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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 397)

Cleveland Browns, GM John Dorsey part ways after 2 seasons

Westlake Legal Group john-dorsey-Reuters Cleveland Browns, GM John Dorsey part ways after 2 seasons Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 46a0d75f-b445-547f-89ae-e27b99d36bfb

Cleveland Browns and general manager John Dorsey parted ways Tuesday.

Dorsey and the organization “couldn’t come to an agreement on a future restructure of the organization,” ESPN first reported. An official told ESPN the two had “mutually parted ways.”

NFL HEAD COACHING SEARCHES COULD BRING TEAMS TO FIRST-TIMERS

Dorsey became the general manager on Dec. 7, 2017. He had two years remaining on his contract.

Browns owners Dee and Jimmy Haslam confirmed Dorsey’s departure in a statement.

Dorsey released a separate statement.

Cleveland failed to make the playoffs in each of his two full seasons as general manager.

CLEVELAND BROWNS FIRE FREDDIE KITCHENS AFTER ONE SEASON

He was responsible for the drafting of Baker Mayfield, Denzel Ward and Nick Chubb. He also made the deals to bring in Jarvis Landry, Odell Beckham, Kareem Hunt, Sheldon Richardson and Olivier Vernon.

However, in those two full seasons Cleveland was 13-18-1 and didn’t finish better than third in the AFC North. Dorsey fired Hue Jackson in the middle of the 2018 season and replaced him with defensive coordinator Gregg Williams. He then chose Freddie Kitchens over Williams to become the head coach for the 2019 season because of Kitchen’s progress with Mayfield.

But after a 6-10 season, Kitchens was out as head coach and less than two days later Dorsey was out as well.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

The circus atmosphere around the Browns was thought to have ended as the team had a seven-win season in 2018 – the most they had since 2014. An offseason filled with hype only ended with crushing disappointment. Disappointment that appears Browns ownership was done suffering through with a solid team and a young corps to build around.

Westlake Legal Group john-dorsey-Reuters Cleveland Browns, GM John Dorsey part ways after 2 seasons Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 46a0d75f-b445-547f-89ae-e27b99d36bfb   Westlake Legal Group john-dorsey-Reuters Cleveland Browns, GM John Dorsey part ways after 2 seasons Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nfl/cleveland-browns fox-news/sports/nfl fox news fnc/sports fnc article 46a0d75f-b445-547f-89ae-e27b99d36bfb

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Missouri cop accused of manslaughter after killing girl, 4, in on-duty accident

The tragic death of a 4-year-old girl who was run over by a police vehicle at a Missouri school has led nearly a year later to the indictment of the on-duty officer who was behind the wheel.

Andria Heese, a 28-year-old member of the Columbia Police Department, was charged with manslaughter Monday in the Jan. 4 death of Gabriella Curry outside Battle High School, according to reports.

“We’ve been working with the Highway Patrol,” Camden County prosecutor Heather Miller told Fox 22 Columbia. “We’ve been in contact with the family, working with them and making sure that all the ducks were in a row before we were comfortable filing the case.”

Westlake Legal Group andria-heese-split Missouri cop accused of manslaughter after killing girl, 4, in on-duty accident Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc article 2796c0d9-982c-5a93-9713-8168bc45ab6a

Gabriella Curry, 4, was run over and killed by a police vehicle nearly a year ago. Columbia police officer Anria Heese was charged with manslaughter Monday in her death.  (Curry Family/Fox 22 Columbia)

FLORIDA BOY, 3, KILLED IN HIT-AND-RUN CRASH WAS SITTING IN PASSENGER’S LAP, AUTHORITIES SAY

A call from Fox News seeking comment from Heese’s attorney was not immediately returned.

The indictment comes after the city of Columbia agreed to pay Gabriella’s parents $3.4 million to settle a lawsuit seeking damages for claims of wrongful death.

The school district, which also has been sued, agreed to a $125,000 settlement.

ALABAMA CAR CRASH KILLS 3 HIGH SCHOOL CHEERLEADERS ON CHRISTMAS

Curry’s mother told KOMU-TV Monday the criminal case against Heese makes it even more difficult with Gabriella’s one-year anniversary of her death this weekend.

According to reports at the time of the accident, Heese was in a patrol SUV when she struck the girl after driving onto the sidewalk to monitor school buses.

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After hitting her, Heese assisted Gabriella, giving her CPR and calling for help, KOMU reported.

She was put on administrative leave after the accident. Her current status was not known.

