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Westlake Legal Group > News Corporation (Page 40)

What to Expect From Netflix Earnings

Westlake Legal Group 16netflix1-facebookJumbo What to Expect From Netflix Earnings Netflix Inc Company Reports

Netflix, the streaming video giant, showed a rare moment of weakness last quarter when it reported that it lost domestic subscribers for the first time since starting its digital television service 12 years ago.

It was an unhealthy sign in the face of looming rivals, but the internet juggernaut has another chance today to build confidence when it announces its third-quarter results after the market closes. The subscriber marks will be closely eyed by Wall Street investors, who have traded down Netflix shares about 20 percent since its last earnings report.

Analysts expect Netflix to add seven million new customers for the third quarter, including about 800,000 in the United States. If that holds true, it would be a much-needed improvement over the previous period when the company lost 126,000 paid users domestically. Investors are looking for roughly $470 million of income on $5.2 billion in sales.

The quarter will likely have benefited from Netflix’s best-known series, “Stranger Things,” which debuted its hugely anticipated third season over the Fourth of July weekend.

Netflix, which started as a DVD-by-mail service, has become a dominant force in Hollywood, and its disruptive growth has reordered the television landscape. It often outspends its rivals and has forced the industry’s biggest players to embrace streaming as they abandon, albeit slowly, the pay-television model.

Netflix is the nation’s largest digital television network with over 151 million customers around the world, including 60 million in the United States.

That audience has become critically important as well-financed competitors wait in the wings. On Nov. 1, the tech behemoth Apple plans to unveil its streaming product, Apple TV Plus; 11 days later, The Walt Disney Company intends to launch Disney Plus, which will feature Marvel’s biggest franchises, the complete “Star Wars” library and the Disney content vault.

In a cheeky marketing stunt, Disney owned Twitter for a few hours on Monday when it promoted its service on an epic Twitter thread with a seemingly endless string of titles (both famous and obscure) that will appear on Plus. Not to be outdone, Jennifer Aniston, who stars in Apple’s new signature series “The Morning Show,” drew Instagram’s attention Tuesday when she finally joined the social platform.

Both streamers will come stocked with original films and series, and both will cost about half the price of Netflix. (By early next year, Netflix will face another competitor: AT&T’s HBO Max.)

That suggests that the more important consideration in its financial report is Netflix’s expectation for the current quarter, when it will come up against the biggest competitive threats it has ever faced as a streaming service.

The fourth quarter is also traditionally Netflix’s most lucrative period when it adds the most subscribers. Wall Street analysts estimate that the company will add about 9.4 million customers, with 1.4 million in the United States. But it’s possible Netflix will forecast slower growth because of the new entrants.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Ex-Aide Saw Gordon Sondland as a Potential National Security Risk

Westlake Legal Group 16dc-sondland1-facebookJumbo Ex-Aide Saw Gordon Sondland as a Potential National Security Risk United States Politics and Government United States International Relations Ukraine Trump, Donald J Trump-Ukraine Whistle-Blower Complaint and Impeachment Inquiry Sondland, Gordon D (1957- ) Pompeo, Mike Mulvaney, Mick Fiona Hill Espionage and Intelligence Services Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Bolton, John R

WASHINGTON — A former top White House foreign policy adviser told House impeachment investigators this week that she viewed Gordon D. Sondland, the United States ambassador to the European Union, as a potential national security risk because he was so unprepared for his job, according to two people familiar with her private testimony.

The adviser, Fiona Hill, did not accuse Mr. Sondland of acting maliciously or intentionally putting the country at risk. But she described Mr. Sondland, a hotelier and Trump donor-turned-ambassador, as metaphorically driving in an unfamiliar place with no guardrails and no GPS, according to the people, who were not authorized to publicly discuss a deposition that took place behind closed doors.

Ms. Hill, the former senior director for European and Russian affairs at the White House, also said that she raised her concerns with intelligence officials inside the White House, one of the people said.

Mr. Sondland’s lawyer declined to comment.

