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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 399)

Trump Says U.S. and China Will Sign Trade Deal in January

Westlake Legal Group 31DC-TRADE--1-facebookJumbo Trump Says U.S. and China Will Sign Trade Deal in January United States Politics and Government Presidential Election of 2020 International Trade and World Market Customs (Tariff) China Agriculture and Farming

WASHINGTON — President Trump said Tuesday that the United States and China would sign a “very large and comprehensive” trade deal at the White House on Jan. 15, though exact details of the agreement have not yet been released.

The signing would cement the first phase of an agreement that took nearly two years to negotiate and will formalize a trade truce between the world’s two largest economies. The president, who announced the date of the ceremony on Twitter, said that “high level representatives of China” would attend the signing ceremony and that he planned to travel to China “at a later date” to begin talks on the second phase of the agreement.

Mr. Trump did not say whether Xi Jinping, the Chinese leader, would be in attendance or name any representatives from China who might attend the ceremony.

Text of the agreement, reached in mid-December, has not been made public and its exact contents have yet to be fully vetted by experts or the many businesses that have suffered from the protracted trade fight with China. The deal would reduce only a small portion of the tariffs Mr. Trump imposed on $360 billion worth of Chinese goods, leaving many levies in place.

Officials from both countries have said that the agreement includes commitments from China to increase purchases of American farm and energy products, places limits on Beijing’s ability to weaken its currency and provides enhanced protections to American companies doing business in China. The agreement also reduces tariffs on about $120 billion worth of goods, and forestalled new tariffs that were scheduled for Dec. 15.

In announcing the agreement, the United States said that China’s farm purchases were expected to grow to at least $40 billion annually over a period of two years and that total exports of food, energy, manufactured goods and services to China would increase by a total of $200 billion. Chinese officials, however, have remained vague when describing what exactly they agreed to buy and on what timeline.

Specific details on China’s purchase commitments could be left out of the text of the agreement that is made public because officials have been concerned that commodities markets could be distorted if such information is released. The deal is expected to have some flexibility so that China can tailor its purchases to market demand.

The agreement was expected to be signed during the first week of January and the fact the timing of the ceremony had not been announced raise some fears that additional obstacles had emerged. However, Peter Navarro, the White House trade adviser, said on Fox Business Network on Monday that the two sides were in the process of translating the agreement and that a signing was imminent.

The trade dispute between the United States and China rattled the world economy during the last 19 months as both countries raised tariffs and other trade barriers while negotiations sputtered and stalled. By breaking the agreement into pieces, China was able to avoid additional tariffs and Mr. Trump secured a policy win heading into his re-election campaign.

Yet the first phase of the agreement does not address many of the most significant concerns that the United States has with China’s economic practices, particularly its industrial policy and subsidies of state-owned enterprises. Mr. Trump has said those issues will be addressed in future talks and has said the remaining tariffs will continue to exert pressure on China to accede to America’s demands.

Mr. Trump announced the signing just before markets opened on Tuesday. Stocks in the United States were mixed in early trading.

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Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020

Westlake Legal Group npr-finalmikedriver-final4_custom-34cf5f4d1807130251b4aa9c48b48f3a79c2e24a-s1100-c15 Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020

We all struggle with healthy habits — including experts. They just have science-tested tips to get them back on track. Michael Driver for NPR hide caption

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Michael Driver for NPR

As a college student, Katy Milkman played tennis and loved going to the gym. But when she started graduate school, her exercise routine started to flunk.

“At the end of a long day of classes, I was exhausted,” Milkman says. “Frankly, the last thing I wanted to do was drag myself to the gym. What I really wanted to do was watch TV or read Harry Potter.”

What got her back to regular workouts was something she calls “temptation bundling.” She resolved to indulge in her love of wizard-lit only while at the gym, by listening to audiobooks with earbuds.

Milkman, now a professor at the Wharton School of Business who specializes in human decision-making, says that when it comes to making a behavioral change, the trick is to pair the thing you dread with something you love.

Looking for more tips like these to make your New Year’s resolution stick? Whatever your goals, we have insights that can make it a little easier for you to achieve them. Here are six “life recipes” for good mental health from research that NPR reporters covered this year:

Westlake Legal Group caretaker-self-care_wide-4adce35da6f48000f25dceb19d7b18cef4715092-s1100-c15 Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020
Cornelia Li for NPR
Westlake Legal Group  Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020

Cornelia Li for NPR

Cultivate joy

Feeling stressed? Just eight techniques — a “buffet of life skills” — can make a significant improvement in well-being, say scientists who taught the techniques to caregivers of people with dementia. After learning techniques such as how to keep a gratitude journal, for example, and how to quickly reframe negative experiences in a positive light — these family caregivers reported impressive decreases in both stress and anxiety.

Prepare to fail. It’s part of succeeding

If you’re trying to get a new routine to stick — whether it’s getting more exercise, eating less sugar or learning to play the ukulele — scholars who study human behavior say the key is to accept failure as a part of the process. Expect that at some point you will mess up. And when that happens, don’t give in to the “what-the-heck” effect — the feeling that since you’ve missed one session, your whole plan is a bust. Just get back to taking steps toward your goal, and don’t beat yourself up.

Help an anxious partner the right way

You can support a partner who has an anxiety disorder without sinking yourself, say therapists: First, don’t try to fix things immediately. Instead, acknowledge your loved one’s perspective. “You can move to logic, but not before the person feels like they’re not being judged and … misunderstood,” says licensed psychologist Carolyn Daitch. Learning how to gently maintain boundaries is important, too.