Westlake Legal Group andria-heese-split Missouri cop accused of manslaughter after killing girl, 4, in on-duty accident Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc article 2796c0d9-982c-5a93-9713-8168bc45ab6a   Westlake Legal Group andria-heese-split Missouri cop accused of manslaughter after killing girl, 4, in on-duty accident Robert Gearty fox-news/us/us-regions/midwest/missouri fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement fox news fnc/us fnc article 2796c0d9-982c-5a93-9713-8168bc45ab6a

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GOP Sen. Susan Collins Sides With Mitch McConnell On Impeachment Trial

Westlake Legal Group 5e0b7f8425000079bad3181f GOP Sen. Susan Collins Sides With Mitch McConnell On Impeachment Trial

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said she is “open” to calling witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. However, she added that it is too early to determine which witnesses should appear and that the Senate ought to decide after opening arguments and initial questioning of both sides.

“I am open to witnesses. I think it’s premature to decide who should be called until we see the evidence that is presented and get the answers to the questions that we senators can submit through the chief justice to both sides,” Collins told Maine Public Radio on Monday.

Collins’ stance on the parameters of the impeachment trial aligns her with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who has all but promised a swift acquittal of Trump. McConnell has argued for following the framework of the 1999 impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton, which punted a decision on witness testimony until after the initial arguments and senatorial questioning.

“We haven’t ruled out witnesses,” McConnell said last week in a “Fox & Friends” interview. “We’ve said let’s handle this case just like we did with President Clinton. Fair is fair.”

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), meanwhile, is demanding the Senate agree upfront to hear from witnesses who refused to appear during House committee hearings, including acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security adviser John Bolton. The Democratic leader argued that witnesses with firsthand knowledge about Trump’s decision to block military assistance to Ukraine could provide crucial information. 

“President Trump, if you are so confident you did nothing wrong, why won’t you let your men testify?” Schumer said at a press conference in New York City on Monday. “What are Senator McConnell and President Trump afraid of if all the facts come out?”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has delayed sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate, reportedly to give Schumer more leverage in talks with McConnell over procedures for a “fair” trial. The Senate cannot begin the trial until the House formally transmits the articles to the upper chamber. But just days before senators are due to return to Washington from their holiday break, there are no signs the impasse between the two Senate leaders is easing.

In her interview with Maine Public Radio, Collins also called McConnell’s vow of “total coordination” with the White House on the trial process “inappropriate,” while chiding some Senate Democrats for rushing to judgment.

“It is inappropriate, in my judgment, for senators on either side of the aisle to prejudge the evidence before they have heard what is presented to us because each of us will take an oath, an oath that I take very seriously, to render impartial justice,” she said.

“And I have heard Democrats like Elizabeth Warren, saying that the president should be impeached, found guilty and removed from office,” Collins added. “I’ve heard the Senate majority leader saying that he’s taking his cues from the White House. There are senators on both sides of the aisle who, to me, are not giving the appearance of and the reality of judging this in an impartial way.”

McConnell told reporters earlier this month that he didn’t view himself as an impartial juror. “I would anticipate we will have a largely partisan outcome in the Senate,” he said. “I’m not impartial about this at all.”

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) was the first Republican to publicly voice concern over the Senate majority leader’s handling of the proceedings, telling KTUU last week that she was “disturbed” by McConnell’s comments.

Democrats in the Senate want to hear from White House officials who, at Trump’s urging, defied House subpoenas and didn’t testify. The list includes Mulvaney; Bolton; Robert Blair, senior adviser to Mulvaney; and Michael Duffey, associate director for national security at the Office of Management and Budget.

To subpoena their desired witnesses, Democrats will need to convince at least four Republican senators to vote with them. Moderates like Collins and Murkowski will be their top targets.

Collins is seeking reelection in 2020 in what is shaping up to be a fierce contest.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ultra-rare albino lobster goes on display after being caught off England’s coast

A very rare albino lobster is on display after being caught off the coast of Yorkshire in the United Kingdom.

The white crustacean was captured by a very surprised fisherman earlier this month, news agency SWNS reports.

A conservation officer for the North Eastern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority (IFCA) told SWNS that he’s “never seen anything like it.”

He explained: “Albino lobsters are incredibly rare — I’ve never seen one.”

VAST MAYAN PALACE DISCOVERED IN MEXICO

Westlake Legal Group lobster-swns Ultra-rare albino lobster goes on display after being caught off England's coast fox-news/science/wild-nature/fish fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 1aaec993-ffe6-5651-abb3-6c1a0f560f10

An ultra-rare albino lobster has gone on display after being caught off the Yorkshire coast. (Image via SWNS)

NASA REVEALS GALACTIC ‘FIREWORKS’ IN STUNNING NEW IMAGE

The fisherman reportedly wanted the rare specimen to go somewhere it could be enjoyed by the general public.

“It was good of him to do that because it’s well known they can be sold for good money,” the conservation officer told SWNS.

Albino lobsters are the consequence of a genetic condition called leucism, which leaves them with no pigment in their shells.

The lobster is currently on display inside a tank at a National Trust visitor center near Whitby, in North Yorkshire.