In her testimony, Ms. Hill described her fears that Mr. Sondland represented a counterintelligence risk because his actions made him vulnerable to foreign governments who could exploit his inexperience. She said Mr. Sondland extensively used a personal cellphone for official diplomatic business and repeatedly told foreign officials they were welcome to come to the White House whenever they liked.

Ms. Hill said that his invitations, which were highly unusual and not communicated to others at the White House, prompted one instance in which Romanian officials arrived at the White House without appointments, citing Mr. Sondland.

Ms. Hill also testified that Mr. Sondland held himself out to foreign officials as someone who could deliver meetings at the White House while also providing the cellphone numbers of American officials to foreigners, the people said. Those actions created additional counterintelligence risks, she said.

Mr. Sondland is scheduled to meet privately with impeachment investigators himself on Thursday, despite directions from the State Department and the White House that he and other witnesses should not cooperate with an investigation because the president and his senior advisers view it as illegitimate. Mr. Sondland’s lawyer has indicated that his client will testify.

Other aspects of Ms. Hill’s explosive testimony that have been previously reported as well as details offered by other officials who have spoken to investigators put Mr. Sondland at the center of a parallel foreign policy toward Ukraine. Sidelining career experts and the former American ambassador to Kiev, Mr. Sondland, other political appointees close to the president and Mr. Trump’s private lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani sought to pressure Ukraine’s new government to open investigations into Democrats that would benefit the president politically.

Ms. Hill said that she and her boss, John R. Bolton, then the national security adviser, were so concerned by what they saw that Ms. Hill alerted White House lawyers. She told the committees that Mr. Bolton wanted to make clear that he was not part of whatever “drug deal” that Mr. Sondland and Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, were crafting on Ukraine, and that on another occasion Mr. Bolton compared Mr. Giuliani to “a hand grenade who’s going to blow everybody up.”

Ms. Hill testified that she and Mr. Bolton were moved to act after Mr. Sondland revealed during a July 10 meeting that there was an agreement with Mr. Mulvaney that Mr. Trump would meet with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine if his government opened the investigations the White House sought. Mr. Sondland also mentioned Burisma, the Ukrainian energy firm that had appointed Hunter Biden, the son of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., to its board.

A White House meeting would be a sought-after prize for Mr. Zelensky, conferring legitimacy on his new government and demonstrating American support as Ukraine battles Russian-backed separatists in its east.

Ms. Hill left the White House in July, before Mr. Trump’s call with Mr. Zelensky that prompted the whistle-blower complaint that set off the Ukraine scandal.

Earlier this month, Kurt D. Volker, the former special envoy for Ukraine, produced to investigators text messages with Mr. Sondland and other American and Ukrainian officials that showed Mr. Sondland was deeply enmeshed in efforts to secure investigations from the Ukrainians that could help the president politically.

Michael S. Schmidt contributed reporting.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

One Direction’s Liam Payne Says Staying In The Band Would’ve Killed Him

Westlake Legal Group 5da749c1210000140f34a241 One Direction’s Liam Payne Says Staying In The Band Would’ve Killed Him

Liam Payne had some serious things to say about leaving the band that made him famous: “I needed to stop, definitely. It would have killed me.”

In an appearance on the “Table Manners with Jessie Ware” podcast, Payne said he was “definitely over-worked” and that being in One Direction was a “mega stressful” period of his life. 

After five albums over five years, the boy band broke up in 2015. 

“It was really scary at first,” Payne said of the split, which the band initially called a “hiatus.” He went on to say that staying in the band would’ve killed him “one hundred percent.”

The 26-year-old explained how the fame impacted him: “There’s no stop button. You’ve got no control over your life. That’s why I lost complete control of everything.”

Payne talked about the “dangerous” patterns he was stuck in, telling Ware, “I just lived so long as this reclusive pop star who was afraid of people, who just stayed inside all the time.” 

He also added: “You’re either going to end up a crazy child star who dies at whatever age, or you’re going to live life and actually get on with it.” He said he has since learned “how to be a person.”

Since the band broke up, Payne and each of the band’s other members ― Harry Styles, Louis Tomlinson, Niall Horan and Zayn Malik — have gone on to pursue solo careers.