Westlake Legal Group anger_animation Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020

Feeling extra angry? Get checked out for depression

Many patients — and doctors — associate depression with feelings of hopelessness, sadness and lack of motivation. But a growing number of psychiatrists say depression is also behind some hypercritical tendencies and outbursts of anger. The good news: This sort of irritability is responsive to counseling and medication.

Redefine exercise: Move a little bit, often

Maria Godoy, one of NPR’s editors, learned to love exercise when she realized every little bit counts. “I reframed what I thought of as exercise,” she says. Vacuuming with gusto, taking the stairs — these little bursts of movement throughout the day add up, like pennies in a piggy bank.

Take a minute today to consider your life’s purpose

Having a purpose in life seems to have a more powerful impact on decreasing a person’s risk of premature death than exercising regularly, quitting smoking or curbing your alcohol intake, research suggests. Maybe you find greatest meaning in guarding the environment, raising good children, making music or touching lives through your volunteer work. It doesn’t seem to matter what your life’s purpose is, a growing body of research suggests. What matters is that you feel you have one.

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Georgia Tech football recruit, 17, dies after being struck by train in Florida

Westlake Legal Group football-laces-istock Georgia Tech football recruit, 17, dies after being struck by train in Florida Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fox news fnc/sports fnc e897ba2c-fc1e-570b-ab31-8c9f0d5006d9 article

A Georgia Tech college football recruit was killed Monday after he was hit by a freight train in Florida, police said.

Bryce Gowdy, 17, was identified as the victim in the incident. The Broward County Sheriff’s office said in a statement that he was struck by the train in Deerfield Beach and died at a hospital. Police said an investigation was underway over the events surrounding the teen’s death and that the cause and manner of death would be determined by the medical examiner’s office.

PERINE LEADS NO. 6 GATORS PAST VIRGINIA 36-28 IN ORANGE BOWL

Gowdy was a standout wide receiver for Deerfield Beach High School and was committed to playing at Georgia Tech next season.

“He was one of the leaders of the team,” Dave Brousseau, a Deerfield Beach alumnus who is active with the high school’s football program, told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. “He was one of the guys who, when they were getting ready pre-game, he was always getting them fired up.”

URBAN MEYER’S DAUGHTERS COME FOR ESPN ANCHOR OVER CRACK ABOUT THEIR FATHER

Yellow Jackets football coach Geoff Collins released a statement on Gowdy’s death.

“Our entire Georgia Tech football family is devastated by the news of Bryce’s passing,” Collins said.

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“Bryce was an outstanding young man with a very bright future. He was a great friend to many, including many of our current and incoming team members. On behalf of our coaches, players, staff and families, we offer our deepest condolences to Bryce’s mother, Shibbon, and his brothers, Brisai and Brayden, as well as the rest of his family members, his teammates and coaches at Deerfield Beach High School, and his many friends. Bryce and his family will always be a part of the Georgia Tech football family.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group football-laces-istock Georgia Tech football recruit, 17, dies after being struck by train in Florida Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fox news fnc/sports fnc e897ba2c-fc1e-570b-ab31-8c9f0d5006d9 article   Westlake Legal Group football-laces-istock Georgia Tech football recruit, 17, dies after being struck by train in Florida Ryan Gaydos fox-news/us/us-regions/southeast/florida fox-news/sports/ncaa-fb fox-news/sports/ncaa fox news fnc/sports fnc e897ba2c-fc1e-570b-ab31-8c9f0d5006d9 article

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Carlos Ghosn, Fugitive but a Favorite Son, Returns to Beirut

Westlake Legal Group 31lebanon-ghosn1-facebookJumbo Carlos Ghosn, Fugitive but a Favorite Son, Returns to Beirut Nissan Motor Co Lebanon Japan Ghosn, Carlos Fugitives Beirut (Lebanon)

BEIRUT, Lebanon — For weeks last winter, Carlos Ghosn’s face seemed inescapable in the Lebanese capital, appearing without warning on digital billboards normally devoted to ads for cellphone plans and fancy cars. “We are all Carlos Ghosn,” the text announced, declaring support for the man charged in Japan as a corporate titan gone bad.

Now the actual Carlos Ghosn has materialized in Beirut — a flesh-and-blood fugitive somehow come home.

Mr. Ghosn, the former chairman of Nissan, has abruptly announced that he is in Beirut, where he grew up, after escaping Tokyo, where he was set to stand trial next year on charges of financial wrongdoing.

Almost nothing about how he got here is clear: How did he evade the constant surveillance of the Japanese authorities? How did he manage to clear passport controls in at least two countries without any of his three passports (Brazilian, French, Lebanese)? Who helped him? And was he smuggled out in a box, as some unconfirmed reports say?

“It’s a real adventure,” said Ricardo Karam, a Lebanese television host who has interviewed Mr. Ghosn on his show, and who was briefly rumored on Tuesday morning — falsely, Mr. Karam said — to be providing the escapee with a place to stay. “It’s like a movie.”

Box or no box, in Lebanon Mr. Ghosn has probably picked a safe hide-out. The country is staggering through a financial and political crisis, and its new government, which does not yet officially exist, is contending with persistent antigovernment protests and a slow-motion economic collapse. Even if things were less of a shambles, Lebanon does not have an extradition treaty with Japan: checkmate.

Besides, Beirut residents seem pleased to have him. Some of them, at least.

“I’m surprised and happy. All the family is in solidarity with Carlos,” said Sandra Nader, who said she was a relative of Mr. Ghosn.

“We’re proud of his achievements and what he’s done abroad,” said Mireille Firzli, who was doing her New Year’s Eve grocery shopping Tuesday afternoon. “It’s not fair to put him in jail.”

