and Warren became desperate to prove that their opponents were hypocrites or that their own campaign finances were on the up-and-up. Buttigieg called Warren a “millionaire.” Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) said fighting about fundraising standards was a distraction from the real issues.

TV Democrats who interviewed Warren later that night were incensed. CNN’s Van Jones said Warren’s refusal to hold fundraisers with billionaires was a “purity test” that made “a lot of people feel left out” and was therefore “elitist.” Let that sink in: Jones portrayed the refusal to grant special consideration of the rich as elitist. Jones even asked if it would be corrupt for him, as a millionaire, to give to Warren’s campaign.

“Buttigieg said the Democrats are going to tie one hand behind their back if they continue on your road with this,” added anchor Chris Cuomo.

Former Obama confidant David Axelrod — another CNN talking head — pointed out that Warren had raised money from wealthy donors in the past without turning her office into a favor-mill for the rich. If Warren could stand up to donor pressure, Axelrod suggested, why wouldn’t any other Democrat? 

CNN’s Democrats aren’t alone in their elite anger. TV lawyer Lisa Bloom, a one-time Harvey Weinstein ally, derided Warren on Twitter for turning down money that could be used to defeat Trump. “Pete Buttigieg is right,” Bloom wrote. “We don’t need purity tests. Who cares if he had a fundraiser in a wine cave. Our country is currently run by a whining cave man. Take any legal money you can raise and beat him in November.”

People don’t really frame other pressing issues as purity tests, of course. When a Democrat gets up and talks about voting rights as a basic, inviolable commitment of democratic government, no self-proclaimed centrist rises to emphasize the need to make pragmatic concessions to racists. 

Axelrod’s insistence that big money doesn’t necessarily corrupt lawmakers, meanwhile, is akin to the argument put forward by the Supreme Court majority in its infamous 2010 Citizens United decision: that money in politics is not corrupt unless it involves an explicit trading of political favors for cash. 

Until very recently, it would have been disgraceful for a Democrat to publicly champion such an idea. In the modern Democratic party, corruption has never been conceived of as a narrow question of trading favors for cash. It’s about who counts in a democracy, and how citizens hold their leaders accountable. Corruption contributes to who sets the agenda, whose problems are considered the most pressing, which bills get written, which get a vote, and who gets fancy Washington jobs. If you want to be the next ambassador to Denmark or Barbados, the best way to go about doing it is to attend a fundraiser and tell the candidate that’s what you want. (Kathryn Hall, co-owner of the crystal-laden wine cave, served as ambassador to Austria under President Bill Clinton.)

And for most Democrats, Bloom’s idea of accepting literally any legal money is noxious. Some sources are just obviously improper ― the NRA, oil executives, Harvey Weinstein. Democrats don’t want their leaders taking money from these people for a reason: It’s corrupt. They don’t want their elected representatives to be thinking about Harvey Weinstein’s interests, consciously or unconsciously.

Instead of framing corruption as a basic dispute over democratic values, Buttigieg, Bloom and Cuomo present the issue as a mere campaign tactic. But even there, Warren and Sanders are not paying a price for their so-called purity. They’ve consistently out-raised everyone else in the race, including Buttigieg, despite their focus on small donors and detailed policy agendas that infuriate the superrich

In the fall of 2010, Axelrod, then a member of President Barack Obama’s White House, appeared on ”Face the Nation” to downplay the severity of a “robo-signing” epidemic that was sweeping the housing industry. At the time, thousands of mortgages were frozen because the banks that wanted to foreclose on them couldn’t document who actually owned the property. Axelrod promised the administration was working for a speedy resolution.

“We are working closely with these institutions to make sure they go expedite the process of going back and reconstructing [mortgages] and throwing out those that don’t work,” he said.

It wasn’t true. The banking problem was not a technical hiccup and the Obama administration was not lighting a fire under the banks to sort it out. It was instead a widespread fraud which the biggest banks in the country eventually agreed to pay tens of billions of dollars to settle. Obama’s Treasury Department had essentially turned over the administration of its own anti-foreclosure initiative to big banks, which were squeezing homeowners for whatever they could, with or without the right paperwork, often overcharging families or even wrongfully evicting them. After dragging its feet about this outrage for years, the Justice Department under Obama eventually inked a settlement, and then promptly declined to prosecute anyone for the wrongdoing involved.

Maybe it was a coincidence that Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign raised nearly $44 million from the financial sector ― more than any other candidate in history ― including more than $1 million from employees of Goldman Sachs, nearly $1 million from JPMorganites, and over three-quarters of a million from his supporters at Citigroup, some of whom ended up staffing his administration.

So guys like Axelrod get touchy when candidates talk about corruption. But it’s not just people with fancy TV contracts. Rank-and-file Democratic voters don’t like corruption, but they also don’t like to think about ways their favorite Democrats have failed them in the past. Accepting the standard Warren and Sanders are setting means coming to terms with the fact that Obama and Bill Clinton’s administrations engaged in activity that is hard to defend. Even Warren and Sanders know that’s a big ask for most Democratic voters, so they rarely apply the implications of their own rhetoric to Obama’s activities.