Payne’s first solo album is “finished” and slated for release in 2020.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_147055953_ffc81971-88cd-4e61-8f2f-c87e78913da5-facebookJumbo Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal Shondaland Rhimes, Shonda podcasts iHeartMedia Inc

Shonda Rhimes, the prolific television producer whose body of work includes the durable ABC drama “Grey’s Anatomy,” moved into the streaming world in 2017 when she signed a nine-figure deal to create new shows for Netflix. Now, she is taking her talent for storytelling to the audio realm as the executive producer of new podcasts to be made in conjunction with the broadcast giant iHeartMedia.

Ms. Rhimes’s production company, Shondaland, and iHeart announced the partnership, a three-year deal, on Wednesday. Under the arrangement, Ms. Rhimes will produce “a full slate” of iHeartRadio original podcasts that will be available on the iHeartPodcast Network. With the deal, Shondaland has also started a new division, Shondaland Audio.

In addition to “Grey’s Anatomy,” a network stalwart since 2005, Ms. Rhimes and Shondaland were behind ABC’s “Scandal” and “How to Get Away With Murder.” For Netflix, Ms. Rhimes has said she plans to make at least eight new shows. The first to go into production, “Bridgerton,” a high-society soap set in Regency-era London, is based on a popular series of romance novels by Julia Quinn. With a cast that includes Julie Andrews and Rege-Jean Page, it is scheduled to start streaming next year.

Ms. Rhimes is no podcasting rookie. In 2018, Shondaland created “Katie’s Crib,” a weekly podcast focused on motherhood hosted by the “Scandal” actress Katie Lowes. That show will migrate to iHeartPodcast under the terms of the new deal.

Shondaland is “just beginning our digital journey,” Ms. Rhimes said in an email. Of her podcasting venture, she said that “if the opportunity presents itself for some crossover with our friends at Netflix, we would certainly explore it.”

Nearly a third of Americans ages 12 and up — about 90 million people — listen to podcasts at least once a month, up from 21 percent three years ago, according to a survey this year by Edison Research.

The 67 shows on NPR, the top podcast studio, were downloaded more than 151 million times last month, according to a ranking from the podcast measurement firm Podtrac. Ranked second was iHeartRadio, with 268 shows downloaded 147 million times. “The Daily,” from The New York Times, is the most popular single podcast.

Commercial time on popular podcasts can fill up months in advance, advertisers have reported. A report this summer from the Interactive Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers estimated that advertising revenue hit $479.1 million last year.

Conal Byrne, the president of iHeartPodcast Network, said in an email that he expected Shondaland Audio to be especially appealing to “an engaged, smart female audience” as well as “top-tier, big, established brands” interested in advertising their wares.

Shondaland podcasts will have four commercials on average, he said — one at the beginning of each episode, two in the middle, and one at the end, each 30 to 60 seconds long.

The intimacy of podcasting is attractive to some advertisers. But as the medium has evolved, the trope of a host riffing on ad copy has is no longer the only option. Ads for Shondaland Audio will use a process called dynamic insertion, which allows publishers to go with ads that target specific groups of listeners.

The data on who is listening to a given show is murky, however, and podcasting platforms do not provide “sophisticated targeting tools on par with what Facebook and other digital platforms offer advertisers,” according to an analysis conducted by the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz.

For years, iHeartMedia, which operates about 850 terrestrial radio stations in the United States, largely sat out the podcast revolution. Then last year, it paid $55 million for Stuff Media, the producer of hit podcasts like “Stuff You Should Know.” The company has also announced plans to distribute shows like “Stuff You Should Know” translated into Spanish, Hindi, Portuguese, French and German.

Now, the company offers technology that allows podcast advertisers to “reach exactly who they want, at scale,” said Mr. Byrne, the iHeartPodcast Network president.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_147055953_ffc81971-88cd-4e61-8f2f-c87e78913da5-facebookJumbo Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal Shondaland Rhimes, Shonda podcasts iHeartMedia Inc

Shonda Rhimes, the prolific television producer whose body of work includes the durable ABC drama “Grey’s Anatomy,” moved into the streaming world in 2017 when she signed a nine-figure deal to create new shows for Netflix. Now, she is taking her talent for storytelling to the audio realm as the executive producer of new podcasts to be made in conjunction with the broadcast giant iHeartMedia.