Mr. Ghosn was born to a Lebanese family in Brazil, home to a large Lebanese diaspora community, and educated in Beirut and France, home to another. His father moved the family from Rio de Janeiro to Beirut when Mr. Ghosn was 6.

Ever since, Mr. Ghosn has lived the Lebanese dream. If the Lebanese are not, as the billboards had it, “all Carlos Ghosn,” there were many who may have wanted to be.

Generations of Lebanese have left the country, fleeing civil war, instability and an economy that offers little to young people, to make their fortunes abroad. Mr. Ghosn was a paragon of that path: prestigious schools in Paris, promotions at Michelin in France and then the United States, the chairmanship of a multicontinent auto empire including Nissan, Mitsubishi and Renault. There were homes in Tokyo, in the 16th arrondissement of Paris and in Rio, plus a private jet to carry him there.

But throughout his global rise, Mr. Ghosn remained proudly Lebanese, and the Lebanese proud of him. His first and second wives are both Lebanese. He graduated from the middle-class neighborhood of his childhood to Achrafieh, Beirut’s grandest community, where he kept an immaculate pink villa — which, an internal Nissan investigation found, a company subsidiary had bought for $8.75 million and renovated for a further $6 million, one of several properties around the world the subsidiary had paid for Mr. Ghosn to use.

In February, Mr. Karam, the Lebanese television host, aired a 47-minute special on Mr. Ghosn, lionizing his career and lamenting his fall.

“The legend of the car world is currently in cold, solitary prison,” Mr. Karam said at the end, quoting the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

“Carlos Ghosn,” Mr. Karam continued, “you’re not alone.”

On Tuesday, a private security guard stood outside the pink mansion, but Mr. Ghosn was not to be seen. He had issued a statement through a spokeswoman announcing that he would “no longer be held hostage by a rigged Japanese justice system.”

He added: “I have not fled justice — I have escaped injustice and political persecution.”

In fleeing Japan for Lebanon, Mr. Ghosn has traded a country where the rigidity of the justice system has come under scrutiny for one where the judiciary is notoriously politicized and the rule of law notoriously fickle. But the same atmosphere of impunity that may help him is under attack from some of the very people who once celebrated him as a folk hero.

The current antigovernment protests, which began in mid-October and at one point drew as much as a quarter of Lebanon’s population of 4 million into the streets, have taken aim at political elites, rich bankers and businessmen and the corruption that is said to enrich them all.

Chanting, “Give back the stolen money,” the protesters have demanded a new political system, new leaders, an overhauled banking system and an independent judiciary that they hope will bring corrupt politicians and businessmen to justice.

At such a time, Mr. Ghosn’s great escape, with its above-the-law audacity, may sit strangely with the national mood.

Mohamed Abdullah, a fisherman in Beirut, had more pressing concerns than the fate of a man unimaginably richer than he. For one thing, no one was buying fish.

“Who cares? With this bad economy, I could care less about Ghosn,” he said, upon hearing the news.

“As if this country needs more thieves,” he said. “This is just adding one more thief to the list.”

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Trump is openly calling for his trial to be as corrupt as possible

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Pictures: New Year’s Eve celebrations around the world

Westlake Legal Group 01_GettyImages-1196822606 Pictures: New Year's Eve celebrations around the world fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc fd243d26-ab4e-5bc7-9339-e7a2eb93be55 article

https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2019/12/918/516/01_GettyImages-1196822606.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

Fireworks explode over the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Sydney, Australia, Jan. 1, 2020. 

James Gourley/Getty Images

https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2019/12/918/516/01_GettyImages-1196822606.jpg?ve=1&tl=1

Westlake Legal Group 01_GettyImages-1196822606 Pictures: New Year's Eve celebrations around the world fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc fd243d26-ab4e-5bc7-9339-e7a2eb93be55 article   Westlake Legal Group 01_GettyImages-1196822606 Pictures: New Year's Eve celebrations around the world fox-news/world fox news fnc/world fnc fd243d26-ab4e-5bc7-9339-e7a2eb93be55 article

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Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take ‘offensive measures’ to protect country’s security

Kim Jong Un has told party leaders in a long speech that North Korea needs to take “positive and offensive measures” to protect the country’s security, according to reports.

The North Korean dictator issued the call during a seven-hour speech at a weekend gathering in Pyongyang of Workers’ Party officials that the BBC described as unusual for this time of year.

Reuters quoted state media KCNA as reporting Monday that Kim suggested action in the areas of foreign affairs, the munitions industry and armed forces, stressing the need to take “positive and offensive measures for fully ensuring the sovereignty and security of the country.”

State TV showed hundreds in attendance for the meeting.

Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-3 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649

People watch a TV screen showing a file image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump, left, during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019. The sign reads: “North Korea and the United States can’t restore confidence.” (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

JAPAN POLICE FIND HUMAN REMAINS IN ‘GHOST BOAT’ SUSPECTED FROM NORTH KOREA

“By ‘positive and offensive measures,’ they might mean highly provocative action against the United States and also South Korea,” said Yang Moo-jin, a professor at the University of North Korean studies in Seoul, according to Reuters.

Kim’s speech comes amid worries North Korea could scuttle talks with the U.S. on denuclearization and restart long-range missle tests.

Those talks have stalled over Kim’s demand for sanctions relief in exchange for disarmament.

It is expected Kim will use his annual New Year’s address to announce major changes to his economic and security policies.

Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-2 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649

In this Monday, Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un speaks during a Workers’ Party meeting in Pyongyang, North Korea. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

US ON HIGH ALERT FOR POSSIBLE ‘CHRISTMAS GIFT’ MISSILE FROM NORTH KOREA

KCNA did not report any decisions made at the party meeting or mention any specific comment by Kim toward the United States.