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Westlake Legal Group lobster-swns Ultra-rare albino lobster goes on display after being caught off England's coast fox-news/science/wild-nature/fish fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 1aaec993-ffe6-5651-abb3-6c1a0f560f10   Westlake Legal Group lobster-swns Ultra-rare albino lobster goes on display after being caught off England's coast fox-news/science/wild-nature/fish fox news fnc/science fnc Christopher Carbone article 1aaec993-ffe6-5651-abb3-6c1a0f560f10

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Mariah Carey Makes History As First Artist To Hit No. 1 In Four Separate Decades

Westlake Legal Group 5e0b6e4f250000201998f7ba Mariah Carey Makes History As First Artist To Hit No. 1 In Four Separate Decades

Mariah Carey is closing out 2019 in an epic way.

The singer-songwriter has become the first artist ever to top the Billboard Hot 100 chart in four separate decades, Billboard announced on Monday.

Carey has now had No. 1 hits in the 1990s, 2000s, 2010s and 2020s ― thanks to the recent chart-topping success of her 1994 Christmas classic “All I Want for Christmas Is You.”

The song charted at the No. 1 spot earlier this month, 25 years after its release. It has now spent its third week atop the Hot 100 chart, the latest of which is dated Jan. 4, 2020, the music publication noted.

Carey’s 19 No. 1 songs include hits like 1996′s “Always Be My Baby” and 2005′s “We Belong Together.”

The singer has celebrated a number of music milestones this holiday season.

“All I Want for Christmas Is You” became the first holiday song to reach the No. 1 spot on the Hot 100 chart since The Chipmunks’ 1958 “The Chipmunk Song.” Last month, Guinness World Records named Carey’s song the most streamed track on Spotify by a female artist in a 24-hour window.

Carey released a new music video for “All I Want for Christmas Is You” earlier this month featuring a surprise cameo from her 8-year-old twins Moroccan and Monroe.

On Tuesday, she celebrated her Hot 100 chart milestone with her fans on Instagram.

“Yaaaaaaaaay!!! WE. DID. IT,” she wrote, adding “But…. what’s a decade?”

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The surprising impact that Californians flooding Texas may have on 2020 election

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Texas-Flag-Getty-iStock The surprising impact that Californians flooding Texas may have on 2020 election Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 6588105e-fad7-5620-83d9-8a60ba619617

The latest Census Bureau data shows that more than 86,000 California residents moved to Texas in 2018 alone and that’s raising the question of whether or not they are bringing their politics with them ahead of the 2020 presidential election.

“While Texas might not typically be thought of as a swing state, fresh polling shows the 2020 race getting potentially close,” said Fox News contributor and pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson on her new Fox Nation show “What Are The Odds?”

A CNN poll of Texans, conducted in early December, showed President Trump statistically tied with former Vice President Joe Biden in a hypothetical 2020 matchup.

“In 2018, there were 86,164 Californians who moved to the state of Texas,” said Soltis Anderson, noting that many new residents are being enticed by a booming economy in the Lone Star state.

“On the one hand, the economy being good — you would think would benefit Republicans. On the other hand, if Texas, in particular, is really good and folks are coming from blue states to red, does that make Texas potentially more of a pickup target for Democrats in 2020?” she asked her guest Chris Wilson, a former Ted Cruz campaign pollster and CEO of WPA Intelligence.

Wilson said that is a phenomenon that he is watching very closely in his role as a pollster for Texas Governor Gregg Abbott.

“We’ve done some pretty in-depth look at people who are moving into the state,” he revealed. “I’ll give an example — Ted Cruz won by more [in the 2018 midterm election against former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas] with new voters into Texas than he did with voters who had been in Texas for their entire lives.”

“What we find is that in that first election, they cast a vote in, yes, they tend to be a little more Democratic than they do Republican,” he continued. “But the next election, and as they vote more and more, they become more Republican… we do find that after three to four elections, as people move in the state, they are highly more likely to be Republican than they are Democrat.”

Wilson said he attributed some of that apparent effect to the increased standard of living that the new Texas residents may experience.

“You can imagine you could sell you’re a little bitty small home that’s jammed in the city in San Francisco and go buy a mega-mansion in Plano, Texas… and have lots of land and go to good schools and not have homeless people leaving hypodermic needles on your front porch. So all these things got to factor into creating a new cultural experience for people as they moved to Texas,” Wilson argued.

“So coming to Texas actually converts them to become Republican a little bit along the way?” joked Soltis Anderson.

“They see what good government can do in a governor like Abbott and Republican representation and a good economy,” Wilson concluded, “it’s amazing the conversion process.”

To watch all of Fox Nation’s “What Are The Odds?” go to Fox Nation and sign up today.