Ms. Rhimes’s production company, Shondaland, and iHeart announced the partnership, a three-year deal, on Wednesday. Under the arrangement, Ms. Rhimes will produce “a full slate” of iHeartRadio original podcasts that will be available on the iHeartPodcast Network. With the deal, Shondaland has also started a new division, Shondaland Audio.

In addition to “Grey’s Anatomy,” a network stalwart since 2005, Ms. Rhimes and Shondaland were behind ABC’s “Scandal” and “How to Get Away With Murder.” For Netflix, Ms. Rhimes has said she plans to make at least eight new shows. The first to go into production, “Bridgerton,” a high-society soap set in Regency-era London, is based on a popular series of romance novels by Julia Quinn. With a cast that includes Julie Andrews and Rege-Jean Page, it is scheduled to start streaming next year.

Ms. Rhimes is no podcasting rookie. In 2018, Shondaland created “Katie’s Crib,” a weekly podcast focused on motherhood hosted by the “Scandal” actress Katie Lowes. That show will migrate to iHeartPodcast under the terms of the new deal.

Shondaland is “just beginning our digital journey,” Ms. Rhimes said in an email. Of her podcasting venture, she said that “if the opportunity presents itself for some crossover with our friends at Netflix, we would certainly explore it.”

Nearly a third of Americans ages 12 and up — about 90 million people — listen to podcasts at least once a month, up from 21 percent three years ago, according to a survey this year by Edison Research.

The 67 shows on NPR, the top podcast studio, were downloaded more than 151 million times last month, according to a ranking from the podcast measurement firm Podtrac. Ranked second was iHeartRadio, with 268 shows downloaded 147 million times. “The Daily,” from The New York Times, is the most popular single podcast.

Commercial time on popular podcasts can fill up months in advance, advertisers have reported. A report this summer from the Interactive Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers estimated that advertising revenue hit $479.1 million last year.

Conal Byrne, the president of iHeartPodcast Network, said in an email that he expected Shondaland Audio to be especially appealing to “an engaged, smart female audience” as well as “top-tier, big, established brands” interested in advertising their wares.

Shondaland podcasts will have four commercials on average, he said — one at the beginning of each episode, two in the middle, and one at the end, each 30 to 60 seconds long.

The intimacy of podcasting is attractive to some advertisers. But as the medium has evolved, the trope of a host riffing on ad copy has is no longer the only option. Ads for Shondaland Audio will use a process called dynamic insertion, which allows publishers to go with ads that target specific groups of listeners.

The data on who is listening to a given show is murky, however, and podcasting platforms do not provide “sophisticated targeting tools on par with what Facebook and other digital platforms offer advertisers,” according to an analysis conducted by the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz.

For years, iHeartMedia, which operates about 850 terrestrial radio stations in the United States, largely sat out the podcast revolution. Then last year, it paid $55 million for Stuff Media, the producer of hit podcasts like “Stuff You Should Know.” The company has also announced plans to distribute shows like “Stuff You Should Know” translated into Spanish, Hindi, Portuguese, French and German.

Now, the company offers technology that allows podcast advertisers to “reach exactly who they want, at scale,” said Mr. Byrne, the iHeartPodcast Network president.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_147055953_ffc81971-88cd-4e61-8f2f-c87e78913da5-facebookJumbo Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal Shondaland Rhimes, Shonda podcasts iHeartMedia Inc

Shonda Rhimes, the prolific television producer whose body of work includes the durable ABC drama “Grey’s Anatomy,” moved into the streaming world in 2017 when she signed a nine-figure deal to create new shows for Netflix. Now, she is taking her talent for storytelling to the audio realm as the executive producer of new podcasts to be made in conjunction with the broadcast giant iHeartMedia.