But it said Kim noted that the Workers’ Party is determined to enter “another arduous and protracted struggle,” possibly referring to efforts to overcome U.S.-led sanctions and pressure, before concluding his speech with calls for “dynamically opening the road” toward building a powerful socialist nation.

KCNA said the party is working to draft a resolution based on the agenda laid out by Kim and plans to discuss an unspecified “important document.”

In his New Year’s speech to begin 2019, Kim said his country would pursue an unspecified “new path” if the administration of President Trump persists with sanctions and pressure on North Korea.

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Negotiations faltered following the collapse of his second summit with Trump in February, where the Americans rejected North Korean demands for broad sanctions relief in exchange for the dismantling of an aging nuclear facility in Yongbyon, which would only represent a partial surrender of its nuclear capabilities.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-3 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649   Westlake Legal Group NK-Today-AP-3 Kim Jong Un says North Korea needs to take 'offensive measures' to protect country's security Robert Gearty fox-news/world/conflicts/north-korea fox-news/person/kim-jong-un fox news fnc/world fnc article 62c1395e-1c40-5412-a573-cdbfa500b649

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Turkey rounds up at least 124 suspected of links to ISIS ahead of New Year’s Eve celebrations

Westlake Legal Group istanbul-iStock Turkey rounds up at least 124 suspected of links to ISIS ahead of New Year's Eve celebrations Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc cec9e84e-1693-541d-a02f-8b6e5b71a6bf article

Over 100 people suspected of having links to the Islamic State terror group were rounded up in raids across Turkey on Monday, in an apparent attempt to prevent any attacks on New Year’s Eve.

Of the 124 people who were detained, 33 were foreign nationals arrested in the capital Ankara in a joint operation conducted by anti-terrorism police and the national intelligence agency, the state-run news agency Anadolu reported.

In the country’s biggest city of Istanbul, 24 suspects were detained by officials, including four foreign nationals.
 
US LAUNCHES DRONE STRIKES IN SOMALIA AFTER DEADLY CAR BOMBING

Dawn raids were also conducted in the cities of Adana, Kayseri, Samsun and Bursa, while an operation in Batman led to the seizures of weapons and ammunition, along with 22 people taken into custody, according to Anadolu.

Authorities have conducted raids of suspected terrorists in the month of December over the past couple of years, following the 2017 attack at an upscale nightclub in the early hours of New Year’s Day, according to Sky News.

The attack, which involved an assailant dressed in a Santa Claus costume, left 39 dead and 70 wounded, most of them foreigners. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack, saying at the time it targeted the place where “Christians were celebrating their pagan feast.”

Turkey was hit by a wave of attacks in 2015 and 2016 blamed on ISIS and Kurdish militants that killed over 300 people.

US EMBASSY COMPOUND IN BAGHDAD UNDER SIEGE AS CROWDS PROTESTING AIRSTRIKES BREAK THROUGH GATE

Meanwhile, Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said Sunday that in 2019 Turkey deported a total of 778 Islamic State members or other jihadists.

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Turkey has stepped up its efforts to expel foreign fighters back to their countries of origin in recent months, accusing many European countries of not taking responsibility for their nationals and saying Turkey was “not a hotel” for foreign fighters.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Westlake Legal Group istanbul-iStock Turkey rounds up at least 124 suspected of links to ISIS ahead of New Year's Eve celebrations Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc cec9e84e-1693-541d-a02f-8b6e5b71a6bf article   Westlake Legal Group istanbul-iStock Turkey rounds up at least 124 suspected of links to ISIS ahead of New Year's Eve celebrations Travis Fedschun fox-news/world/world-regions/turkey fox-news/world/terrorism/isis fox-news/world/terrorism fox news fnc/world fnc cec9e84e-1693-541d-a02f-8b6e5b71a6bf article

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The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Westlake Legal Group protestscompositeheader_wide-e8da1e8bfd30b622d6ab22a914f5640186d918eb-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Clockwise from top left: Venezuela in 2019; Greece in 2015; Bahrain in 2011; Pakistan in 2015; Britain in 2019; Lebanon in 2019. Protests have been emblematic of the entire past decade. Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images; Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP via Getty Images; Suhaib Salem/Reuters; Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images; Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images; A Majeed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images; Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP via Getty Images; Suhaib Salem/Reuters; Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images; Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images; A Majeed/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Clockwise from top left: Venezuela in 2019; Greece in 2015; Bahrain in 2011; Pakistan in 2015; Britain in 2019; Lebanon in 2019. Protests have been emblematic of the entire past decade.

Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images; Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP via Getty Images; Suhaib Salem/Reuters; Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images; Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images; A Majeed/AFP via Getty Images

2019 has become known as a year of protest. But this year does not exist in isolation: Protests have been emblematic of the entire past decade.

The 2010s began with the Arab Spring and Occupy protests, and are ending with a swell of anti-government demonstrations in India, Iraq, Lebanon, Hong Kong, Latin America, parts of Europe and beyond. The middle years likewise were marked by major protests on multiple continents, from Iran to Ukraine, South Korea, Zimbabwe and Greece.

All decade long, people around the world — young, middle-aged and old, in places wealthy and not — poured into the streets, over and over again, insisting on economic and social equality, demanding better governance and action on a range of ills including corruption, racism, sexual abuse and climate change.

The impact and legacy of these protests will become clear in the years to come. But all made their mark on a turbulent decade, throwing into relief the issues people cared about most. Starting in 2019 and moving back, here are some glimpses from around the world, outside the United States.