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Fox Nation programs are viewable on-demand and from your mobile device app, but only for Fox Nation subscribers. Go to Fox Nation to start a free trial and watch the extensive library from Tomi Lahren, Pete Hegseth, Abby Hornacek, Laura Ingraham, Ainsley Earhardt, Greg Gutfeld, Judge Andrew Napolitano and many more of your favorite Fox News personalities.

Westlake Legal Group Trump-Texas-Flag-Getty-iStock The surprising impact that Californians flooding Texas may have on 2020 election Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 6588105e-fad7-5620-83d9-8a60ba619617   Westlake Legal Group Trump-Texas-Flag-Getty-iStock The surprising impact that Californians flooding Texas may have on 2020 election Matt London fox-news/topic/fox-nation-opinion fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/politics fox-news/opinion fox-news/fox-nation fox news fnc/media fnc article 6588105e-fad7-5620-83d9-8a60ba619617

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A Decade Marked By Outrage Over Drug Prices

Westlake Legal Group shkreli_gettyimages-508357106_custom-234ed0e357de94d7ca8ab5cf755a52f646991636-s1100-c15 A Decade Marked By Outrage Over Drug Prices

Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, appeared before the House Oversight Committee during a contentious hearing on drug pricing on Feb. 4, 2016. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  A Decade Marked By Outrage Over Drug Prices

Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, appeared before the House Oversight Committee during a contentious hearing on drug pricing on Feb. 4, 2016.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., was in the middle of describing drug price gouging as a scheme to enrich a few industry executives at the expense of everyday patients when he stopped to reprimand a witness.

“It’s not funny, Mr. Shkreli,” said Cummings, the top Democrat on the House Committee on Oversight and Reform until his death this past October, said to a smirking man at the table before him. “People are dying. And they’re getting sicker and sicker.”

The man was Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, who was called before Cummings’ committee in February 2016. After hiking the price of an old drug for parasitic infections to $750 a pill from $13.50, Shkreli became the poster boy for pharmaceutical greed that helped define the decade.

During that time, new drugs emerged with higher price tags than ever, and many old drugs got sudden price hikes. Meanwhile, nearly 1 in 4 Americans has trouble affording prescription drugs, according to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll.

“Price increases that consumers have suffered under the last 10 years have been at a greater rate compared to inflation than we’ve ever seen in this country,” says Jim Yocum, a senior vice president of Connecture DRx, a health data firm.

Here are a few medicines that Americans depend on but that suddenly became much harder to afford in the last decade.

Daraprim: An old drug gets a huge new price

For decades, Daraprim has been the go-to medicine for treating toxoplasmosis, a parasitic infection especially dangerous for people with compromised immune systems, such as people living with HIV and patients who’ve undergone organ transplants.

The drug was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1953, and its patents expired long ago. But there wasn’t a generic version available, and there was only one supplier in the United States. Even so, Daraprim cost just $13.50 a pill in early 2015, which was a good deal for a lifesaving drug with minimal side effects, Wendy Armstrong, an infectious disease specialist at Emory University, told Shots.

Then Turing Pharmaceuticals — run by former hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli — bought the rights to the drug and raised its list price more than 5,000% overnight. Shkreli eventually left the company and went to prison for an unrelated crime (securities fraud), but not before becoming known as the “Pharma Bro.”

The pricing tactic didn’t start with him. It’s what another company called Valeant did the same year when it bought two old heart drugs — Isuprel and Nitropress — that had little competition. It’s also what Rodelis Therapeutics did when it acquired an old tuberculosis drug called Seromycin and hiked the price for a month’s supply to $10,800 from $500.

“Once you’re the sole manufacturer, you can do what you want,” says Vinay Prasad, an oncologist at Oregon Health & Science University. There’s no competition to drive prices down.

Despite public outcry over Shkreli’s move, Daraprim’s price hasn’t budged.

Today, many health insurance companies won’t pay for the drug, and it’s too expensive for many hospitals to keep in stock, says Armstrong. As a result, she says, doctors have been forced to turn to cheaper alternatives that have more side effects and less proof that they work.

One of her patients was diagnosed with toxoplasmosis after undergoing a kidney transplant. But when it came time to move the woman from the hospital to a rehabilitation facility, the rehab place wouldn’t take her.

“They wouldn’t assume the cost of the drug,” Armstrong tells Shots. “She ended up staying in a hospital for months, developing additional complications — simply because the Daraprim was priced out of range for the accepting facility.”

EpiPen: A steady stream of price increases adds up

By the time EpiPen’s list price reached $300 per auto-injector in 2016, its manufacturer, Mylan, had made more than a dozen price hikes in just six years.

People clamored for a cheaper generic of the product, which injects a dose of epinephrine to counteract allergic reactions.

“These things have an expiration date,” Connecture DRx’s Yocum says. “So they have to be replaced on a regular basis, even if they are never used.”

And EpiPen wasn’t new, after all. The product was approved in 1987. But Mylan had a virtual monopoly on it. In spring of 2016, the FDA had rejected two applications from other firms that wanted to make generic versions.