Ms. Rhimes’s production company, Shondaland, and iHeart announced the partnership, a three-year deal, on Wednesday. Under the arrangement, Ms. Rhimes will produce “a full slate” of iHeartRadio original podcasts that will be available on the iHeartPodcast Network. With the deal, Shondaland has also started a new division, Shondaland Audio.

In addition to “Grey’s Anatomy,” a network stalwart since 2005, Ms. Rhimes and Shondaland were behind ABC’s “Scandal” and “How to Get Away With Murder.” For Netflix, Ms. Rhimes has said she plans to make at least eight new shows. The first to go into production, “Bridgerton,” a high-society soap set in Regency-era London, is based on a popular series of romance novels by Julia Quinn. With a cast that includes Julie Andrews and Rege-Jean Page, it is scheduled to start streaming next year.

Ms. Rhimes is no podcasting rookie. In 2018, Shondaland created “Katie’s Crib,” a weekly podcast focused on motherhood hosted by the “Scandal” actress Katie Lowes. That show will migrate to iHeartPodcast under the terms of the new deal.

Shondaland is “just beginning our digital journey,” Ms. Rhimes said in an email. Of her podcasting venture, she said that “if the opportunity presents itself for some crossover with our friends at Netflix, we would certainly explore it.”

Nearly a third of Americans ages 12 and up — about 90 million people — listen to podcasts at least once a month, up from 21 percent three years ago, according to a survey this year by Edison Research.

The 67 shows on NPR, the top podcast studio, were downloaded more than 151 million times last month, according to a ranking from the podcast measurement firm Podtrac. Ranked second was iHeartRadio, with 268 shows downloaded 147 million times. “The Daily,” from The New York Times, is the most popular single podcast.

Commercial time on popular podcasts can fill up months in advance, advertisers have reported. A report this summer from the Interactive Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers estimated that advertising revenue hit $479.1 million last year.

Conal Byrne, the president of iHeartPodcast Network, said in an email that he expected Shondaland Audio to be especially appealing to “an engaged, smart female audience” as well as “top-tier, big, established brands” interested in advertising their wares.

Shondaland podcasts will have four commercials on average, he said — one at the beginning of each episode, two in the middle, and one at the end, each 30 to 60 seconds long.

The intimacy of podcasting is attractive to some advertisers. But as the medium has evolved, the trope of a host riffing on ad copy has is no longer the only option. Ads for Shondaland Audio will use a process called dynamic insertion, which allows publishers to go with ads that target specific groups of listeners.

The data on who is listening to a given show is murky, however, and podcasting platforms do not provide “sophisticated targeting tools on par with what Facebook and other digital platforms offer advertisers,” according to an analysis conducted by the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz.

For years, iHeartMedia, which operates about 850 terrestrial radio stations in the United States, largely sat out the podcast revolution. Then last year, it paid $55 million for Stuff Media, the producer of hit podcasts like “Stuff You Should Know.” The company has also announced plans to distribute shows like “Stuff You Should Know” translated into Spanish, Hindi, Portuguese, French and German.

Now, the company offers technology that allows podcast advertisers to “reach exactly who they want, at scale,” said Mr. Byrne, the iHeartPodcast Network president.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal

Westlake Legal Group merlin_147055953_ffc81971-88cd-4e61-8f2f-c87e78913da5-facebookJumbo Shonda Rhimes, Star TV Producer, Signs a Podcast Deal Shondaland Rhimes, Shonda podcasts iHeartMedia Inc

Shonda Rhimes, the prolific television producer whose body of work includes the durable ABC drama “Grey’s Anatomy,” moved into the streaming world in 2017 when she signed a nine-figure deal to create new shows for Netflix. Now, she is taking her talent for storytelling to the audio realm as the executive producer of new podcasts to be made in conjunction with the broadcast giant iHeartMedia.

Ms. Rhimes’s production company, Shondaland, and iHeart announced the partnership, a three-year deal, on Wednesday. Under the arrangement, Ms. Rhimes will produce “a full slate” of iHeartRadio original podcasts that will be available on the iHeartPodcast Network. With the deal, Shondaland has also started a new division, Shondaland Audio.