Venezuela

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1126895249_slide-b54430910388d4b1e68fc801fb40787ebbb4ac02-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó take part in a march in Caracas in February 2019. Amid Venezuela’s isolation and catastrophic economic conditions, Guaidó emerged as a key challenger to Nicolás Maduro’s rule, but has had difficulty sustaining his initial mass momentum in support. Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó take part in a march in Caracas in February 2019. Amid Venezuela’s isolation and catastrophic economic conditions, Guaidó emerged as a key challenger to Nicolás Maduro’s rule, but has had difficulty sustaining his initial mass momentum in support.

Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia, Peru, Chile, Bolivia and Ecuador

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite4_custom-72c2115eafdc20fee7a0d6871d4b0fa96ff366fd-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Clockwise from top left, scenes from protests roiling Latin America at the end of 2019: Indigenous people and students protest against Colombia’s government. A protester representing victims of forced sterilization marches in Lima, Peru. A man clutches a rock in Santiago, Chile, during a protest demanding an end to inequality. Supporters of Bolivia’s ousted President Evo Morales gather in Quito. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images; Martin Mejia/AP; Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images; Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images; Martin Mejia/AP; Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images; Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Clockwise from top left, scenes from protests roiling Latin America at the end of 2019: Indigenous people and students protest against Colombia’s government. A protester representing victims of forced sterilization marches in Lima, Peru. A man clutches a rock in Santiago, Chile, during a protest demanding an end to inequality. Supporters of Bolivia’s ousted President Evo Morales gather in Quito.

Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images; Martin Mejia/AP; Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP via Getty Images; Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Nicaragua

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1159284549_slide-2944cc257736f454977597c0985330125fec1aa4-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

With heart-shaped graffiti spray-painted by activists on a shield, Nicaraguan riot police stand by in August 2019 as anti-government protesters in Managua call for the reinstatement of health workers who lost their jobs for assisting protesters during a deadly 2018 uprising against President Daniel Ortega. Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

With heart-shaped graffiti spray-painted by activists on a shield, Nicaraguan riot police stand by in August 2019 as anti-government protesters in Managua call for the reinstatement of health workers who lost their jobs for assisting protesters during a deadly 2018 uprising against President Daniel Ortega.

Inti Ocon/AFP via Getty Images

India

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1189632449_slide-e6c22707164103ceba20f38f1f4db08f91506c00-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Police detain a demonstrator in New Delhi in December 2019. Countrywide protests continued throughout India in December as public anger grew over new changes to citizenship laws. Amal KS/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Amal KS/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Police detain a demonstrator in New Delhi in December 2019. Countrywide protests continued throughout India in December as public anger grew over new changes to citizenship laws.

Amal KS/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Lebanon

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1186498624_slide-89f2c0780492edc4d35ae3a2cf24c96cd51dfd6c-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Lebanese anti-government protesters scuffle with riot police in Beirut in December 2019. The protests, which began in October, brought the country to a standstill amid a downward economic slide. Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Lebanese anti-government protesters scuffle with riot police in Beirut in December 2019. The protests, which began in October, brought the country to a standstill amid a downward economic slide.

Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images

The United Kingdom

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite5_custom-5808506eea7b037b1833482ec2787a817e71d2db-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: European Union and British flags are flown in pro- and anti-Brexit protests outside Britain’s Parliament in October 2019. Right: Demonstrators hold flags and set off red flares during anti-Brexit and anti-austerity protests, as Britain’s Conservative Party conference gets underway in Manchester in 2017. Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images; Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: European Union and British flags are flown in pro- and anti-Brexit protests outside Britain’s Parliament in October 2019. Right: Demonstrators hold flags and set off red flares during anti-Brexit and anti-austerity protests, as Britain’s Conservative Party conference gets underway in Manchester in 2017.

Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images; Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Iraq

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1181405761_slide-c6b2e871b16118d4fe31c3e21be368ac6e6b0bce-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Iraqi protesters join hands after taking part in prayers during anti-government demonstrations in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, in November 2019. The anti-government protests began in October, leading to the prime minister’s resignation. Haidar Hamdani/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Hamdani/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Iraqi protesters join hands after taking part in prayers during anti-government demonstrations in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, in November 2019. The anti-government protests began in October, leading to the prime minister’s resignation.

Haidar Hamdani/AFP via Getty Images

Italy

Westlake Legal Group ap_19344647898262--1-_slide-41dbca3a2a8971f9cf3a983413ccec27002b4fce-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Liliana Segre (center), an 89-year-old Holocaust survivor and Italian senator for life, attends an anti-racism demonstration in Milan, joined by 600 Italian mayors, in December 2019. Amid rising nationalistic and anti-immigrant sentiment in Italy, Segre was targeted with abuse and threats after calling for an investigation into hate speech, racism and anti-Semitism. Luca Bruno/AP hide caption

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Luca Bruno/AP

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Liliana Segre (center), an 89-year-old Holocaust survivor and Italian senator for life, attends an anti-racism demonstration in Milan, joined by 600 Italian mayors, in December 2019. Amid rising nationalistic and anti-immigrant sentiment in Italy, Segre was targeted with abuse and threats after calling for an investigation into hate speech, racism and anti-Semitism.