State and federal lawmakers took notice. For years, they had been passing laws that pushed for schools and other public places to have EpiPens on hand.

“My office has been contacted by dozens of concerned Connecticut residents, families, school nurses and first responders who urgently require your lifesaving product but fear that its skyrocketing price has put it out of reach,” Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., wrote to Mylan’s CEO at the time. He demanded that the company lower its price.

It did. Well, sort of. Mylan started offering its own generic at half the price in December 2016 and left the price of its brand-name product where it was. Mylan’s new version is called an authorized generic. These are usually introduced to undercut competition from other companies’ generics — and eat into some of the competitors’ profits.

In this case, Mylan’s generic version was an apparent response to public pressure, but it still cost triple what the EpiPen had cost just a few years earlier.

In 2018, the first true generic version of EpiPen was approved, but it wasn’t cheaper than the authorized generic.

“It’s the new normal,” Yocum says. “The first several generics that come in have not typically been at a significant discount to the branded product.”

Sovaldi: a first-of-its-kind hepatitis drug with a sky-high price tag

Sovaldi was heralded as a turning point for people with hepatitis C when the FDA approved the medicine in 2013. It was the first drug that could cure most cases of the chronic liver disease in just a few months — and without the debilitating side effects of previous treatments. But there was a catch: Sovaldi was priced at $1,000 per pill. To rid a patient of the hepatitis C virus would cost $84,000 per person.

State health systems struggled to pay for the treatment, and health insurers denied the drug to all but the sickest patients. An investigation led by Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley and Oregon Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden found that state Medicaid programs spent more than $1 billion on the drug in 2014, but less than 2.4% of Medicaid patients with hepatitis C got Sovaldi.

“There were potentially a million people in the Medicaid program who had hepatitis C,” Matt Salo, executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors, told Shots. “At the list price that we were getting back in 2014, 2015, we would have spent as much on that one drug for this one condition as we would have for every other drug in the entire Medicaid program combined.”

Now, there are a few other brand-name hepatitis C cures on the market, creating some competition.

“We were able to go to Merck and Gilead and the other manufacturers and say, ‘We’re going to cover one of these products. It might be yours. It might be the other guy’s. So if you want it to be yours, you’re going to have to bring your price down significantly,’ ” Salo says.

Now the negotiated price after discounts and rebates for hepatitis C medicines can be around $20,000 per patient, which helps improve access, Salo says. But even that price is not low enough to provide a cure to everyone who has hepatitis C.

Now attention has turned to Louisiana, which reached a five-year deal with drugmaker Gilead for an unlimited amount of an authorized generic of Epclusa — another hepatitis C drug, which Gilead makes — for its Medicaid and prison populations. Instead of paying per dose, Louisiana will pay a fixed annual dollar amount. The state is calling this subscription approach the “Netflix model.” The goal is to eradicate the disease from Louisiana.

Insulin: Near-simultaneous price hikes draw a lawsuit

After insulin was discovered nearly 100 years ago, the rights to it were transferred to the University of Toronto for $1 so that insulin could be made widely available at a low cost.

But insulin prices have continued to creep upward at a rate that’s higher than inflation. As a result, some patients have rationed their medicine, skipping doses or cutting them in half.

In 2017, a group of patients sued the three major insulin-makers — Sanofi, Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk — when they noticed that the companies were increasing their prices in lockstep.

Yocum calls these price hikes “mind-boggling.” They seemed to go up in a pattern, at certain times of year, despite the availability of products from competing manufacturers. “I can’t think of a product, over the last 10 years, where you have that sort of pricing leverage,” Yocum says, that hasn’t led to “some sort of competitive pushback from another manufacturer of prescription drugs.”

When Congress and the media took notice, the price hikes mostly stopped, but prices didn’t drop.

“The last time we saw significant increases across the board in the list prices of insulins was between 2017 and 2018,” Yocum says. “Most of them have held the line on that pricing since then.”

One of the lawyers in the insulin-pricing suit tells Shots that his team is seeking an injunction against the insulin manufacturers that could lower prices.

“Hopefully, we will obtain a ruling to that effect within a year,” says attorney Steve Berman.

The drug companies, for their part, say the allegations against them are false, and they are fighting the suit.

Zolgensma: a gene-altering drug that could bust the bank

Despite increasing pressure from the White House and Congress in recent years to reduce the price of prescription medicines, Novartis introduced in 2019 the world’s most expensive drug: Zolgensma.

It’s a gene-altering injection that costs $2.1 million for a one-time treatment for a severe form of spinal muscular atrophy, a rare inherited disease that destroys certain cells involved in muscle movement. If left untreated, the young patients often don’t live past childhood.

“It’s a new phenomenon that we will see more of in the next decade,” Yocum predicts of seven-figure drug prices.