In addition to “Grey’s Anatomy,” a network stalwart since 2005, Ms. Rhimes and Shondaland were behind ABC’s “Scandal” and “How to Get Away With Murder.” For Netflix, Ms. Rhimes has said she plans to make at least eight new shows. The first to go into production, “Bridgerton,” a high-society soap set in Regency-era London, is based on a popular series of romance novels by Julia Quinn. With a cast that includes Julie Andrews and Rege-Jean Page, it is scheduled to start streaming next year.

Ms. Rhimes is no podcasting rookie. In 2018, Shondaland created “Katie’s Crib,” a weekly podcast focused on motherhood hosted by the “Scandal” actress Katie Lowes. That show will migrate to iHeartPodcast under the terms of the new deal.

Shondaland is “just beginning our digital journey,” Ms. Rhimes said in an email. Of her podcasting venture, she said that “if the opportunity presents itself for some crossover with our friends at Netflix, we would certainly explore it.”

Nearly a third of Americans ages 12 and up — about 90 million people — listen to podcasts at least once a month, up from 21 percent three years ago, according to a survey this year by Edison Research.

The 67 shows on NPR, the top podcast studio, were downloaded more than 151 million times last month, according to a ranking from the podcast measurement firm Podtrac. Ranked second was iHeartRadio, with 268 shows downloaded 147 million times. “The Daily,” from The New York Times, is the most popular single podcast.

Commercial time on popular podcasts can fill up months in advance, advertisers have reported. A report this summer from the Interactive Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers estimated that advertising revenue hit $479.1 million last year.

Conal Byrne, the president of iHeartPodcast Network, said in an email that he expected Shondaland Audio to be especially appealing to “an engaged, smart female audience” as well as “top-tier, big, established brands” interested in advertising their wares.

Shondaland podcasts will have four commercials on average, he said — one at the beginning of each episode, two in the middle, and one at the end, each 30 to 60 seconds long.

The intimacy of podcasting is attractive to some advertisers. But as the medium has evolved, the trope of a host riffing on ad copy has is no longer the only option. Ads for Shondaland Audio will use a process called dynamic insertion, which allows publishers to go with ads that target specific groups of listeners.

The data on who is listening to a given show is murky, however, and podcasting platforms do not provide “sophisticated targeting tools on par with what Facebook and other digital platforms offer advertisers,” according to an analysis conducted by the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz.

For years, iHeartMedia, which operates about 850 terrestrial radio stations in the United States, largely sat out the podcast revolution. Then last year, it paid $55 million for Stuff Media, the producer of hit podcasts like “Stuff You Should Know.” The company has also announced plans to distribute shows like “Stuff You Should Know” translated into Spanish, Hindi, Portuguese, French and German.

Now, the company offers technology that allows podcast advertisers to “reach exactly who they want, at scale,” said Mr. Byrne, the iHeartPodcast Network president.

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

Trump shouts out St. Louis Blues superfan Laila Anderson during White House ceremony

President Trump on Tuesday offered some kind words to St. Louis Blues superfan Laila Anderson during the team’s Stanley Cup ceremony at the White House.

Laila, the 11-year-old who helped inspire the Blues to go on an amazing run to the Stanley Cup title while battling a rare autoimmune disease, was on hand at the Rose Garden to celebrate with her favorite team. Trump recognized how important the girl was and offered some kind words to hear as he made his remarks about the team.

TRUMP JOKES WITH ST. LOUIS BLUES’ ALEXANDER STEEN DURING STANLEY CUP CEREMONY

“You inspired the Blues all season, and today you continue to inspire all Americans,” Trump said. “We all know your story.”

Westlake Legal Group Laila-Anderson-WH Trump shouts out St. Louis Blues superfan Laila Anderson during White House ceremony Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nhl/st-louis-blues fox-news/sports/nhl fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/sports fnc article 71bf5833-c652-5973-8873-8f8d681033cb

Laila Anderson celebrates the Blues’ Stanley Cup win at the White House.

As the Blues celebrated their Stanley Cup championship on the ice in June, Laila was with the team all the way and even got to go onto the ice and kiss the Cup herself.