Luca Bruno/AP

Hong Kong

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite1_custom-325d45b25d43ab975eb783e80905d25f22518fdb-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Top: Police officers detain an anti-government protester in Hong Kong in December 2019. Left: Police fire tear gas toward protesters, who are using umbrellas for protection near Hong Kong government headquarters in September 2014. Right: Hong Kong police descend a stairwell as pro-democracy demonstrators gather for a rally in September 2014. Danish Siddiqui/Reuters; Xaume Olleros/AFP via Getty Images; Dale de la Rey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Danish Siddiqui/Reuters; Xaume Olleros/AFP via Getty Images; Dale de la Rey/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Top: Police officers detain an anti-government protester in Hong Kong in December 2019. Left: Police fire tear gas toward protesters, who are using umbrellas for protection near Hong Kong government headquarters in September 2014. Right: Hong Kong police descend a stairwell as pro-democracy demonstrators gather for a rally in September 2014.

Danish Siddiqui/Reuters; Xaume Olleros/AFP via Getty Images; Dale de la Rey/AFP via Getty Images

Indian-administered Kashmir

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite10_custom-608318a1aecb73797c6a214eb0280d50c8ad05cb-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: Girls protest after Friday prayers in Srinagar, Indian-administered Kashmir, in September 2019. The Indian government revoked Kashmir’s special status in August and shut down Internet access in much of the region. Right: At a hospital in Srinagar, doctors and paramedics wear bandages to protest the plight of Kashmiris shot in the eyes with pellet guns in 2016. Francis Mascarenhas/Reuters; Tauseef Mustafa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: Girls protest after Friday prayers in Srinagar, Indian-administered Kashmir, in September 2019. The Indian government revoked Kashmir’s special status in August and shut down Internet access in much of the region. Right: At a hospital in Srinagar, doctors and paramedics wear bandages to protest the plight of Kashmiris shot in the eyes with pellet guns in 2016.

Francis Mascarenhas/Reuters; Tauseef Mustafa/AFP via Getty Images

Sudan

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1136148212_slide-bfc0b4a8b74d2d92e8ce5ed8c050f2a0049ddc4c-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Standing on a white car and wearing a traditional white thobe, Sudanese student Alaa Salah led protest chants against longtime dictator President Omar al-Bashir in Khartoum in April 2019. A social media post showing a photo of Salah went viral, and she was dubbed Sudan’s “Lady Liberty.” Sudan’s military ousted Bashir that same month. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Standing on a white car and wearing a traditional white thobe, Sudanese student Alaa Salah led protest chants against longtime dictator President Omar al-Bashir in Khartoum in April 2019. A social media post showing a photo of Salah went viral, and she was dubbed Sudan’s “Lady Liberty.” Sudan’s military ousted Bashir that same month.

AFP via Getty Images

Zimbabwe

Westlake Legal Group rts283g71Zimbabwe_slide-4ac1bc3e9fd85798437ad61aa3ca72329a8817c3-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Supporters of Zimbabwe’s opposition Movement for Democratic Change march in Harare, November 2018, angered by a protracted economic crisis and Prime Minister Emmerson Mnangagwa’s election earlier that year. Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters hide caption

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Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Supporters of Zimbabwe’s opposition Movement for Democratic Change march in Harare, November 2018, angered by a protracted economic crisis and Prime Minister Emmerson Mnangagwa’s election earlier that year.

Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters

Afghanistan

Westlake Legal Group rtx69nu7_slide-d4309190e0623cf219e6d19735d75390cb8088fa-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Dozens of Afghan men rest after arriving in Kabul in June 2018. The group marched hundreds of miles to demand an end to decades of conflict, from Helmand province to Kabul, and abstained from food and water during daylight hours because it was the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. As war in Afghanistan ground on throughout the decade, grassroots demands grew louder for an end to the violence. Mohammad Ismail/Reuters hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Dozens of Afghan men rest after arriving in Kabul in June 2018. The group marched hundreds of miles to demand an end to decades of conflict, from Helmand province to Kabul, and abstained from food and water during daylight hours because it was the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. As war in Afghanistan ground on throughout the decade, grassroots demands grew louder for an end to the violence.

Mohammad Ismail/Reuters

South Korea

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite2_custom-069714c3943f63edd10752bad2da108806bb2bf8-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: Holding signs saying “My life is not your porn,” thousands of South Korean women protest against being filmed secretly in August 2018 in Seoul. Right: Schoolgirls wearing butterfly hairpins take part in a weekly protest outside Seoul’s Japanese Embassy in July 2015, demanding an apology and compensation for Japan’s abuse of Korean comfort women in World War II. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images; Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: Holding signs saying “My life is not your porn,” thousands of South Korean women protest against being filmed secretly in August 2018 in Seoul. Right: Schoolgirls wearing butterfly hairpins take part in a weekly protest outside Seoul’s Japanese Embassy in July 2015, demanding an apology and compensation for Japan’s abuse of Korean comfort women in World War II.

Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images; Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

Argentina

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-537944722_slide-bf9035f19cf36e9894c2ff55e6f169b5aca1976d-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Demonstrators wearing purple wigs representing the “Ni Una Menos” (Not One [Woman] Less) movement hold signs saying “Enough humiliation, we have rights, respect us” during a June 2016 protest against violence against women in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Eitan Abramovich/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Demonstrators wearing purple wigs representing the “Ni Una Menos” (Not One [Woman] Less) movement hold signs saying “Enough humiliation, we have rights, respect us” during a June 2016 protest against violence against women in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Eitan Abramovich/AFP via Getty Images

Greece

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-498564826_slide-1cad9257d01ebde7118ef033540c7f79a358e0cd-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Their lips sewn shut in protest against limits on their movement, asylum-seekers from Iran wait to cross from Greece into Macedonia at the border near Idomeni, Greece, in November 2015. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Their lips sewn shut in protest against limits on their movement, asylum-seekers from Iran wait to cross from Greece into Macedonia at the border near Idomeni, Greece, in November 2015.

Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-496810528_slide-68998cf3bc85444cd9e54f1f99cf82095a82ed47-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

During a 24-hour general strike in Athens in 2015, thousands demonstrated against austerity and government cuts, with sporadic outbreaks of violence. The leftist government of Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tspiras was elected on an anti-austerity ticket that year. Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

During a 24-hour general strike in Athens in 2015, thousands demonstrated against austerity and government cuts, with sporadic outbreaks of violence. The leftist government of Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tspiras was elected on an anti-austerity ticket that year.

Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP via Getty Images

Australia, Sweden, France

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite3_custom-a09d7417433c19b0508f9eca66bf865f2fe17e81-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Top: Red Rebel performers from the Extinction Rebellion movement rally against climate change in October 2019 in Sydney, Australia. Bottom left: In November 2015, a man walks amid hundreds of shoes in Paris, left to protest climate inaction after marches were banned following terrorist attacks. Bottom right: Greta Thunberg leads one of her first climate strikes outside Sweden’s parliament in 2018. Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images; Michael Campanella/Getty Images; Laurent Cipriani/AP hide caption

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Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images; Michael Campanella/Getty Images; Laurent Cipriani/AP

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Top: Red Rebel performers from the Extinction Rebellion movement rally against climate change in October 2019 in Sydney, Australia. Bottom left: In November 2015, a man walks amid hundreds of shoes in Paris, left to protest climate inaction after marches were banned following terrorist attacks. Bottom right: Greta Thunberg leads one of her first climate strikes outside Sweden’s parliament in 2018.

Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images; Michael Campanella/Getty Images; Laurent Cipriani/AP

Pakistan

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-462903940_slide-98cb3049ef7a87b8fe10f01c7cb5b8978404f3ef-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Relatives of more than 100 Pakistani schoolchildren killed in a December 2014 Taliban attack in Peshawar weep during a protest over delays in an investigation of the massacre in February 2015. A Majeed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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A Majeed/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Relatives of more than 100 Pakistani schoolchildren killed in a December 2014 Taliban attack in Peshawar weep during a protest over delays in an investigation of the massacre in February 2015.

A Majeed/AFP via Getty Images

Russia

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-491694737_slide-0e5d51fa91b4ad67ab42ba2f156f41ab47241c2f-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Supporters of LGBT rights in St. Petersburg, Russia, release balloons as part of a demonstration to mark World Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia in May 2014. Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Supporters of LGBT rights in St. Petersburg, Russia, release balloons as part of a demonstration to mark World Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia in May 2014.

Olga Maltseva/AFP via Getty Images

Ukraine

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-470193947_slide-56d16d12f9220b053a9426f6c461eae70d2c0938-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Amid fires set around Independence Square, known as the Maidan, in Kyiv, Ukraine, protesters demonstrate against the government of then-President Viktor Yanukovych in February 2014. Protesters called for Yanukovych’s ouster over allegations of corruption and abandoning a trade agreement with the European Union. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Amid fires set around Independence Square, known as the Maidan, in Kyiv, Ukraine, protesters demonstrate against the government of then-President Viktor Yanukovych in February 2014. Protesters called for Yanukovych’s ouster over allegations of corruption and abandoning a trade agreement with the European Union.

Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Iran

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite9_custom-a06a2fc5dac9d36084cb498980d19961d1fc0cf0-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: Iranian students form a human chain during a protest to defend their country’s nuclear program outside the Fordo nuclear facility in Qom, November 2013. Right: An Iranian woman raises her fist amid teargas at the University of Tehran during a protest driven by anger over economic problems in December 2017. Chavosh Homavandi/AFP via Getty Images; AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chavosh Homavandi/AFP via Getty Images; AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Left: Iranian students form a human chain during a protest to defend their country’s nuclear program outside the Fordo nuclear facility in Qom, November 2013. Right: An Iranian woman raises her fist amid teargas at the University of Tehran during a protest driven by anger over economic problems in December 2017.

Chavosh Homavandi/AFP via Getty Images; AFP via Getty Images

Egypt, Bahrain, Libya

Westlake Legal Group protestscomposite8_custom-eea4667d2974b2b96a17f514e919a3fadc534f9d-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Arab Spring protests began in 2010 in Tunisia and spread throughout the region. Top: Egyptians in Cairo’s Tahrir Square celebrate the resignation of longtime President Hosni Mubarak in February 2011. Bottom left: A Libyan protester at Martyrs’ Square in Tripoli in October 2011. Bottom right: Protesters wave flags and call for the fall of Bahrain’s government in Maqsha, Bahrain, in November 2011. Tara Todras-Whitehill/AP; Hasan Jamali/AP; Suhaib Salem/Reuters hide caption

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Tara Todras-Whitehill/AP; Hasan Jamali/AP; Suhaib Salem/Reuters

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

Arab Spring protests began in 2010 in Tunisia and spread throughout the region. Top: Egyptians in Cairo’s Tahrir Square celebrate the resignation of longtime President Hosni Mubarak in February 2011. Bottom left: A Libyan protester at Martyrs’ Square in Tripoli in October 2011. Bottom right: Protesters wave flags and call for the fall of Bahrain’s government in Maqsha, Bahrain, in November 2011.

Tara Todras-Whitehill/AP; Hasan Jamali/AP; Suhaib Salem/Reuters

Italy

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-129265216_slide-0b02c5415f6f596dcf995d0b59f495ecd7e18692-s1100-c15 The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

A protester waves a red flag in front of anti-riot police in Rome in October 2011. Tens of thousands marched as part of a global day of protests inspired by Occupy Wall Street. Alberto Pizzoli/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Pizzoli/AFP via Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  The 2010s: A Decade Of Protests Around The World

A protester waves a red flag in front of anti-riot police in Rome in October 2011. Tens of thousands marched as part of a global day of protests inspired by Occupy Wall Street.