But the divide over corruption isn’t going away. It cuts to the core of what it means to be a member of a party that calls itself democratic. Do Democrats represent everyone, or are some Democrats more equal than others?

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‘Duck Dynasty’ star Sadie Robertson, Christian Huff share stunning vacation photos: ‘God’s filter’

Westlake Legal Group dasie 'Duck Dynasty' star Sadie Robertson, Christian Huff share stunning vacation photos: 'God's filter' Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/duck-dynasty fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc dccb3a74-665c-55d8-b5dd-88306f9653dd article

Sadie Robertson and Christian Huff are still in amazing spirits off their beautiful beach honeymoon.

The “Duck Dynasty” alum, 22, took to Instagram on Friday to share more photos from their luxurious vacation in the sun and sand.

“Gods [sic] filter – a series,” she captioned an album of images ranging from the stunning blue water to a rainbow that appeared outside their hotel room.

Earlier in December, the newlyweds posted their first batch of honeymoon photos.

SADIE ROBERTSON LEARNED TO OVERCOME FEAR BY FINDING TRUST IN GOD: MY BELIEF IS ‘UNSHAKABLE’

“I might not be able to take the beach with me BUT IM TAKING THE VIEW AYEEEE,” Robertson wrote on Instagram. “I know it’s only week 1 but marriage is awesome.”

The former “Dancing with the Stars” contestant got engaged to Huff in June after he popped the question. Robertson and Huff got married on her family’s Louisiana farm last week after five months of engagement.

People magazine reported that the family converted a tennis court on their sprawling property with hedges and string lights to create a romantic setting for them to exchange their vows and say “I do.”

“Christian is so kind and so affirming of who I am as a person. He makes me a lot stronger. I just feel like equally, we make each other better when we’re together,” 22-year-old Robertson told the outlet prior to her wedding.

When the reality TV personality announced her engagement she said of Huff, “He’s strong and kind. He’s handsome and humble. He is hilarious. He’s my best friend.” Robertson said their relationship isn’t perfect, “but at the end of every day I couldn’t be more grateful for this walking answered prayer.”

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While he said of Robertson, “I cannot speak highly enough about you and all that you have taught me this past year. Thank you for always showing me how to be more like Christ everyday, you embody the spirit so beautifully. Sadie rob you’re the best babe and this race is so much more fun running with you.”

Westlake Legal Group dasie 'Duck Dynasty' star Sadie Robertson, Christian Huff share stunning vacation photos: 'God's filter' Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/duck-dynasty fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc dccb3a74-665c-55d8-b5dd-88306f9653dd article   Westlake Legal Group dasie 'Duck Dynasty' star Sadie Robertson, Christian Huff share stunning vacation photos: 'God's filter' Jessica Napoli fox-news/entertainment/events/couples fox-news/entertainment/duck-dynasty fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc dccb3a74-665c-55d8-b5dd-88306f9653dd article

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Ex-Fort Worth officer indicted for murder of Atatiana Jefferson

A former Fort Worth police officer was indicted on a murder charge Friday in the October death of 28-year-old Atatiana Jefferson.

Aaron Dean, 34, was one of several officers who responded to Jefferson’s home on Oct. 12 after police were called for a welfare check when a neighbor saw Jefferson’s front door open in the middle of the night.

Responding officers searched the perimeter of the house and saw a person standing inside near the window, police had said. When he got to the back window, Dean “perceived a threat” and “drew his weapon and fired one shot, striking the person inside the residence,” the Fort Worth Police Department had said in a statement.

Dean hit Jefferson with a single shot that killed her, Fox 4 reported. She was playing with her 8-year-old nephew at the time.

Westlake Legal Group AP-Atatiana-Jefferson Ex-Fort Worth officer indicted for murder of Atatiana Jefferson Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc article 961d55e2-c52f-55e1-bc8d-ebcc52ebc54c

This undated photo provided by Jefferson’s family shows Atatiana Jefferson. (Jefferson’s family via AP)

ATATIANA JEFFERSON, TEXAS POLICE SHOOTING VICTIM, HAD BEEN ASSUMING ROLE OF FAMILY MATRIARCH

After a Tarrant County grand jury indicted Dean on Friday, an attorney for Jefferson’s family, S. Lee Merritt, said they are “relieved” by the news, but “we need to see this through to a vigorous prosecution and appropriate sentencing.”

The family is “cautiously optimistic that a conviction and appropriate sentence will come in the near future,” Merritt said in a statement. “This is a huge first step in the long road to justice for this family.”

Dean was initially placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation. He resigned Oct. 14 and was later charged with murder. He was released on a $200,000 bail. Dean had been with the department since April 2018.