Novartis has offered insurers the choice of paying for the treatment in $425,000 installments over five years.

Critics were initially somewhat split about the propriety of such a price. On the one hand, the drug could add years to patients’ lives. On the other, even if a drug is covered by a patient’s health plan, insurers simply pass along the high cost to everyone else in the form of higher premiums.

Then came even more controversy. Novartis learned that data used in the marketing application submitted to the FDA for Zolgensma’s approval had been manipulated, but it didn’t tell the FDA until after Zolgensma’s approval. The manipulation by company researchers happened during testing on mice, not people, and the company fired two executives after the scandal broke. The FDA said it is still confident in the drug’s safety and efficacy.

Novartis plans to give away free doses of Zolgensma via a lottery in countries where the drug hasn’t yet been approved for use; but the move has been criticized as too simplistic and emotionally taxing for families to endure.

What’s next?

In December, the House passed a bill to lower prescription drug prices. The proposed legislation would allow the government to negotiate prices of some drugs prescribed to Medicare patients, cap Medicare patients’ out-of-pocket costs for prescription medicine and penalize drugmakers for raising prices faster than inflation. But the Senate isn’t expected to move forward on the House bill, and the White House vowed to veto it.

Still, action on drug prices is inevitable, says Oregon Health & Science University’s Prasad.

“What is the status quo?” Prasad asks. “Unrelenting price increases with no downward pressure in a system that at some point cannot take it anymore and will collapse.”

But until the nation has no choice but to solve its drug price problem, Prasad said pharmaceutical companies will “extract as much money as they can.”

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3 wildest bikini trends of 2019

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6018792474001_6018800326001-vs 3 wildest bikini trends of 2019 Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc bf7d5007-ef4f-5cb3-8e9c-483b18ed30f0 article

From the runway to real life, 2019 saw plenty of wild styles and fashionable splashes in women’s swimwear. And although plenty good, bad and ugly swimsuits made headlines this year, three memorable fads won’t soon be forgotten.

While it remains to be determined whether or not brazen beachgoers ultimately sport such bold bikinis in the warmer months ahead, 2019 certainly taught beach babes everywhere one critical lesson: The most important thing to wear is confidence.

1. Bra-inspired bikinis

Underwear became outerwear when starlets like Emily Ratajkowski and Olivia Culpo embraced lingerie-inspired bathing suit tops. The fad was a far-cry away from the full-coverage choices that were popular the previous summer.

WILD STYLES: THE SILLIEST FASHION CHOICES, RETAIL ITEMS AND CLOTHING TRENDS OF 2019

2. The ‘loincloth’ trend

For those who truly dared to bare, loincloth bikini bottoms seized the spotlight in 2019. Rita Ora, Kourtney Kardashian and Ashley Graham (above) were among the celebrities and influencers who rocked the Tarzan-like trend.

3. Cutout one-piece swimsuits

Perhaps a harbinger of what’s to come, Bella Hadid and Kylie Jenner both adopted the same cutout swimsuit look at the end of the year.

“What’s unique about this piece is that it offers the coverage and support of a one-piece, along with the sexiness of a ’90s high-cut bikini,” swimwear designer Melissa Simone Gardner told the New York Post of the same $140 strapless suit they both modeled on Instagram.

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“I have always been in love with the high-cut silhouette because of its ability to create and enhance a woman’s curves,” Gardener said of the “extremely versatile” cutout one-piece swimsuit style.

Honorable mention: Confidence, because “everybody bloats!”

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In a related story, two of the most popular bikini bloggers in Australia earned praise for embracing their bodies and showing off their “bloated” bellies in a series of unedited images this year.

“NEWS FLASH: bloating is normal and just because I don’t have a six-pack doesn’t mean I’m not beautiful,” influencer Ariella Nyssa wrote on Instagram in November, in a post that included poolside snaps with pal Karina Irby.

“You bloat, I bloat, EVERYBODY BLOATS! Don’t you dare feel inferior for it,” Nyssa declared.

Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6018792474001_6018800326001-vs 3 wildest bikini trends of 2019 Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc bf7d5007-ef4f-5cb3-8e9c-483b18ed30f0 article   Westlake Legal Group 694940094001_6018792474001_6018800326001-vs 3 wildest bikini trends of 2019 Janine Puhak fox-news/style-and-beauty fox-news/lifestyle fox-news/fitness-and-wellbeing fox news fnc/lifestyle fnc bf7d5007-ef4f-5cb3-8e9c-483b18ed30f0 article

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Justin Bieber shows off religious ink in new Instagram videos

Justin Bieber is letting fans get up close and personal with his body art.

Taking to his Instagram Story on Monday, the “Sorry” singer, 25, shared multiple videos that showed off the intricate tattoos that cover the majority of his body.