TEENAGE ROOKIES HUGHES, KAKKO STRUGGLING EARLY IN SEASON

Earlier this month, Alexander Steen and Colton Parayko surprised Laila at her home and presented her with her own championship ring with her name inscribed on it.

“You know how much you mean to us, right, and what an inspiration you’ve been to so many people,” Steen said. “So me and Colton are here and representing our organization and everybody there, and we have something that we would like you to open right now.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE ALL-NEW FOXBUSINESS.COM

The Blues are currently working to successfully defend their title.

Westlake Legal Group NHL-Laila-Anderson Trump shouts out St. Louis Blues superfan Laila Anderson during White House ceremony Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nhl/st-louis-blues fox-news/sports/nhl fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/sports fnc article 71bf5833-c652-5973-8873-8f8d681033cb   Westlake Legal Group NHL-Laila-Anderson Trump shouts out St. Louis Blues superfan Laila Anderson during White House ceremony Ryan Gaydos fox-news/sports/nhl/st-louis-blues fox-news/sports/nhl fox-news/person/donald-trump fox news fnc/sports fnc article 71bf5833-c652-5973-8873-8f8d681033cb

Real Estate, and Personal Injury Lawyers. Contact us at: https://westlakelegal.com 

GM And UAW Reach Tentative Agreement To End National Strike

Westlake Legal Group gettyimages-1175594710-1-_wide-8890c7363a1f0c4198fba15b7121f41c78b3e3c2-s1100-c15 GM And UAW Reach Tentative Agreement To End National Strike

The UAW GM National Council will vote on a new tentative deal Thursday, in a potential end to the national strike that has idled GM plants. Here, union members and their families rallied near the General Motors Flint Assembly plant on Sunday. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption

Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Westlake Legal Group  GM And UAW Reach Tentative Agreement To End National Strike

The UAW GM National Council will vote on a new tentative deal Thursday, in a potential end to the national strike that has idled GM plants. Here, union members and their families rallied near the General Motors Flint Assembly plant on Sunday.

Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

General Motors and the United Auto Workers have reached a tentative agreement to end the strike that began one month ago, the labor union announced Wednesday. The UAW GM National Council will vote on the deal Thursday.

When the national council reviews the deal’s terms, it will also decide whether nearly 50,000 workers should remain on strike or if they should go back to work before the full membership ratifies the agreement.

In a short statement about the deal, GM said, “We can confirm the UAW’s statement regarding a proposed tentative agreement. Additional details will be provided at the appropriate time.”

Contract negotiations had been hung up on key issues, from workers’ wages and health care to profit-sharing and the carmaker’s reliance on temporary workers. The union had been seeking to win seniority rights for temp workers. Like GM, the union’s statement about the deal did not provide details about how those matters were resolved.

“The number one priority of the national negotiation team has been to secure a strong and fair contract that our members deserve,” said UAW Vice President Terry Dittes, director of the UAW GM department, in a news release about the breakthrough.

The UAW strike halted production at 33 GM manufacturing plants in nine states. It also affected more than 20 parts distribution warehouses. Industry analysts had predicted GM could lose as much as $50 million for every day the strike continued.

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Women’s group calls for Dems to pull MSNBC debate amid ‘culture of sexual abuse’ at NBC News

A prominent women’s group has called on the Democratic National Committee to pull its upcoming debate from MSNBC unless NBC News “cleans house” and launches an independent investigation into “allegations of a culture of sexual abuse” at the network.

UltraViolet Action, a leading national women’s organization, thinks the fifth Democratic presidential debate – which is currently scheduled to air on MSNBC next month – shouldn’t happen if NBC keeps its beleaguered leadership in place.

NBC NEWS BOSS ANDY LACK’S LEADERSHIP SCRUTINIZED AS RONAN FARROW TELL-ALL APPROACHES

“The DNC needs to make it clear that they support survivors of sexual abuse and cancel the upcoming 2020 Democratic presidential primary debate on MSNBC until Comcast and NBC News take clear steps to clean up the toxic culture that exists across their networks,” UltraViolet co-founder Shaunna Thomas said in a statement.