Alberto Pizzoli/AFP via Getty Images

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Protesters Attack U.S. Embassy in Iraq, Chanting ‘Death to America’

Westlake Legal Group 31Iraq2-promo-facebookJumbo-v2 Protesters Attack U.S. Embassy in Iraq, Chanting ‘Death to America’ United States Iraq Iran Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Baghdad (Iraq)

BAGHDAD — Protesters broke into the heavily guarded compound of the United States Embassy in Baghdad on Tuesday and lit fires inside to express their anger over American airstrikes that killed 24 members of an Iranian-backed militia over the weekend.

The men did not enter the main embassy buildings and later withdrew from the compound, joining thousands of protesters and militia fighters outside who chanted “Death to America,” threw rocks, covered the walls with graffiti and demanded that the United States withdraw its forces from Iraq.

The situation remained combustible, with protesters vowing to camp outside the compound indefinitely. Their ability to storm the most heavily guarded zone in Baghdad suggested that they had received at least tacit permission from Iraqi security officials sympathetic to their demands.

The American airstrikes on Sunday have resulted in the most serious political crisis in years for the United States in Iraq, stoking anti-Americanism and handing an advantage to Iran in its competition for influence in the country.

The airstrikes targeted an Iranian-backed Iraqi militia, Kataib Hezbollah, which the United States accused of carrying out a missile attack on an Iraqi military base that killed an American contractor and wounded American and Iraqi service members. A spokesman for the militia denied involvement in the attack.

But the size of the American response — five strikes in Iraq and Syria that killed two dozen fighters and wounded dozens of others — prompted condemnation from across the political spectrum and accusations that the United States had violated Iraqi sovereignty.

President Trump quickly blamed Iran for both the death of the American contractor and the storming of the embassy compound, which he described as “an attack,” adding that the Iraqi government shared responsibility for the compound’s safety.

“Iran killed an American contractor, wounding many. We strongly responded, and always will,” he wrote on Twitter. “Now Iran is orchestrating an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Iraq. They will be held fully responsible. In addition, we expect Iraq to use its forces to protect the Embassy, and so notified!”

Thousands of protesters marched into Baghdad’s heavily guarded Green Zone on Tuesday after prayer services for the militia fighters killed in the American strikes. While few of them were armed, many were members of Kataib Hezbollah and other fighting groups that are technically overseen by the Iraqi military. The militia is separate from the Hezbollah movement in Lebanon, although both groups are backed by Iran and oppose the United States.

At the United States Embassy, protesters used long poles to shatter security cameras, covered the compound walls with anti-American graffiti and lit a guardhouse on fire. After breaking open a compound entrance, dozens of men entered and lit more fires while embassy security guards watched them from the embassy roof and fired tear gas.

One group of protesters ended up separated from United States troops by only a pane of glass, according to a video shared on social media. It was not immediately clear how many Americans were inside the compound.

The men eventually left the embassy compound, but climbed on top of adjacent buildings where they planted militia flags. Iraqi police and military personnel eventually arrived at the scene, but they did not disperse the protesters.

The Iraqi interior minister, Yassin al-Yasiri, said in an interview near the embassy that American attacks on an Iraqi militia had invited trouble.

“These are the dangerous ramifications of this strike,” he said. “What happened today is the danger that we were afraid of, and that the Americans should have been afraid of.”

Mr. al-Yasiri said he had coordinated with the Iraqi military and the militias to ensure the embassy’s safety and request that the militia members leave the compound.

While the protesters carried the flags of Iraq and a range of militia groups, the most prominent was that of Kataib Hezbollah, the group targeted by the United States.

A spokesman for Kataib Hezbollah, Mohammed Muhi, said his group intended to erect tents in the street in front of the United States Embassy for an opened-ended sit-in to pressure the Americans to leave Iraq.

“We will not leave these tents until the embassy and the ambassador leave Iraq,” Mr. Muhi said.

The upheaval comes at a critical time for Iraq and for the United States’ role in the country. Mass protests in recent months against poor governance have weakened the government and underscored the criticism of Iraqis who feel that Iran has too much sway over the country’s politics.

At the same time, Iran and the United States have been competing for political influence in the aftermath of the battle against the Islamic State, which once covered large areas of Iraq.

Iraqi militias, known as the Popular Mobilization Forces, formed in part to help fight the Islamic State in tandem with the national security forces, a battle that effectively put them on the side of the United States.

They have since evolved into a powerful military and political force with a significant bloc in Parliament. Some of the militias are backed by Iran and use their power to help advance its interests in Iraq.

The United States has about 5,000 troops in Iraq in addition to an unclear number of civilian contractors. The troops are tasked with training Iraqi security forces and helping to prevent a jihadist resurgence.

After years of military and political investment in Iraq, the United States finds itself in a position where few powerful Iraqis are willing to stand up for it and its role in the country.

Condemnation of the recent airstrikes continued on Tuesday. The Iraqi prime minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi, announced an official three-day mourning period for the men killed in the strikes, which he called an “outrageous attack.”

In a statement, the Iraqi military reiterated the government’s condemnation of the strikes, but called on protesters to stay away from foreign embassies.

“Any attack on foreign embassies or representatives will be firmly prevented by the security forces and punishable by law with the most severe penalties,” it said.

Falih Hassan reported from Baghdad, and Ben Hubbard from Beirut, Lebanon.

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