JUSTIN BIEBER PENS POEM TO ‘SOULMATE’ HAILEY BALDWIN: ‘I THINK ABOUT YOU, GODS GREATEST CREATION’

Westlake Legal Group Image-from-iOS-16 Justin Bieber shows off religious ink in new Instagram videos fox-news/person/justin-bieber fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article Andy Sahadeo 33310bed-dc1b-5755-840f-b55c20a42769

Justin Bieber’s Jesus Christ tattoo on his left calf. (Justin Bieber/Instagram)

One of Bieber’s most notable tattoos is the one of Jesus Christ on his left calf symbolizing the singer’s devotion to Christianity. Bieber has gone on record multiple times to speak on his faith and has credited God with “saving” him during the darkest periods of his life.

In an Instagram post from September, Bieber shared a lengthy statement that entailed his rise to fame, drug abuse and how his faith was able to keep him strong.

JUSTIN BIEBER ADMITS HE WAS INTO ‘HEAVY DRUGS,’ STRUGGLED WITH FAME

“I started doing pretty heavy drugs at 19 and abused all of my relationships. I became resentful, disrespectful to women, and angry. I became distant to everyone who loved me,” Bieber poignantly reflected. “It’s taken me years to bounce back from all of these terrible decisions, fix broken relationships, and change relationship habits.”

“Luckily god blessed me with extraordinary people who love me for me. Now I am navigating the best season of my life ‘MARRIAGE’ !!” Bieber continued. The singer is now married to Hailey Baldwin.

JUSTIN BIEBER, HAILEY BALDWIN SHARE FIRST WEDDING PHOTOS FROM STAR-STUDDED BASH AS UNCLE ALEC BALDWIN SKIPS OUT

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Bieber’s tattoo-covered midsection, featuring a “Son of God” tattoo across his stomach. (Justin Bieber/Instagram)

Bieber also showed off his midsection that is completely covered in ink. Bieber’s devotion to God becomes even more evident with a massive cross emblazed on his chest along with the words, “Son of God,” written across his stomach. The “Never Say Never” singer’s chest also features a tiger and a bear on each of his pectorals.

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Bieber’s bicep tattoo, which features two revolvers and the words “Make Em Pay” written underneath. (Justin Bieber/Instagram)

Bieber also boasts an inner bicep tattoo featuring two revolvers intertwined with the words, “Make Em Pay,” written underneath, along with a multitude of animals scattered throughout his body.

Westlake Legal Group JustinBieber2015 Justin Bieber shows off religious ink in new Instagram videos fox-news/person/justin-bieber fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article Andy Sahadeo 33310bed-dc1b-5755-840f-b55c20a42769   Westlake Legal Group JustinBieber2015 Justin Bieber shows off religious ink in new Instagram videos fox-news/person/justin-bieber fox-news/entertainment/celebrity-news fox-news/entertainment fox news fnc/entertainment fnc article Andy Sahadeo 33310bed-dc1b-5755-840f-b55c20a42769

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Carlos Ghosn’s Escape Astounds a Japan Struggling for Answers

Westlake Legal Group 31GHOSN-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn’s Escape Astounds a Japan Struggling for Answers Securities and Commodities Violations Renault SA Nissan Motor Co Lebanon Japan Ghosn, Carlos extradition Courts and the Judiciary

TOKYO — Cameras on his doorstep. Police and reporters watching his every move. Still, one of Japan’s most famous faces gave them the slip.

Carlos Ghosn’s audacious escape from Japan has left the country flabbergasted. Its leaders are responding to questions with official silence. Even his top Japanese lawyer said he was shocked and bewildered when he saw the news on television Tuesday morning.

Mr. Ghosn, the deposed chief of the Nissan and Renault auto empire, confirmed on Tuesday that he had fled Japan to avoid a trial on charges of financial wrongdoing. The auto executive, in a statement, assailed what he described as a “rigged Japanese justice system where guilt is presumed, discrimination is rampant, and basic human rights are denied.”

“I have escaped injustice and political persecution,” he wrote, adding that he planned to tell his story next week.

In the meantime, politicians in Japan wondered whether shadowy figures or even a foreign government were involved. The aggressive local media scrambled for clues.

The confusion extended beyond Japan. An official in Beirut said he entered the country using a French passport, while at least one Lebanese outlet reported, without offering proof, that Mr. Ghosn had been spirited out inside a box meant for musical equipment.

It seems likely that the confusion was a feature, not a bug: Mr. Ghosn’s escape coincided with Japan’s most important holiday, New Year’s Day, when government agencies and most businesses close for as long as a week and airports are packed with travelers — the perfect time to stage an escape.

Government officials said they were trying to establish the facts of Mr. Ghosn’s escape to Lebanon, which has no extradition treaty with Japan.

On Twitter, Masahisa Sato, a member of Japan’s upper house and a former top Foreign Ministry official, asked whether Mr. Ghosn “had the support of some country” in his escape.