DAD OF ATATIANA JEFFERSON, TEXAS POLICE SHOOTING VICTIM, DIES AFTER HEART ATTACK: REPORTS

The department had released bodycam footage of the incident “to provide transparent and relevant information to the public as we are allowed within the confines of the” investigation, it said at the time. Any video taken inside the house could not be distributed due to state law.

The neighbor who called 911 about the open front door told Fox 4 in October that the police officers didn’t announce who they were or knock on the door before searching the outside of the house.

“When I made that non-emergency call, I didn’t say it was a burglary. I didn’t say it was people fighting. I didn’t say anything to make them have a gun. All they needed to do is ring the doorbell,” James Smith had said.

“They didn’t park up front, they parked on the side. They sent SRT, which is the special response team. They didn’t have a plainclothes officer to knock on that door,” activist and pastor Kyev Tatum had told Fox 4.

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Of the nine officer-involved shootings so far this year in Fort Worth, five targeted African-Americans and six resulted in deaths, according to department data.

Nearly two-thirds of the department’s 1,100 officers are white, just over 20 percent are Hispanic, and about 10 percent are black. The city is about 40 percent white, 35 percent Hispanic and 19 percent black.

The October incident came less than two weeks after a white former Dallas police officer was sentenced to 10 years in prison for shooting and killing her black neighbor inside his own apartment. Amber Guyger said during her trial that she mistook Botham Jean’s apartment for her own, which was one floor below Jean’s. Guyger, 31, was convicted of murder for Jean’s September 2018 death.

Click for more from Fox4News.com.

Fox News’ Frank Miles and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095263116001_6095265882001-vs Ex-Fort Worth officer indicted for murder of Atatiana Jefferson Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc article 961d55e2-c52f-55e1-bc8d-ebcc52ebc54c   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6095263116001_6095265882001-vs Ex-Fort Worth officer indicted for murder of Atatiana Jefferson Melissa Leon fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/texas fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc article 961d55e2-c52f-55e1-bc8d-ebcc52ebc54c

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Lady Gaga reveals she can’t remember the last time she’s bathed

Lady Gaga is ‘fessing up that she doesn’t know the last time she’s been clean.

The pop superstar, whose name is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta, revealed on social media on Wednesday that she can’t remember last time she’s bathed as she teased what many fans hope will be her sixth studio album come 2020.

“My assistant: when’s the last time you bathed,” Lady Gaga tweeted to her followers. “Me: i don’t remember.”

LADY GAGA’S MOTHER OPENS UP ABOUT THE SINGER’S YOUNGER DAYS: ‘SHE WENT THROUGH A LOT OF DIFFICULT TIMES’

The 33-year-old “Shallow” songstress has certainly enjoyed wild success in 2019, especially after her career-shaping performance alongside Bradley Cooper in his directorial debut, “A Star Is Born,” which landed Gaga an Academy Award for best original song.

Gaga hasn’t shed much light on her career plans moving into the next year. However, she issued insight on what she’d like to see in her life and put any questions to bed of a possible retirement in an interview with YouTube content creator NikkieTutorials.

“More music, not retiring any time soon … all kinds of different music,” she said. “I wanna do more movies, I wanna have babies and I want to continue to build the behemoth that is Haus Laboratories into the makeup company of my dreams.”

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-a833ec249c064073975dbd6b025067f0 Lady Gaga reveals she can’t remember the last time she’s bathed Julius Young fox-news/person/lady-gaga fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article acd40164-aba1-509c-8c48-b1e26c6cdaf6

Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga in “A Star Is Born” (Neal Preston/Warner Bros. via AP)

During her resurgence, Gaga also recently opened up about her enormous struggles with mental health and the battles she’s endured throughout her life to combat the trauma she says she was subjected to growing up.

“I’ve actually not opened up very much about this, but I think it’s an important thing for people to know and hear: I was a cutter for a long time,” she told Oprah Winfrey during an interview published in Elle magazine’s December cover issue.

LADY GAGA FALLS OFF LAS VEGAS CONCERT STAGE

“The only way that I was able to stop cutting and self-harming myself was to realize that what I was doing was trying to show people that I was in pain instead of telling them and asking for help,” Gaga added.

Westlake Legal Group ContentBroker_contentid-07c3a4b1e01d478991b6ac71e36e552c Lady Gaga reveals she can’t remember the last time she’s bathed Julius Young fox-news/person/lady-gaga fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article acd40164-aba1-509c-8c48-b1e26c6cdaf6

Lady Gaga participates in the second annual Stonewall Day honoring the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, hosted by Pride Live and iHeartMedia, in Greenwich Village on Friday, June 28, 2019, in New York. (Photo by Greg Allen/Invision/AP)

During the interview, Gaga maintained she suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic pain as a result of the constant abuse.

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“I was raped when I was 19 years old, repeatedly,” Gaga told Oprah. “I have been traumatized in a variety of ways by my career over the years from many different things, but I survived, and I’ve kept going.”

Fox News’ Talia Kaplan contributed to this report.

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