“The DNC needs to make it clear that they support survivors of sexual abuse and cancel the upcoming 2020 Democratic presidential primary debate on MSNBC until Comcast and NBC News take clear steps to clean up the toxic culture that exists across their networks.”

— UltraViolet co-founder Shaunna Thomas

The DNC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Ronan Farrow’s book, “Catch and Kill,” hit stores this week and details allegations that NBC refused to expose Harvey Weinstein as a sexual predator. The book also suggests the Peacock Network wasn’t truthful regarding knowledge of alleged sexual misconduct by former “Today” co-host Matt Lauer.

Westlake Legal Group LauerLackOppenheimSplit Women’s group calls for Dems to pull MSNBC debate amid ‘culture of sexual abuse’ at NBC News fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood b349ca48-99d8-5f10-ae5d-d4205421ae5c article

Matt Lauer, Andy Lack and Noah Oppenheim.

Farrow reported that Weinstein leveraged information regarding Lauer to keep NBC off his back. Farrow’s former NBC News producer Rich McHugh, who is a key figure of the book, also penned a recent Vanity Fair column that said NBC News Chairman Andy Lack, and his top deputy Noah Oppenheim, breached “journalistic integrity” when they put the kibosh on the Weinstein story.

“Mounting reports show that NBC News executives – namely Noah Oppenheim – failed to hold sexual abusers accountable, failed to combat a toxic culture across newsrooms, and that the network’s so-called investigation into its culture was little more than a sham to provide cover for executives,” Thomas said.

MIKA BRZEZINSKI PUBLICLY SUPPORTED NEWS VET BROKAW AMID MISCONDUCT CLAIMS, PRIVATELY APOLOGIZED

NBC famously told Farrow that his reporting on Weinstein wasn’t fit to print, so he took it to The New Yorker where it won the Pulitzer Prize and helped launch the #MeToo movement. “Catch and Kill” details Farrow’s side of the story and features additional accusations against NBC News bigwigs.

“Additional reports that MSNBC executive Phil Griffin showed staff graphic images of Access Hollywood personality Maria Menounos prove that this toxic culture is an epidemic that extends across nearly all newsrooms and networks at the company,” Thomas said. “Taken together, these initial reports demonstrate that NBC’s current leadership is either unable or unwilling to take appropriate steps to combat the culture of sexual abuse at the networks.”

After the Weinstein and Lauer bombshells were reported in 2017, NBC refused to hire an outside investigator to determine who knew about Lauer’s sexual misconduct and whether NBC executives looked the other way. NBC relied on in-house general counsel Kim Harris despite widespread calls for an outside law firm to conduct the review.

NBC eventually declared that management was completely oblivious to Lauer’s behavior and Harris’ high-powered colleagues were cleared by the network. Lack and Oppenheim remain atop NBC News.

“The DNC must stand with survivors and pull the upcoming democratic presidential primary debate from MSNBC until Comcast takes clear steps to clean house at NBC News.”

— UltraViolet co-founder Shaunna Thomas

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The UltraViolet founder said the ongoing issues “can only be solved by significant structural and cultural changes at MSNBC, NBC News and its parent company, Comcast,” and called on the DNC to stand with women and force necessary changes.

“The DNC must stand with survivors and pull the upcoming democratic presidential primary debate from MSNBC until Comcast takes clear steps to clean house at NBC News,” Thomas said.

MSNBC and NBC News did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

UltraViolet bills itself as “a powerful and rapidly growing community of people mobilized to fight sexism and create a more inclusive world that accurately represents all women, from politics and government to media and pop culture.”

Westlake Legal Group LauerLackOppenheimSplit Women’s group calls for Dems to pull MSNBC debate amid ‘culture of sexual abuse’ at NBC News fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood b349ca48-99d8-5f10-ae5d-d4205421ae5c article   Westlake Legal Group LauerLackOppenheimSplit Women’s group calls for Dems to pull MSNBC debate amid ‘culture of sexual abuse’ at NBC News fox-news/politics/2020-presidential-election fox-news/media fox news fnc/media fnc Brian Flood b349ca48-99d8-5f10-ae5d-d4205421ae5c article

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