“It’s a huge problem that his illegal escape from Japan was allowed so easily,” he wrote.

The former governor of Tokyo, Yoichi Masuzoe, accused the Lebanese embassy of helping to smuggle Mr. Ghosn out.

“It’s a diplomat’s work to exfiltrate Lebanon’s national hero,” he wrote, providing no evidence. Calls to the Lebanese embassy went unanswered.

Apparently caught flat-footed, Japanese prosecutors rushed to ask a Tokyo court to rescind Mr. Ghosn’s bail, according to the national broadcaster NHK, possibly leaving him to forfeit the $9 million that he had paid for the privilege of living outside jail while he awaited trial.

His lawyer, too, seemed dumbfounded by the Houdini-like disappearance.

Addressing around 40 reporters outside his Tokyo office, the lawyer, Junichiro Hironaka, said Mr. Ghosn’s departure was “totally unexpected.”

There had been no sign that Mr. Ghosn was preparing to flee, he said. To the contrary, Mr. Hironaka added, everything suggested he was preparing to defend himself in court.

Mr. Ghosn’s bail conditions barred him from using a phone, and he spent most of his days in his lawyer’s office, the only place he was allowed to use the internet. For months, he had been commuting from his home in an elegant neighborhood in central Tokyo to meet with his lawyers and prepare for his trial.

All the while, a court-ordered camera monitored his doorway, recording his comings and goings. Whenever he went out, he suspected that authorities and private investigators from Nissan followed him around the city, according to people familiar with the matter.

Mr. Ghosn spoke with his wife, Carole, for about an hour on Dec. 24, Mr. Hironaka said. Prosecutors had asked a judge to forbid the couple from contacting each other over concerns that they might conspire to tamper with evidence or witnesses. The court had kept the couple from communicating for months, Mr. Hironaka said, and they had spoken only twice since Mr. Ghosn was rearrested in April.

Nevertheless, Mr. Ghosn stayed in touch with his family. His daughter Maya visited him in Tokyo, according to people familiar with his movements. And his outings with his children would occasionally be reported by the Japanese press or pop up on social media, where commentators speculated about his welfare.

Mr. Hironaka said that the legal team spent Christmas Day in court discussing preparations for Mr. Ghosn’s trial, which was expected to take place sometime next year.

The team had planned to regroup on Jan. 7 for the first strategy session of the new year.

All three of Mr. Ghosn’s passports were in his lawyers’ possession, Mr. Hironaka said. It was one of the conditions of his bail, which his attorneys had only won after repeated, hard-fought attempts to convince the court that their client, with all of his wealth and power, was not a flight risk.

“He left his things here,” Mr. Hironaka told reporters. “I want to ask him, ‘How could you do this to us?’”

“It would have been difficult for him to do this without the assistance of some large organization,” Mr. Hironaka said.

Mr. Ghosn’s defense team had repeatedly spoken out about what they described as a “hostage justice” system, complaining that Japanese courts and prosecutors had put their client at an almost impossible disadvantage as he sought to defend himself.

“I wanted to prove he was innocent,” Mr. Hironaka said on Tuesday. “But when I saw his statement in the press, I thought, ‘He doesn’t trust Japan’s courts.’”

The Japanese media rushed for clues as well, but they were hampered by skeleton staffs and closed government offices ahead of the New Year’s Day holiday. NHK reported that border control officials in Japan and Lebanon had no record of Mr. Ghosn’s leaving the country, speculating that he may have used a fake passport and an assumed name.

But in Lebanon, the minister for presidential affairs, Salim Jreissati, said late Tuesday that Mr. Ghosn “entered the country legally using his French passport and Lebanese ID.”

He said the Lebanese government wasn’t notified in advance of his arrival, adding, “We were all surprised.”

“The government has nothing to do with his decision to come,” he said. “We don’t know the circumstances of his arrival.”

In France, a deputy minister for economy and finance, Agnès Pannier-Runacher, said she learned about Mr. Ghosn’s flight from news reports. “We have to understand what happened,” she said on France Inter radio.

Mr. Ghosn isn’t above the law, she said, and “if a foreign citizen fled the French justice system, we would be very angry.” But she noted that, as a French citizen, he could use the country’s consular services.

A group of children may have been among the last people to see him before he left Japan, according to a report in The Asahi Shimbun, which described the possible sighting on the morning of Dec. 27 in much the way one would an appearance by Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster.

“His eyebrows stand out,” the 12-year-old girl told a reporter combing the streets near Mr. Ghosn’s home for clues about his disappearance.

“Everyone was saying to each other, ‘Isn’t that Ghosn?”

Makiko Inoue and Eimi Yamamitsu contributed reporting from Tokyo, Elian Peltier from London, and Hwaida Saad from Beirut.

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